Jules

What Tools and/or Materials Am I Missing?

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It's a 3-1/2 hour drive to the boat, one way, so I want to bring along everything I can think of to do the job.  It's been about 45 years since I last did this kind of work so my memory is a bit hazy.

We will be installing two instrument transducers and one bronze Groco through hull fitting with flanged seacock.   So I'll be drilling three holes.  The hull is solid fiberglass.  I will also be drilling one hole above the waterline for a discharge on the AC. 

The list so far includes:

  • 20v battery drill
  • assortment of hole saws
  • files, rasps & saws for shaping the fairing block
  • 3M 4200
  • caulk gun
  • sandpaper - 80-180 grit
  • putty knives

I have a pretty good assortment of hand tools that will be along for the ride.  If I can get everything installed on Saturday we may paint the bottom Sunday.  Here's what I'll be bringing for that:

  • Masking tape
  • Roller pan & rollers, plus a handle extension
  • Paint brushes
  • Respirator
  • Sandpaper

I'm sure I'm missing something.

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you're *sure* the hull is solid? I always like to have some sort of 2 part epoxy on hand just in case something goes pear shaped. the west 610 in a caulking tube is a little pricey but dead simple to use. buy some extra mixing tips, since they are not reusable and you're likely to only use a little epoxy at a time.

if the hull were cored, I'd want a hex key or a bent nail to clean out core material to fill with epoxy, but it doesn't sound like you'll need that for this job.

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duct-tape-fixes-everything_fb_1187858.jp

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plenty sixpacks and whatever it takes not to inhale whatever you drill out, it's nasty stuff, some people even get big problems if it just touches their skin... so if you have a John Doe willing to do the job for a nickel and a dime, let him have at it, sit back and enjoy the next sixpack

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Nitrile gloves, several pair. Rags, Acetone.

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Plenty of data on your phone so you can come back on here when it goes wrong and ask us more dumbass questions. 

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Credit card and a reservation at a nearby hotel with a poolside bar. This is what boatyards are for.

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Also important what not to bring:

Your wife, Clean's space cookies, bed bugs, and rain.

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Some paint thinner, because it will inevitably go somewhere it shouldn't.

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Geezus you guys are off your game..... the title alone is like a hanging curveball the size of a grapefruit!

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2 minutes ago, BillDBastard said:

Geezus you guys are off your game...

Geezus has nailed it, and no, I am not off my game, this time.

 

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Electrical connectors, wire strippers, shrink tube, soldering iron, solder, etc. 

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a map to the nearest home depot/west marine

kneepads

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14 hours ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Also important what not to bring:

Your wife, Clean's space cookies, bed bugs, and rain.

 

Is that like Mary Jane brownies???

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Can you guys get those big tubs of man sized industrial baby wipethings. They are the bomb.com for cleaning up sealant. 

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6 hours ago, billy backstay said:

 

Is that like Mary Jane brownies???

Guess so, I myself never progressed much beyond hash brown potatoes of the Mountain House variety.

For a while it looked like  @Mr.Clean was going to be the Mary Jane of SA, but the Ed must have gotten sick of his recipes, and seems to have pulled the thread.

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On 4/19/2019 at 3:16 PM, Jules said:

It's a 3-1/2 hour drive to the boat, one way, so I want to bring along everything I can think of to do the job.  It's been about 45 years since I last did this kind of work so my memory is a bit hazy.

We will be installing two instrument transducers and one bronze Groco through hull fitting with flanged seacock.   So I'll be drilling three holes.  The hull is solid fiberglass.  I will also be drilling one hole above the waterline for a discharge on the AC. 

The list so far includes:

  • 20v battery drill
  • assortment of hole saws
  • files, rasps & saws for shaping the fairing block
  • 3M 4200
  • caulk gun
  • sandpaper - 80-180 grit
  • putty knives

I have a pretty good assortment of hand tools that will be along for the ride.  If I can get everything installed on Saturday we may paint the bottom Sunday.  Here's what I'll be bringing for that:

  • Masking tape
  • Roller pan & rollers, plus a handle extension
  • Paint brushes
  • Respirator
  • Sandpaper

I'm sure I'm missing something.

Check specs on 4200 vs. 5200.  5200  is considered permanent and is rated for below waterline, 4200 is "removable" and not rated for below waterline.  http://sailanything.com/post/48445963210/4200-or-5200-what-should-you-use

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A left-handed metric adjustable wrench.

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Like this one:

  • Stahlwille 4026-10 Single End Adjustable Left Handed Spanner, Grade 10, 29mm Diameter, 257mm Length, 71mm Width
 
    
 

Stahlwille 4026-10 Single End Adjustable Left Handed Spanner, Grade 10, 29mm Diameter, 257mm Length, 71mm Width

 

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Far more important to not forget the walking stick, defibrillator, notebook, ballpoint, blue pills and anusol cream.

 

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17 hours ago, voodoochile said:

Check specs on 4200 vs. 5200.  5200  is considered permanent and is rated for below waterline, 4200 is "removable" and not rated for below waterline.  http://sailanything.com/post/48445963210/4200-or-5200-what-should-you-use

3M considers 4200 to be suitable for below the waterline. I'm going with them. https://www.3m.com/3M/en_US/company-us/all-3m-products/~/3M-Marine-Adhesive-Sealant-Fast-Cure-4200FC/?N=5002385+3291170224&rt=rud

Quote

Excellent for Applications Above and Below the Water Line
3M™ Marine Adhesive Sealant Fast Cure 4200FC chemically reacts with moisture, delivering flexible bonds with good adhesion to wood, fiberglass, gelcoat, plastics and metals. This multi-purpose adhesive bonds dissimilar materials, forming a watertight, weather-resistant seal on joints and boat hardware above and below the waterline. The flexibility of 3M™ Marine Adhesive Sealant Fast Cure 4200FC (PDF, 443.47 Kb) allows for joint movement and stress caused by shock, vibration, swelling or shrinking. Permanently elastic, this medium strength sealant adheres to a wide variety of substrates and allows for disassembly of parts after prolonged use.

 

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17 hours ago, voodoochile said:

Check specs on 4200 vs. 5200.  5200  is considered permanent and is rated for below waterline, 4200 is "removable" and not rated for below waterline.  http://sailanything.com/post/48445963210/4200-or-5200-what-should-you-use

4200 is rated for below the waterline. permanence vs removability has nothing to do with that.

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5 minutes ago, Ishmael said:

I would go with the voice of experience and listen to @Ishmael. Just my 2 cents worth.

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I met two guys at the boatyard, one finished building his boat a few years ago.  The other is about half way done now.  Both preferred Sikaflex 291 over either 3M 5200 or 4200 for thru hull installations.  The guy who is still building is a cabinetmaker by trade and, like most cabinetmakers, is a perfectionist.  He gave me some 1/4" G-10 for making backer plates.  For the flanged seacock he recommended epoxying 1/4-20 studs into the G-10.  So I used (3) 1/4-20 flat head stainless screws and drilled through the backer plates, countersinking the screws in one of them. 

I must have worked for over an hour trying to get all the gelcoat off the inside of the because I just couldn't get a clean surface.  The cabinetmaker lent me an die grinder to clean up the surface for epoxy.  Then I epoxied the plates together and bedded them with thickened epoxy to the inside of the hull.  It's only for a 3/4" raw water inlet but it looks like the sturdiest thru-hull installation anywhere on the boat.  The manufacturer didn't install any flanged seacocks.

Anyway, that's how I left it yesterday.  Next weekend we trek across Florida again to hopefully finish up so we can splash it and get her home.

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magic silver tape...  

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@Jules I guess I lost track of your other thread. What boat did you end up with?

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9 hours ago, Blitz said:

Beer

Or, if you really want to fuck it up, rum.

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On 4/27/2019 at 12:38 AM, Ishmael said:

Or, if you really want to fuck it up, friends to help, along with the rum.

FIFY

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