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1 hour ago, Cazzate said:

Almost a Farr IMOCA 60 

Yes it's set up like an Imoca bar the single steering wheel at the back which throws me. The coachroof speaks being protected from the elements like an IMOCA. Could it be drawings of the new Hugo Boss? Off course not. 

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Please stop the madness

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2 hours ago, terrafirma said:

Yes it's set up like an Imoca bar the single steering wheel at the back which throws me. The coachroof speaks being protected from the elements like an IMOCA. Could it be drawings of the new Hugo Boss? Off course not. 

I don't think that's a single wheel, I think there's one each side but its tucked in just behind the coachroof so the helm can duck when a wave rolls over but be protected from the elements most of the time.

The bow has overtones of the Farr 400 dreadnought look.

Overall, it's a render of something that will look very little like that when or if it is ever made.

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Is that the yellow boat Loick P has been testing over in France?

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Not as ugly as the Sunfast 3300...

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1 hour ago, Raz'r said:

Not as ugly as the Sunfast 3300...

True very true

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It's obviously a comedy routine... " Corporate sponsorship potential in Australia and globally is substantial. " :lol:

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7 hours ago, mcexley001 said:

Good work..! Fascinating project. I love the bit, In Certain Conditions it could be leading the 30m Maxi's...!  It also says funding the design work? I wonder who is doing this?

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3 hours ago, Third Reef said:

It’s very narrow 

Yeah the foils provide the stability so in non foiling conditions less drag.

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I wonder how well it will foil in a confused sea, we’ve all been tossed around like corks offshore and we’ve seen how well foilers go on relatively calm seas but just how well will the foils work in 10m+ Bass Strait swells?

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6 minutes ago, TheUltimateSockPuppet said:

I wonder how well it will foil in a confused sea, we’ve all been tossed around like corks offshore and we’ve seen how well foilers go on relatively calm seas but just how well will the foils work in 10m+ Bass Strait swells?

No different to Hugo Boss sailing around the world in the Imoca Class. So she will be a 50 footer. Maybe Mr Buckland would be better off buying a used Imoca 60? He jumped on the canters early too.

https://www.fishingboating-world.com/n/Exciting-new-design-at-Hamilton-Island/-18729?source=google.au

 

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5 hours ago, terrafirma said:

Yeah the foils provide the stability so in non foiling conditions less drag.

Interesting. So why do mini's with foils seem be scows ? 

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1 hour ago, Third Reef said:

Interesting. So why do mini's with foils seem be scows ? 

This article explains why. 

Dario Valenza is Australian Sailing + Yachting's technical contributor and runs Carbonic Boats, which makes an interesting A Class and also produces other high-tech design elements. See more at www.carbonicboats.com. Dario writes:

The short answer is more righting moment, both across the boat and longitudinally. For a given overall beam and keel weight, a scow bow gives more volume away from the centreline as well as more volume ahead of the centre of gravity.

Instead of only having outboard volume from the middle of the boat to the transom as on a pointy boat, with a scow you have it all the way along. This means that the centre of buoyancy moves outboard further when you heel, giving a higher metacentre, or more leverage for the keel and boat mass to exert righting moment.

If sail area is unrestricted, more righting moment means you can carry more sail for a given windspeed. Similarly, downwind you can press harder without burying the nose. 

The above only considers hydrostatics. When you look at the dynamic situation, the scow also gives more planing area. But this is secondary since ordinary Minis had no problem planing. Maybe a scow can plane a bit sooner. 

Another secondary advantage is that you have more volume for water ballast.

I am not up to speed with the Mini rules, but if they have a static heel limit with ballast loaded, then a scow will get more righting moment from a similar water ballast arrangement to a conventional peer. 

The clever thing about a scow is that it obtains the extra righting moment without big changes in trim with heel. You don't get the tendency that wedge-shaped boats have to trim bow-down when heeled. Though recent progress in chined hull design has helped deal pretty effectively with the warping of the waterplane with heel, scows don't have to deal with it at all. 

Which brings us to the downsides. The single biggest handicap is additional wetted area when upright. Once powered up the waterline gets narrower, but at zero heel you have a canoe body with disproportionately wide and shallow sections.

A conventional boat can shift weight forward to unstick the transom. A scow is harder to trim and does not have the narrow forward sections of a conventional hull. 

Also the blunt bow does give more resistance in some wave conditions and more windage when sailing upwind. Some consideration must also be given to the fact that the keel root is very close to the surface when heeled. Finally, a scow hull uses more material than a conventional one so it will be stiffer but heavier. 

In the end the outcome is in great part rule-dependent. The Mini is a short light boat with unrestricted sail area, so adding righting moment usually pays because it allows you to carry more canvas. Some of the extra sail area offsets any drag penalty paid for the extra righting moment. The rest is a net gain.

Another consideration is that with good weather routing, most time on the course can be spent sailing downwind in breeze where the drawbacks of the scow are smaller. 

You might be interested to know that RC 10 Raters went through a scow 'trend' in (I think) the 1970s. Possibly around the time the Moths did. http://www.radiosailing.org.au/our%20past/Frank%20Russell.pdf. Notably the 10 Rater rule allows you to trade waterline length for sail area.

Also interesting is that the 10 Raters could get away with very low freeboard like the lake scows, but for a different reason: The lake scows sail mainly in flat water but the 10 Raters had no crew to keep dry. 


Read more at http://www.mysailing.com.au/news/scow-bows-more-righting-moment-and-better-downwind-speed#3r47bwJrUBurx4o9.99

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That is what I call a good foil design.  Lots of horizontal to provide maximum lift and righting moment. And then the vertical part that acts as a dagger board to make the boat shoot through the water like a dart.  Well done.

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Gents & ladies,

Here to provide some accuracy....or at least good estimates.

To help, a few key points:

1. It's roughly the same beam as a tp52, but when foiling, the RM increases to around 2x the TP.

2. Also ~ 1500 kg lighter than said TP.

3. Crew numbers might be 7 or 8, so human provisions for 48 hours Cat 1/2 Are light.

4. We neglected pics of rudder foil, so here is the v1 pressure distribution and foil geometry.

Anyhow, most questions happily answered here.

AB

Rudder Tfoil.png

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Good interview if you can get past the gulls and saw.

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Fantastic interview on the foiling progression.  If only the Figaro 3 had used this design.

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