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Boat repair kit

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(not sure if this should go in repair anarchy or gear anarchy so I'm sorry if I guessed wrong...)  At thistle nationals last year, I ended up with a rather major repair needed to the wood of my boat (fortunately my crew found it during the practice race and repaired prior to any catastrophic failure.)  First off, HUGE thanks to the couple dudes who helped me out.  I love racing in a fleet where people are willing to be late to dinner to help get you on the water!  It got me thinking however.  Had it not been for a couple guys with the resin, solvent, and knowledge I needed, I'd have been out of luck and possibly unable to race.  I want to build a repair kit to bring with me to events that will functionally get us on the water until I get home and can fix it properly.  It'll hopefully keep me out of trouble, AND possibly be able to return the favor if any other unprepared sailor is caught in a world of hurt.  What should be in that kit?  My boat's Glass and wood, so no motor or electronics.  And I'm not worried about spare cleats, blocks, or lines.  I've got all that covered.  Here's my thought.  What would you add or subtract?

Acetone

West System Epoxy (with the fast hardener)

light weight filler for fairing

heavy duty filler for repairing

Assorted Sandpaper

Mixing cups

stir sticks

Brushes

Spreader

syringes

6 inch fiberglass tape

Varnish

brushing thinner

Thanks!

 

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I'd actually suggest polyester resin + catalyst for fast repairs. You can adjust the amount of catalyst to make it kick very fast for fast repairs. Not as sensitive to mix ratios as epoxy when you are in a hurry.

If you have access to electricity, add an extension cord and a heat gun too. Can really speed a cure up. And a sander.

I'd also add a yard of 6 oz cloth. Good for a large crash that puts a dent or hole in the hull.

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My epoxy bag has travel shampoo bottles full of resin and no fewer than three different hardeners. It's not always about how fast something needs to be done, but the needed pot life and conditions. If you're out in the blazing sun, you will need a slower hardener for almost everything.

I use Raka epoxy and carry the cold weather hardener (super fast), a normal one (forget which), a slow one and a non-blushing one. Mixed by volume in various sizes of plastic measuring cups. Also in the bag are spice shakers full of the various fillers I use. Cabosil, milled glass, chopped glass fibers, glass microspheres at a bare minimum. Sometimes wood flour or phenolic microspheres, though I use them less.

Missing from your list: gloves.

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Get a toilet bowl wax seal/doughnut at the hardware store and keep it in a ziplock bag. They are mushable/malleable/moldable and allegedly works great for temporarily sealing cracks and leaks. Yes, it's waxy and might impede later epxoy adhesion. Acetone should clean up the residue. It's for emergency repairs, not deliberate Gougeon emulation. I kept one in a bag on my boat for a few years but the Texas heat turned it into a soft serve greasy turd, so I tossed it. Rochester heat won't be an issue.

Snubs  

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Some peel ply would be a good idea. 

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Interesting thread. My biggest problem when putting together an epoxy kit for the R2AK was how to meter the epoxy. I ended up choosing 207 hardener because the 3 to 1 ratio is easier to meter than 5 to 1 and I took the graduated medicine cups and larger 12 oz graduated cups to measure with. WEST used to sell tiny digital scales (and maybe still do) and if I had gone that route I could have used 205 hardener. I also had underwater epoxy, 5 minute, and G-Flex. I used only the 5 minute and G-Flex. I also had glass, carbon, and peel ply in my kit for bigger repairs, but only had about a pint of epoxy, so still a pretty small kit.

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If I want no-worry mixing, I just use Six-10. 

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Yeah, I keep that on my dink. It's great for emergency patching of holes in PVC tubes. Don't ask how I know.

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Thanks for the info guys!  I’ve never really done repair that requires wetting out glass so I’m not familiour with Polyester Resin.  I’m researching it a bit and it looks like there’s laminating and surfacing resin.  I’m guessing 1 has the wax the other doesnt.  IF you were to keep this in i a kit, would you go un-waxed and have a thing of the wax additive rather then both types?  Does the peal ply get rid of the need for the wax?  Also, do you think I should throw gelcoat in or is that something you’d hold off on till you get home?  Finally, in looking at the polyester resin they talk about freshness being important.  How long does the stuff last?  Would it be bad to take and pour some into a smaller container?  Looks like it’s really only sold in gallons or bigger and I’m not sure i would need that much with me.  Thanks again!

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Heat gun,100 ft drop cord,nitrle gloves,cordless drill,basic hand tools,cordless saws(sawzall Milwaukee tools hacksaw).Plus your list 

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Gorilla Tape, seizing wire, SplashZone underwater epoxy, maybe some gauze, ball bearings.

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There is a Walmart near everywhere. 

A stash of whatever little things you can lose or break is nice . 

 

Your best defense against regatta breakdowns is a decent maintenance program 

if you race Sailboats you spend a smal fortune per regatta just to be there. 

That ten year old Laser is still a great boat but it WILL let you down once in a while.

Your 60 year old Thistle must be thoroughly inspected not as a chore but as a passionate hobby. Driving to Sandusky to sail with 113 other  Thistles includes a whole lot of preparation and although the right hotel room and restaurant is nice, the weekend is about SAILING!!!

do something about that wiggly thing, the chafed thing, the crack, the really old wire with the gottchas, 

And regrease  all those trailer bearings, replace the tired wood and carpet 

If you need that kit, the weekend is already on life support 

 

 

 

 

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19 minutes ago, Gouvernail said:

There is a Walmart near everywhere. 

ERRR NO There are NO Walmarts in the Eastern Caribbean. 

I think Puerto Rico is my closest.

 

 

 

 

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15 hours ago, Gouvernail said:

There is a Walmart near everywhere. 

A stash of whatever little things you can lose or break is nice . 

 

Your best defense against regatta breakdowns is a decent maintenance program 

if you race Sailboats you spend a smal fortune per regatta just to be there. 

That ten year old Laser is still a great boat but it WILL let you down once in a while.

Your 60 year old Thistle must be thoroughly inspected not as a chore but as a passionate hobby. Driving to Sandusky to sail with 113 other  Thistles includes a whole lot of preparation and although the right hotel room and restaurant is nice, the weekend is about SAILING!!!

do something about that wiggly thing, the chafed thing, the crack, the really old wire with the gottchas, 

And regrease  all those trailer bearings, replace the tired wood and carpet 

If you need that kit, the weekend is already on life support 

 

 

 

 

I agree with you to a point, though I’ve had plenty of damage over the years due to racing not my lack of preparation or Maintenance. I think people who do boat projects at regattas are idiots (though I feel a bit guilty for saying that since I don’t know their life so perhaps that was the only time they had, and I’m ultimately just happy to see them there.).  My boat is fairly meticulously cared for and fairly new.  However, I’ve hit my board on a rock at a venue I’d never been, or when he water level was lower then I’m used to, or had the trailing edge of my rudder clipped.  I’ve seen people get their rails cracked in a botched crossing, or dropping the main sheet in a RIPPING puff that blew out the side of their traveler as the car shot to leeward.... things DO happen and parts/boats do break.  That’s the stuff I’m trying to prepare for.  That and I’m kind of the type of guy who likes to sort through my crap and be purposeful with what I bring to an event and how I’m organized.  If i were to take a pole of racers who go to week long events, I’m sure MOST of us have crap with us in our vehicles that we think we’ll need at some point, but honestly never really have needed in the past.  I just like to give thought to what I’ve got with me rather then carrying box’s of crap.

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Waxed polyester resin is fine for small repairs. Shelf life is about 1 year +.

It's cheap enough that you can do a bit of practice learning how to wet out fiberglass. Tons of YouTube tutorials too.

No gelcoat. Gelcoat is for making a nice shiny repair. This is for a patch job.

 

 

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For mixing epoxy I always use a cheap digital scale. Don't have to fuss with pumps or syringes. For a R2AK race where grams count I'd take a 2:1 epoxy like System 3. Much more forgiving of mix variation. I would also take a graduated paint mixing cup like you get at at autobody shops. Works with 2:1, 3:1,5:1 whatever, and can be reused

 

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I keep a tube of this on the boat and another one at home. Lasts forever.

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1 hour ago, Zonker said:

Waxed polyester resin is fine for small repairs. Shelf life is about 1 year +.

It's cheap enough that you can do a bit of practice learning how to wet out fiberglass. Tons of YouTube tutorials too.

No gelcoat. Gelcoat is for making a nice shiny repair. This is for a patch job.

 

 

The hardener for polyester resin isn't as forgiving. It would be worthwhile buying a new one every 3 months or so. Write the date on it so you can throw it out before you are tempted to use it, or learn to enjoy stripping uncatalyzed resin from your project.

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Another answer for the OP.

ask to

look at everybody’s Regatta stashes and then write an article for the Bagpipe, 

it wouid  he a truly fine service 

maybe i should write one for the Laser Sailor 

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Yeah I forgot MEKP has a lifespan. It lasts much longer at cooler storage temps so don't leave it in a hot car for months.

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