alctel

What modifications have you made to make your cockpit comfortable?

Recommended Posts

Hi Bob I agree but tough on trailer sailers and some other yachts exactly as you highlighted. I find the backrest/support being too low or the seats not being uninterrupted over an about 6 foot 5 length on many yachts equally problematic. The length is so 6 foot 2 me can take a nap on them or sleep outside on really hot nights. :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Grith:

I also like 15" high seat backs.

On small boats the best way is to eliminate the coaming as much as you can. Look at a J 24. That's a comfortable boat to sit on. No coaming. It can't always be done but those are good bench marks to keep in mind.

45937448784_0776c0d4ee_k.jpgKiyi2 deck lines by robert perry, on Flickr

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Bob I get the 15inch high back rest but hard to design in on trailables I feel.  

No combing is great for racing and seat width on the J24’s I have seen over here in Aus but for cruising something has to keep the beer on board when that bloody stink boat flys past your anchorage throwing a big wake. :) 

must be my phone but your drawings won’t blown up for me and remain clear to really see measurements. Any thoughts?  Regards Graeme 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've got an "IMS Racer" cockpit - three winches on a side take up the place where you'd want a coaming. 

We're looking at a hard top/soft side dodger to cut the SF breezes, and then I'm kicking around ideas for the cockpit. Maybe some sort of snap-on seating like those chairs mentioned above, but that would fit between winches. i've got 3' aft of the wheel where I could add "coamings" or backrests of a sort, but I like the idea above of lee-cloths.  Those may be just the ticket.

 

image.thumb.png.5b79a0bc1ca610084cd682bce2744871.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

image.png.b1309e82b2eafc3387e852831e7d3f63.pngThe grey paint is post-core repair and pre-repaint....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Raz'r Wow that's one hell of a wheel on a yacht that size. I think I could do away with my love of tillers if I had that much precision and feel available. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

Grith:

I also like 15" high seat backs.

On small boats the best way is to eliminate the coaming as much as you can. Look at a J 24. That's a comfortable boat to sit on. No coaming. It can't always be done but those are good bench marks to keep in mind.

45937448784_0776c0d4ee_k.jpgKiyi2 deck lines by robert perry, on Flickr

Hi Bob I have now used a different viewing system and can blow your drawing up without losing clarity and can read the writing. I couldn't even see that it was a trailable design previously. Have you got some more specs just to tease me? Weight on trailer, width and length on trailer, min and max depth, accommodation layout etc or are these propriety things you need to charge for? I am sure that would be one mother to tow regardless and I am not going to get it in on my local half cabin fishing stink boat ramp or the remote location rough ramps out in the outback of Australia am am planning to frequent. :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Grith said:

Hi Raz'r Wow that's one hell of a wheel on a yacht that size. I think I could do away with my love of tillers if I had that much precision and feel available. :)

She was built before the almost ubiquitous dual wheels came into fashion. It would probably be better with those, but I'm not paying for them. As is, you can easily sit on the low side, get a great view and have the wheel right there.  It wouldn't be too hard to fit a tiller and remove the wheel for in-the-bay stuff, but nothing like a big wheel on a 2000 mile downwind race.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

IMO Plexi drop boards are the only way to go - light, simple, cheap, easy to make, no maintenance, more light below and if tinted they look good.

What's not to like?

This is lighter.... and damn nice, imho

10856464_10152879796698011_2098929044831231819_o.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, CriticalPath said:

Uh yeah dude, it's on the replacement list.  Veneer on the inside of the old boards is cracked, the framework is slowly turning to sawdust, and they leak...

Companionway.jpg.7b7988f9a8a378683ab3e257ac4e8810.jpg

Was thinking of sourcing plexi replacements, but the carbon touch would be very sweet!  The only question is when would your services be available?!

Cheers!

 

When does this cycle end?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, basketcase said:

This is lighter.... and damn nice, imho

10856464_10152879796698011_2098929044831231819_o.jpg

Bit of C&C showing through, good stuff. Is that a marble drop board below that? Adds a bit of weight, eh wot?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Bit of C&C showing through, good stuff. Is that a marble drop board below that? Adds a bit of weight, eh wot?

More of a dirty shop table, less marble. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 5 warmest years on record - since records have been kept - have been the last 5 years on Earth. No secret, our sun awning, a valued modification,  has been getting used more regularly during the sailing season here in the Northeast.

 

An awning, high enough to move under,  is a little work to rig (about 10-15 mins).  Ours covers the cockpit and decks forward for 1/3rd of the house. 

907808339_Awning.thumb.jpg.7da75f75f237a989fec27725f416d5b7.jpg

But it has become less effective at keeping us cool during the hot afternoons. Last season we spent most of August in Southern NE. On several occasions, the afternoon sun - that inevitably slips below the high awning - was blistering hot. 

Sandwich MA. by 1:00pm; a half a cockpit of shade:

1519949185_Sandwich1pmAugust.thumb.jpg.ea3d54da8949400c08bb7c2e661fbd75.jpg

Rockport (the lesser) MA. At 5:06 PM, we cower with the dogs in the only shade on a side deck. In the 90's not a breath of air. 

441693759_506pmAwningnotworking_.thumb.jpg.7256906460c238444015f2e4b7384788.jpg

I've been looking at old boats that have side curtains. Here's a Fife with a Caribbean experienced awning: 

1631579113_AwningFife.thumb.jpg.ec5bea8908a135265cb3aa03d4d2848e.jpg

But are the sides low enough?

We've found you need a very low curtain at times. More than once I've left the dinghy sail hoisted and pulled along side. All pointed to windward, sun blocked,  you get a good breeze over the house and decks. Many days, by mid afternoon, we've all had enough sun and want to turn it OFF: 

814887375_Afternoonshade.thumb.jpg.0ff27c28b4b77f908f67aea77f41f5b2.jpg

So I think I'll look into having one rectangular panel made, with matching grommits to tie to the awning, that runs forward beyond the cockpit. It will be worth rigging on the sun side on those really hot days that - odds are good - are coming. Have to decide how wide, any advice? 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Bit of C&C showing through, good stuff. Is that a marble drop board below that? Adds a bit of weight, eh wot?

I find cheap marble from from Home Depot makes a great surface when laying up small flat parts

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re: awnings and side-curtains. What about greenhouse shadecloth?  It’s a mesh, specified to block XX% of sunlight. It blocks some breeze (they use it for wind-breaks too) but ought to pass air better than solid panels. Some kinds have reflective material sewn in to promote reflection rather than absorption. Though this is often turned inward to conserve heat on winter nights.  Mesh type can be rather heavy and bulky but reflective type is quite lightweight.  As an industrial material, it doesn’t come in party colors.  Also does nothing for rain.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, toddster said:

Re: awnings and side-curtains. What about greenhouse shadecloth?  It’s a mesh, specified to block XX% of sunlight. It blocks some breeze (they use it for wind-breaks too) but ought to pass air better than solid panels. Some kinds have reflective material sewn in to promote reflection rather than absorption. Though this is often turned inward to conserve heat on winter nights.  Mesh type can be rather heavy and bulky but reflective type is quite lightweight.  As an industrial material, it doesn’t come in party colors.  Also does nothing for rain.  

The Leopard 47 cat that we chartered had this type of material, probably a little thicker than a tennis windscreen, though white coloured, for the drop down side sun shades.

The screens dropped down from the hard cockpit roof, and could effectively block 180 deg of late afternoon sun when swinging on the anchor(the cabin house blocks the rest),  but let the breeze through, and you could see through them a little bit. When sailing or when the sun is high you roll them away and don't see them.Very well executed. 

 I even saw another boat anchored near us use the screens to set up an outdoor movie screen for their evening cinema requirements.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Grith:

Why don't you go to my website at www.perryboat.com and send me an email. I don't think I want to clutter up this thread with a bunch of drawings for the maxi trailerable boat.

I'll email you some drawings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, toddster said:

Re: awnings and side-curtains. What about greenhouse shadecloth?  It’s a mesh, specified to block XX% of sunlight. It blocks some breeze (they use it for wind-breaks too) but ought to pass air better than solid panels. Some kinds have reflective material sewn in to promote reflection rather than absorption. Though this is often turned inward to conserve heat on winter nights.  Mesh type can be rather heavy and bulky but reflective type is quite lightweight.  As an industrial material, it doesn’t come in party colors.  Also does nothing for rain.  

 

This is a brilliant idea! Especially to see if the side curtain will do the trick. It's airy so it won't feel like an enclosure. 

sc-gr70_1.jpg

I found green in a 70% sun block which could be just the trick in the low afternoon light and will be close enough to our green awning. Best thing, I found one source that will cut, put the edge tape on with grommets, to whatever size I need. Cost is about $30! About the $ of one yard of Sunbrella.  I'll probably get two, made to go awning to deck, for the rare time the privacy would be great. 

I don't care about the rain, the Sunbrella overhead keeps the cockpit pretty dry unless the rain comes in on a gale then the whole awning becomes a nightmare. Good deal to try the idea, thanks! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last year I bought a vinyl mesh tarp with  a 50% shading rating.  I hung it off the Bimini behind the back stay when motoring with the sun behind the boat.  Helped to keep the helm comfortable but you can see through it.  They are cheap online and it is easy to add grommets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

combings.jpg.60365d5bea15edc67c145291238cf239.jpg

 

I thought I'd done with cockpit combings, and then this bloody beard came along and all I do now is comb.

(Sorry, couldn't help myself)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Isn't that the stuff that deck chair cushions are upholstered with?

Yes, also all the giant mobo windows are covered in it too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

See, going back to the weather cloths - if you add a small awning over the cockpit combined with the weather cloths, you get just about the right height for privacy and shade. Deployment is simple if you have a roll-bar on the back as you just unroll it, tie it to the shrouds and stick in the staves. If you need more shade, tie it down tighter and close the gap. 

Of course, this doesn't solve the screen problem, but then if you supply yourself with a couple electric fly swatters, it is a good source of evening entertainment to see who can rack up the most kills. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/14/2019 at 4:55 PM, Kris Cringle said:

 

This is a brilliant idea! Especially to see if the side curtain will do the trick. It's airy so it won't feel like an enclosure. 

sc-gr70_1.jpg

I found green in a 70% sun block which could be just the trick in the low afternoon light and will be close enough to our green awning. Best thing, I found one source that will cut, put the edge tape on with grommets, to whatever size I need. Cost is about $30! About the $ of one yard of Sunbrella.  I'll probably get two, made to go awning to deck, for the rare time the privacy would be great. 

I don't care about the rain, the Sunbrella overhead keeps the cockpit pretty dry unless the rain comes in on a gale then the whole awning becomes a nightmare. Good deal to try the idea, thanks! 

The big tarp supply places will make you a tarp out of anything you want, any size, any shape. Not very expensive either. https://www.tarpsplus.com

I had a couple made to shade the cockpit and foredeck before we went the the Caribbean and they were great to have. The cockpt one hangs down from our bimini. Easy to take on/off.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Simple enough to hem a tarp.  Especially if you've drunk the SailRite Kool-Aid and need to sew at least twenty more projects to break even on that machine...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doesn't make the cockpit more comfortable, but this 1961 bronze manhole is now in it's second cockpit in my boat. I'm not sure the manufacturer but quite a few of these were installed in pre 70's sailboats. 

For the most part it just sits flush in the cockpit sole. Large bronze screws hold the plug in the frame. To check the stuffing box, steering parts or anything else on the aft side of the engine, it takes a minute to turn the screws a half turn and lift it out (it's quite heavy - 30lbs). In you go, if you're not too large diameter. 

cockpit-manhole-access-_-jpg.162124

This winter I'm pulling my old transmission to get a rebuild done. It has the reduction gear and large 1" thick steel adaptor plates so it is quite a chunk. I took it out 19 years ago and can't quite recall how I did it, then. 

First step, remove the coupling. With a sawzall and carbide blade, that was easy. I knew the shaft was shot when the last new cutlass install revealed wear. The coupling doesn't owe anybody. 

img_1716-jpg.162128 

After some fettlin' it slides off. With the limited space you note I sit on a removable plywood seat and straddle the coupling to work. It's the only way.

The tranny - now between my legs; my left foot slid out but the 100 pound loose chunk pinned my right foot,  at my ankle. Fek. 

img_1750-jpg.162528

I don't panic, I know I did this once before and survived. 'Reach your laces, untie,..." something tells me. Sure enough, foot pulls through and I can reach the wedged shoe, from the left side. No 911 call needed.

19 years ago, I might have yanked this out by it's neck.  But it wasn't happening today. I never designed my high cover frame for lifting but I gave it a whirl. With a come along, the trans. moved, the ridge pole rolled a bit and bent, but it was enough. 

img_1752-jpg.162730

Click, click, click. I recall the man 19 years ago, with fondness. Stronger, sure,  but not as smart as the one today. I'd even guess that this pull is less frustrating a task. Patience is a fair trade for brawn. 

img_1753-jpg.162731

And I wasn't taking any chances with a new cockpit and sole. I'd cut an old heavy rubber backed carpet runner to fit the manhole. Plus I had a plastic mortar pan to receive the trans filled with oil. 

img_1754-jpg.162732

That's it. Off to the rebuilder hopefully for new clutch disks and spring plates. So why doesn't every boat have a manhole in the cockpit sole? 

283422346_Bronzemanholedecked(1of1).thumb.jpg.2dd1592df96eb74829179cae74158f24.jpg

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^Nice bit of old school charm. Almost worth getting a gimp to put under it.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at my iTunes history, it seems that half of the albums I’ve bought in the last few years were on the occasion of the artists death. Is this wrong?  Or just ironic?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To make my cockpit comfortable, I removed the large pieces of aggressive Vetus nonskid (have you ever seen the stuff?) the previous owner glued to the cockpit seat backs.  Seriously.  WTF?  (I’m building wooden bench seat backs, thin slats of mahogany.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

To make my cockpit comfortable, I removed the large pieces of aggressive Vetus nonskid (have you ever seen the stuff?) the previous owner glued to the cockpit seat backs.  Seriously.  WTF?  (I’m building wooden bench seat backs, thin slats of mahogany.

perhaps he regularily sailed at "tom scott" angle of heel?

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, chester said:

perhaps he regularily sailed at "tom scott" angle of heel?

It’s a heavy fucker of a boat.  Then again, it was sailed by previous owner up to Labrador, where they hit a rock in an uncharted fjord —so who knows what heeling adventures they had?

(I’m not getting the “Tom Scott” reference, but I think I know what you mean.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh Tom is a member who sails an older morgan 30 out of florida and he and the boat liked to sail at 30 + degrees...inside CA joke.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure wish I could lengthen my cockpit so I could sleep in it.  And this, on a 33’ boat.  Sheesh.

(And sure wish I could post a pic here.  Starting several months ago, I think after getting a new iPhone, thisbsite stipled accepting my photos (too large, often)...can’t be bothered to edit/crop...so can’t be bothered to post much since site doesn’t make it easy.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Sure wish I could lengthen my cockpit so I could sleep in it.  And this, on a 33’ boat.  Sheesh.

(And sure wish I could post a pic here.  Starting several months ago, I think after getting a new iPhone, thisbsite stipled accepting my photos (too large, often)...can’t be bothered to edit/crop...so can’t be bothered to post much since site doesn’t make it easy.)

If you email the photos to yourself, the phone will ask you what resolution to use and tell you how big they'll be. Then you can easily copy and paste them from your email into your post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/21/2019 at 3:21 PM, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

To make my cockpit comfortable, I removed the large pieces of aggressive Vetus nonskid (have you ever seen the stuff?) the previous owner glued to the cockpit seat backs.  Seriously.  WTF?  (I’m building wooden bench seat backs, thin slats of mahogany.

I have good friends with a steel boat. I looked up Vetus, as my friends non skid is very agressive stuff. It isn't Vetus I see, which has a small pattern of circles.

 

72809-vetus-den-anti12hap-ppm-tif

 

Turns out there's looks like Treadmaster, diamond shaped,  which looks more aggressive than Vetus. 

11368.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Problem with Treadmaster is it makes your bum look like a lattice pie crust. 

lattice-top-apple-quince-pie-su-x.jpg?it

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, IStream said:

If you email the photos to yourself, the phone will ask you what resolution to use and tell you how big they'll be. Then you can easily copy and paste them from your email into your post.

That only seems to work sometimes, frustratingly.  My old iPhone always “asked” that when emailing pics.  (I tried this morning with cockpit pic - no - then it asked me when sending another pic to myself!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's my friends metal boat, Jud. After running a 100 year old local charter schooner in season for 20 years (and taking care of it in the off season), they bought their retirement boat.

It was built from scratch by a guy who was quite skilled. He did a great job, spared little expense in materials and spent many years doing it. 

Once the boat was complete, he realized sailing it was never really the reason he built it. He did one short season and sold it. 

My friends got a good deal on it. This is not their first metal boat. Before they bought the schooner to make a living day chartering, they owned, cruised, raised 4 kids and lived aboard a 38' metal boat. They were looking for a low maintenance boat and got it. They sail a lot! 

2073519889_JackBarbaraMoore.thumb.jpg.f69a863bc022ff189e3b933d71e2fcd2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

That only seems to work sometimes, frustratingly.  My old iPhone always “asked” that when emailing pics.  (I tried this morning with cockpit pic - no - then it asked me when sending another pic to myself!

Weird, man.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/14/2019 at 5:02 AM, Kris Cringle said:

No secret, our sun awning, a valued modification,  has been getting used more regularly during the sailing season here in the Northeast.

They also work on raceboats, where a dodger can get in the way.  We keep this rolled up and stored below in a quarterberth:

IMG_1767-X3.jpg

 

Make it bigger than you think it needs to be, in that photo (take in late afternoon) you can see that the sun is fairly low.

I didn't use Sunbrella, this is just a cheap outdoor cloth (I think it was about $5/yard).  It also works well in light rain.  I've motored with it a few times, but we mostly stow it when the boat is under way.  It only took two hours to make and the battens are just 1/2" by 1" pine.

alex

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How did you attach the battens, just sewn pockets? 

I sometimes use a tarp over the boom but without battens it doesn't hold it's shape very well

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, alctel said:

How did you attach the battens, just sewn pockets? 

I sometimes use a tarp over the boom but without battens it doesn't hold it's shape very well

I bought a cheap white 10x12 tarp and my wife sewed pockets into it. Four 10' lengths of fiberglass rod cut in half and joined by SS couplings I made, and it worked great. We used it a couple of times, but sometimes it's just easier to sling a tarp over the boom and call it good.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, alctel said:

How did you attach the battens, just sewn pockets? 

I sometimes use a tarp over the boom but without battens it doesn't hold it's shape very well

On our last boat we used a blue poly tarp as a boom tent. We had lengths of 3/4" pvc pipe as ribs lashed to each set of grommets on the tarp. I cut the pipes in the middle and slip fit them together using PVC couplers. That way we could fold the tarp in half and roll it up around the pipe sections for stowing. 

After using a boom tent like that, and refining the design we replicated it using a cheap sunbrella-like fabric.

The nice thing about the ribs is that you can have the tarp quite flat for shade, or you can cinch the sides down into an arch to provide some protection from blowing rain.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Jabber said:

On our last boat we used a blue poly tarp as a boom tent. We had lengths of 3/4" pvc pipe as ribs lashed to each set of grommets on the tarp. I cut the pipes in the middle and slip fit them together using PVC couplers. That way we could fold the tarp in half and roll it up around the pipe sections for stowing. 

After using a boom tent like that, and refining the design we replicated it using a cheap sunbrella-like fabric.

The nice thing about the ribs is that you can have the tarp quite flat for shade, or you can cinch the sides down into an arch to provide some protection from blowing rain.

I have done the same thing for the last couple of boats, but the joiner is just a short length of dowel held in one side by a couple of copper boat nails.

they work really well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, alctel said:

How did you attach the battens, just sewn pockets? 

I sometimes use a tarp over the boom but without battens it doesn't hold it's shape very well

Yes, I sewed in some pockets. It’s a quick project. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just have eyelets on the cover and lead the lines through holes on the end of the conduit before they are tied to the lifelines.

A figure 8 after they pass through the conduit keeps it shipshape.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, olaf hart said:

I just have eyelets on the cover and lead the lines through holes on the end of the conduit before they are tied to the lifelines.

A figure 8 after they pass through the conduit keeps it shipshape.

Yeah that sounds a lot like how we did it. When we made our new tent out of canvas we just used webbing loops, but if we did it again I think we would add short pockets for the ends of the poles to slide into.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Treadmaster is ok as long as you wear clothes,  otherwise that's why God made cushions. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A Yeti cooler.

Doesn't do a damn thing to improve the quality of the seats in my J/35 or make our butts any less wet, or make it cooler when it's hot out, but a cold beer or cool water makes everybody in the cockpit feel more comfortable.  We've got a propane-driven camp cooker to make hot coffee & cocoa when it's cold out.  That improves cockpit comfort too... One day I'll be able to have padded seats... one day...

We do have a boom tent we rig for long days of delivery/cruising motoring on the Chesapeake when it's hot out in the summer, and some new lifeline pads are inbound to keep the Fantasy Island staff happy while underway.  The tent helps a lot to take the curse off the blazing sun.  Tacking ourselves to sit in the shade of the sails when we have a breeze is also good, and I find the English tiller helm position, on the low side, is actually extremely comfortable, almost cradled up against the lifelines. <- Been too long since this guy has sailed.  

It sounds silly but Jimmy Buffet was right about changes in attitude.  We're minimalist but the little things make a big difference.  But we are gonna buy some luxury accomodations on the next boat we buy... the dues will have been paid forward. 
 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyone have thoughts on cockpit coaming angles?  

I'm doing some glass work in my cockpit putting a new deck on the boat and right now they are glassed plywood with a spot of rot... so it wouldn't take much to add a bit of lay back to them.  Just figuring there is probably a starting point to aim for from too plumb, as the only perfect comfortable spot is right where the winch stripper hits you in the middle of the back...     

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've heard several numbers:  8 degrees,  20 degrees.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/21/2019 at 5:23 AM, Kris Cringle said:

That's it. Off to the rebuilder hopefully for new clutch disks and spring plates. So why doesn't every boat have a manhole in the cockpit sole? 

283422346_Bronzemanholedecked(1of1).thumb.jpg.2dd1592df96eb74829179cae74158f24.jpg

 

I'd love to see more details of this hatch, especially the gasket. I guess it's pretty obvious what holds it down, but it would be great to see what's keeping the water out. 30 lbs doesn't seem bad for a cast hatch of that size

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

I'd love to see more details of this hatch, especially the gasket. I guess it's pretty obvious what holds it down, but it would be great to see what's keeping the water out. 30 lbs doesn't seem bad for a cast hatch of that size

I'd love more details on the gasket, too! There is a groove - trough - cut in the bronze outer bronze ring, just inside the step(you can just make it out in this photo). I assume this was for a small gasket. This part was likely designed and cast in the 50's or earlier.

135116260_cockpitmanholeringinstall.thumb.jpg.53568e14bf1693c9c16dd8d527015e9e.jpg

There didn't appear to be anything left in there so I cleaned it out and found some screen gasket that fit the groove. The gasket stuff is not pliable enough to seal real well. I'll look for some 1/8" gasket material as it would be nice to make it water. A few drips find there way below into the deep bilge, that might always be the case? 

The bronze machine screws that hold the plate in tightly, have a flat round head. Each head has a flat cut off so you only need turn the screws a slight turn to line up the flats, and lift the cover. I'm missing one screw and just use a bolt with a flat ground and a slot cut into the top. I should get a new set cut from somebody, sometime,...

You match your decking pattern up and cut to fit the 1/2" gain in the cover. I installed the new decking in the cover with screws through the existing holes and adhesive caulk, then paid the seams with polysulfide. These bronze manholes were used later by Alden in fiberglass cockpits in Caravelles. Probably too labor intensive and they disappeared? I couldn't imagine caring for my boat without this access. Engine, stuffing box, steering, wiring, sea cocks, you name it. 

1457194642_cockpitmanholecoverinplace.thumb.jpg.12f0d3b2616a97be02e94890e77ac133.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In a Previous sailing cruiser  the main change was foam seat backs to stop the cockpit combing digging into your back as you heeled over. Oh and twin shorter rudders with twin tillers allowing  control from each side without tiller extensions..

Not having a sailing cruiser at the moment just a mini keelboat, (16ft) think large 2.4mR in design but the hull shape is U shaped not a pregnant whale.

i'm fitting a hard wood seat ( bit like a deck recliner off a cruise liner), which will have removeable padded seats. I intend to be comfortable during a 2 to 4 hour race.. ( oh and maybe a bottle holder and clips for a glass just by it's side...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, The Q said:

In a Previous sailing cruiser  the main change was foam seat backs to stop the cockpit combing digging into your back as you heeled over. Oh and twin shorter rudders with twin tillers allowing  control from each side without tiller extensions..

Not having a sailing cruiser at the moment just a mini keelboat, (16ft) think large 2.4mR in design but the hull shape is U shaped not a pregnant whale.

i'm fitting a hard wood seat ( bit like a deck recliner off a cruise liner), which will have removeable padded seats. I intend to be comfortable during a 2 to 4 hour race.. ( oh and maybe a bottle holder and clips for a glass just by it's side...)

Q,

Not to derail the thread, but do you have any more details or photos of your keelboat? Sounds interesting. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

I'd love more details on the gasket, too! There is a groove - trough - cut in the bronze outer bronze ring, just inside the step(you can just make it out in this photo). I assume this was for a small gasket. This part was likely designed and cast in the 50's or earlier.

Hi Kris, I'll help you find some gasket options. I'm pretty familiar with the choices and sources. The ultimate gasket seems to be latex surgical tubing, but that needs a different style of notch or rebate, so I think a medium density neoprene may be appropriate. Maybe a half-round section. If you can, measure the width and depth of the notch, groove, trough, rebate, or whatever it's called. Take a close-up, I'd like to see it.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/14/2019 at 6:56 AM, SloopJonB said:

IMO Plexi drop boards are the only way to go - light, simple, cheap, easy to make, no maintenance, more light below and if tinted they look good.

What's not to like?

Had 25mm thick acrylic washboards on my last boat. As you say, let in light, easy to maintain.

Drop one, corner-down on your foot (or on the cabin sole) and it  makes a lasting impression.    Never again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Jackett said:

Q,

Not to derail the thread, but do you have any more details or photos of your keelboat? Sounds interesting. 

Unfortunately no photos at the moment they were all on my previous tablet computer which committed suicide by leaping down a companion way . If I remember I'll see if I can take a few this weekend the cover needs resetting anyway. 

She was designed as 16ft long 4ft wide, hull draft 6 inches, overall draft 3ft. Weight 1/2 ton. I was in Saudi when I designed it. By hand no internet out there..  I came home on holiday to find the class I was going to race in had disappeared.. So I changed the design to 18ff to be able to race. I only got to sail it twice in Saudi before we got moved to the mountains,  so not much developement work was carried out. 

When I came back from Saudi,  they had started a sailing school, now fifteen years later we have doubled the numbers sailing and the original class has reestablished  ( allcomers  B boats below 17ft) with 20+ boats regularly sailing. 

I've been racing in the yeoman class for some years but an old injury  to my back has gradually become more painful so I've been rebuilding  my boat .

I had made provision to remove the extra 2ft, this was done last summer. Left to do is to rebuild the cockpit,  I've been give a kestrel dinghy class mast and boom,  which are the right size and lighter to replace the wooden ones I had built. That has to be fitted,  the keel is to be modified,  I had to use a steel weighted lift keel in Saudi due to a very long shallow slipway . This is being replaced by a fixed keel, not yet built. 

I've since used freeship to assess the design and it came in where my paper designs had said. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried up to 4 Sport A Seats (2 end to end for sleeping) and like others, found them to be a great idea that just didn't work out so well. Something similar but smaller and cheaper works much better  - CrazyCreek Camp Chair (or similar). Stow in a MUCH smaller space as a bonus, and dry out quicker...

campChair.thumb.jpeg.6ed91bd8fd3664474384358a26304649.jpeg

This year gonna try out a suspended mesh aluminum frame chair, that must have come off a canoe or kayak. I can find no branding on mine whatsoever (someone left it at marina), but it is uber comfy and being mesh is ventilated and dries quick. Stowage is a bit tougher than a camp chair above but the comfort is so many levels above, it's worth it (I think so far). This company makes something similar to what I have:

https://millenniummarine.com/product/b-100-gray/

b100gray.thumb.jpg.a3d50a6e1eaeac85b2885fe55be81fbd.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Capnk,

This old luders has a chair setup that might tickle you...  https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1965/luders-54-3524860/?refSource=enhanced%20listing 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Zach said:

Capnk,

This old luders has a chair setup that might tickle you...  https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1965/luders-54-3524860/?refSource=enhanced listing

 

 

Wow, think of all the cool Youtoob angles you could shoot from those - underway, or interview-style at anchor, or bikini bewbs just behind the helmsman... ;)

Or leave the mizzen off, get some fancy teak and stainless fighting chairs and a pair of Penn Silver 130's to go after Big Ones while underway. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/1/2019 at 6:56 PM, SloopJonB said:

How about custom cockpit cushions?

Pricey but they are the best comfort improvement I've ever experienced.

My new-to-me boat came with a set of custom sunbrella cushions.  We tried them out for the first time last weekend, and they slid all over the place; not the thing you want to have happen while heeling.  How do you keep yours in place?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Hukilau said:

My new-to-me boat came with a set of custom sunbrella cushions.  We tried them out for the first time last weekend, and they slid all over the place; not the thing you want to have happen while heeling.  How do you keep yours in place?

Our boat has the factory (J boat) custom cockpit cushions that are held in place with snaps.  The snaps are similar to:

https://www.sailrite.com/Snap-Fastener-Cloth-to-Surface-Silver-Button-3-8-Screw-Stud

The footwell side of the cushions have a flap about 1 1/2 inches long that hangs vertically that the snaps attach to.  On the outboard side of the cushions there is a small diagonal strip ( I'd guess about 3" long) at the bottom of the corner that the snap attaches to.  The strip is only attached to the cushion at the cushion sides so you can get your fingers on the snap itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/1/2019 at 2:50 PM, Lex Teredo said:

A Yeti cooler.

Doesn't do a damn thing to improve the quality of the seats in my J/35 or make our butts any less wet, or make it cooler when it's hot out, but a cold beer or cool water makes everybody in the cockpit feel more comfortable.  We've got a propane-driven camp cooker to make hot coffee & cocoa when it's cold out.  That improves cockpit comfort too... One day I'll be able to have padded seats... one day...

We do have a boom tent we rig for long days of delivery/cruising motoring on the Chesapeake when it's hot out in the summer, and some new lifeline pads are inbound to keep the Fantasy Island staff happy while underway.  The tent helps a lot to take the curse off the blazing sun.  Tacking ourselves to sit in the shade of the sails when we have a breeze is also good, and I find the English tiller helm position, on the low side, is actually extremely comfortable, almost cradled up against the lifelines. <- Been too long since this guy has sailed.  

It sounds silly but Jimmy Buffet was right about changes in attitude.  We're minimalist but the little things make a big difference.  But we are gonna buy some luxury accomodations on the next boat we buy... the dues will have been paid forward. 
 

Ditto on the Yeti.  The nice thing about having kids that are doing well in life, is that they can afford nice birthday gifts.  My daughter just gave me a Yeti perfectly sized to fit in the void under the helmsperson seat.  It will be perfect for those days where I need  a drink or snack but can't leave the wheel.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, slap said:

Our boat has the factory (J boat) custom cockpit cushions that are held in place with snaps.  The snaps are similar to:

https://www.sailrite.com/Snap-Fastener-Cloth-to-Surface-Silver-Button-3-8-Screw-Stud

The footwell side of the cushions have a flap about 1 1/2 inches long that hangs vertically that the snaps attach to.  On the outboard side of the cushions there is a small diagonal strip ( I'd guess about 3" long) at the bottom of the corner that the snap attaches to.  The strip is only attached to the cushion at the cushion sides so you can get your fingers on the snap itself.

Thanks.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well we started with a boat designed around the cockpit, Bene 43, which seems to be the easiest thing to do to make it more comfortable. Not satisfied with that however I've done a few other things. We replaced the bimini with something less intrusive, so instead of a dark heavy heat magnet wrapped over the frame edges we have this thing with the frame exposed, which makes a nice rail to hold onto while getting about deck underway. Much crisper appearance in my mind. I made my first one out of recycled sails and we just had a proper new one made last year in the same style. More Aero.

Added bonus of the bene is the wine cooler molded into the middle of the table in the cockpit, can hold four bottles on ice.

I also now buy some new cheap cushions from Canadian Tire (Walmart works too) every two years from the outdoor living section. You can get replacement chair cushions comparatively cheap with nice fold points in them, so they stay a bit stiff and have lots of ways to reconfigure them in the cockpit either under way or at anchor. For $50 each or so, I can afford to have them in the consumable category so its not the end of the world if you dump a whole rum punch over one. just replace them every two years or so.

The on deck cooler at the back is handy, I sit on it while Auto drives and I dick about with the GPS screen on the back of the table assembly, obviously mobile for easy cleaning and cold beer at hand in an instant.

Best cruising investment was a 10'x10' bug net (Cube shape) that we can hang under the bimini just before sundown. Only $50 at MEC and it happens to fit our cockpit just about perfectly. This extends cockpit enjoyment well into the evening when you might otherwise have to retire below to avoid the critters. It compresses down into a stuff sack about 10" long and 6" in diameter, we use a few extra clothing pegs to hold it in place and you're good to go. We always have clothing pegs in the cockpit for myriad uses.

Last year I also fabricated some quick and dirty side panels for the bimini for when the sun is low at our dock and the heat is sweltering. They can be put on in a matter of moments and also made from recycled dacron sails. Dirt cheap, mucho pleasure.

Next up this year, new and improved cockpit speakers. Might build myself a new dodger for the long hauls.

Cockpit-01.jpg.49e78cd845713bce970213a3b7347be8.jpgCockpit-02.jpg.232d950dbb85af482bfdbb28e9fbd5a5.jpgCockpit-03.jpg.018e2fbcd2f1659d327b8c0750ab02dc.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/2/2019 at 9:59 AM, Kris Cringle said:

For those of us lucky enough to own a yawl,...  I bet no one has ever sat on this. 

506848534_mizzenseat.thumb.jpg.8289661f1531f9c734c8964affd7e049.jpg

We just hang a bosun's seat off the Mizzen mast, so that it's gymballed.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now