Ajax

Round the world nonstop on a (insert vessel here)

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I am always impressed by people who manage this feat and I do not mean to diminish their accomplishments in any way, however-

It's been done by an ever growing list of people. There is an entire planet out there, waiting to be experienced. By simply racing around the 5 capes, I think that many of these folks are squandering an opportunity to step onto land rarely experienced by human beings. Patagonia springs to mind (Yes, I know people live in Patagonia).

I think @B J Porter has it right- rather than sail around the world, he's sailing around *in* the world.

Now, people are doing nonstop circumnavs to set ever more obscure records- The oldest, the youngest, the first person to do it in a walnut shell pram, the first to do the Figure-8, etc. Of what value are these records?

Ah well... I don't wish to deny anyone the right to climb their own personal Everest but if I ever decide to circumnavigate, I would stop often and would probably not do the whole thing solo. I would explore the lands and meet people from other cultures and nations.

There are a lot of books about circumnavigations out there, but one of my favorite, is "The Log of the Molly Brown" written by the father of the previous owner of my boat. It's not the deepest book ever written, but it is a fun, funny and amazing story that inspires me.

https://www.amazon.com/Molly-Brown-Media-General-publication/dp/0878580352

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I think it comes down to the old dichotomy of whether the goal is the passage or the destination. For most of us cruisers, it would be the destination, along with the satisfaction of meeting the challenges of the passage. For the hard core solo circumnavigators of Moitissier's ilk, it is the beauty and solitude of long ocean passages, marked by the achievements of passing the great capes. To many of the later, records are secondary goals.

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Well, there are those who rock and mountain climb free solo, unroped, and those who don’t...those who only ski groomed runs at resorts, and those who do big, wild mountain backcountry skiing...those who sail and those who ride on cruise ships...those who, like 007, like their martinis shaken, and not stirred :-)  A chacun son goût.

A few years back, a guy and his wife blogged about a high latitude circumnavigation (s/v Tawodi), making only a few stops in places like Stanley (Falklands), NZ, Cape Town.  That seems like a reasonable compromise...it’s like the NWP.  Why rush through in a stressful summer one of the most beautiful places on the planet:  winter over and enjoy the majestic scene! :-)

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I think you have to do the capes to be put into the circumnav conversation with the earlier pioneers. 

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I will probably never sail around the world but this reminds e of the days I would go riding on my motorcycle. Joined a group and it seemed they were only interested in the destination. Usually a restaurant. I liked to look at a map for interesting backroads, good places to stop for taking pictures, etc. For me it’s the journey and the things you learn along the way. 

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I'm not saying that there's no value in the "passage" part. There definitely is, and I would enjoy the solitude of 1-3 weeks at sea. It's not just about the destination.  I want the meat and potatoes of sailing combined with the dessert of visiting new places.

I'm just saying that *for me*, there is little value in a painful, expensive, non-stop circle that bypasses everything. A solo, non-stop circumnavigation is just a huge, tough steak to chew on.

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This is the difference between running a 24 mile marathon or taking a few days to walk 24 miles and check out some shops, restaurants, and B&Bs on the route or the difference between taking a two week road trip from New York to LA or getting a copilot and trying to beat the Cannon Ball Run record.

Totally different operations going on for different reasons.

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1 hour ago, Ajax said:

I'm not saying that there's no value in the "passage" part. There definitely is, and I would enjoy the solitude of 1-3 weeks at sea. It's not just about the destination.  I want the meat and potatoes of sailing combined with the dessert of visiting new places.

I'm just saying that *for me*, there is little value in a painful, expensive, non-stop circle that bypasses everything. A solo, non-stop circumnavigation is just a huge, tough steak to chew on.

I get it.  But I suppose that for some folks who’ve already circumnavigated via the standard trade wind route, solo RTW nonstop is simply “the next challenge” - like transiting the NWP, or going around solo via trade wind route, or racing around instead of cruising or, like Webb Chiles, going around in a very small boat (having done multiple big boat voyages and, of course, an open boat voyage).  Solo nonstop RTW has crossed my mind for “one day” - but I’ve never done anything like that so not realistic any time soon, and it does sound very arduous and expensive...all depends what kind of experience you’re after.  It would certainly be a massive challenge - probably the largest any sailor is likely to ever undertake.  

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59 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

This is the difference between running a 24 mile marathon or taking a few days to walk 24 miles and check out some shops, restaurants, and B&Bs on the route or the difference between taking a two week road trip from New York to LA or getting a copilot and trying to beat the Cannon Ball Run record.

Totally different operations going on for different reasons.

Agreed.

For people like Jerome Rand who quietly circumnavigated for personal reasons with no record or fame intended, I get it. For him, it was a personal challenge that he wanted to complete, like the marathon.

There are people who set out to break ever more obscure, esoteric records. Those folks, I don't really understand. Some of the motivation seems to be at attempt to garner 15 minutes of fame. Is Socrates' primary motivation the "oldest to circumnavigate" record, or is her motivation just getting around the globe?  I dunno.

I suspect that my failure to understand is rooted in the fact that I have zero desire for fame or being known for anything.

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The weirdest thing to me about all the people doing non-stops alone is that I remember a brief time when more people had walked on the Moon than had singlehanded around the world. Sailors now have no idea what an extraordinary feat it was 50 years ago. Chichester got Knighted for doing it back then. Now it barely rates a mention in the sailing press.

Damn I'm old. :(

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I remember following the first (and far as I know only) round the world unrefueled flight and thinking "Cool record, but I would much rather stop and check out all the interesting places you are flying over".

People all have very different internal motivations. Whenever I see something amazing sailing by myself it makes me a little sad no one is there to see it with me. YMMV hugely on this point. 

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I think it might have something to do with the weird pathology some people have that turns every conceivable activity into a competition.

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24 minutes ago, toddster said:

I think it might have something to do with the weird pathology some people have that turns every conceivable activity into a competition.

Smart answer.

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4 hours ago, Ajax said:

For people like Jerome Rand who quietly circumnavigated for personal reasons with no record or fame intended, I get it. For him, it was a personal challenge that he wanted to complete, like the marathon.

A long time ago someone at Shearwater Yacht Club introduced me to an old codger (whose name I appropriately don't remember) as "the first sailor to solo circumnavigate the world and not write a book about it". He said it was just something he "had a mind to do" so he did it.

I re-read Slocum's Sailing Alone Around The World every few years; pretty amazing that he started it all.

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It depends how you view passages, I suppose. I find the idea of a nonstop round the world trip to be utterly unappealing and pointless, but that's my view on things. On road trips I tend divert from highways to eat at local restaurants, and I often take the scenic route. I'm out here to see things and experience things, not pace around my boat for six months, only showering when my own stink offends me too much. Sure you have lots of time to read and reflect, but you don't need to be on a moving sailboat off shore to get that.

It's either about getting there or being there. In this day and age, while nonstop around the world is still an achievement, it's not unique any more. It's been done enough so it's barely noteworthy except among people that follow and understand these things which is a very small segment of the population*. So it's basically a self challenge. I'm far too lazy for that sort of thing. And there seems to be no "getting there" or "being there" on a nonstop around the world anyway, since you end up back where you started without having seen much of anything on the way.

Passages are OK, but long distance sailing isn't why I'm out here. I view them as something to be covered as quickly and safely as possible before we can get on to something more interesting. In many ways I see passages like those long boring stretches of I95 that take up the space between the more interesting places. I don't hate them, but but don't love them or seek them out if I don't have to.

That's why ice cream comes in flavors. Though I really can't muster up much interested or excitement for these sort of adventures, beyond wondering what is the point of them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

* Though Rimas has shown there is a segment of the population you can shake down for cash with a sea story, no matter how unlikely and incompetent you are.

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7 hours ago, toddster said:

I think it might have something to do with the weird pathology some people have that turns every conceivable activity into a competition.

My wife's niece won that one in perpetuity years ago.

She was about 9 Y.O. and her parents were toilet training her little brother. He had just dropped his first one and they were heaping praise on him. Chris walked by, took a look and said "I can do a bigger one than that". :D

I can't see any possible way to be more competitive than that.

By the way, her father (RIP) told that story during his toast to the bride on her wedding day.

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Here is the greatest passage maker in the history of our sport. I can't know it, but I suspect that while he might have a very healthy ego, fame and notoriety are not prime motivators. I also suspect that the actual record or the win, while important to him, are secondary to the absolute satisfaction of accomplishing and executing this mad symphony of awesome motion and power. 

If you want to try telling him about the process, the destination, the points along the way, better brush up on your French. 

 

 

 

 

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16 minutes ago, fufkin said:

Here is the greatest passage maker in the history of our sport. I can't know it, but I suspect that while he might have a very healthy ego, fame and notoriety are not prime motivators. I also suspect that the actual record or the win, while important to him, are secondary to the absolute satisfaction of accomplishing and executing this mad symphony of awesome motion and power. 

If you want to try telling him about the process, the destination, the points along the way, better brush up on your French. 

 

 

 

 

Far be it from me to argue with someone about life choices.

But it does seem going RTW on that boat involves a lot less time smelling your own ass than on a Contessa 32.

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As kent_island_sailor so eloquently put it "Totally different operations going on for different reasons."

I have circumnavigated and I took my time doing it, visiting countries for extended stops and whiling away almost eight years, because that was my aim.  I also wanted the challenge, so we sailed east-to-west through Patagonia and onward.  The destinations and the passages meant different things to me but gave me just what I was looking for at the time.  Now, I find myself toying with the idea of a nonstop, single-handed circumnavigation, not to set records or win any sort of acclaim, but for myself.  Each person has different motivation and, no matter what it happens to be, at least it keeps them on the water and off the couch!

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23 hours ago, Ajax said:

...

There are a lot of books about circumnavigations out there, but one of my favorite, is "The Log of the Molly Brown" written by the father of the previous owner of my boat. It's not the deepest book ever written, but it is a fun, funny and amazing story that inspires me.

https://www.amazon.com/Molly-Brown-Media-General-publication/dp/0878580352

I enjoyed reading the book as much for the author's love life as his sailing adventure.

 

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22 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Is that the one where the guy takes off owing the IRS all kinds of money and then they confiscate his boat when he gets back?

Yes.

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12 hours ago, obelisk said:

As kent_island_sailor so eloquently put it "Totally different operations going on for different reasons."

I have circumnavigated and I took my time doing it, visiting countries for extended stops and whiling away almost eight years, because that was my aim.  I also wanted the challenge, so we sailed east-to-west through Patagonia and onward.  The destinations and the passages meant different things to me but gave me just what I was looking for at the time.  Now, I find myself toying with the idea of a nonstop, single-handed circumnavigation, not to set records or win any sort of acclaim, but for myself.  Each person has different motivation and, no matter what it happens to be, at least it keeps them on the water and off the couch!

Some people are content to do mellow single pitch (I.e., off the ground and back) rock climbing only on sunny summer weekends at their local rock climbing crag.  Others do that a while and get better and keep going and eventually think, hmm, I’m gonna try for all fourteen 8000 meter peaks in the world, maybe some solo and without supplemental oxygen.  Some —truly a select few— are simply driven and able to accomplish really hard and risky projects, like that, or a solo RTW nonstop.  

D8716876-B065-4E6F-B759-66CED1C4E457.jpeg

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I hate being cold, so I'll climb up some warm mountain maybe.. Sailing around in the southern ocean without heat just seems like a hate mission to me. YMMV

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Tall mountains are ALL cold at the top.

Hence the year round snow.

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1 hour ago, kent_island_sailor said:

I hate being cold, so I'll climb up some warm mountain maybe.. Sailing around in the southern ocean without heat just seems like a hate mission to me. YMMV

As an alpine climber or two has said, tongue in cheek, “It doesn’t have to be ‘fun’ to be fun.”

Separately, I’m trying to imagine how my standard diesel heater chimney would fare against deck-sweeping waves.

(Does anyone doing big Southern Ocean distances run heat on passage?  I somehow doubt it’s really possible?)

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6 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

As an alpine climber or two has said, tongue in cheek, “It doesn’t have to be ‘fun’ to be fun.”

Separately, I’m trying to imagine how my standard diesel heater chimney would fare against deck-sweeping waves.

(Does anyone doing big Southern Ocean distances run heat on passage?  I somehow doubt it’s really possible?)

Jerome Rand didn't have heat.

He just spent as much time belowdecks as possible, swaddled in mildewing blankets until they were nearly black with mold.

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I think that lot of the guys who do these long singlehanded sails on small boats are "spiritual". Not in the sense that they need to follow some organised religion to be happy but that they need solitude for some inner experience. In a way I see them as modern part-time hermits...

Looking at them under the prism of tradewind cruisers isn't really helpful IMHO.

As for the money aspect, going round non stop on a Contessa 32 must be close to the cheapest circumnavigation option.

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27 minutes ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

As an alpine climber or two has said, tongue in cheek, “It doesn’t have to be ‘fun’ to be fun.”

Separately, I’m trying to imagine how my standard diesel heater chimney would fare against deck-sweeping waves.

(Does anyone doing big Southern Ocean distances run heat on passage?  I somehow doubt it’s really possible?)

I think you would need an Espar/Webasto type heater. Along those lines, someone who cruised Antarctica made their exhaust pipe run back and forth the length of the cabin to get more heat below when running the engine.

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51 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Tall mountains are ALL cold at the top.

Hence the year round snow.

That is why I climb the short ones ;)

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The idea of taking a formula 40 or something along those lines and doing a circumnavigation seems like a great challenge to me. Using all the available weather forecasting and skirting around perceived areas that could cause you an issue while trying to keep things moving as fast as possible seems like a great way to spend a couple of months to me. Then again so does taking a nice comfortable cruiser and seeing all sorts of places I normally wouldn't have a chance to experience. To me they both have their merits for totally different reasons. 

 

edit: something like this 

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Which is why I want to join the Royal [insert place name] Yacht Club, to have that kind of sailing, er, pardon me, yachting experience.  Blue blazer with embroidered gold crest thing on left breastpocket. White collared shirt with ascot. Yachting visor cap.  Pressed khaki trousers.  Uptight accent. Pursed lips. Cool gin and tonic in hand, with the boat never heeling much so as not to spill my drink.  They’re all valid sailing experiences (some more appealing than others...)  Then, after that, the big sufferfest Singlehanded Transpac Race in an ultralight displacement Moore 24.  I want to live them all :-)

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Impetuous,

That Trispirit is a cool boat, it was fun to follow their story but hadn't thought of them for some time.  Such a lot of work they put into the refit.    It would be a great (and much less expensive) alternative to that new Rapido 40.  Too bad its so far away.  Their last blog post was Nov of 2018.  Seems a shame they are selling.  I guess they are on to other things, I wonder what.  Good luck to them.

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15 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

As an alpine climber or two has said, tongue in cheek, “It doesn’t have to be ‘fun’ to be fun.”

Separately, I’m trying to imagine how my standard diesel heater chimney would fare against deck-sweeping waves.

(Does anyone doing big Southern Ocean distances run heat on passage?  I somehow doubt it’s really possible?)

Works fine if you go on a 6000 tonne icebreaker. Bonus, you get to look out the bridge windows at the waves sweeping the decks instead of cowering below while they go over the top of you.

FKT

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17 hours ago, eric1207 said:

Impetuous,

That Trispirit is a cool boat, it was fun to follow their story but hadn't thought of them for some time.  Such a lot of work they put into the refit.    It would be a great (and much less expensive) alternative to that new Rapido 40.  Too bad its so far away.  Their last blog post was Nov of 2018.  Seems a shame they are selling.  I guess they are on to other things, I wonder what.  Good luck to them.

It really is a well thought out conversion they did on that boat and there is a real beauty to it's simplicity and functionality. Someone out there will get a great deal on that boat.

 

Can't say I didn't spend some time charting out a course from Thailand and estimate how many days it would take to get up to the PNW.... 

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On 3/20/2019 at 7:09 PM, impetuous_donkey said:

The idea of taking a formula 40 or something along those lines and doing a circumnavigation seems like a great challenge to me. Using all the available weather forecasting and skirting around perceived areas that could cause you an issue while trying to keep things moving as fast as possible seems like a great way to spend a couple of months to me. Then again so does taking a nice comfortable cruiser and seeing all sorts of places I normally wouldn't have a chance to experience. To me they both have their merits for totally different reasons. 

 

edit: something like this 

Cruising a formula 40 is not for the faint of heart!

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1 hour ago, Panoramix said:

Cruising a formula 40 is not for the faint of heart!

Just a dream.... but it's fun to think about

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Speaking of rounding —or, in this case, re-rounding— Cape Horn...this just in.

Well, Mo is around and has passed for the second time this passage under Cape Horn, thus completing her circuit of the Southern Ocean via the Capes, non-stop and solo. It’s been 110 days since we saw Cape Horn for the first time, and better than 15,000 miles at 45°S and and higher have passed under Mo’s bum in the interim.” https://www.latitude38.com/lectronic/2019/03/22/#randall-reeves-re-rounds-cape-horn

(Now en route north, I think, headed toward the Northwest Passage this summer.  Hardly a low-budget endeavour, but an impressive Corinthian effort by what seems to be a “regular guy” with some cash, out for a huge adventure.  Success at transiting through the NWP is, I suppose, very uncertain, since ice conditions vary year to year...and soloing there must be difficult.)

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I have the exact same book, but mine is a little more beat up and has a $1.50 sticker in the top right corner.

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1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Speaking of rounding —or, in this case, re-rounding— Cape Horn...this just in.

Well, Mo is around and has passed for the second time this passage under Cape Horn, thus completing her circuit of the Southern Ocean via the Capes, non-stop and solo. It’s been 110 days since we saw Cape Horn for the first time, and better than 15,000 miles at 45°S and and higher have passed under Mo’s bum in the interim.” https://www.latitude38.com/lectronic/2019/03/22/#randall-reeves-re-rounds-cape-horn

(Now en route north, I think, headed toward the Northwest Passage this summer.  Hardly a low-budget endeavour, but an impressive Corinthian effort by what seems to be a “regular guy” with some cash, out for a huge adventure.  Success at transiting through the NWP is, I suppose, very uncertain, since ice conditions vary year to year...and soloing there must be difficult.)

awesome, thanks for posting

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27 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

I have the exact same book, but mine is a little more beat up and has a $1.50 sticker in the top right corner.

What can I say except, “LOL”!

:-) Love this place (usually). 

Here are two more books I’ve got on board that I’ve yet to get through (I love wild, far away places).  (Whiskey bottle a prop for effect only; haven’t touched it.)

B5FEEC2C-1AE6-4C13-946E-5B35F4A68237.jpeg

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1 hour ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

What can I say except, “LOL”!

:-) Love this place (usually). 

Here are two more books I’ve got on board that I’ve yet to get through (I love wild, far away places).  (Whiskey bottle a prop for effect only; haven’t touched it.)

B5FEEC2C-1AE6-4C13-946E-5B35F4A68237.jpeg

The Tilman books are wonderful, but unfortunately the combined edition which you have eliminated a lot of his original photos. I've a complete set of the original publications, not necessarily first editions, but good reading copies with all the pix.

It's worth avoiding the book club editions, incidentally, as they also eliminated a lot of pix and the font is smaller, making them harder to read with old eyes.

Tilman was a very, very tough man.

FKT

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10 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

The Tilman books are wonderful, but unfortunately the combined edition which you have eliminated a lot of his original photos. I've a complete set of the original publications, not necessarily first editions, but good reading copies with all the pix.

It's worth avoiding the book club editions, incidentally, as they also eliminated a lot of pix and the font is smaller, making them harder to read with old eyes.

Tilman was a very, very tough man.

FKT

Indeed Tilman was very, very tough, in spite of his money.  (There are some great bios about him, but he was, of course, a great writer himself.)  Now, by contrast, imagine how tough the Siberian reindeer people are. :-)

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5 minutes ago, SimplyDabbling said:

A recent article from Sail Magazine on Jerome Rand's journey.

May give a little insight into this question!

 

https://www.sailmagazine.com/cruising/a-nonstop-solo-circumnavigation

Jerome came to speak at my shorthanded sailing club this past fall.

What I loved about his talk, is that he is totally un-jaded and all the wonder was fresh in his face. He was a lively and engaging speaker, and very articulate. Webb Chiles is awesome and 100% has my respect but after 5-6 times around the marble, he's kind of done it all.

I think the coolest moment in Jerome's talk, was how he spent a really rough night in the southern reaches somewhere near New Zealand with huge waves. He said he came on deck the next morning to find an ink blot like a smear from a huge windshield wiper from a squid that had been tossed against his mainsail and got hung in some lines or something.

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Thoughts after reading the article...nearly running out of water...losing 50 lbs in body weight...being terrified/awed by massive waves with troughs big enough to fit a football field in...

To quote hardcore alpinist Mark Twight (read his autobiography...), “It doesn’t have to be fun to be fun.”  But you do have to ‘enjoy’ suffering, because suffer you will.  (There’s a well-known early, like 1930s, Austrian mountaineer [whose name escapes me now] who used to cycle around in winter gloveless, and carry snow in his hands, to toughen himself.  Seems like something like that wouldn’t be amiss as training for a solo nonstop RTW !)

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Am I the only one here that has a job? i.e. I would LOVE to go circumnavigate the universe but, until I can get some free time (and money...) it aint gonna happen I think...

Maybe I'm just being realistically pessimistic and my sense of adventure is DEAD :lol: Books are certainly a way to experience that however.

Also, Pogo 50. 

~him

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I've been thinking about this topic for a while, but I think I've figured it out: my preferred boat for sailing around the world non stop is  Adix!

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7 minutes ago, alphafb552 said:

I've been thinking about this topic for a while, but I think I've figured it out: my preferred boat for sailing around the world non stop is  Adix!

THIS Adix?! Sounds... Perfect. 

Adix-2-1400x933.jpg

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28 minutes ago, alphafb552 said:

Yep, that's the one!

Adix2.jpg

In one his his videos, Leo, the fella in WA state shows him as the deck boss on this beauty. I'll pitch in a few quid if I can go with you.

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40 minutes ago, woahboy said:

In one his his videos, Leo, the fella in WA state shows him as the deck boss on this beauty. I'll pitch in a few quid if I can go with you.

Always welcome - I gather she would need a sizeable crew...

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On 3/21/2019 at 5:04 AM, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

As an alpine climber or two has said, tongue in cheek, “It doesn’t have to be ‘fun’ to be fun.”

Separately, I’m trying to imagine how my standard diesel heater chimney would fare against deck-sweeping waves.

(Does anyone doing big Southern Ocean distances run heat on passage?  I somehow doubt it’s really possible?)

Well, I don't ... but then I don't go around the world just NZ/Chile Jan/Feb low 40's a couple of times. Temp stays around 15º C... not unpleasantly cold and you don't wander around naked when you go below....

Chilean channels a bit different... 'winter'...  ie April through September..is the best sailing season. Temps can stay around 0~2º C for weeks on end. Some keep their boats like saunas... horrible... I just run the Espaker when I get up in the morning and then again in the evening.... 12º C is as warm as I ever want it below..

Deck sweeping waves? You have been reading too many books.....

**This** is a patagonian chimney... Mani Suanto's boat... bit of a Finnish legend but I don't think he writes books about what he has done...

P6120467.jpg

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20 hours ago, him&her said:

Am I the only one here that has a job? i.e. I would LOVE to go circumnavigate the universe but, until I can get some free time (and money...) it aint gonna happen I think...

Maybe I'm just being realistically pessimistic and my sense of adventure is DEAD :lol: Books are certainly a way to experience that however.

Also, Pogo 50. 

~him

No,  you're not.  I'm chained to my desk like a baby veal a considerable amount of the year. The goal is to pay off the house and have a retirement fund that allows me to cruise at least 6 months per year. Winter over in the Caribbean/Florida and summer in the Chesapeake-New England range. Maine is high on my list of interests.

Do I worry that I might not survive until retirement? Yeah, some.

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10 hours ago, Cisco said:

Deck sweeping waves? You have been reading too many books.....

**This** is a patagonian chimney... Mani Suanto's boat... bit of a Finnish legend but I don't think he writes books about what he has done...

 

That is a crazy chimney! :-). To keep heater going in face of williwaws/huge down drafts that would extinguish stove?

Well, I thought we were talking RTW nonstop (Ajax’s maybe plan once he cuts his desk chains :-) - so, deck sweeping waves, as in southern Indian Ocean.  (E.g., Tony Abhilash, Susie Goodall etc. in Golden Globe Race a few months ago: pitchpole/broach/dismastings in heavy seas: https://www.sail-world.com/news/210702/?source=email )

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Deck sweeping waves can be found pretty much anywhere offshore sometimes - BTDT - but I sure would think that rounding the Capes in the Roaring 40s would have a bunch of them and you would be wet a lot.

I think I am too social to be a solo RTW sailor. All my best memories of offshore sailing involve my mates and then there was the drunk moped off the dock thing and........ :lol:

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Here are my choices for Round the World yachts.

Schooner Atlantic

1608912503_SchoonerAtlantic.png.3ad562da8ca1cec1e80d50f5b6cc9ecc.png

 

SuperYacht A

Actually, due to my respiratory problems, and the fact that I hate crowds, I'd prefer this motor yacht over the Schooner Atlantic. We need a MotorYacht Anarchy forum!

511449189_SuperyachtA.thumb.jpg.7944c286c186d08c32b572653d770507.jpg

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On 3/19/2019 at 7:48 AM, Ajax said:

I am always impressed by people who manage this feat and I do not mean to diminish their accomplishments in any way, however-

It's been done by an ever growing list of people. There is an entire planet out there, waiting to be experienced. By simply racing around the 5 capes, I think that many of these folks are squandering an opportunity to step onto land rarely experienced by human beings. Patagonia springs to mind (Yes, I know people live in Patagonia).

I think @B J Porter has it right- rather than sail around the world, he's sailing around *in* the world.

Now, people are doing nonstop circumnavs to set ever more obscure records- The oldest, the youngest, the first person to do it in a walnut shell pram, the first to do the Figure-8, etc. Of what value are these records?

Ah well... I don't wish to deny anyone the right to climb their own personal Everest but if I ever decide to circumnavigate, I would stop often and would probably not do the whole thing solo. I would explore the lands and meet people from other cultures and nations.

There are a lot of books about circumnavigations out there, but one of my favorite, is "The Log of the Molly Brown" written by the father of the previous owner of my boat. It's not the deepest book ever written, but it is a fun, funny and amazing story that inspires me.

https://www.amazon.com/Molly-Brown-Media-General-publication/dp/0878580352

Excellent points - I find that I enjoyed my racing a lot more when I wasn't in contention for the points championship, and could focus instead on the parts of the event I really liked - drinking in the pits with the other racers after going fast.  

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1 hour ago, QBF said:

 

 

SuperYacht A

Actually, due to my respiratory problems, and the fact that I hate crowds, I'd prefer this motor yacht over the Schooner Atlantic. We need a MotorYacht Anarchy forum!

I don't think there are many powerboats that have the range to do a non stop circumnavigation... If power is the way you want to go, you're looking at giving the USNavy a call to borrow one of their nuclear powered ships...

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No one here seems to know about "El Jefe" aka Jeff Hartjoy who did a solo non stop circumnavigation in his ketch rigged Baba 40. Jeff has been around the Horn twice and is off once again by himself in the South Pacific. Jeff did add a hard dodger to the Baba. an awful looking hard dodger. But I'm sure he has learned to love it by now.

 

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10 minutes ago, Bob Perry said:

No one here seems to know about "El Jefe" aka Jeff Hartjoy who did a solo non stop circumnavigation in his ketch rigged Baba 40. Jeff has been around the Horn twice and is off once again by himself in the South Pacific. Jeff did add a hard dodger to the Baba. an awful looking hard dodger. But I'm sure he has learned to love it by now.

 

Read his book. Enjoyed the heck out of it. And I am sure he is more interested in functionality than looks with the type of sailing he does. 

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2 hours ago, Bob Perry said:

No one here seems to know about "El Jefe" aka Jeff Hartjoy who did a solo non stop circumnavigation in his ketch rigged Baba 40. Jeff has been around the Horn twice and is off once again by himself in the South Pacific. Jeff did add a hard dodger to the Baba. an awful looking hard dodger. But I'm sure he has learned to love it by now.

 

Don't underestimate us Bob, we were all rooting for him, following all the updates you could provide here!

Whatever happened to that old headsail that he had to keep patching up? I seem to remember there were calls for him to sell pieces of it as memorabilia of his fantastic voyage.

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10 minutes ago, alphafb552 said:

Don't underestimate us Bob, we were all rooting for him, following all the updates you could provide here!

Whatever happened to that old headsail that he had to keep patching up? I seem to remember there were calls for him to sell pieces of it as memorabilia of his fantastic voyage.

Jeff’s commentary/logs were fantastic reading when Bob posted them.  Informative and humorous - gave a real insight into his “psyche” during the voyage - he seems to be irrepressibly optimistic, a massively useful quality to have for that undertaking!

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Alpha:

I think Jeff cut that genny up and gave away patches of it with his books.

 

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An old San Juan 24.

- Rimas Meleshyus, 2013 

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On 4/12/2019 at 12:36 AM, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

That is a crazy chimney! :-). To keep heater going in face of williwaws/huge down drafts that would extinguish stove?

Well, I thought we were talking RTW nonstop (Ajax’s maybe plan once he cuts his desk chains :-) - so, deck sweeping waves, as in southern Indian Ocean.  (E.g., Tony Abhilash, Susie Goodall etc. in Golden Globe Race a few months ago: pitchpole/broach/dismastings in heavy seas: https://www.sail-world.com/news/210702/?source=email )

To stop rachas filling your cabin with soot the trick is to also draw combustion air from outside the cabin.... I've seen it done but dont ask me to describe it... you can also get thingummies that go in the chimney....

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Here is the latest from Jeff Hatjoy:

 

Marshall's to Mazatlan, Mexico. Days-40-41-42.

Total miles sailed so far=5,669 nm .(in miles-6523)
Miles sailed over past 3-days=424 nm (in miles-487)

Day-40.
24hr.Run=154 nm. Pos. Lat.30*08' N. Long. 118* 45' W.
Weather: Wind=15-35 kts. N. Seas=10-18 feet. Speed=7 kts.
Cabin temp.=64*. Bar=1016 mb. down 4-mb Course=130 T.

The Rest of the Story.
Today finds us in deteriorating conditions. The gale is moving upon us, approaching down the coast from California. The amazing thing is that I have listened to numerous May Days off the California coast and messages from US Coast Guard that Epirbs have been set off by various boats. Much of this is happening before the "Gale" reaches Sailors Run.
Today the "Gale" engulfs us. I'm running a reefed main and genoa about 50% rolled out and it has become to much. I scramble on deck and role the Genoa all the way in, so now we have just the main up and slip below to have my morning coffee. Soon I decide to have my shower a once every 5-days event. The main reason being that a large wave had broken over the stern of Sailors Run filling the cockpit and drenching me to the skin.
Once out of the shower the likes of which no human being would except ashore I feel refreshed and great. I sit with my coffee cup in hand and realize this is not working as I'm rounding up in the gusts of 35 knots and the staysail needs to go up to Give Sailors Run Balance. "Shit" I'm clean and dry and once again must venture top side. I strip to just my jockey shorts as I'm running out of dry alternative clothing and pop on my mustang suit.
Once on deck I hoist the stay sail increasing our speed to way to much, then drop the main all the way down. Now we have a manageable sail plan for the Gale Force conditions.
Once below I watch our boat speeds and even though we are hitting 11.5 kts surfing down the larger waves for the most part it looks do able. The really cool thing is after all this time out on deck I never got hosed down by a huge breaking wave, and many were lurking about.
Just Getting there El Jefe'.

Day-41.
24hr.Run=137 nm. Pos. Lat.28*40'N. Long.116*55'W.
Weather: Wind= N.25-35 kts. Seas=10-18 ft .Speed 6-kts
Course:124*T Cabin Temp at 7am-62* Bar:1015 mb.down1 mb.

The Rest of the Story.
This day we sailed under stay sail alone for the entire day, and simply enjoyed a great sail in pretty heavy seas. Dinner was a tuna sandwich and I have found I prefer the Spam fried up with breakfast rather than for dinner. Nothing broke so little to report about on this day.
Just rolling down the Baja Coast El Jefe'.

Day-42.
24hr.Run: 133 nm. Pos. Lat.27*16'N Long.115*00'. N.
Weather:12-25 kts. From North.Seas:8-10 feet N. Speed =6kts
Course=127*T. Cabin Temp at 7 am=64*.Bar:1012 mb. Down 3 mb.

The Rest of the Story.
Today I switched up to the Genoa from the stay sail as winds were down a little and decided to leave the main down as I was sailing deep to maintain my course and the main would have blanked the Genoa setting into motion a bunch of uncomfortable sounds that make getting rest below tough.
I had been in my bunk about 1-hour when the AIS-Alarm went off. I struggled to escape my dream world for what ever was to come next.
I got up staggering around the cabin to get myself in front of the AIS. The alarm was a-bit more alarming than usually as I had two ships approaching from the South on my starboard side and three ships coming up astern from the North. The ship that triggered the alarm was 8-miles out doing 16 kts and appears that he will run me down. Fortunately, we are going the same direction so I still have 42-minutes to live.
I grab the VHF radio mike and hail the named vessel and after several minutes he answers. I say,that it looks like we are going to be passing very close,"Do you see me?" There is a pause and he comes back, Yes, I see you and will be passing on your starboard side. I question starboard side as I know there are already two ships there and they will be within three miles of me and there is nobody on my port side. Now, we have yet another pause, then at last he says "Oh" I see more clearly now I will pass you on the port side. I say,
"Thank you and I will maintain my course" as I have little choice being in the center of a BaHa Coast Sandwich. It all went down well and the 800 ft cargo vessel passed one mile to port of me.
These last miles seem to be proving to be very challenging.
Trying to just get in safely, El Jefe'.

Image may contain: ocean, sky, outdoor, water and nature
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On 3/20/2019 at 12:33 PM, kent_island_sailor said:

I think you would need an Espar/Webasto type heater. Along those lines, someone who cruised Antarctica made their exhaust pipe run back and forth the length of the cabin to get more heat below when running the engine.

I don't think you could carry enough fuel to make much of a difference. We had an Espar on our Bristol 45.5 when we lived onboard for two winters in NYC, not exactly the coldest place on Earth and we were always dry of course. Wonderful machine but I bought 20 gallons of fuel (half diesel and half kerosene) every two weeks or so. When we did our rtw we stayed in warm places. The only place that was cool (not cold) was the SW corner of South Africa and it felt cool only because we had had such warm conditions further east. Foul weather gear tended to be a bathing suit during the day.

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I watched a Tom Cunnlife video on his solid fuel stove. He burns coal or charcoal.

I wonder if coal has a higher energy density and if you could carry enough onboard to make a difference.

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54 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I watched a Tom Cunnlife video on his solid fuel stove. He burns coal or charcoal.

I wonder if coal has a higher energy density and if you could carry enough onboard to make a difference.

Interesting point, there is a well written wiki article on energy density : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_density

With an interesting graph (below), wood isn't here but it is at 18MJ/Kg (About where glucose is on the horizontal axis) and coal between 10 and 20. So unfortunately not, nevertheless most boats are badly insulated so I imagine the solution could be on this side. Make a sandwich hull with a 100mm thick balsa sandwich and bob is your uncle!

Energy_density.svg

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1 hour ago, Panoramix said:

Interesting point, there is a well written wiki article on energy density : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_density

With an interesting graph (below), wood isn't here but it is at 18MJ/Kg (About where glucose is on the horizontal axis) and coal between 10 and 20. So unfortunately not, nevertheless most boats are badly insulated so I imagine the solution could be on this side. Make a sandwich hull with a 100mm thick balsa sandwich and bob is your uncle!

Energy_density.svg

Ah, if you look, Anthracite coal is very high at 70.  You're looking at bituminous coal.

I wonder which Tom is burning in his stove and if Anthracite coal is even available for purchase?

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2 hours ago, Ajax said:

Ah, if you look, Anthracite coal is very high at 70.  You're looking at bituminous coal.

I wonder which Tom is burning in his stove and if Anthracite coal is even available for purchase?

Good point.

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Polyester rates better than anticipated. Polyethylene too. Looks like you could power an auxillary pretty well off Aquafina bottles and old Hawaiian shirts.

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9 hours ago, Ajax said:

Ah, if you look, Anthracite coal is very high at 70.  You're looking at bituminous coal.

I wonder which Tom is burning in his stove and if Anthracite coal is even available for purchase?

Sure it is (available). Several of the folks in the shipyard here burn anthracite all winter in their boats (and in some workshops). Comes from eastern Pennsylvania, sold by some local fuel companies and at least one old-time hardware store where you shovel it yourself and drive across their big scale. 

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9 hours ago, Ajax said:

Ah, if you look, Anthracite coal is very high at 70.  You're looking at bituminous coal.

I wonder which Tom is burning in his stove and if Anthracite coal is even available for purchase?

Sure you can buy anthracite coal. Maybe not in Antarctica, but plenty in Pennsylvania.

https://elligsontrucking.com/

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15 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

I don't think you could carry enough fuel to make much of a difference. We had an Espar on our Bristol 45.5 when we lived onboard for two winters in NYC, not exactly the coldest place on Earth and we were always dry of course. Wonderful machine but I bought 20 gallons of fuel (half diesel and half kerosene) every two weeks or so. When we did our rtw we stayed in warm places. The only place that was cool (not cold) was the SW corner of South Africa and it felt cool only because we had had such warm conditions further east. Foul weather gear tended to be a bathing suit during the day.

Reminds me - here’s a good article on cold weather cruising everyone will enjoy :-)

Trevor explained the steps involved in making pancakes. "First melt some ice for water. To start the kerosene stove even the preheat alcohol has to be preheated next to the lantern before it will burn. Chisel off a chunk of frozen olive oil. Then melt the batter in a double boiler of water. Fry the pancake. Then melt the frozen jam in the double boiler. Then eat quick before it freezes up again." ‘

https://www.atomvoyages.com/articles/sailor-interviews/105-iceman.html

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7 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Reminds me - here’s a good article on cold weather cruising everyone will enjoy :-)

Trevor explained the steps involved in making pancakes. "First melt some ice for water. To start the kerosene stove even the preheat alcohol has to be preheated next to the lantern before it will burn. Chisel off a chunk of frozen olive oil. Then melt the batter in a double boiler of water. Fry the pancake. Then melt the frozen jam in the double boiler. Then eat quick before it freezes up again." ‘

https://www.atomvoyages.com/articles/sailor-interviews/105-iceman.html

I just read that interview on the Iceman. Just incredible.

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9 hours ago, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

Reminds me - here’s a good article on cold weather cruising everyone will enjoy :-)

Trevor explained the steps involved in making pancakes. "First melt some ice for water. To start the kerosene stove even the preheat alcohol has to be preheated next to the lantern before it will burn. Chisel off a chunk of frozen olive oil. Then melt the batter in a double boiler of water. Fry the pancake. Then melt the frozen jam in the double boiler. Then eat quick before it freezes up again." ‘

https://www.atomvoyages.com/articles/sailor-interviews/105-iceman.html

Now I *really* want the Fisher with nice central heat and hot showers!

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By that chart we should all be burning aluminium for max efficiency. 

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32 minutes ago, Elegua said:

By that chart we should all be burning aluminium for max efficiency. 

Not really. It burns so hot and fast it would burn right through the stove.

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1 hour ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Not really. It burns so hot and fast it would burn right through the stove.

Yeah, aluminium fires are very exciting - especially when mixed with water.