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I am considering buying a Seaclipper 28 timaran - opinions, experiences etc are welcome

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In order to finally change my present boatless status, I am considering buying a Seaclipper 28 timaran that appeared at the local market at a reasonable price.

Going to take a look at the boat on Sunday to check its (her?) conditions.

Opinions, experiences, criticisms and whatever from the Multihull Anarchy crowd are welcome.

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1 hour ago, Rasputin22 said:

I have one. Post photos after you go look at her. What coast are you on? 

And, what abou the boat, in general? Performance, "accomodations", ease of sailing, maintenance...

Ditto on the pics.

Not in the US. Inland southern Brasil.

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Accomodations is a bit of a stretch. I've spent a couple of nights aboard and will be taking my spring cruise in a couple of weeks. Cockpit is tight for two. Hard boat to get in and out of a dock or slip (offset outboard!) but I have no problem singlehanding it. I do better sailing to a dock than with the motor since it wants to turn when first engaging the motor due to the offset thrust of the motor. Motors well with a Yamaha 4 stroke 8HP until it gets pretty choppy but you are better off sailing by then anyway. I want to build a small doghouse/pilothouse over the companionway but need to work out better sheeting system first. Centerboard up and down are the biggest hassle and I need to improve on that first.

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No direct experience, just via a friend. 

Some of the seaclippers had centerboard trunk rot issues. And his CB was heavy heavy, he replaced with a foam board. Said it really helped.

Others i've read about had deck rot issues (not unlike balsa boats, ply boats can rot if fresh water seeps in)

I think they're damn cool.

 

There's a long thread about them on Cruising Forum. 200 pages?

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My centerboard is very heavy and a tight fit. I ground down the sides to get a looser fit but it is still tight now. May be easier to make a new narrower boat that has a shorter chord as well. As designed about 10 inches of the board sticks out of the bottom of the hull when fully up. That really makes a difference when beaching an if flush with the bottom I could beach at high tide and winch the boat into my yard for cleaning and bottom painting. Shallow draft as it is but that 10 inches of the board hanging out makes a big difference. Not rot in my case or whole boat for that matter. It was built by a certified Airframe and Powerplant Mechanic who had a really cool little seaplane landing/base up on the Hudson RIver. All Brunzeel ply and Doug Fir and Sitka Spruce and it looks like he spent 10 years working on it in his hanger during the winters. He would roll it out of the shed when the summer seaplane taxi services start up. He also had summer camping trailer lots on adjacent to the seaplane ramp and the neighborhood went all gentrified and the new city weekend fat cats tried to run all the long time summer camper lease holders out. The old Eagle stood up for his people and he deeded the whole place to the town on the provision that when the old farts in the campers died off that the whole place would become a waterfront park. He finally finished the SeaClipper and headed downriver with the goal of gunkholing in the Bahamas. Poor guy just barely made it to salt water and put into Sandy Hook, New Jersey to prep for a Spring passage to the Islands. He had a heart attack in the Marina an his family had one of his seaplane buddies fly down and pick him up and bring him back up home and he never saw his boat (or salt water!) again. Family left the boat in NJ for three years and somehow it survived Hurricane Sandy in the marina. A lifeguard from about 40 mile south on the Jersey shore bought the boat for marina fees and put a brand new Yamaha on it and motored it down to his beach town and he let it sit on a mooring for a couple more years. When I bought it I could tell that the boat had really never been sailed due to the way the sheets and halyards had been rigged and the sails were still crisp and tied up in the bags with sailcloth strips having been folded and rolled on the loft floor and never even out of the bag before I got to it. I'm a bit ashamed I haven't sailed it as much as I should have or sorted out the rigging/rudder/centerboard issues.

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Friend of mine built a beautiful example way back in 1984, all very fair with West products holding it together.

With a tight interior I recall sleeping in a dome tent on the net with my wife at the 1985 Annapolis Multihull Symposium where we first saw Transient.

My friend and his wife are little (she is tiny) people so it worked and later, when they had a couple of kids a box structure was added between the beams for two wing berths and it still worked for them, but you are a Big Guy Rasp!

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Yeah, about the same as the original interior on TRANSIENT but at least you can get to the very narrow forward berth without going outside! I'd like to see how they fit the wing berths in. 

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Here is my Seaclipper 28 all stripped down and spiderwebbed in the end of the bayou in prep for a hurricane.

SeaClipper28.thumb.jpg.c76d84de8dabf591d0b66a5c66851e53.jpg

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I had the opportunity to buy this SeaClipper 28 but the guy who built it must have thought it was a 36'er and just put too many goodies on it for such a small simple boat. He admits that but it was way down on her lines. He and his wife did do a long cruise in it from the East Coast to I think Guatemala.

Image result for seaclipper 28 tri

Image result for seaclipper 28 tri

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Yep, looks just like my buddies - interesting color scheme, his is all white. The boat has been ashore for some years as he now owns a Jim Brown 34’ Seaclipper - built in Airex foam sandwich - she completed a circumnavigation before he bought her.

I might have some pictures, will hunt them down, the wing boxes really opened up the interior, widened the deck, made the boat drier in chop but, not being attached to the beams, added no rigidity like they did on Transient.

That foreword “berth” on Transient - Tim put a composting head in there - I use the bucket!

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Wow - hell of a lot more bottom paint than the SeaClipper I knew but you gotta use what you have - serious cruise for that boat.

I had almost forgotten, the original amas we’re abandoned in favor of longer, more buoyant “Constant Camber” amas that made the boat sail much faster and flatter, pretty sure the plans were John Marples designed and approved, they looked really nice but even in her original build, lightness won out over shape perfection and she was fast, a good bang for the buck - I know there is a shot of her tearing it up with a monster guy fighting the weather helm - the rudder was replaced too.

I guess I screwed up, the Jim Brown 34 is a SeaRunner not a SeaClipper!

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Those amas should just barely kissing the water. My heavy 8hp 4stroke Yamaha to stbd puts a couple of inches of ama in the water and the other one just kisses. I painted bottom paint up higher that than that but no near what shows in that photo. The tan boat was built by your guy Mark from Carolina I think because he does now have a SeaRunner 34. Lots of good stuff from him on that Cruising site.

attachment.php?attachmentid=28125&d=1307318007

 

http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f48/trimaran-especially-searunner-owners-14322-56.html

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Small world and a different guy, my friend is Pat from New Jersey, I guess if you build a John Marples SeaClipper you tend to regard the Jim Brown SeaRunner as your dream boat.

The Marples was really nimble with a big roach main and full battened non overlapping jib, the Brown, obviously a much bigger boat is ideal for offshore cruising.

Anyway, Trovao, back on subject, the SeaClipper 28 is an honest to goodness, simple to build and sail, capable and swift pocket cruiser. As my friend discovered, building and substituting more sophisticated amas is a nice upgrade and the boat is infinitely repairable.

Good Luck with your boat check out on Sunday.

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Those Constant Camber amas would be a big upgrade to the boat. I tell people that my SeaClipper 28 is the Model T of multihulls. Simple, stout and will get the job done. I've hit 16 knots on GPS with really under spec'd plain vanilla sails. The boat has a funny hump in its speed scale. A good bit of rocker in the main hull with that flat dory bottom makes it sort of squat up to about 12 knots an it really pulls up a stern wake. If you press it hard, the V amas take up displacement quickly and then the main hull sort of unloads and then starts planing and the wake moves aft and it goes into a whole different mode. Forth Mode maybe?

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The pressed performance you describe makes sense as the V form amas are too short and lacking in low down buoyancy aft, to prevent squatting with it’s associated big wake in light air but pressed there is a rapid rise in aft ama support, the boat flattens and -  presto - off she goes. I witnessed this when the boat was new.

The Constant Camber amas are much longer aft with the buoyancy distributed lower in the hull form, the pressed transition is much less pronounced and she moves right out in light air - where we do most of our sailing.

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Sweet looking boat, any idea where and by who she was built.

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Well, sort of a downer. The owner's wife got ill so he wasn't able to go show us the boat.

Maybe next weekend, if the lady gets (hopefully) better.

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Well, me and the admiral finally managed to go see the boat.

The general condition is what to be expected from a boat that is lying on the weather for at least the last 1.5 years.

Lots of mould inside and out and on the sails too. The boat has a dacron Quantum rolling jib in reasonable state and a cheap-"dacron" full-battened main in worse-than-average condition, but the rags really don't worry me as I am a sail loft dealer and intend to eventually replace them with the brand I work for.

Except for a small rotten spot on the cockpit seat, the hulls look to be in pretty decent shape, although dirty and in need of some paint. If I manage to negotiate a decent price, I think I'll close th deal. I have already got a lot of plans...

20190504_160308.jpg

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20190504_160241.jpg

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Couldn't manage to upload the rest of the pics from the tablet. Tomorrow I'll try again from the computer.

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1047293664_WhatsAppImage2019-05-05at15_14_17.thumb.jpeg.0d27a944c1aa3a2dff9d9dd7dad53a4d.jpeg772668803_WhatsAppImage2019-05-05at15_14_48.thumb.jpeg.c45dc2b6b5c8f778649b93c4bb92c55e.jpeg2098993570_WhatsAppImage2019-05-05at15_14_38.thumb.jpeg.07f7a955881570ed09cfc3bcdccb6b86.jpeg1174505621_WhatsAppImage2019-05-05at15_16_51.thumb.jpeg.aee9b63ca0749a716cbd431338923a1b.jpeg

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19 hours ago, Trovão said:

Well, me and the admiral finally managed to go see the boat.

The general condition is what to be expected from a boat that is lying on the weather for at least the last 1.5 years.

Lots of mould inside and out and on the sails too. The boat has a dacron Quantum rolling jib in reasonable state and a cheap-"dacron" full-battened main in worse-than-average condition, but the rags really don't worry me as I am a sail loft dealer and intend to eventually replace them with the brand I work for.

Except for a small rotten spot on the cockpit seat, the hulls look to be in pretty decent shape, although dirty and in need of some paint. If I manage to negotiate a decent price, I think I'll close th deal. I have already got a lot of plans...

20190504_160308.jpg

it (she?) deserves to be painted, cleaned and new sails. GO TROVAO

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195050772_WhatsAppImage2019-05-05at15_17_10.thumb.jpeg.5949e006815b941411017b6c2c21c59f.jpeg1238582431_WhatsAppImage2019-05-05at15_17_19.thumb.jpeg.bf2192fd5933f05c5e992eba81b2c4d9.jpeg1097105538_WhatsAppImage2019-05-05at15_18_08.thumb.jpeg.f80ae9e5889e4a238fb7f5b4e62c0ba5.jpeg1064130996_WhatsAppImage2019-05-06at09_20_59.thumb.jpeg.8511cec397dbeb0a3b78d099ddc1c460.jpeg1820429207_WhatsAppImage2019-05-06at09_20.59(9).thumb.jpeg.521e157d9f233c3530af902014c51876.jpeg

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1 minute ago, sail(plane) said:

it (she?) deserves to be painted, cleaned and new sails. GO TROVAO

yeah, thanks. that is my opinion too. now is more a matter of coming to a mutually acceptable number with the current owner.

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You want to know the weight of that wing mast. Looks like an old Gougeon section which could be pretty heavy. The rocker on those hulls makes them pitch a bit and a big heavier than designed mast might really get it hobby horsing. My stock Sitka Spruce mast weights maybe 45 lbs for comparison. The wing would really turbo the design if not too heavy though especially rotating as I see in the photos. 

    That rot pocket looks scary. I also see a doghouse of sorts over the companionway. I'd like to see more photos of it since I have contemplated adding one to my boat.

     The roller rack that carries the outboard motor may be an improvement to the side sled mount of the stock design but once again the weight of a motor (esp a 4 stroke) that much further aft might put her stern down. Wait, maybe it will simply counteract the heavier mast... I see other departures from the design such as the pinnings for the floats to the beams and with all the mods from Brown/Marples original I would carefully consider how that might affect the overall design. 

Good Luck

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59 minutes ago, Russell Brown said:

Are you surveying the boat yourself?

Yes, people payed me do it for them so I thought I'd do it for myself too... not sure if it is such a great idea:P

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41 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

You want to know the weight of that wing mast. Looks like an old Gougeon section which could be pretty heavy. The rocker on those hulls makes them pitch a bit and a big heavier than designed mast might really get it hobby horsing. My stock Sitka Spruce mast weights maybe 45 lbs for comparison. The wing would really turbo the design if not too heavy though especially rotating as I see in the photos. 

    That rot pocket looks scary. I also see a doghouse of sorts over the companionway. I'd like to see more photos of it since I have contemplated adding one to my boat.

     The roller rack that carries the outboard motor may be an improvement to the side sled mount of the stock design but once again the weight of a motor (esp a 4 stroke) that much further aft might put her stern down. Wait, maybe it will simply counteract the heavier mast... I see other departures from the design such as the pinnings for the floats to the beams and with all the mods from Brown/Marples original I would carefully consider how that might affect the overall design. 

Good Luck

I asked the seller about it but he had no idea. He's checking with the previous owner, who might have better info.

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3 hours ago, Trovão said:

yeah, thanks. that is my opinion too. now is more a matter of coming to a mutually acceptable number with the current owner.

I hope the seller realizes he will have a buyer once in a century. 

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3 hours ago, sail(plane) said:

I hope the seller realizes he will have a buyer once in a century. 

The seller hasn't seen the boat for over an year due to a series of personal problems and the visit this last weekend served like an eye-opener.

He seems to realize things have deteriorated during this year and that the target price he had in mind would no longer apply.

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1 hour ago, Trovão said:

The seller hasn't seen the boat for over an year due to a series of personal problems and the visit this last weekend served like an eye-opener.

He seems to realize things have deteriorated during this year and that the target price he had in mind would no longer apply.

The price he has in mind SHOULD be whatever you offer. 

But it doesn't always work like that with sellers :D

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23 hours ago, sail(plane) said:

The price he has in mind SHOULD be whatever you offer. 

But it doesn't always work like that with sellers :D

Well, it worked exactly like that.

So now, instead of being a boatless couple, the Admiral and me are the happy owners of a 1985 28' SeaClipper trimaran.

Let the joys of boat ownership begin...

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Now that I think of it, maybe "fair winds" isn't what you want. I guess what is "fair" is subjective... Me, I like a strong breeze.

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Good on you. Keep us posted. I would have sailed mine down if I knew you wanted one so bad! But I just came into the house after sitting on my dock for sunset and there she sits patiently awaiting me to get off my ass and scrape the bottom in preparation for our annual cruise/reunion for small boats here on the Panhandle. 

Image may contain: text

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53 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Good on you. Keep us posted. I would have sailed mine down if I knew you wanted one so bad! But I just came into the house after sitting on my dock for sunset and there she sits patiently awaiting me to get off my ass and scrape the bottom in preparation for our annual cruise/reunion for small boats here on the Panhandle. 

Image may contain: text

Quite a trip to southern Brazil...

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1 hour ago, Whiskey.T said:

Now that I think of it, maybe "fair winds" isn't what you want. I guess what is "fair" is subjective... Me, I like a strong breeze.

Yeah, I like some fresh breeze too...

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On 5/7/2019 at 12:54 AM, Trovão said:

Yes, people payed me do it for them so I thought I'd do it for myself too... not sure if it is such a great idea:P

sadly not as you have an emotional attachment .

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1 minute ago, Mid said:

sadly not as you have an emotional attachment .

Yeah, sort of, but not really. I am well aware of what I am stepping into, but this is what I can manage for the time being so, here it is... Better be sailing on a non-ideal boat than not sailing at all, as has been the case.

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long as your eyes are open ,go for it .

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Next week I should receive the ownership documents and finalize the payment.

Than it will be time to start working on bringing it back to form.

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Good Luck with the refit, lots of sanding and some quality, light colored (what’s with that natural grain panel effect on the deck!) paint will work wonders.

My friends Seaclipper 28 is the same age and still looks and is, a really cool boat.

Go For It!

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