Sign in to follow this  
fan

Cabo 2019

Recommended Posts

Well there is less then 2 weeks until the 2019 Cabo Race.  This would be I think the last So Cal Offshore Tune up Race remaining before the 2019 Transpac.   Speaking for our fleet I am disappointed to see no other J125's entered.  Velvet Hammer was registered but has since withdrawn for unknown reasons and the exDerivitive now Snoopy is out due to an owner injury.  Still looks like a great fleet for us in ORR3.  We are a little late to the gate this year so trying to get everything ready for this adventure.  We have a new water maker, some new gear storage, a few new sails and few new crew so really looking forward to getting out there. Been dealing with getting expedition up and running after the latest update triggered some license issues and small C-Map issue I am working through now.  So who is going and on what?

41838085_898369283687523_2243676261001986048_o.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

good luck! one of the best races i have ever done.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where are the weather pundits? I see rain forecast for the middle of next week. Timing could be good or bad.. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Nick G said:

Where are the weather pundits? I see rain forecast for the middle of next week. Timing could be good or bad.. 

Bit too far out to have a reliable grasp of what's going to happen.  That said, here's a pretty picture for Friday 15th. 

Screen Shot 2019-03-05 at 8.41.37 AM.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fan looking forward to another trip down Baja. This time on Destroyer the TP52. We've got a great crew coming together over the last year. Our newest addition for Cabo will be Peter Isler navigating and tactics. The boat just finished a new deck refurbishment. We've got a new instrument package. A new main, 2A+ and a new 1A for the trip south.cropped-9_Destroyer.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With the utmost respect to the crews and owner sailing the race here are some of my picks:

ORR 5 This class consists mostly of cruising boats and the heavily funded chubasco.  Unless its a moderate wind race I think the J124 will take this race, they have the boat dialed in nicely and with a breeze they can get up and go, the Hobie is the other boat to watch.

ORR 4 This is the santa cruz 50/52 class and I think lucky duck will take this one, Horizon is the other boat to keep an eye out for but lots of changes on the crew.

ORR 3 A mix of sprit boats and a swan 60 and a Tripp 56.  I think the j/125 (Timeshaver) guys will handle this class no problem.  The rogers 46 (Bretwalda) is the other boat to look out for and it will be fun to see the new J "one two one" race but don't expect a win on their first trip with the boat.

ORR 2 The 70 fleet, pyewacket wins (again).  OEX with the new mast and Grand Illusion under new ownership will be interesting to follow.

ORR 1 A mix of 70 something footers and fast 50 footers.  The Pac 52 (Badpak) wins this, they have that thing setup right and barring a remarkably slow race they will take it.  Rio 100 first to finish.  Cal Maritime is sailing the andrews 77 and has 17 people listed on the crew list, I don't know what to make of this. Rio has 15.

Multihull only has 2 boats and Maserati will crush first to finish.  I kinda hope to see a sub 48 hour race from these guys.  Ticket to ride will probably correct out and it looks so mean.

2019CaboClassBreaks.pdf

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Tom O'Keefe said:

Fan looking forward to another trip down Baja. This time on Destroyer the TP52. We've got a great crew coming together over the last year. Our newest addition for Cabo will be Peter Isler navigating and tactics. The boat just finished a new deck refurbishment. We've got a new instrument package. A new main, 2A+ and a new 1A for the trip south.cropped-9_Destroyer.jpg

I wondered if the owner would spring for a new instrument package.  That B&G display system powered by the crazy Bravo processor, was....well crazy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Headed down on a very last minute entry in class 3 with the soto 40. Guessing we will be off pace early with very little time in the boat, but optimistic we will figure it our and be chasing down my homies on the shaver by falso. Viva la mexico!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Hitchhiker said:

I wondered if the owner would spring for a new instrument package.  That B&G display system powered by the crazy Bravo processor, was....well crazy!

Word was that processor was pretty dynamic if you were from Espana. Not a lot of support in the States.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Tom O'Keefe said:

Word was that processor was pretty dynamic if you were from Espana. Not a lot of support in the States.

Which is why it was so popular world wide.  Said nobody ever!  Hope you guys have a good race.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Horizon is ready. Frustrated that there are no slips for us in Cabo and have to take the boat to Los Cabos shortly after the finish. 

31357922_1773420199382785_5644258974577459200_o.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is that true for most of the fleet? Or did some make reservations early enuff?  Los C is nice - doesn't have the full tourist vibe of Cabo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, longy said:

Is that true for most of the fleet? Or did some make reservations early enuff?  Los C is nice - doesn't have the full tourist vibe of Cabo.

True for Most of the fleet, my bad assuming that the OA took care of the slips. The same thing happened to the HaHa last year "we got it, we got it we got it, we don't got it.... sorry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah heard there were no slips available for anybody as of 2 weeks ago when owner called Cabo marina directly.  I guess it will be like the motor in after you finish PV FTMFL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Which start window looks better?  Friday or Saturday?

Really a shame that we can't get ECMWF anymore.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I heard that all the BIG boat owners buy their weather?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Dude said:

I heard that all the BIG boat owners buy their weather?

 

What constitutes a BIG boat? 45' and up?B)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Dude said:

Horizon is ready. Frustrated that there are no slips for us in Cabo and have to take the boat to Los Cabos shortly after the finish. 

31357922_1773420199382785_5644258974577459200_o.jpg

good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that is a longer motor than PV...bring refreshments

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be pretty happy leaving with today's conditions. But then it gets pretty funky around Sunday.

Next week looks like it  will be a real race to get south before the system moves through.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With the Cabo start approaching this thought runs through my head at 4:30 AM

game-of-thrones-emilia-clarke-daenerys-targaryen-season-6-finale.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

is she the new tactician

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/7/2019 at 3:49 PM, Hitchhiker said:

What constitutes a BIG boat? 45' and up?B)

Well seeing as I am on a 40, what's it look like to the weather gurus? I'm seeing a medium race setting up...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, notallthere said:

Well seeing as I am on a Soto 40, what's it look like to the weather gurus? I'm seeing a medium race setting up...

FIFY.

If it was last Friday as the go day, I would have said Drysuits for you lot for 3 and half days.  Now, not so much!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a follow up.

Here are the least and most optimistic summaries for a generic 40 footer.  Your mileage will vary:

 

 

 

Screen Shot 2019-03-11 at 3.06.16 PM.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Hitchhiker said:

As a follow up.

Here are the least and most optimistic summaries for a generic 40 footer.  Your mileage will vary:

 

 

 

Screen Shot 2019-03-11 at 3.06.16 PM.png

Seems legit, though hoping our avg is slightly quicker...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah most of what I am seeing for us is 41/2 to 5 days. A lot of A1 and A3 sub 14 knots.  Not ideal for us as we like 16+ and on the step so might be tough with some of these waterline boats.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

waterline...good...big boat year?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The forecast looks like it is slowing down again. At least it's warming up as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

how was todays start? 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, sumpin said:

how was todays start? 

 

We got out for a practice about an hour and a half after the start. Breeze had filled in nicely from the NW at 10-12 knots. The first start got away well and as of 4 hours ago the tracker showed they were off Ensenada.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

looks really lite for the rest ... grab an extra sandwich

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oex and badpak bail.  What a terrible race, I feel for the organizers. 

 

Most interesting race is between zero gravity, time shaver and fast exit.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/19/2019 at 5:10 PM, blunderfull said:

Chubby’s hanging with leaders last time I ck’d.

Who’s calling tactics?  

Jeff Thorpe aka Elvis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/5/2019 at 11:52 AM, OHAWHO said:

With the utmost respect to the crews and owner sailing the race here are some of my picks:

ORR 4 This is the Santa Cruz 50/52 class and I think lucky duck will take this one, Horizon is the other boat to keep an eye out for but lots of changes on the crew.

 

 

54524721_10106515371445224_2071520141983612928_o.thumb.jpg.786b6ad00f9487c0ee49e287c479a58c.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/13/2019 at 9:14 AM, Tom O'Keefe said:

The forecast looks like it is slowing down again. At least it's warming up as well.

congrats buddy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Dude said:

54524721_10106515371445224_2071520141983612928_o.thumb.jpg.786b6ad00f9487c0ee49e287c479a58c.jpg

You definitely took them at the mag bay convergence, congrats. 

Didn't see fast exit winning this, congrats to them as well. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you’ve done 6 impossible things before racing, why not round it off with an overall win of NHYC Cabo Race 2019.

Ok, so maybe not impossible, nor six, but certainly highly improbable.  Fast Exit, an Andrews 40 under ownership of John Raymont, crewed by Alan “Details” Andrews, Doug Johnstone (Hitchhiker), Zack Maxam, Steve Mader, Shane Vowels and Taylor Mullins, mounted a very unlikely and generally regarded, doubtful bid to win Division 3 under ORR. Overall at that time was not even a mere speck of a consideration.

ORR 2 was a mishmash class ranging from ultralights at the low comfort end (Soto 40) to luxury sleds (Swan 60) at the posh end.  The all around downwind weapon J-125 Timeshaver, was the bookies favourite to win.  Fast Exit was pegged to show, possibly!

Going into the race the weather was not promising a blazing run to Cabo with a high pressure ridge setting up over the race course and low pressure pushing over the top, which could either crush the gradient all together or help out at the lower end of the course with a building NW gradient.  As it turns out it did a bit of both.  We wanted to get outside and get outside fast, then get south and stay ahead of the high ridge if at all possible.

Friday opened clear with spectacular views of snow topped mountains and a dominant offshore flow.  We got a great start at the left end of the line in company of Bretwalda 3 the Rogers 46, Timeshaver, and the Soto 40 Zero Gravity (cool name and even cooler paint job).  The fifties class which started with us were all line up to leeward on our hip and the luxury sled owned the right end of the line.  Straight into the A-2 we were moving out smartly, holding off the hard charging Timeshaver.  Then the tack line parted and caused a small amount of drama.  This allowed the J-125 to go past and as the breeze built, they lit up and sailed away. The transition into the onshore flow was smooth and the breeze continued to build into the mid to high teens which allowed our turbo camper to get on step and minimize the damage that Timeshaver was inflicting on us.  We held off the fifties and the boats inshore of us for the bulk of day one into day two.  Actually, come to think of it, we held off the fifties for pretty much the whole race.

Day two opened with lighter conditions as expected. But, we had good course position and had Timeshaver in visual, good for us, not so much for them! A bit of a seabreeze built in the afternoon, nothing big but enough to allow the J-boat to sail a bit faster and lower than we could.  This would be a habit of theirs that would wear thin as the race progressed.

As we lost visual, it was time to start polling Yb.  The OA had removed any delay, so one could essentially track the competition in real time.  Not that there was much to track at that time.  Later in the race it would become a very useful tool for avoiding holes down the course. 

Going into day three, it was pretty much more of the same.  Routine onboard was well established with the watch system rolling well and the nav floating between.  Each watch change was started with a brief on the weather, what was to be expected for the next three or four hour period and what was for lunch.  Tweaks were made constantly to routing solutions but we stuck with the main plan of being outside to the west of the competition.  Guadalupe island loomed into view at one point maybe.  The next piece of action was about to get to us as we reached our intended limit offshore.  Keeping a close eye on Good Call inshore of us and on Timeshaver, we waited for the gybe inside.  Around 2230 we gybed to port and found ourselves in a great down course position.  Then, we lost all satellite data connections.  We had text and voice, but no weather, no Yb, and no e-mail for position reports and standings.  Somewhere the service provider had cut us off and the Boss was not happy. For all of Sunday, the lightest day of the race,  we sailed SOTP.  With no good idea of where the competition was and relying on the last downloaded grib file which progressively got older.  Going Old Skool in the nav department also meant looking out of the window, a bizarre and antiquated method of figuring out what the weather was going to do.   Finally, around 0200 Sunday morning we found another boat, Bretwalda 3, coming at us on starboard.  They gybed to port with us for a while then gybed back to starboard and crossed behind.  Ok, cool.  We were in good company. Meanwhile the Boss had to resort to old world methodology of using somewhat gangster techniques to get us back into the digital age. After multiple cajoling and increasingly threatening phone calls to the sat comm provider, they saw the error of their ways and finally got us back online. No one got whacked.

Later that morning around 0900 we spotted another boat, then another boat and then another. Timshaver, Zero Gravity, Lucky Duck and Horizon all inshore of us and all headed out.  We had rejoined the party and even made up some time on Timeshaver.  Fist bumps all around followed by a couple of hours exchanging gybes with the other teams.  Night came and with it more breeze.  The game of stretch the bungy resumed as Timeshaver legged out.

In toward Magdalena Bay on day five. We again closed with Timeshaver, Lucky Duck and Horizon.  Zero Gravity was ahead and Bretwalda 3 was now well down course.  The Luxo sled had done a runner on all of us and stretched out a 62 mile lead.

Another small gybing tussle ensued with the fifties trying to get in on the action, but really we were only focused on the J-boat.  As the breeze started to filter in from the south and east the J-boat started gaining gauge on us.  I became despondent.  Then they gained another quarter mile or so.  I became depressed. They started averaging about a quarter mile every 20 mins.  I was put on suicide watch.  My belt was removed, laces taken out of my deck shoes and all the sporks were removed from the galley.

The J-boat continued to gain on us, until finally in the afternoon the breeze came in properly and we could step up.  A great afternoon of planing was had with Steve the Cook going mad and setting the high speed at 17.2. The next Grib download finally had some good news for us, with lighter pressure again showing up inshore.  We started making some inroads on the J and looking forward started to tweak our final approach for Cabo.  Gybing at 2000 on Tuesday night, Timeshaver went with us.  Projecting their course to our projected track, we finally had them boat for boat by about five minutes.  They gybed back inshore while we stayed on our port gybe for the final set up to the finish.  The final delta was just over an hour.  In the process we also got past Horizon who had passed us earlier in the day.  On the line in our division it was Good Call, Zero Gravity, Fast exit and Timeshaver.

Upon docking, Details started grilling the race director about the projected  finish times of the bigger boats on the course.  It was eventually decided that as nice as it may be Overall was not going to happen for a small boat, again.

But, I wasn’t going to let go yet, and repeated checking of Yb through out dinner and later watching the future generation of Americans get trashed in Squid Roe, we got the confirmation.  Around 2130 hours Pyewacket finished and could not make the cut.

Fast Exit had the overall win.  Shots all around and ready to party more.

In closing, when John Raymont bought the boat as Bien Roulee, it was not the finished design brief that Alan had been hired to execute. The original owner was more of cruiser than a racer and some compromises were made.  The end result was that the boat was not stiff enough and the rudder was too small, so that under some conditions, the boat would suddenly fall over and go sideways, much to the consternation of those aboard. John has been relentless in his goal of executing the original design brief along with some other improvements with results validating the original concept.

Finally huge kudos to the team aboard.  A really intensely competitive group, with very relaxed egos. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fan. Really glad to see you posting.  We saw you gurneyed off when you guys came in, with obviously much concern.  Viggo filled us in later.

Take it easy and heal up quick mate!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, Hitchhiker said:

If you’ve done 6 impossible things before racing, why not round it off with an overall win of NHYC Cabo Race 2019.

Ok, so maybe not impossible, nor six, but certainly highly improbable.  Fast Exit, an Andrews 40 under ownership of John Raymont, crewed by Alan “Details” Andrews, Doug Johnstone (Hitchhiker), Zack Maxam, Steve Mader, Shane Vowels and Taylor Mullins, mounted a very unlikely and generally regarded, doubtful bid to win Division 3 under ORR. Overall at that time was not even a mere speck of a consideration.

ORR 2 was a mishmash class ranging from ultralights at the low comfort end (Soto 40) to luxury sleds (Swan 60) at the posh end.  The all around downwind weapon J-125 Timeshaver, was the bookies favourite to win.  Fast Exit was pegged to show, possibly!

Going into the race the weather was not promising a blazing run to Cabo with a high pressure ridge setting up over the race course and low pressure pushing over the top, which could either crush the gradient all together or help out at the lower end of the course with a building NW gradient.  As it turns out it did a bit of both.  We wanted to get outside and get outside fast, then get south and stay ahead of the high ridge if at all possible.

Friday opened clear with spectacular views of snow topped mountains and a dominant offshore flow.  We got a great start at the left end of the line in company of Bretwalda 3 the Rogers 46, Timeshaver, and the Soto 40 Zero Gravity (cool name and even cooler paint job).  The fifties class which started with us were all line up to leeward on our hip and the luxury sled owned the right end of the line.  Straight into the A-2 we were moving out smartly, holding off the hard charging Timeshaver.  Then the tack line parted and caused a small amount of drama.  This allowed the J-125 to go past and as the breeze built, they lit up and sailed away. The transition into the onshore flow was smooth and the breeze continued to build into the mid to high teens which allowed our turbo camper to get on step and minimize the damage that Timeshaver was inflicting on us.  We held off the fifties and the boats inshore of us for the bulk of day one into day two.  Actually, come to think of it, we held off the fifties for pretty much the whole race.

Day two opened with lighter conditions as expected. But, we had good course position and had Timeshaver in visual, good for us, not so much for them! A bit of a seabreeze built in the afternoon, nothing big but enough to allow the J-boat to sail a bit faster and lower than we could.  This would be a habit of theirs that would wear thin as the race progressed.

As we lost visual, it was time to start polling Yb.  The OA had removed any delay, so one could essentially track the competition in real time.  Not that there was much to track at that time.  Later in the race it would become a very useful tool for avoiding holes down the course. 

Going into day three, it was pretty much more of the same.  Routine onboard was well established with the watch system rolling well and the nav floating between.  Each watch change was started with a brief on the weather, what was to be expected for the next three or four hour period and what was for lunch.  Tweaks were made constantly to routing solutions but we stuck with the main plan of being outside to the west of the competition.  Guadalupe island loomed into view at one point maybe.  The next piece of action was about to get to us as we reached our intended limit offshore.  Keeping a close eye on Good Call inshore of us and on Timeshaver, we waited for the gybe inside.  Around 2230 we gybed to port and found ourselves in a great down course position.  Then, we lost all satellite data connections.  We had text and voice, but no weather, no Yb, and no e-mail for position reports and standings.  Somewhere the service provider had cut us off and the Boss was not happy. For all of Sunday, the lightest day of the race,  we sailed SOTP.  With no good idea of where the competition was and relying on the last downloaded grib file which progressively got older.  Going Old Skool in the nav department also meant looking out of the window, a bizarre and antiquated method of figuring out what the weather was going to do.   Finally, around 0200 Sunday morning we found another boat, Bretwalda 3, coming at us on starboard.  They gybed to port with us for a while then gybed back to starboard and crossed behind.  Ok, cool.  We were in good company. Meanwhile the Boss had to resort to old world methodology of using somewhat gangster techniques to get us back into the digital age. After multiple cajoling and increasingly threatening phone calls to the sat comm provider, they saw the error of their ways and finally got us back online. No one got whacked.

Later that morning around 0900 we spotted another boat, then another boat and then another. Timshaver, Zero Gravity, Lucky Duck and Horizon all inshore of us and all headed out.  We had rejoined the party and even made up some time on Timeshaver.  Fist bumps all around followed by a couple of hours exchanging gybes with the other teams.  Night came and with it more breeze.  The game of stretch the bungy resumed as Timeshaver legged out.

In toward Magdalena Bay on day five. We again closed with Timeshaver, Lucky Duck and Horizon.  Zero Gravity was ahead and Bretwalda 3 was now well down course.  The Luxo sled had done a runner on all of us and stretched out a 62 mile lead.

Another small gybing tussle ensued with the fifties trying to get in on the action, but really we were only focused on the J-boat.  As the breeze started to filter in from the south and east the J-boat started gaining gauge on us.  I became despondent.  Then they gained another quarter mile or so.  I became depressed. They started averaging about a quarter mile every 20 mins.  I was put on suicide watch.  My belt was removed, laces taken out of my deck shoes and all the sporks were removed from the galley.

The J-boat continued to gain on us, until finally in the afternoon the breeze came in properly and we could step up.  A great afternoon of planing was had with Steve the Cook going mad and setting the high speed at 17.2. The next Grib download finally had some good news for us, with lighter pressure again showing up inshore.  We started making some inroads on the J and looking forward started to tweak our final approach for Cabo.  Gybing at 2000 on Tuesday night, Timeshaver went with us.  Projecting their course to our projected track, we finally had them boat for boat by about five minutes.  They gybed back inshore while we stayed on our port gybe for the final set up to the finish.  The final delta was just over an hour.  In the process we also got past Horizon who had passed us earlier in the day.  On the line in our division it was Good Call, Zero Gravity, Fast exit and Timeshaver.

Upon docking, Details started grilling the race director about the projected  finish times of the bigger boats on the course.  It was eventually decided that as nice as it may be Overall was not going to happen for a small boat, again.

But, I wasn’t going to let go yet, and repeated checking of Yb through out dinner and later watching the future generation of Americans get trashed in Squid Roe, we got the confirmation.  Around 2130 hours Pyewacket finished and could not make the cut.

Fast Exit had the overall win.  Shots all around and ready to party more.

In closing, when John Raymont bought the boat as Bien Roulee, it was not the finished design brief that Alan had been hired to execute. The original owner was more of cruiser than a racer and some compromises were made.  The end result was that the boat was not stiff enough and the rudder was too small, so that under some conditions, the boat would suddenly fall over and go sideways, much to the consternation of those aboard. John has been relentless in his goal of executing the original design brief along with some other improvements with results validating the original concept.

Finally huge kudos to the team aboard.  A really intensely competitive group, with very relaxed egos. 

Nice words on the experience...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congratulations to Fast Exit!

Saturday's start was light and flukey. We saw everyone crowding the boat end with a little more pressure at the pin end. We owned the pin end. We led off to the left until CDM. Then the strop blew on our MHG. By the time we were able to recover Bad Pack and Peligroso had slipped past. 

Thus started 4 days of chutes and ladders. First the outside looked awesome. OEX was boat for boat ahead of Rio on the extreme outside track.Then Pyewacket got launched on the inside. Pedro had us leaning on the outside of middle and then back in just south of Cedros. Staying in contact while playing the middle was job one.

We started with 6 in Division 1 and ended up with 3. Wednesday morning we were looking at a Thursday dawn finish with it all to play for between Peligroso, Medicine Man and Destroyer. Mid day the breeze kicked in and Medicine Man jibed in early searching for a knock to cut the corner. We initially went with them only to jibe back to the south. Then it became a call for optimum lay line. Pedro nailed it. From then on it was a drag race between us and the clock on Peligroso and side by side with Taxi Dancer. Thursday night was very good to us. While Taxi was able to finish just ahead, we were stoked to have corrected out on Peligroso and take 1st in Division One. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice videos Hitchhiker!  Didn't know you were recording.  It was pretty fun driving fully powered up with the 3A in those hours after the start just zipping down the coast.  Also, great job in keeping us pointed the right direction to Cabo!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Hitchhiker said:

Fan. Really glad to see you posting.  We saw you gurneyed off when you guys came in, with obviously much concern.  Viggo filled us in later.

Take it easy and heal up quick mate!

Thanks you guys sailed a great race. It was the two of us the whole way on corrected. Wish I as in a bit better shape at the end to realy give you a run from the nav side. We had many discussion about how your boat speed has improved so much.  Well deserved win nicely done!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/23/2019 at 11:46 AM, Alan Andrews said:

Nice videos Hitchhiker!  Didn't know you were recording.  It was pretty fun driving fully powered up with the 3A in those hours after the start just zipping down the coast.  Also, great job in keeping us pointed the right direction to Cabo!

nice to see you got another boat to the cabo overall. congrats buddy! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this