stayoutofthemiddle

Santa Cruz 70 - Fleet Roll Call

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Bit of chatter on the Merlin thread about SC 70's. Got me thinking, where are they all now? In the early 2000's they were all on the lake with several in Chicago.
Now there may be 1 or even 0 left in town and a couple in Michigan, and some went back to the left coast I believe...

Anyone want to take a stab a boat names and current ports of call? Here are some names but I have no idea where they live these days...

Nitemare

Blondie

Pied Piper

Mirage

Thanks all I can remember!

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There were always 4 -5 SC 70's on the left coast, even when the Chi fleet was big. And one in the Carib.

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Grand Illusion is in NPB.

Catapult (ex Maverick. ex Pyewacket is in MDR).

 

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Chance left Sheboygan and went to Detroit, now Equation. Evolution left Sheboygan and went to Michigan as well, still Evolution as far as I know. 

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I never stepped on what was Cynosure without thinking that it was the nicest boat I ever stepped foot on.  All of them were one of a kind (yes, I get the oxymoron).  

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1 minute ago, Cal20sailor said:

I never stepped on what was Cynosure without thinking that it was the nicest boat I ever stepped foot on.  All of them were one of a kind (yes, I get the oxymoron).  

Evolution  went to the next level. Even though my favorite will always be Cyno, Nick and Rich were OCD squared with the way they took care of that boat. You could run an operating room in the galley of that boat. 

I remember cleaning the bottom a week before the Chi-Mac and noticing a few small blisters on the rudder. I mentioned them, as I should. Few days later the whole damn boat’s on the hard to fix it before the Mac. They didn’t mess around. 

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5 minutes ago, Monkey said:

Evolution  went to the next level. Even though my favorite will always be Cyno, Nick and Rich were OCD squared with the way they took care of that boat. You could run an operating room in the galley of that boat. 

I remember cleaning the bottom a week before the Chi-Mac and noticing a few small blisters on the rudder. I mentioned them, as I should. Few days later the whole damn boat’s on the hard to fix it before the Mac. They didn’t mess around. 

Were you there for the fuel tank?  I hated the cockpit on Evo.  It would keep me from doing more than one job.  

Something about owning North Sails drove them.  

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6 minutes ago, Cal20sailor said:

Were you there for the fuel tank?  I hated the cockpit on Evo.  It would keep me from doing more than one job.  

Pretty sure I’m the one who gave you the whole detailed fuel tank horror story, and yes, I was there for every horrible minute, hour, and days. 

Edit:  That is the one and only thing I will forever hate about that boat. 

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5 minutes ago, Monkey said:

Pretty sure I’m the one who gave you the whole detailed fuel tank horror story, and yes, I was there for every horrible minute, hour, and days. 

Edit:  That is the one and only thing I will forever hate about that boat. 

I got it from Dan when I picked Cyno up.  I have my own story from a delivery years later but the fuel tank takes the cake.  

Seriously, who wants 100 gals of diesel in their bilge?

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3 minutes ago, Cal20sailor said:

I got it from Dan when I picked Cyno up.  I have my own story from a delivery years later but the fuel tank takes the cake.  

Seriously, who wants 100 gals of diesel in their bilge?

He was exaggerating. It was only an 85 gallon tank, and we only had about 65 gallons in it. Besides, the weld cracked high enough it could still hold about five gallons. 

I can say this though. It dumped enough diesel into the bilge to overflow the floorboards. That’s how I found the problem. I woke up for my watch and got wet feet. I assumed water because we had an issue on a prop shaft seal the year before. As soon as I went to pull up the floor board, I knew it wasn’t water. 

Then when the whole god damned nightmare went all Groundhog Day on us, and hit us again the next day, well I just don’t want to re-live that again. Ever. 

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4 minutes ago, Monkey said:

Then when the whole god damned nightmare went all Groundhog Day on us, and hit us again the next day, well I just don’t want to re-live that again. Ever. 

That's what made it an epic story.  Too funny.  

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18 minutes ago, Cal20sailor said:

That's what made it an epic story.  Too funny.  

The only funny part was that doing everything right failed. Saying fuck it and using 5200 to glue a chunk of angle iron on fixed the issue. 

Edit:  I’m still pretty sure satellites could’ve tracked us all the way to Port Huron based on the oil slick left behind. (We tried our best to be responsible)

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OEX was in Roche Harbor, WA a couple of years ago.  Not sure where now, but she looked gorgeous.

Had the pleasure of racing on several of them, including the first (Blondie) and the last (Orient Express), both for one of the greatest owners ever.... but of all of them, always thought Blondie was something special.  Even among equals, she seemed to have just a little bit extra off the wind.

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My list.... updated as time permits....

SC-70s

Built

Builder

Original name

Original SailNo

Later Name(s)

0

1977

SC

Merlin

8955

 

1

1984

SC

Blondie

18970

Pied Piper 2, Nitemare, Warpath

2

1985

SC

Kathmandu

87580

Colt-45, Details

3

1985

SC

Citius

87666

Ole, Thirsty Tiger (GL)

4

1986

SC

Starlight Express

25168

Donnybrook, Stripes

5

1986

SC

Pied Piper

41104

Retro, Buono Sera

6

1987

SC

Hotel California

97117

Grand Illusion

7

1987

SC

Mongoose

18997

Westerly

8

1988

SC

Drumbeat

52701?

Cynosure, Windancer

9

1988

SC

Silver Bullet

29009

Luna Barba, OEX (per Bill Lee)

10

1989

SC

Chance

97503

 

11

1989

SC

Evolution

97530

 

12

1989

SC

Donnybrook

 

Starlight Express?, Neptune's Car

13

 

SC

<there wasn't a #13?>

 

 

14

1989

SC

Holua

97656

 

15

1990

SC

Mirage

28115

 

16

1990

SC

Hotel California II

 

 

17

1990

SC

Chardonnay II (charter)

 

 

18

1990

SC

Pyewacket

US-4

Chessie, Blondie, Skylark (per Bill Lee)
Valkyrie, Maverick,, Catapult

19

1993

SC

Orient Express

US-93

Equation, then Orient Express again?

    1.  

1997?

SC-72?

Donnybrook

 

very different stern, per Bill Lee

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10 hours ago, Monkey said:

He was exaggerating. It was only an 85 gallon tank, and we only had about 65 gallons in it. Besides, the weld cracked high enough it could still hold about five gallons. 

I can say this though. It dumped enough diesel into the bilge to overflow the floorboards. That’s how I found the problem. I woke up for my watch and got wet feet. I assumed water because we had an issue on a prop shaft seal the year before. As soon as I went to pull up the floor board, I knew it wasn’t water. 

Then when the whole god damned nightmare went all Groundhog Day on us, and hit us again the next day, well I just don’t want to re-live that again. Ever. 

I'm surprised that you weren't choking/puking on fumes!! :o

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11 hours ago, sledracr said:

My list.... updated as time permits....

SC-70s

Built

Builder

Original name

Original SailNo

Later Name(s)

0

1977

SC

Merlin

8955

 

1

1984

SC

Blondie

18970

Pied Piper 2, Nitemare, Warpath

2

1985

SC

Kathmandu

87580

Colt-45, Details

3

1985

SC

Citius

87666

Ole, Thirsty Tiger (GL)

4

1986

SC

Starlight Express

25168

Donnybrook, Stripes

5

1986

SC

Pied Piper

41104

Retro, Buono Sera

6

1987

SC

Hotel California

97117

Grand Illusion

7

1987

SC

Mongoose

18997

Westerly

8

1988

SC

Drumbeat

52701?

Cynosure, Windancer

9

1988

SC

Silver Bullet

29009

Luna Barba, OEX (per Bill Lee) 

10

1989

SC

Chance

97503

 

11

1989

SC

Evolution

97530

 

12

1989

SC

Donnybrook

 

Starlight Express?, Neptune's Car

13

 

SC

<there wasn't a #13?>

 

 

14

1989

SC

Holua

97656

 

15

1990

SC

Mirage

28115

 

16

1990

SC

Hotel California II

 

 

17

1990

SC

Chardonnay II (charter)

 

 

18

1990

SC

Pyewacket

US-4

Chessie, Blondie, Skylark (per Bill Lee)
Valkyrie, Maverick,, Catapult

19

1993

SC

Orient Express

US-93

Equation, then Orient Express again?

    1.  

1997?

SC-72?

Donnybrook

 

very different stern, per Bill Lee

Wow, that's a very comprehensive list! The more I read about these the more I am impressed with their impact and place in history for Offshore Racing. Does anyone know how / why the class was started? Few rich owners come together or was it a build it and they will come approach by SC?  I also heard that the engine and sail locker were on the port side of the boat to bias it for the long port runs on the TransPac, not sure if that's true or urban legend...

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21 hours ago, Void said:

Westerly is still active in the PNW (Home port Victoria, BC) and has done a few hawaii races in the last few years. She's also had a massive refit recently; looks gorgeous and is an absolute rocketship.

 

PS She's for sale:

 

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1987/santa-cruz-70-uldb-3250125/

Is this Dog House original from SC or was it added? Looks like a submarine...

Dog House.png

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That was done by ?? (damn age) who ran the boat as 'Mongoose'

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1 hour ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

Does anyone know how / why the class was started?

 

"fast is fun" ~ b. lee/associated chicken coopers

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2 hours ago, longy said:

That was done by ?? (damn age) who ran the boat as 'Mongoose'

Paul Simonson, IIRC

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13 minutes ago, sledracr said:

Paul Simonson, IIRC

That was the owner. The guy that did the work is very well known: Zan Dryse (sp?) of santa cruz.

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13 minutes ago, ROADKILL666 said:

I thought Equation was a Andrews 68

It was. He’s had a lot of boats. 

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6 minutes ago, Monkey said:

It was. He’s had a lot of boats. 

Rich fucker

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33 minutes ago, longy said:

The guy that did the work is very well known

That's another great part of the SC70 story, the guys that ran the boats.  Petey Frazier on Blondie, Robert Flowerman on Silver Bullet, etc...  Legends.

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3 hours ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

I also heard that the engine and sail locker were on the port side of the boat to bias it for the long port runs on the TransPac, not sure if that's true or urban legend...

From my recollection it was the other way around. All the boats rafted up the night before the start of TransPac and PacCup were listing heavily to starboard because the first day or two are white sail reaching on starboard tack.

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sails and gear and food and stuff initially stowed to starboard, yes.   true of just about any boat at the start of the Transpac. 

Engines on centerline, though.

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28 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

From my recollection it was the other way around. All the boats rafted up the night before the start of TransPac and PacCup were listing heavily to starboard because the first day or two are white sail reaching on starboard tack.

Sorry, yes, wrong side of the boat.

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9 minutes ago, sledracr said:

sails and gear and food and stuff initially stowed to starboard, yes.   true of just about any boat at the start of the Transpac. 

Engines on centerline, though.

How many water jugs and fuel cans??:ph34r:

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I just looked on YW and Mirage is for sale too...

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1990/santa-cruz-70-2850116/?refSource=browse

There are a couple SC 52s for sale and I'm shocked they are asking 300's for them! Are they really getting that for the younger sisters?

The SC 70s are going in the 200's which is what I would have suspected...

 

 

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4 hours ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

I just looked on YW and Mirage is for sale too...

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1990/santa-cruz-70-2850116/?refSource=browse

There are a couple SC 52s for sale and I'm shocked they are asking 300's for them! Are they really getting that for the younger sisters?

The SC 70s are going in the 200's which is what I would have suspected...

The 70's are exactly what you want sailing.  Anyone wanting to do a Rimas should buy a 70 and sail it with a jib and still go fast as hell.  They are really well built. 

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4 hours ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

I just looked on YW and Mirage is for sale too...

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1990/santa-cruz-70-2850116/?refSource=browse

There are a couple SC 52s for sale and I'm shocked they are asking 300's for them! Are they really getting that for the younger sisters?

The SC 70s are going in the 200's which is what I would have suspected...

 

 

The 52's are much more nicely finished, and they can go upwind reasonably well and buoy raced, neither of which is the intended pastime on a SC70. Having said that, if you want to go downwind joyfully and can pay others to do the return trip it is hard to imagine a better ride than a SC70 or SC50.

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3 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

The 52's are much more nicely finished, and they can go upwind reasonably well and buoy raced, neither of which is the intended pastime on a SC70. Having said that, if you want to go downwind joyfully and can pay others to do the return trip it is hard to imagine a better ride than a SC70 or SC50.

Have you sailed on any of the boats you mentioned?  The 70 goes uphill very well.  The 52 is a great boat, but if it's my money, I'm buying a 70.  

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One of the 70’s was out there cruising full time, or was. Which one?

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30 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

The 52's are much more nicely finished, and they can go upwind reasonably well and buoy raced, neither of which is the intended pastime on a SC70. Having said that, if you want to go downwind joyfully and can pay others to do the return trip it is hard to imagine a better ride than a SC70 or SC50.

Hmm...  doesn’t sound at all like any of the three 70’s I sailed on. They go upwind like a freight train, albeit a bouncy one from time to time. They’re also gobs of fun to buoy race!  (I’m the fat kid jumping the kite, which is a long running joke from that picture.  My shirt seemed to inflate and I looked huge!)

E834480B-D0C5-40B7-B51A-0C1A989A42FB.jpeg

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41 minutes ago, Cal20sailor said:

Have you sailed on any of the boats you mentioned?  The 70 goes uphill very well.  The 52 is a great boat, but if it's my money, I'm buying a 70.  

Sure; sailed SC50, SC52, SC70 and Merlin (also SC27 and SC40 although thread drift). They are all awesome boats. I did a PacCup, SF-Catalina, local ocean stuff and a bunch of buoy races on the SC50 but only shorter stuff on the others (including Merlin's maiden sail with the canting keel which is a story for another day). I think it would be difficult to dispute that the SC52 is the best buoy racer in the bunch. It was designed that way. The SC50 and SC70 certainly can go upwind (reasonably well at times), but that was not the task for which they were designed.

If it were my hypothetical money (keeping in mind that I am in NorCal) I would get the SC50. The 70 is too impractical because of its draft, and anyway there would be nobody to race against up here. The SC50 is heaps of fun downhill.

Since it is my actual, not hypothetical, money I have a Lapworth 36. This was the ultralight prototype (well, 71 were built into a healthy OD fleet so not exactly a one-off) for the even lighter Cal 40 which in turn was the spiritual Father of Merlin and in turn the SC70 so I would argue (after a couple of Mt. Gay and Tonics) that  mine is the original West Coast Sled. ;)

I can hear you spluttering out your cocktails, but my 36' mahogany masthead sloop weighs less than a J35 so it was pretty ultralight for the day!

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15 minutes ago, Monkey said:

They’re also gobs of fun to buoy race!)

 

I agree although the fun downhill legs seem to only last about 10% as long as the uphill ones. One of the neatest features of buoy racing them is that when they t-bone you can hear it for MILES! (witness 1992 BBS).

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13 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

I agree although the fun downhill legs seem to only last about 10% as long as the uphill ones. One of the neatest features of buoy racing them is that when they t-bone you can hear it for MILES! (witness 1992 BBS).

I did the Chicago scene with the 70's and collisions were verboten.  Protests were usually never flagged but dealt with at the bar.  When one boat was accused of too much rail meat, they were met on the dock with a scale.  Great times and though I didn't sail with him, Tom Neill is missed.

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20 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

I agree although the fun downhill legs seem to only last about 10% as long as the uphill ones. One of the neatest features of buoy racing them is that when they t-bone you can hear it for MILES! (witness 1992 BBS).

In the BBS collision, IIRC, the ingress into the cockpit was eventually slowed by a primary winch on the t-bone recipient. 

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1 hour ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

In the BBS collision, IIRC, the ingress into the cockpit was eventually slowed by a primary winch on the t-bone recipient. 

Yup.  Maverick's bow cut through the toe-rail like it was butter, went several feet through the topsides/deck and ended up against the primary drum.  Nearly cut the back 8 feet off the boat... Somewhere I have a picture of Dave Ullman standing inside the hull with his head poking through the hull.

Maverick's damage consisted of about 10 pounds of bondo knocked out of place.

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On ‎5‎/‎9‎/‎2019 at 11:18 AM, Void said:

Westerly is still active in the PNW (Home port Victoria, BC) and has done a few hawaii races in the last few years. She's also had a massive refit recently; looks gorgeous and is an absolute rocketship.

 

PS She's for sale:

 

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1987/santa-cruz-70-uldb-3250125/

I forgot how much just looking at something that long ago saved your life and made your life what it is today could flood the brain with snapshots in time. 

Thanks.

If I had a quarter million I'd buy it today.

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I had the cash piled up to get a 70, until I went sailing on one at age 60: nope, no way. If I was still 30, no problem. But it was only the under 30s aboard that could actually work the boat, all us old farts were basically a waste of time, space, and weight. Wisdom did not make up for age. So once it became reasonable financially, it was out of reach physically.

I like my Olson 40. Seems a practical size. I can easily toss a carbon headsail up on deck through the forward hatch.

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On ‎5‎/‎10‎/‎2019 at 9:08 PM, Monkey said:

Hmm...  doesn’t sound at all like any of the three 70’s I sailed on. They go upwind like a freight train, albeit a bouncy one from time to time. They’re also gobs of fun to buoy race!  (I’m the fat kid jumping the kite, which is a long running joke from that picture.  My shirt seemed to inflate and I looked huge!)

E834480B-D0C5-40B7-B51A-0C1A989A42FB.jpeg

...it was always my understanding that they "DIDN'T go up wind like a freight train". I though the sucked up hill but killed it off the breeze. At least that is the story I always heard for the ones on the Big Lake that did the Mac...

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27 minutes ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

...it was always my understanding that they "DIDN'T go up wind like a freight train". I though the sucked up hill but killed it off the breeze. At least that is the story I always heard for the ones on the Big Lake that did the Mac...

You heard wrong.  Check out last year's Mac results on "the Big Lake."  IIRC, it was largely upwind.  

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This thread got me curious about the differences between Merlin and the production Santa Cruz 70s.  Some of the dimensions vary based from one source to another.  Also, I'm not sure if the dimensions I found for Merlin refer to her original configuration or her rebuilt configuration.  As I understand it, the Santa Cruz 70s have significant variations form one boat to another.

LOA

Merlin:  68 feet

SC70:  70 feet

LWL

Merlin:  62 feet

SC70:  64 feet

Beam

Merlin:  12 feet

SC70:  15 feet 1 inch

Draft

Merlin:  9 feet

SC70:  7 feet (or is it 9 feet?)

Displacement

Merlin:  24,000 lbs

SC70:  35,000 lbs

Ballast

Merlin:  10,500 lbs

SC70:  9,600 lbs

Sail Area

Merlin:  1834 sq. ft.

SC70:  1362 sq. ft. (or is it 1520 sq. ft.?)

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11 minutes ago, captain_crunch said:

 

Draft

SC70:  7 feet (or is it 9 feet?)   9 feet was standard, the turbo'd ones were deeper

Displacement

SC70:  35,000 lbs  24,000 was the "brochure" displacement, individual boats displaced more or less depending on construction, configuration, etc. 

 

 

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I see Nick often and sometimes talk about the old girls.  Chance was pretty spartan in her day.  Was fortunate to have raced a CYC event with them years ago.

 

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11 minutes ago, proOC said:

I see Nick often and sometimes talk about the old girls.  Chance was pretty spartan in her day.  Was fortunate to have raced a CYC event with them years ago.

 

Did any of the sleds ever make it down to KWRW? Seems like a lot of boat to take on the road!

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On ‎5‎/‎10‎/‎2019 at 12:14 PM, sledracr said:

That's another great part of the SC70 story, the guys that ran the boats.  Petey Frazier on Blondie, Robert Flowerman on Silver Bullet, etc...  Legends.

Jim Linskey -- Evolution

Greg Heddrick -- Pyewacket

Robbie Beddingfield -- Grand Illusion

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1 hour ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

Did any of the sleds ever make it down to KWRW? Seems like a lot of boat to take on the road!

In the day, maybe but I can not think of one at the moment.  I do remember racing the Havana Cup in 98'.  There was a SC 70 and it was renamed.  If I remember correctly it was the old Thirsty or possibly Pied Piper.  

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1 hour ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

Did any of the sleds ever make it down to KWRW?

Pyewacket did some stuff in the Caribbean after a trip to Ireland, (an official?) transat run and a Bermuda race.  Not sure about KWRW though.

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Back in the day, I used to run MIRAGE, homeported in Santa Cruz, and the lightest SC-70 at 24,105 lb.  But also the least SA..GI had the tallest rig by about 3', was the heaviest, and fastest in light airs around the buoys.  SC-70s were 68.0 feet LOA.  The "70" number is from their theoretical max IOR rating.

On the morning of June 10, 1991, there was a loud crash across the Channel at Harbor Marine.  Zan had MONGOOSE hauled for Transpac prep, and had carefully removed the blocks under the keel to smooth things.  All the weight was on the upright jack stands, one of which buckled as a cleaning crew moved around on deck , sending MONGOOSE crashing onto her starboard side, her bow landing on the rear of the owner's Porsche. Fortunately, no-one was killed, but one of the on deck crew was launched 15' onto the rocks below, resulting in serious injury.  The insurance and medical claims became convoluted, as the boatyard  maintained no responsibility for unauthorized movement of the haul out supports.

1115243441_Mongoose001.thumb.jpg.2b44564b8e6ea2748d85185c09a908ba.jpg

As well as being fun to sail in buoys races like the Cal Cup and BBS, SC-70's could haul the mail in the right conditions. In the 1992 375 mile Aldo Alessio race down the Coast from SF to Long Beach, crews licked their chops for the gale warnings that were hoisted. By sunset the first night MIRAGE was off Pt. Sur, and the breeze had built to 34 knots, gusting 38. Several miles back we had seen VICTORIA lose her mast in an ugly round-down. KATHMANDU and GI also seemed to have lost control.

The seas were short and steep, and it was easy to punch the bow, filling the cockpit and loading up the rig.  Finally in a 40 knot puff we lost it and the boat laid down, the owner's daughter aft, hanging on for dear life, asking her father, "Daddy, are we going to die?  I haven't gone to high school yet."

With the situation in hand after about 20 minutes, we jibed to starboard, sent the chicken chute, and averaged 18 knots to abeam Pt. Conception.  Yowza.

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27 minutes ago, sleddog said:

 VICTORIA lose her mast in an ugly round-down.

Ugly is a good word for it.  Stuck the pole in the water going 20+, rig fairly exploded out of the boat.  Some pieces probably still haven't landed.

Amusing (?) postscript, Mike moved heaven and earth to get a new rig in the boat in time for BBS, got it done, and then.... tuning up behind the Embarcadero the morning of the first race, *that* rig broke, right at the top spreader.  Apparently a weld failed.  Motored to Svensons, pulled the rig, mast-builder put a sleeve and a bunch of parts (along with a couple of guys) on an airplane, all-nighter to sleeve it and bolt it back together, and... we made the rest of the regatta.  In fact, IIRC we won that second race.

Good times <lol>

 

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32 minutes ago, sleddog said:

The insurance ...claims became convoluted

Was that part of Brett's Really Bad Year?

There was one span on time in which Blondie got t-boned, GI grounded in front of the entrance to St. Francis and pushed the keel up into the boat, Mirage fell off the stands, probably some others I'm forgetting, and... pretty much all the 70s had insurance through the same guy.  Ugh.

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Skip , Mario here  that race will always stand out in my memory gybing in front of that ship when we told of our intentions

and him responding  he couldn't do much but he'll watch.... good times! 

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3 hours ago, sledracr said:
  3 hours ago, captain_crunch said:

Draft

SC70:  7 feet (or is it 9 feet?)   9 feet was standard, the turbo'd ones were deeper

Displacement

SC70:  35,000 lbs  24,000 was the "brochure" displacement, individual boats displaced more or less depending on construction, configuration, etc. 

Thanks!  I found three sources that gave conflicting dimensions for the SC70.

https://sailboatdata.com/sailboat/santa-cruz-70

https://www.boats.com/reviews/perry-design-review-santa-cruz-70/

http://sailingmagazine.net/article-1784-santa-cruz-70.html

 

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56 minutes ago, sleddog said:

Back in the day, I used to run MIRAGE, homeported in Santa Cruz, and the lightest SC-70 at 24,105 lb.  But also the least SA..GI had the tallest rig by about 3', was the heaviest, and fastest in light airs around the buoys.  SC-70s were 68.0 feet LOA.  The "70" number is from their theoretical max IOR rating.

On the morning of June 10, 1991, there was a loud crash across the Channel at Harbor Marine.  Zan had MONGOOSE hauled for Transpac prep, and had carefully removed the blocks under the keel to smooth things.  All the weight was on the upright jack stands, one of which buckled as a cleaning crew moved around on deck , sending MONGOOSE crashing onto her starboard side, her bow landing on the rear of the owner's Porsche. Fortunately, no-one was killed, but one of the on deck crew was launched 15' onto the rocks below, resulting in serious injury.  The insurance and medical claims became convoluted, as the boatyard  maintained no responsibility for unauthorized movement of the haul out supports. 

1115243441_Mongoose001.thumb.jpg.2b44564b8e6ea2748d85185c09a908ba.jpg

As well as being fun to sail in buoys races like the Cal Cup and BBS, SC-70's could haul the mail in the right conditions. In the 1992 375 mile Aldo Alessio race down the Coast from SF to Long Beach, crews licked their chops for the gale warnings that were hoisted. By sunset the first night MIRAGE was off Pt. Sur, and the breeze had built to 34 knots, gusting 38. Several miles back we had seen VICTORIA lose her mast in an ugly round-down. KATHMANDU and GI also seemed to have lost control. 

The seas were short and steep, and it was easy to punch the bow, filling the cockpit and loading up the rig.  Finally in a 40 knot puff we lost it and the boat laid down, the owner's daughter aft, hanging on for dear life, asking her father, "Daddy, are we going to die?  I haven't gone to high school yet."

With the situation in hand after about 20 minutes, we jibed to starboard, sent the chicken chute, and averaged 18 knots to abeam Pt. Conception.  Yowza. 

Epic photo! Love the early 90's cars too! Looks like an old Bronco in the photo but I could be mistaken...

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3 hours ago, Former MDR Vandal 1 said:

Jim Linskey -- Evolution

Greg Heddrick -- Pyewacket

Robbie Beddingfield -- Grand Illusion

Unfortunately, Robbie passed away a month ago.  Vale, Robbie!

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Equation (ex Chance), Evolution, and Dynamis (ex Windancer, Cynosure) racing in Detroit a couple years back.  All boats are still very active around here.

xkN6QxH.jpg

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4 hours ago, sledracr said:

There was one span on time in which Blondie got t-boned, GI grounded in front of the entrance to St. Francis and pushed the keel up into the boat, MONGOOSE fell off the stands, probably some others I'm forgetting, and... pretty much all the 70s had insurance through the same guy.  Ugh.

It can be forgiven if some of the usual SC-70 suspects get their names mixed up. After any BBS Race, the purple smoke could be smelled wafting in the west corner of the St.Fancy parking lot.  I remember one post BBS race Dave Wahle was passing around some of his best Santa Cruz homegrown near the back of a van.  As the joint reached one of KIALOA's grinders, Skip W., he politely declines. "Thanks, I'm a cop," says Skip.

It wasn't GI who "grounded and pushed the keel into the boat." In '92 there were 11 ULDB 70's on the BBS start line.  Some heavy hitters had flown in, and I knew we'd be up against the likes of Kostecki, Dickson, Kolius, etc. Knowing we'd be short tacking up the City Front in building flood against these heavies, during practice some of MIRAGE's crew took a dinghy out to sound the St.F.Y.C. waterfront.  We were especially interested in the location of "Irv's Rock" just off the north tip of the breakwater. It didn't take long to find the infamous "Rock," 50' north of the last visible breakwater rock with 5' depth at zero tide. And we had a good fix in our minds, and on a sketched chart, the location of this obstacle.

Fast forward to Race #3.  MIRAGE is passing the crowded St. Francis Y.C. bar, on port tack, closehauled, in 18 knots, making 8.6 knots to weather towards the orange inflatable weather mark off Crissy.  I glance astern at our closest competitors.  GRAND ILLUSION (GI) and EVOLUTION, abeam of each other, are just approaching the breakwater,  both also on port tack.  GI is a length to leeward and outside of EVO, who is taking a line directly over Irv's Rock.

I say to no one in particular in our 16 crew, "Hey Guys, watch this. EVO's gonna hit the rock."  Through unfamiliarity, greed, or miscalculation (likely a combo of all 3), there is a mighty crash....Astern, EVO fetches up, comes to an instantaneous, bow down, mast shaking stop, and heels well to starboard before sliding off the Rock.

My comment to the crew was "Holy Shit, hope they can make it to the dock before they sink."

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1 hour ago, Bow Movement said:

Equation (ex Chance), Evolution, and Dynamis (ex Windancer, Cynosure) racing in Detroit a couple years back.  All boats are still very active around here.

xkN6QxH.jpg

The last of the 150's me thinks...  :) . Gotta live the gennys coming back that far.  I Remember dodging elbows with the rest of the foredeck getting that damn thing around the front of the mast in a tack back 9n the good old days...  

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I am aware, Silent Bob.  Robbie was a old friend.  Sailed on GI and Amazing Grace with him.

Robbie told me he was watching Evo inside of GI at the breakwall and called over, "you know, there's a rock there" just as Evo hit it.  I don't remember the keel being "pushed up" into the boat, but I am told it was a hard hit.  Didn't hurt its upwind performance too much; I was on Evo when it on the sled class at '96 BBS.

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1 hour ago, Former MDR Vandal 1 said:

I am aware, Silent Bob.  Robbie was a old friend.  Sailed on GI and Amazing Grace with him.

Robbie told me he was watching Evo inside of GI at the breakwall and called over, "you know, there's a rock there" just as Evo hit it.  I don't remember the keel being "pushed up" into the boat, but I am told it was a hard hit.  Didn't hurt its upwind performance too much; I was on Evo when it on the sled class at '96 BBS.

you ever sail with danny schiff ? he did bow on evo in the early 90's, and was on kathmandu before that.

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9 hours ago, sledracr said:

Ugly is a good word for it.  Stuck the pole in the water going 20+, rig fairly exploded out of the boat.  Some pieces probably still haven't landed.

Good times <lol>

 

Did the same on Kathmandu circa 1996.  A bit deep on the wave late at night in big breeze, pole dips in the water, boats goes down and starts a pirouette around the pole, and BLAMMO boat stands up without the mast.  Cut the rug away (make sure nothing is looped around your ankle as the rig sinks) and spend the next 12 hours motoring (slowly, gingerly, barely enough fuel) into Port San Luis.  They wont sell us fuel without a commercial fishing license.  No problem-an hour later 2 vans show up, and we leave 2 jigs with the boat to figure out how to get her home.  Good times

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Donnybrook  was written off back in 2010 odd when she hit the chesapeake tunnel  . bought by aussie sailors geoff hill and syd fischer she was completley refurbished at crackerboys in florida in 2011-2 and then won Antigua Race week in 2012 before heading to Hong Kong  . Now owned by Hill she has been competing v successfully on the Asian circuit . Currently based in Subic Bay she is on her way to OZ to race out of Darwin then back to HK to compete in the Hong Kong to vietnam race  . Run by Alan[Guilty] Tillyer she is still sailing over 10,000 odd miles a year and is in Cat 1 condition 

U

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20 hours ago, sleddog said:

It can be forgiven if some of the usual SC-70 suspects get their names mixed up.

Heh. I've always said "if you remember the 80s you didn't fully enjoy them."  Maybe that continued into the 90s, too.

And, thanks for the clarification.  I knew GI was "in the picture", for some reason I had it in my head they were the ones that hit the rock.  I do distinctly remember being shocked at the impact - as you said, the boat had an "an instantaneous, bow down, mast shaking stop" 

What I had heard (didn't see, but heard) that the impact was enough that it knocked the motor out of alignment, and there was enough cracking around the floors that people were worried about structural integrity.  IIRC, the boat went straight from there to Santacruz for repair...

So it goes...

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On ‎5‎/‎10‎/‎2019 at 12:24 AM, sledracr said:

My list.... updated as time permits....

SC-70s

Built

Builder

Original name

Original SailNo

Later Name(s)

0

1977

SC

Merlin

8955

 

1

1984

SC

Blondie

18970

Pied Piper 2, Nitemare, Warpath

2

1985

SC

Kathmandu

87580

Colt-45, Details

3

1985

SC

Citius

87666

Ole, Thirsty Tiger (GL)

4

1986

SC

Starlight Express

25168

Donnybrook, Stripes

5

1986

SC

Pied Piper

41104

Retro, Buono Sera

6

1987

SC

Hotel California

97117

Grand Illusion

7

1987

SC

Mongoose

18997

Westerly

8

1988

SC

Drumbeat

52701?

Cynosure, Windancer

9

1988

SC

Silver Bullet

29009

Luna Barba, OEX (per Bill Lee)

10

1989

SC

Chance

97503

 

11

1989

SC

Evolution

97530

 

12

1989

SC

Donnybrook

 

Starlight Express?, Neptune's Car

13

 

SC

<there wasn't a #13?>

 

 

14

1989

SC

Holua

97656

 

15

1990

SC

Mirage

28115

 

16

1990

SC

Hotel California II

 

 

17

1990

SC

Chardonnay II (charter)

 

 

18

1990

SC

Pyewacket

US-4

Chessie, Blondie, Skylark (per Bill Lee)
Valkyrie, Maverick,, Catapult

19

1993

SC

Orient Express

US-93

Equation, then Orient Express again?

    1.  

1997?

SC-72?

Donnybrook

 

very different stern, per Bill Lee

What was Taxi Dancer?

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On ‎5‎/‎13‎/‎2019 at 4:05 PM, Bow Movement said:

Equation (ex Chance), Evolution, and Dynamis (ex Windancer, Cynosure) racing in Detroit a couple years back.  All boats are still very active around here.

xkN6QxH.jpg

Is this Detroit NOOD?

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2 minutes ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

Is this Detroit NOOD?

No.  I'm willing to bet it was a staged photo shoot.  They're just off Belle Isle at dusk and I don't know of any racing in that section of the river.  

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17 minutes ago, Cal20sailor said:

No.  I'm willing to bet it was a staged photo shoot.  They're just off Belle Isle at dusk and I don't know of any racing in that section of the river.  

 

Good point. A lot of crew in the back of the bus in the photo. Looks more like a cocktail cruise!

 

 

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18 minutes ago, stayoutofthemiddle said:

 

Good point. A lot of crew in the back of the bus in the photo. Looks more like a cocktail cruise!

 

 

They were doing an unofficial thursday night biiiiiiig boat race down to ambassador bridge and back to BYC. 

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