woahboy

Decisions, Decisions. Opinions Requested.

Recommended Posts

I have a budget of $5,000 or less. I live north of Dallas/Fort so the choices may not be as wide as what you might have on the Great Lakes, East Coast, PNW etc. I am looking for something that you can day sail and spend the night on from time to time. I would also like to be somewhat competitive in can races when that time arises. The boss hasn't spent much time on the water so somewhat dry would be nice. So far what I have an interest in is:

Seafarer 26. Great condition, lot's of extras and in the price range:  (Will be looking at this 03/16/2019) But relatively slow. N.E PHRF 240 $4,500. In the water locally.
https://dallas.craigslist.org/ftw/boa/d/azle-very-clean-77-seafarer-26-sailboat/6836658105.html

Cal 25 MK II. Looks to be in good shape but how can really tell just by photos. Has the comfort and is a mite more nimble than the Seafarer. Have not planned to view as it's over 3 hours away.
https://killeen.craigslist.org/boa/d/belton-cal-25-ft-sailboat-2000-obo/6836100893.html

H Boat. Another member here let me know about this boat and is going to report on the condition of to me soon. Nice performance but not near as comfortable as the above two boats.

Columbia 26 MK II. This boat has been on sale in this area off and on for the last couple of years. I see it is rated as high as 246 (Long Island) Looks comfortable. Condition unknown
https://dallas.craigslist.org/dal/boa/d/rowlett-sail-boat-no-trailer/6842299788.html

Those are just a few but if there are people on here that are in my area and know of any other boats that might be for sale shoot me a PM. I thought that this was going to be easy. And it's always fun to spend other people's money. So, bring on the opinions, suggestions, etc. (*)(*) <----- Boobs
Thank You
Jim

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The hell with comfort. The H boat is cool and sails beautifully. If you want to stand up go outdoors! You already said you only want the odd overnight. I shouldn't talk about it publicly, but you can have wonderful sex in a small boat if you plan it well.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Mr. Ed said:

The hell with comfort. The H boat is cool and sails beautifully. If you want to stand up go outdoors! You already said you only want the odd overnight. I shouldn't talk about it publicly, but you can have wonderful sex in a small boat if you plan it well.

Reminds me of an old Buffet song. “Boat drinks”. But I always changed it to “Boat sex”.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That Cal 25 MKII is a sweet deal for $2k.  Stout, relatively quick, under budget, and comfy.  That would be my choice between those 4.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, woahboy said:

H Boat. Another member here let me know about this boat and is going to report on the condition of to me soon. Nice performance but not near as comfortable as the above two boats.

I'm prejudiced. The H-Boat rates around 189, but it will sail above that with good sails, smooth bottom, etc.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, mcsailor0303 said:

That Cal 25 MKII is a sweet deal for $2k.  Stout, relatively quick, under budget, and comfy.  That would be my choice between those 4.

Good lite air boat?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Gouvernail  whatcha got?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd go for the C&C in a heartbeat, but I'm biased.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, woahboy said:

 I have a C&C 25 mk ll. I am very impressed with the build quality of the boat, how she handles, and the ease of use. As for racing, I haven't with her yet. The 24 seems very popular with the people who have owned it. There is a 1000 lb difference between the 24 and 25 but everything I have read states that the 24 isn't too tender and is a good all around boat. Biggest complaint being the heads location.   

I'd also go for the C&C but I am also Biased. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK...No time to edit.  This shall be a stream of consciousness post>>>

 

 

There are a ton of $5000 boats but the necessary maintenance on those boats usually is double that amount.  They all need bottom jobs, lines, have leaking hardware everywhere, rotted pieces of wood, cranky or non-functional motor, tired sails and the electronics are ancient and non-functional 

There are various boats abandoned in storage yards and back yards....FOR GOOD REASON!!!

 

Somewhere around $8000 you start to find lots of boats the owners have loved but simply cannot keep anymore.  Your budget cuts out $3000 shy of that number so you are going to have to SHOP and shop some more.

 

DO NOT FALL IN LOVE!!!

The person selling it doesn't love it for a reason. The person selling it probably paid $40,000 to $100,000

When somebody sells a boat for a low figure THAT PERSON knows and freely admits the boat is only worth that much.  In fact, they almost always know EXACTLY why their boats are only worth a little.

 

OK...I have an exception.  Down on Lake Amistad they are closing the last public marina.  Only the military marina will remain open. People are selling their boats for bargain basement prices.

BUT!!!!! Moving a boat hundreds of miles across the desert and the central Texas hills and the prairies between here and you is EXPENSIVE!!!!!

THIS IS NOT INTENDED AS A SALES PITCH. IT IS TELLING YOU WHAT ONE GUY KNOWS ABOUT WITHOUT EVEN TRYING.  YOU NEED TO SHOP!!!

I do know of a Catalina 30 on another lake  you can have splashed in to your lake  for about $10,000 I have not seen it yet, but I am considering buying it as an investment. 

Why? Because I can move it myself on my own trailer and not pay  $3000 of that to somebody else. I would have to go get it and spend both time and lot of money and beat the hell out of my towing vehicle, but...I would sorta like a nice Catalina 30.

I think there is a San Juan 7.7 here in Austin we could make happen at your lake for about $5000. That owner has taken pretty darned god care of it but he cannot be out in the sun anymore and wants out. Hell, we might even  make it show up there for $3500 but that would be with its three  year old bottom job 

There are plenty of J-24 available. I used to sleep on mine all the time but it sure as hell isn't a cruising boat most people would enjoy.  

There is a J-24 sitting in my yard that could be dropped in the water and sailed tomorrow. It wants a paintjob. It wants some new lines. The sails are old but barely used. The guy lost use of his legs twenty five years ago and it was rigged with all brand new stuff about then. It needs lines , it needs lots of cleaning. I dont remember if cushions are in there but we can figure that out later.

I will make that boat show up at your lake if you will part with $2500. We could probably leave a trailer under it for an additional $1500

It has sat in my yard since 2009. I want my space back. 

If you come get it I can probably give it to you on a trailer for $3000.  If you will come prepare the trailer for the road yourself AFTER paying for the boat and trailer, I would gleefully accept $2500

There are literally hundreds of deals like this al over texas.  Look for one you like.

 

I could tell you about at least a dozen more boats sitting around at various Lake Travis Marinas.  

 

shop!!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 5
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Requires a bit of extra persuasion to get a gal to lie down in a boat she cannot stand up in.

West Wright Potter would be the exception. That fleet does a serious amount of cruising, socializing, and racing. They look inexpensive...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was gonna say, J-24.  Buy the nicest $5000 dollar one you can find.  If your under the age of 50, you can easily spend the occasional night aboard.  You'll have a great beer can boat, and will learn more about sail trim than any other boat you are looking at.  When you are ready to move on, you'll still have a boat worth 5 grand....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

C&C24 is a great boat, I had one. Sail really nicely, good manners and easy to single-hand (looks like that one is set up for it too, plus it's got a traveler), dry cockpit and pretty stable. Below is very comfortable even if not quite standing headroom (unless you're 5'6" or shorter). Reasonably fast and a nice wide "groove" that makes it easy to sail to the rating, well built.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

C&C

There is a San Juan 24 with a little more room below. Next to the j24, best bang for the buck.

https://austin.craigslist.org/boa/d/san-juan-24-sailboat/6794615160.html

Had to laugh at this ad...https://austin.craigslist.org/boa/d/austin-25-ft-sailboat-7999/6811338659.html

Wait, this isn't mocking ads...

1
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for all of the good input. And Bull for the interior design input. I’ve sold all of my plaid clothing.

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Ajax said:

We have one in our shorthanded sailing club. Sails above its rating. Surprisingly quick for its size.

Thank You, Ajax.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Going to look at the C&C 24 today. If In good shape may offer $2,000.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Bull City said:

I'm prejudiced. The H-Boat rates around 189, but it will sail above that with good sails, smooth bottom, etc.

Are there any potential problem areas with the H Boat?  I scanned your thread showing the work on yours and was hoping you could give me an idea of what if any structural areas should be viewed closely once it is washed?  I do not want to miss anything when I go take photos.  Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gouv knows boats and is as good as it gets in boatwork. Honest to a a fault. I wish he hadn't mentioned Amistad as that is tempting.  I suppose the closing is just one more product of our wonderful DHS?  Vee haff vays to keep you zecure?  Security > Freedom  yeah, I know take it to PA. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Little Wood Boats said:

Are there any potential problem areas with the H Boat?  I scanned your thread showing the work on yours and was hoping you could give me an idea of what if any structural areas should be viewed closely once it is washed?  I do not want to miss anything when I go take photos.  Thanks

There are others here who are far more knowledgeable than me, but the main things are (1) look at the hull & deck for signs of delamination. Sounding the hull & deck (rapping with a little hammer and listen for a dead sound), look for springiness in the deck when you walk on it. These are signs. (2) Look at the tabbing around bulkheads, where it joins the hull and deck. This will give you an idea of whether it's worth getting (paying for) survey.

Read Don Casey's "Inspecting the Aging Boat."

https://www.amazon.com/Inspecting-Sailboat-International-Marine-Library/dp/0071445455/ref=sr_1_2?crid=352KP3ESPJNWK&amp;keywords=inspecting+the+aging+sailboat&amp;qid=1552755370&amp;s=gateway&amp;sprefix=inspecting%2Caps%2C151&amp;sr=8-2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bull City said:

There are others here who are far more knowledgeable than me, but the main things are (1) look at the hull & deck for signs of delamination. Sounding the hull & deck (rapping with a little hammer and listen for a dead sound), look for springiness in the deck when you walk on it. These are signs. (2) Look at the tabbing around bulkheads, where it joins the hull and deck. This will give you an idea of whether it's worth getting (paying for) survey.

Read Don Casey's "Inspecting the Aging Boat."

https://www.amazon.com/Inspecting-Sailboat-International-Marine-Library/dp/0071445455/ref=sr_1_2?crid=352KP3ESPJNWK&amp;keywords=inspecting+the+aging+sailboat&amp;qid=1552755370&amp;s=gateway&amp;sprefix=inspecting%2Caps%2C151&amp;sr=8-2

Thanks Bull City, his book is one I have in my boating library.  Would be a good idea to spend some time reviewing.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, woahboy said:

Thank you for all of the good input. And Bull for the interior design input. I’ve sold all of my plaid clothing.

Jim

Woabhoy,

Knowing what you are looking for, I would stay away from a J24. The cabin is so-so and the cockpit comfort sucks.

B.C.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

seafarer1.thumb.JPG.620eae966d7d9038bbf9feabd5c885ab.JPGWell, to make a long story short I bought the Seafarer today. After looking at the C&C 24 and knowing that it would probably take a lot of money or more sweat equity than I was willing to put into it, I passed. (Not gas. Even though I am an old fart. RE: Perry Sliver Class thread at the end) . The Seafarer has a relatively new bottom, as well as the  hull.  All of the standing rigging looks almost brand new, as well as running. This may sound funny but the PO got a marine A/C - Heater unit from his uncle's high end house boat and mounted it in the storage area of the fore peak. Sounds wimpy but it gets hot as hell down here in the Texas summers. Most importantly the Boss likes it. Not the fastest boat on the lake but for what we want to do it fits the bill nicely. And it is well built. Better be for displacing 4,900 lbs. Thanks to everyone that chimed in with some great suggestions as well as advice. I have contracted Bull to do the interior design. We will be working on this soon.
Jim
Pictures to follow if interested.

Going to name her The Gordon Wesley in honor of my dad.

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sorry mate, but you clearly don't understand this place. You're supposed to look at every boat in the world, get every shipping quote, solicit and ignore all the advice in the world, get to the stage where we start throwing peanuts, and then decide you'd be better off with an RV. 

Oh, I get it now. The Seafarer is the only one that none of us recommended . . . You're deep you are, deep . . .

Pish.

But well done.

The A/C is only powered at the dock?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Rushman said:

@hoppyneeds to read this

I'm in no rush, Rushman :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, hoppy said:

I'm in no rush, Rushman :P

I know, just pulling your chain :lol: 

How is your rehab going?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Rushman said:

I know, just pulling your chain :lol: 

How is your rehab going?

Not too bad. Avoiding going on the foredeck during races.

FWIW When I bought my Jeanneau, I flew down to Greece for 10 days and found the boat before I returned to work. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Seafarer is a good solid choice for the cruising couple on a budget. The LED lighting is nice, the a/c a lucky upgrade and the new electric panel cost hundreds of dollars. The way it was maintained makes it the easy choice for you. Congrats!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All this talk about buying boats got me hankering for another boat, so yesterday I decided to buy this one.

It’s been a zombie for 12 years and the owner realizes he got too deep in to see the way out. That’s where I come in...

C3B8D649-2C51-4E30-BA2B-EA3F27D5AC49.jpeg

7FB525AC-6C85-4398-8F8A-D0702B927E4B.png

  • Like 3
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

All this talk about buying boats got me hankering for another boat, so yesterday I decided to buy this one.

It’s been a zombie for 12 years and the owner realizes he got too deep in to see the way out. That’s where I come in...

C3B8D649-2C51-4E30-BA2B-EA3F27D5AC49.jpeg

7FB525AC-6C85-4398-8F8A-D0702B927E4B.png

Gosh, well done. What's her story?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats S4B..... What is she? Sorry I led you down this path.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Lanikaisailor said:

Congrats!  Best under 36hour thread ever.  Fun to watch and great info shared.

Mahalo

Thanks again for all the encouragement. It’s fun spending other peoples money. :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks like a fun and interesting project. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Mr. Ed said:

I'm sorry mate, but you clearly don't understand this place. You're supposed to look at every boat in the world, get every shipping quote, solicit and ignore all the advice in the world, get to the stage where we start throwing peanuts, and then decide you'd be better off with an RV. 

Oh, I get it now. The Seafarer is the only one that none of us recommended . . . You're deep you are, deep . . .

Pish.

But well done.

The A/C is only powered at the dock?

For now yes. I don't know the current draw. There are 2 practically brand new batteries on board. Apparently Seafarer offered a lot of options on this boat. This one did not come from the factory with the diesel inboard. (No old diesel stink). Batteries charge only on shore power but I am thinking maybe a solar panel. More important things, although minor, to get sorted.hvac.jpeg.a6f54576e8680884d0b50a625599b67c.jpeg
The mast is rigged for a stack pack. Just doesn't have the canvas part. That is one of the things at the top of the list. Again any opinions and suggestions are appreciated. Oh, question to the group. Should I post smaller images?

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Ajax said:

That looks like a fun and interesting project. 

Thank You, Ajax. I'm letting it all sink in now and I am not worried a bit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, woahboy said:

Thank You, Ajax. I'm letting it all sink in now and I am not worried a bit.

Good job and good name choice (my dad was Gordon also).  And A/C in Texas is almost a must.  - really helps keep boat dry as well. . 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And thank goodness this boat never had an inboard. No bad fuel smells. My big project, which isn't needed, is to find a way to run the A/C off of battery. I know, I am dreaming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, woahboy said:

And thank goodness this boat never had an inboard. No bad fuel smells. My big project, which isn't needed, is to find a way to run the A/C off of battery. I know, I am dreaming.

You are totally dreaming. Congratulations on the new boat, have fun!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, woahboy said:

And thank goodness this boat never had an inboard. No bad fuel smells. My big project, which isn't needed, is to find a way to run the A/C off of battery. I know, I am dreaming.

Run it off a portable generator, like a Honda or something.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Trovão said:

Run it off a portable generator, like a Honda or something.

Not in any anchorage I'm in, thankyouverymuch.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Ishmael said:

Not in any anchorage I'm in, thankyouverymuch.

He's on a lake in Texas. You'd never notice the generator noise over all the jetskis and wake boats.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s really not a noisy lake. And I like peace and quiet. Good suggestion but not for me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I want to add a small two burner stove. Which is safer, propane or alchohol?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...and simplest.

I had one of those on my Pearson 30 and lived aboard for a year. It was great, just took a little longer to cook than with propane. For a lake cruiser, it'll be perfect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/16/2019 at 6:36 PM, woahboy said:

Well to make a long story short I bought the Seafarer today. 
 

Nice boat, congrats!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Crash & Ajax thanks for the recommendation. Looks to be a winner! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, CruiserJim said:

Nice boat, congrats!

Thank you sir. She's a keeper. Until I get the bug for something bigger. It's always something with these money pits. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, woahboy said:

And thank goodness this boat never had an inboard. No bad fuel smells. My big project, which isn't needed, is to find a way to run the A/C off of battery. I know, I am dreaming.

Probably dreaming, yes. Even a small A/C unit draws 1000 watts/hr on average.  Deep cycle lead acid batteries store aprox. 22 watts/lb. with 50% available for use so you would need 90 lbs of batteries for each hour of runtime you want out of the A/C.  900 lbs for 10 hours.   If you went lithium things look up quite a bit and it starts to become realistic but the $ ramp up fast and would cost more than what you paid for the boat.

If you just want a couple of hours in the worst of the heat of the day, that can be do-able with three or four hundred pounds of batteries and a good inverter/charger.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank You, SB. If it gets too hot we can always head back to the dock and plug into shore power. Now it's time to start reading up on solar panels. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank You, Norse Horse. That and a good charge controller shouldn't break the bank. Any suggestions on a controller? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A sun awning + a few 12V DC fans for the cabin will make anything tolerable. 

If you live in a full AC world (home/car/store) you will never get acclimated to the heat and things will be tougher for you

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, woahboy said:

Thank You, Norse Horse. That and a good charge controller shouldn't break the bank. Any suggestions on a controller? 

Victron Blue Solar controllers. They even come Bluetooth enabled so you can check the status from your smartphone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Zonker said:

A sun awning + a few 12V DC fans for the cabin will make anything tolerable. 

If you live in a full AC world (home/car/store) you will never get acclimated to the heat and things will be tougher for you

Thankfully the PO installed 3 12v fans. They move the air nicely. I am sure we'll only run the A/C when we're down below sleeping. Thank You, Zonker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Victron Blue Solar controllers. They even come Bluetooth enabled so you can check the status from your smartphone.

Should I get a 12/24/48 volt controller?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thier Smart Solar MPPT 100/30 will handle up to 400W of solar into a 12V battery bank, or double that if you have a 24V battery bank.

Solar is sized mainly on the amount of input power you have from panels, if your batteries are wired for 12V, you'll need a controller that can handle it. The other voltages it can do won't matter.  The input voltage on that model is 100V so you can wire a coupe of panels in series for a higher input voltage. That usually gives you better efficiency, but if you have any partial shading, parallel wiring of panels can sometimes be preferable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, sbman said:

Thier Smart Solar MPPT 100/30 will handle up to 400W of solar into a 12V battery bank, or double that if you have a 24V battery bank.

Solar is sized mainly on the amount of input power you have from panels, if your batteries are wired for 12V, you'll need a controller that can handle it. The other voltages it can do won't matter.  The input voltage on that model is 100V so you can wire a coupe of panels in series for a higher input voltage. That usually gives you better efficiency, but if you have any partial shading, parallel wiring of panels can sometimes be preferable.

Well, I am on a "lake" in Texas so I don't have a need for a lot of charging power. Cell phone, laptop, stereo, etc. One cool thing that came with the boat is an unopened Raymarine I70 package for windspeed, direction, hull speed and water temperature but I am sure that doesn't draw a lot. Than You again, sbman.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Odd thing with the add-on bowsprit. Usually these are for using an asymmetric but in this case it looks like the forestay is attached to the bowsprit end so it'll be used for your working foresails. Not sure if the add-on sprits were designed for that. Looks like the prior owner took some extra steps to beef up the attachments, looks like the original tang is bolted to the underside of the sprit? I wouldn't call it a deal breaker, but I would check to see if he took any steps to strengthen the unit.

Seems like a lot of effort to gain so little in sail area.

You mentioned something about the rigging appearing newish. Any chance the entire rig was swapped out from some other boat?

Overall, though, a nice looking boat.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you, Sponge. The original owner was an engineer here in town and added that for a self tacking jib. It’s reinforced like a tank. Was just wondering if it would support an assym. No biggie if it wouldn’t work. I can always go conventional.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, woahboy said:

Should I get a 12/24/48 volt controller?

 

12 hours ago, woahboy said:

Well, I am on a "lake" in Texas so I don't have a need for a lot of charging power. Cell phone, laptop, stereo, etc. One cool thing that came with the boat is an unopened Raymarine I70 package for windspeed, direction, hull speed and water temperature but I am sure that doesn't draw a lot. Than You again, sbman.

Not sure how being on a lake makes much difference to your charging needs.

You might be surprised at your power requirements if you are planning overnight stays.  As well as those items you mentioned you have cabin lighting, 3 fans, nav and anchor lights etc etc. I doubt any of these have been upgraded to LED.

The starting point is the battery, make sure it has enough storage capacity to run everything on the boat all night without deep discharging. Next size your solar panel so that it can get most or all of that back in a normal days sunlight. A good controller is important and will usually come with a few 12v and USB charging points. MPPT enabled ones seem to get the best out of small solar set ups.

Think if you might want to add a 12V fridge in the future. Golden rule is keep the Admiral happy. If on your first overnight trip she is in the middle of cooking dinner and the lights and fans go off the only thing that will get cooked is you. :).

Have fun, it looks like a nice boat, a perfect starter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the good suggestions, paps. Forgot to mention that the PO did install some LED lighting. So, that’s a good starting point. I did pick up a Don Casey book on marine electronics so it’s time to get reading. Thanks again.

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, paps49 said:

 

Not sure how being on a lake makes much difference to your charging needs.

You might be surprised at your power requirements if you are planning overnight stays.  As well as those items you mentioned you have cabin lighting, 3 fans, nav and anchor lights etc etc. I doubt any of these have been upgraded to LED.

The starting point is the battery, make sure it has enough storage capacity to run everything on the boat all night without deep discharging. Next size your solar panel so that it can get most or all of that back in a normal days sunlight. A good controller is important and will usually come with a few 12v and USB charging points. MPPT enabled ones seem to get the best out of small solar set ups.

Think if you might want to add a 12V fridge in the future. Golden rule is keep the Admiral happy. If on your first overnight trip she is in the middle of cooking dinner and the lights and fans go off the only thing that will get cooked is you. :).

Have fun, it looks like a nice boat, a perfect starter.

@paps49The difference is, he will always be pretty close to a shore based charging source, if needed.

@woahboy That being said, don't underestimate the impact of charging personal electronic devices. When calculating my "energy budget" I shrugged those off, thinking the impact would be negligible. Boy, was I wrong. A "dead" smart phone or tablet pulls almost 2 amps. I have a phone and a Samsung tablet. My wife has an iPad Air and TWO iPhones- a personal phone and a work phone. One of those 5 devices is always charging, so there is an impact.

We had bought a couple of these to keep our phones and GPS topped up while kayak camping. We also found them invaluable to avoid killing the house bank on the Tartan:

https://www.goalzero.com/shop/switch-10-family/switch-10-multi-tool-solar-kit/

Last year, we anchored in an area where the water temperature was 92F degrees. This sent my 12v fridge into overdrive because the icebox is against the hull. Charging all the small electronics on the Goal Zero's allowed the fridge to hog the house battery and the main solar panel kept up with it. I also used the Goal Zero to recharge my VHF handheld unit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank You, Ajax. How many solar panels are you using, and how many batteries and their type? All of the batteries on the Seafarer will be house as there never was an inboard installed. A blessing really as I don’t have to worry about fuel odors. The boat came with a nice Tohatsu outboard.

Jim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ajax said:

@paps49The difference is, he will always be pretty close to a shore based charging source, if needed.

@woahboy That being said, don't underestimate the impact of charging personal electronic devices. When calculating my "energy budget" I shrugged those off, thinking the impact would be negligible. Boy, was I wrong. A "dead" smart phone or tablet pulls almost 2 amps. I have a phone and a Samsung tablet. My wife has an iPad Air and TWO iPhones- a personal phone and a work phone. One of those 5 devices is always charging, so there is an impact.

We had bought a couple of these to keep our phones and GPS topped up while kayak camping. We also found them invaluable to avoid killing the house bank on the Tartan:

https://www.goalzero.com/shop/switch-10-family/switch-10-multi-tool-solar-kit/

Last year, we anchored in an area where the water temperature was 92F degrees. This sent my 12v fridge into overdrive because the icebox is against the hull. Charging all the small electronics on the Goal Zero's allowed the fridge to hog the house battery and the main solar panel kept up with it. I also used the Goal Zero to recharge my VHF handheld unit.

Get a little lithium brick for the personal devices. Charge at home. Usually good for quite a few charge ups. If you have an inverter, charge the brick when running the engine...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Get a little lithium brick for the personal devices. Charge at home. Usually good for quite a few charge ups. If you have an inverter, charge the brick when running the engine...

We got those, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

Get a little lithium brick for the personal devices. Charge at home. Usually good for quite a few charge ups. If you have an inverter, charge the brick when running the engine...

No inboard. The boat never had one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, woahboy said:

No inboard. The boat never had one.

I think his comment was directed more at me. You can use the Goal Zero to charge the bricks on the water, though.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The most valuable device you can add is a battery monitor for your house bank. That will solve the mystery and tell you how much power you are using.  It will read real time live draw in amps and also add up consumption over time.  Since you can't see electricity you are flying blind without that information and making guesses.  The Victron BMV-712 Smart is an excellent monitor with bluetooth and and app for your phone, easy to install and setup.  You will also know when you are hitting the 50% point on the house bank and that you are dipping down into battery damaging territory. By the time the lights and fans stop, your battery has already suffered. Do that often enough and you'll be replacing the house bank.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Raz'r said:

Get a little lithium brick for the personal devices. Charge at home. Usually good for quite a few charge ups. If you have an inverter, charge the brick when running the engine...

No inboard. The boat never had one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks again for all of the great suggestions. I know it’s fun spending other people’s money. Just kidding. But y’all are teaching me a lot. But no suggestions for 3DI sails, please.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/18/2019 at 6:28 AM, woahboy said:

I want to add a small two burner stove. Which is safer, propane or alchohol?

We took the pressurized alcohol oven and stove out of our last boat and installed cupboards in the opening. We then bought 2 portable butane stoves. That allowed us to stow the stoves away when not needed, as well as giving us the versatility to cook in the cockpit or on the dock if we wanted to.

The problem with alcohol is that it is not very hot, so you wait a long time for your morning coffee! Butane, on the other hand has more heat energy than even propane.

https://www.amazon.ca/Coleman-2000020958-Butane-Electronic-Ignition/dp/B00VGEOJ5G/ref=asc_df_B00VGEOJ5G/?tag=googlemobshop-20&amp;linkCode=df0&amp;hvadid=292984996977&amp;hvpos=1o2&amp;hvnetw=g&amp;hvrand=16091516994815855604&amp;hvpone=&amp;hvptwo=&amp;hvqmt=&amp;hvdev=m&amp;hvdvcmdl=&amp;hvlocint=&amp;hvlocphy=9001547&amp;hvtargid=pla-350941734953&amp;psc=1#

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Raz'r said:

Get a little lithium brick for the personal devices. Charge at home. Usually good for quite a few charge ups. If you have an inverter, charge the brick when running the engine...

No inboard. The boat never had one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Jabber, will look into those. I saw a two burner as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Jabber said:
On 3/18/2019 at 9:28 AM, woahboy said:

I want to add a small two burner stove. Which is safer, propane or alchohol?

We took the pressurized alcohol oven and stove out of our last boat and installed cupboards in the opening. We then bought 2 portable butane stoves. That allowed us to stow the stoves away when not needed, as well as giving us the versatility to cook in the cockpit or on the dock if we wanted to.

The problem with alcohol is that it is not very hot, so you wait a long time for your morning coffee! Butane, on the other hand has more heat energy than even propane.

https://www.amazon.ca/Coleman-2000020958-Butane-Electronic-Ignition/dp/B00VGEOJ5G/ref=asc_df_B00VGEOJ5G/?tag=googlemobshop-20&amp;linkCode=df0&amp;hvadid=292984996977&amp;hvpos=1o2&amp;hvnetw=g&amp;hvrand=16091516994815855604&amp;hvpone=&amp;hvptwo=&amp;hvqmt=&amp;hvdev=m&amp;hvdvcmdl=&amp;hvlocint=&amp;hvlocphy=9001547&amp;hvtargid=pla-350941734953&amp;psc=1#

Think about your intended use.  The Origo unpressurized alcohol stove has some impressive BTU numbers, much higher than old school pressurized alcohol stives and higher than my Seaward propane stove and oven.  

For lake sailing and occasional overnights, a camp stove and a BBQ may be a better match for your needs.  Certainly cheaper.  On our first keelboat, we stopped using the pressurized alcohol stove and used a Coleman camp stove in the cockpit at anchor  and a Magna BBQ on the stern. Among other advantages, it summer it really helped to keep the cabin cooler.  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Innocent Bystander said:

Think about your intended use.  The Origo unpressurized alcohol stove has some impressive BTU numbers, much higher than old school pressurized alcohol stives and higher than my Seaward propane stove and oven.  

For lake sailing and occasional overnights, a camp stove and a BBQ may be a better match for your needs.  Certainly cheaper.  On our first keelboat, we stopped using the pressurized alcohol stove and used a Coleman camp stove in the cockpit at anchor  and a Magna BBQ on the stern. Among other advantages, it summer it really helped to keep the cabin cooler.  

The butane stoves are quite a bit less expensive. Perhaps the non pressurized alchohol stoves are safer?

At anchor heat may be an issue. But tied up at the dock not so much as the boat has A/C. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites