Sign in to follow this  
89Tiger

J35

Recommended Posts

Looking for a club racer / light weekend cruiser and have found a J35 at what appears to be a very good price.   Good rigging, sails, etc. appears to have been well used, but also well maintained.

“Cheap” price is because of a reported “high moisture content” found by owner after he bought it a couple of  years ago.    

Question - how high is high? A 35 year old boat is going to have moisture, but it shouldn’t be out of life should it?    

Im going to make the 10 hr trip to see it for myself - any key advice from some of y’all with good experience on these J boats would be appreciated. 

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've had two "older" jboats. a 30 and a 35. both of these boats had moisture content to varying degrees. both boats had wet core under the primaries and under the genoa car tracks. I had all of that removed and the void filled with solid glass.

the spots in the hull that bumped the meter were not significant. what is significant to me might be different for you. but I didn't feel it was worth the trouble to go to any extreme measures to remedy these spots on either boat. And neither boat ever seemed to get any worse of suffered any catostrophic failure. I think it's quite possible to scare yourself away from what could be a pretty good boat..

both of these boats also had some blistering. I had a couple yards beg me to do a major workover of the bottoms that would have cost damn near as much as I paid for the boats. I found it far more cost effective to pop them and patch locally whenever I had the boat hauled for a bottom paint.

 

your milage may vary

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with bump n grind don't let some wet readings deter you from a good boat. Obviously size and location may change your comfort level. 

I have an expensive moisture meter that I use for work (not boat related) and had a J30 for 10 years. During that entire time there was a section of deck that showed moisture. I removed all the deck hardware in that area and dug out the surrounding balsa core through the bolt holes. The balsa was dry and looked brand new. Filled the holes and area of removed core with resin. Redrilled the holes and never had an issue. Meter still showed the area as wet. Never figured it out. Maybe a bad mix of resin during the building that never fully cured? Who knows.....but the core was dry and the deck was solid. I would also think this is an exception as I have had other J Boats with wet core. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Moisture readings are tricky things.  We had a surveyor tell us to walk away from a J/36 that he deemed was essentially sopping wet, all over the hull. We figured that if it was as wet as he said, the multiple freeze/thaw cycles we'd had through the winter would have blown the laminations apart - and there was no delamination in the hull. So we brought in another surveyor.  He put his moisture meter inside the hull, where there was no paint...and no moisture. Fittings in the cabin top had caused delamination and rot there, but we determined that we could fix that ourselves.  We got the price lowered considerably because of the reports, and bought the boat 22 years ago.  We like passing Beneteau 36.7's and beating J/109's on handicap when we don't beat them boat for boat,.  It's also great to have a boat big enough to go places and have fun cruising too.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My vote is to do it. I bought a J35 last year and spent the first season just getting stuff sorted out. Do get a survey. I just finished prepping and painting bottom and can't wait to get sailing again. Good luck!

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not so sure the J35 is the right boat for what the OP is looking to do.

And I'm a huge fan and proponent of the boat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love my J/35 and the peeps in the local fleet.  Most J/35 owners are mad about the boat because it sails damn well.  

OTOH, it's a lot of work getting 8 regular crew to race well, both in terms of numbers and the choreography required.  It's also worth evaluating sail costs if you plan to race seriously - one design or in a highly competitive PHRF fleet. If you're casual about racing,  you could probably race PHRF okay with the less costly sort of laminates and make life easy with a furler, and a white #1 sail.  If you are real competitive or decided to try some OD racing (and we'd welcome you to Fleet 7 on the Chesapeake) it probably takes proper racing sails or some very fresh white sails. 

On the gripping hand, the first time you turn to windward with the #1 up and some weight on the rail, or the first time you're heading downwind 12.5 knots on an incredibly stable platform in 25 knots breeze, the boat will make perfect sense and the shortcomings wont seem to matter so much.    

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/12/2019 at 10:42 PM, Bump-n-Grind said:

I've had two "older" jboats. a 30 and a 35. both of these boats had moisture content to varying degrees. both boats had wet core under the primaries and under the genoa car tracks. I had all of that removed and the void filled with solid glass.

the spots in the hull that bumped the meter were not significant. what is significant to me might be different for you. but I didn't feel it was worth the trouble to go to any extreme measures to remedy these spots on either boat. And neither boat ever seemed to get any worse of suffered any catostrophic failure. I think it's quite possible to scare yourself away from what could be a pretty good boat..

both of these boats also had some blistering. I had a couple yards beg me to do a major workover of the bottoms that would have cost damn near as much as I paid for the boats. I found it far more cost effective to pop them and patch locally whenever I had the boat hauled for a bottom paint.

 

your milage may vary

 

We have the same thing on rocket #48, the yard wanted to do all this stuff stripping it, etc. No, just clean-up where the blisters are and we will do the same again next time, like we always have.

We just cleaned-up a couple of spots of soft core on the deck this year and applied the Kiwi Grip on her for the second time, the first coat lasted almost 9 years (we were a little slow in freshening it up), this on a boat that is in the Florida sun 365 days a year.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4/15/2019 at 6:30 PM, Bump-n-Grind said:

I'm not so sure the J35 is the right boat for what the OP is looking to do.

And I'm a huge fan and proponent of the boat.

Thanks for the input and feedback - Bump-n-Grind - really helpful.

i found a very, very nice condition Laser 28 with a trailer that is about perfect for my needs (wants) and potential crew. 

I finally realized that the J35 would be excellent for Charleston harbor - but pretty much too much boat for the lake.   Too bad - made contact with a former owner of the J35 in Chicago who confirms it is an excellent boat - just too much for my needs- not to mention sail $$$

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, 89Tiger said:

Thanks for the input and feedback - Bump-n-Grind - really helpful.

i found a very, very nice condition Laser 28 with a trailer that is about perfect for my needs (wants) and potential crew. 

I finally realized that the J35 would be excellent for Charleston harbor - but pretty much too much boat for the lake.   Too bad - made contact with a former owner of the J35 in Chicago who confirms it is an excellent boat - just too much for my needs- not to mention sail $$$

congrats on the Laser. I think you'll be a lot happier with it for a few years.

a bit weird trying to talk someone out of a J35, but I think in this case, it was the right thing to do :wacko:

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When the going gets weird, Bump turns pro.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there is that

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had mine for 23 years,  Spots have tested moist since I bought her.   Did core samples and the balsa was dry as a bone, still metered as wet.   I did to the bottom peel to stop blisters about 10 years ago. No more blisters. It was a lot but not much more than a new sail at the time here in W. Michigan.   I keep a dehumidifier on the boat at all times and store inside heated in the winter.  Have had a few spots on the deck over the years that I repair as they show up.  Pretty much normal maintenance on a 34 year old boat.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two questions: First, in a 1983 J35, is it a 2gm or 3gm Yanmar? Engine plate is blank and no other identifying info. The impeller I bought is listed for both models. Second question-I have two planks that run down the center of the cabin sole. They are both ten inches wide, 1/2 inch thick and one is sixty inches long. I didn't measure the second, but it looks approximately 36 inches long. They are soft and I want to replace with synthetic. I am looking at plas teak. Any other ideas? Thanks in advance. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a J 35 for sale in the area. The owner is moving up to a J 120.
The boat has a forward V-Berth. It was rigged for offshore and has Refrigeration. Some new sails too.
It would make a great cruiser racer.

He had it on Craig's list but I cannot find it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Look into a J-37, I had one, more cruising comfort same or better speed and pointing then a J-35 , just a thought!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/13/2019 at 12:31 PM, Tack nazi said:

Two questions: First, in a 1983 J35, is it a 2gm or 3gm Yanmar? Engine plate is blank and no other identifying info. The impeller I bought is listed for both models. Second question-I have two planks that run down the center of the cabin sole. They are both ten inches wide, 1/2 inch thick and one is sixty inches long. I didn't measure the second, but it looks approximately 36 inches long. They are soft and I want to replace with synthetic. I am looking at plas teak. Any other ideas? Thanks in advance. 

Most likely the 2GM if it is an 83.  That was the first production year and they started with the 2GM but Yanmar discontinued and replaced with the 3GM in 84-85   I used to have more precise information on this but couldn't put my hands on it now.  If you call J Boats in Newport they used to have all the records if you know your hull number. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How are your math skills?  If you count the injectors on the engine it will either be 2 = 2GM, or 3 = 3GM.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Math skills suck and so do my diesel engine repair skills.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, DrewR said:

How are your math skills?  If you count the injectors on the engine it will either be 2 = 2GM, or 3 = 3GM.

That's right class one injector per cylinder

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 5/16/2019 at 5:17 PM, lartaunt said:

Most likely the 2GM if it is an 83.  That was the first production year and they started with the 2GM but Yanmar discontinued and replaced with the 3GM in 84-85   I used to have more precise information on this but couldn't put my hands on it now.  If you call J Boats in Newport they used to have all the records if you know your hull number. 

Hull 48 from '84 has a 3. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this