Bob Perry

help identifying this boat

Recommended Posts

Looks like a Bullseye, but the rudder is different.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Believe it's a GoldenEye by Cape Cod Ship Building.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cape Cod has been in business a long time. They still build the 24' Raven you're familiar with. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
48 minutes ago, rstone said:

Believe it's a GoldenEye by Cape Cod Ship Building.

Nice. Spot on.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Rstone:

I had no idea the Raven was still built. Spent a lot of time racing a Raven when I was in high school.

The Goldeneye is indeed the boat and many thanks for ID'ing it for me. The FB experts were striking out. I figured it for a Herreshoff design but I had no idea which one. It's quite a handsome shape.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob did not design the boat.  This references the ongoing assortment of advertisements of boats that claim Robert Perry Designed the boat for sale. 

This includes boats that were first built prior to his birth. Boats that  were first built before his parents birth. Boats that using the word “design” is way to generous. 

Bob is not asking what boat is this due to drinking and designing. He rarely forgets that he designed a boat ( Islander 35 mk II excluded) 

So we need a background story to make it more believable.....

Sorry this may reference something from waay back in early SA.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Almost all of the Cape Cod boats have the Hereshoff name on them. They share many features.

Heres my 20’Gauntlet.Sydney Hereshoff design. The 16’ Mercury is a smaller, transom hung rudder version of the Gauntlet. 

Someone else designed the 24 or 26’ Raven. Great boat still.

30B6B396-8433-4F14-BA3C-5CE1F6B139B7.jpeg

DF968F7D-698D-4695-98C6-9E4BC1C08EA5.jpeg

AE5A13AB-6E8A-43AB-B793-E1320FABB3DF.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

Almost all of the Cape Cod boats have the Hereshoff name on them. They share many features.

Heres my 20’Gauntlet.Sydney Hereshoff design. The 16’ Mercury is a smaller, transom hung rudder version of the Gauntlet. 

Someone else designed the 24 or 26’ Raven. Great boat still.

 

 

 

Raven is 24’ designed by Roger McAleer with a centerboard and under stern rudder, weird way to run aground.

Up until the early ‘70s there was a fleet racing in Manhasset Bay, WLIS, hulls were cold molded. When the Etchells came to be around 1973, owners upgraded and the Raven faded away

Capsizing a Raven was a total disaster, usually occuring during a windy jibe, when the Yuge Main took over the helm from the puny rudder.

Cape Cod also builds the Shields, 30’ S&S keel lead mine.

http://www.capecodshipbuilding.com/fleet/index.php?boat=raven

Raven

EC74D14B-CDB5-4DBC-A902-30D08DECE82A.jpeg

E7D526EE-87CF-439F-BE12-70082C0AD0CE.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Kent H said:

Bob did not design the boat.  This references the ongoing assortment of advertisements of boats that claim Robert Perry Designed the boat for sale. 

This includes boats that were first built prior to his birth. Boats that  were first built before his parents birth. Boats that using the word “design” is way to generous. 

Bob is not asking what boat is this due to drinking and designing. He rarely forgets that he designed a boat ( Islander 35 mk II excluded) 

So we need a background story to make it more believable.....

Sorry this may reference something from waay back in early SA.

Same round here, if it’s not a Bob Perry it’s a Herreshoff.

If it’s not a Herreshoff it’s an S&S

nice useful boat, designed by Nat and Sidney, LFH did a similar boat with an outboard rudder, the Herreshoff 14.

https://sailboatdata.com/sailboat/buzzards-bay-14

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Years ago YACHTING magazine held an annual regatta with one boat from each of the one design classes. For years the Raven was the fastest boat next to the scows. I did some very exciting races in a Raven. We once hung four "trapeze" lines off a Raven mast. Can't understand why we didn't pull that mast right out of the boat. But we were young and didn't even think about it.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Long ago had the opportunity to buy "Quick Sliver" Raven hull #151 on Lake Lanier, GA Later, #15 an original plywood version --Rumba (ex Flyaway) also slipped by in Mashpee, MA 

Reluctance to follow through blamed on a disagreeable wife.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

i guess they hadn't invented vangs back then..

Or fore guys.  Maybe that''s why they call it a "guy". "Hey guy, get up there and hold than thang down!"

The centerboard trunk was open on top. The cb pin was in rollers that rode on tracks on top of the trunk slot. You could adjust the angle of the CB and also adjust the fore and aft position of the board for the right helm. It was quite clever.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, rstone said:

_20190313_143353.thumb.JPG.0472d514c59352116c4cda6d6183b0c0.JPG

Subsequent photos of this boat show it having spinnaker troubles, capsizing and then the crew standing on the bottom after it turtles. Thanks to Morris Rosenfeld for an interesting 4 photo series.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's "Now you know the rest of the story..."

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bob Perry said:

Or fore guys.  Maybe that''s why they call it a "guy". "Hey guy, get up there and hold than thang down!"

The centerboard trunk was open on top. The cb pin was in rollers that rode on tracks on top of the trunk slot. You could adjust the angle of the CB and also adjust the fore and aft position of the board for the right helm. It was quite clever.

I too sailed a Raven with a friend of mine. Raven Nationals held on Lake St. Claire in what year I can’t remember. Crewed with some firefighters from the great South Bay on Long Island. Had a Blast. Came in 3rd. Oh to be young again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great photos rstone. Thank you for the memories.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Or fore guys.  Maybe that''s why they call it a "guy". "Hey guy, get up there and hold than thang down!"

The centerboard trunk was open on top. The cb pin was in rollers that rode on tracks on top of the trunk slot. You could adjust the angle of the CB and also adjust the fore and aft position of the board for the right helm. It was quite clever.

The Flying Scot has that board pin roller design to this day, about 4 inches of space at the aft end of the slot on top of the trunk to roll the pin roller back in breeze, until the helm nearly neutralizes. FAST! 

Morris Rosenfeld used to photograph frequently on Manhasset Bay and I believe those 4 shots above to be somewhere on Western Long Island Sound. 

Another shot of Rosie's on Manhasset Bay where Star fleet #1 sailed in 1922. Note the gaff rigs. 

Star #1 is named Little Dipper. Her bow and stern are preserved in the reading room at MBYC when her hull rotted away  

 

 

9B2E6957-8643-4F62-8612-6F0D94E06F28.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

 

The centerboard trunk was open on top. The cb pin was in rollers that rode on tracks on top of the trunk slot. You could adjust the angle of the CB and also adjust the fore and aft position of the board for the right helm. It was quite clever.

same thing with my Rebel 16...   it didn't have a vang either or a backstay..    one of the first times out, inadvertent gybe,  i thought the mast might fail or the shrouds pull out of the deck...  scary...   vang was added,   gybe only when i have to..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

Or fore guys.  Maybe that''s why they call it a "guy". "Hey guy, get up there and hold than thang down!"

The centerboard trunk was open on top. The cb pin was in rollers that rode on tracks on top of the trunk slot. You could adjust the angle of the CB and also adjust the fore and aft position of the board for the right helm. It was quite clever.

Because if the pole sky-ed, it took four guys to fix it. "fore-guy preventer"

- Stumbling

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

i guess they hadn't invented vangs back then..

Nope,  That's why I had my sister sit on the boom going downhill.  An "inadvertent" jibe was always tempting, but I never could decide to face the wrath of my Dad if I launched her.  

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Left Shift said:

Nope,  That's why I had my sister sit on the boom going downhill.  An "inadvertent" jibe was always tempting, but I never could decide to face the wrath of my Dad if I launched her.  

I woude of sworne up an downe in youre supporte that ist wase unittentionalle to see it.                             :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hadn't thought about Ravens for many years. When I started sailing in the late 1970's on the Ohio River in Kentucky, a guy living in Louisville had a Raven and would show up at various regional Portsmouth regattas and clean up. As a kid who learned to sail on a Super Snark, seeing a Raven with multiple trapezes (I remember at least 2 out on the wire) was quite impressive. I think there was also a Raven fleet on Kentucky Lake but it was dead by the time I traveled to Kentucky Lake for regattas.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay

I thought it looked bigger than 18’, more like the 23’ Marlin ... which had a couple of different topside configurations.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now