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No, not that sort of stroke, you evil-minded buggers.

Well, I had one, 3½ weeks ago.  0800 and on the way out to a biz meeting, when suddenly I couldn't see much out of my right eye, and the stuff on the laptop screen in front of me made no sense whatever.  I just couldn't read or parse what I was seeing.

Anyway, being me, I thought 'detached retina, what a pain' and went down to the car and off 15 miles to the meeting, thankfully with friends.  I got completely lost in a town in which I've lived for 25 years and had to call them to say I was late, and why.  As soon as I arrived at the breakfast joint (Bucks in Woodside CA, which is a most excellent place BTW) they insisted they take me at once to Stanford Hospital, which they did.  Good guys.

Hours of CT and MRI scans and drugs, and they located two clots in the back of my brain, which explained the aphasia and sight loss.  Meds and advice, and more tests, and after me flirting with the very nubile nursing (and medical) staff they ejected me in 36 hours.

Two serious lessons:

1. If you or anyone you know gets suddenly hit with stroke symptoms, get to hospital AT ONCE.  If it can be caught and treated within the first hour or two, then some sort of recovery is possible.  If not, some permanent disability is inevitable.

2. If you have a stroke and lose peripheral vision out of your right eye, make sure that any pretty girls are seated to your LEFT.

And a question for any of you neuro medical peeps out there.  I believe the brain has a degree of ability to recover and rebuild.  Is this possible in the occipital lobe, and if so, may there eventually be some sort of return of lost vision?  I can't get any definitive answers on this at all.  FYI, I'm 63 and pretty healthy otherwise.

Thanks be to The Flying Spaghetti Monster, who has touched me with His Noodly Appendage.  RAmen.

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Scary stuff. Glad you came out of it mostly unscathed. Never ignore symptoms that are new. As far as recovery it's a bit of a crap shoot. The brain can do some amazing things. Wish you the best

 

WL

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I should also be less flippant.  Clearly this is serious.

If you have a situation in which you need to retrain some neurons, I highly recommend you read Doidge, if only for inspiration.

I do some work for a company that makes electronic eyewear to assist the visually-impaired.  Can you briefly describe your vision-loss characteristic?

I hope you have someone who you think "gets it" as far as care and recovery.  Neuro-plasticity is real.

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14 minutes ago, bacq2bacq said:

http://www.normandoidge.com/?page_id=1042

I'm not the neuro-peep.  He is.  Helped my wife deal, but it was a different deal.  Good luck fixin yer noodle!  Cereally.

Thanks for this recommendation.  I just ordered from Amazon.  Looks right on.  RAmen.

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41 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

2. If you have a stroke and lose peripheral vision out of your right eye, make sure that any pretty girls are seated to your LEFT.

Evere the practicalle!!        :)

Respectte to teh firste of the originalle anachistes to treatte me as equille.  Wisheng you quicke recorverey.                   :)

 

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Recovery of neural function is difficult to predict and essentially time will tell. The greater concern is the cause of the stroke and how to prevent recurrences.

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Everyone should know how to recognize the symptoms. I saw them first hand at the age of 10 when my dad had a massive stroke at the age of 45. He lived another 20 years paralyzed on the right side, without being able to speak.

I happened to be at a lake one day and saw a group of people standing around their friend who was lying on his side, on a hot asphalt parking lot. They were standing there dumbfounded, doing nothing, guessing he had seizure. Meanwhile he is getting burned by the asphalt. I knew immediately he was having a stroke and started yelling at them to call an ambulance. Then we rolled him onto a blanket I had and carried him to some grass in the shade. Guy was approximately 30 as were his friends. 

When seconds counted, these people didn't have a clue. I never found out how that turned out. I wonder if he can still talk. 

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34 minutes ago, cyclone said:

Recovery of neural function is difficult to predict and essentially time will tell. The greater concern is the cause of the stroke and how to prevent recurrences.

Yes, this is right.  I hadn't had a cholesterol test for some time, and was appalled to discover that levels are very high.  Also blood pressure.  Thankfully both of these can be, and are being treated.  Also my alcohol consumption has been radically modified, as has the diet.  

Keep an eye on these things, especially as you age.

As my late old man, who was a prominent surgeon in the UK, used to say, "By the time a man is 45 he's either his own doctor, or a fool."

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Like Dorado, my dad had a massive stroke at age 59 and lived until he was 82, for the most part as a dependent invalid. He did not tell anyone about the symptoms and his treatment was delayed for many hours. Back then, tPA was not a therapy and he only recovered minimal function and subsequent TIAs and finally creeping Alzheimer’s killed him 23 years later.  

Some strokes don’t respond to tPA but many do and it’s imperative to start the treatment within 3 hours. Don’t ignore the symptoms. Ever. The rest of your life can depend on it. With a family history, I see a cardiologist every 6 months, have echos and stress tests when he wants me to and follow his guidance.  

P Wop. Happy you are still with us and best for a solid recovery. 

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4 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

Yes, this is right.  I hadn't had a cholesterol test for some time, and was appalled to discover that levels are very high.  Also blood pressure.  Thankfully both of these can be, and are being treated.  Also my alcohol consumption has been radically modified, as has the diet.  

Keep an eye on these things, especially as you age.

As my late old man, who was a prominent surgeon in the UK, used to say, "By the time a man is 45 he's either his own doctor, or a fool."

The Medics are good at keeping you alive J, but for repair support, both Cardiovascular and Brain, find a Chiropractor or Naturopath who are into Functional Medicine, they are light years ahead.

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1 hour ago, bacq2bacq said:

I should also be less flippant.  Clearly this is serious.

If you have a situation in which you need to retrain some neurons, I highly recommend you read Doidge, if only for inspiration.

I do some work for a company that makes electronic eyewear to assist the visually-impaired.  Can you briefly describe your vision-loss characteristic?

I hope you have someone who you think "gets it" as far as care and recovery.  Neuro-plasticity is real.

Thanks for this.  Well received.  I will push for the best advice I can find.

I had no idea there was a possible assistance for this sort of impairment.  Since the part of the occipital lobe tissue running the right eye is pretty well toast at this point, I don't understand how external assistance is possible.  But if so, great!  Pretty girls on BOTH sides!

There's essentially two or three blank places from about 40° from center to the right, but just in the vertical middle.  Top and very bottom are reasonably OK, with some small holes.  

Any ideas gratefully received.

And I was being flippant too.  It's part of my nature.  I've been struggling with a much larger medical issue for two years, and this seemed to be another issue on top.  Oh heck.

Onwards!

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Timely advice, best wishes for a full and speedy recovery Jer.  You are needed around here. And on the IBNA FB page.

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1 minute ago, SPORTSCAR said:

Timely advice, best wishes for a full and speedy recovery Jer.  You are needed around here. And on the IBNA FB page.

Thanks, mate.  Let's go sailing!

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2 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

Thanks, mate.  Let's go sailing!

Absolutely, the best cure for all known ailments!

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Happened to me in 2011. Heart attack in the morning, CVA (stroke) a few hours later. Both caused by an underlying congenital heart condition (HCOM) which I never knew I had. At the time I was dysphasic and hemiplegic (right side, left hemisphere stoke) Lots of PT and OT later I'm 95% recovered, can walk well, but some weakness and loss of some feeling in my right arm that I doubt will ever get better and the biggest issue I still have is some dysphasia, I loose words when I speak and I'm dyslexic, I can't spell to save my life (thanks spell check) and I mix up words when I write things, and I cannot read aloud, the connection between eyes, Brian and mouth is gone. I also transpose numbers and have issues with remembering telephone numbers, passwords etc. All in all, I count myself lucky, it could have been worse. The brain is very elastic, functions get moved around and I hope your function improved quickly. There is a new treatment involving Embrel Injections that is supposed to speed up recovery. Look it up, I don't think it's mainstream yet, but if it was around in my case I would have tried it. 

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Firstly welcome back from the edge of never and into the club.  Stress is a killer and as you are already on the path to dropping your cholesterol and BP I am hopeful that you are also being careful to filter what stimulus comes in to trigger and feed the stress.  Learn to manage it quickly.  Hypnosis has been remarkable for me.  Glad to expand by PM or phone if you would like. 

Also, since you are located in the land of probably much better docs than here, shop them and find a team who are more than trained monkeys writing prescriptions and overcharging your insurance.  Get referrals and be particular about diagnoses and recommendations.  

Good luck and get back on the water sooner than later.  

Aloha. 

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14 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

I had no idea there was a possible assistance for this sort of impairment.  Since the part of the occipital lobe tissue running the right eye is pretty well toast at this point, I don't understand how external assistance is possible.  But if so, great!  Pretty girls on BOTH sides!

There's essentially two or three blank places from about 40° from center to the right, but just in the vertical middle.  Top and very bottom are reasonably OK, with some small holes. 

Ouch at the boldface, and I'm not an eye-guy (engineer) but the brain has amazing ways of healing.  Given you've got some decent vision I'd say there's reason to be optimistic.  I'd be exploring the hell out of the limits trying to get it to work again, but that's just me.  Get good help, enjoy Doidge, and go sailing.

Do you sail solo, @P_Wop?  "Starboard.  STARBOARD!  STARBOARD!!!!!"

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Fingers and toes crossed for a full recovery.

 What my grandfather once told me, as I was lying on the ground clutching my crotch in agony after an axe handle had assaulted me from below...... "Just remember, that which does not kill you, does not make you stronger. It just didn't kill you."

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2 hours ago, Snaggletooth said:

Respectte to teh firste of the originalle anachistes to treatte me as equille.  Wisheng you quicke recorverey.                   :)

Thank you Snags. That's a profound and honorable bit of approbation. :-)

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58 minutes ago, Mrleft8 said:

"Just remember, that which does not kill you, does not make you stronger. It just didn't kill you."

You Granfathere is wise man!                                         :)

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Best of luck.

while not my field I have done many tracheostomies and feeding tubes for my neuro colleagues. A good number of these patients surprised me by returning to my office for removal of these tubes. Had one guy with spinal cord transection walk into my offices with braces. Amazing.

The neuro system is complex and amazing. People written off years ago when I was starting practice now show.great improvements.

Find a place that does brain rehab. We have McGee in Philly. Keep at it. 

Good luck

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32 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

You Granfathere is wise man!                                         :)

Until he was 91....... Then that that killed him killed Him.

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My mom had a stroke (at 86) while having dinner alone. We didn't find her until noon the next day. She lived another 10 days. Strokes are bad motherfuckers!

(I still feel a little guilt of not going over there when she didn't answer that night, but it wasn't unusual for her to be out to dinner or at the lake house. Still.....)

 

Best wishes for a full recovery! Glad you got help

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4 years ago I suddenly lost vision in the lower left half of my left eye. Yep, blood clot. Sparing all the details (also thought detached retina although it’s not the classic symptoms) so went right to the ED. Nope, tiny blood clot in the vascular bed for the eye. Anyway, almost right away (months) the vision loss retreated to just lower left quadrant of the left eye. The eye Doc said eventually your brain will compensate till you don’t even notice. Also said the loss is likely permanent and whatever you don’t get back pretty quickly almost certainly will be permanent. She was right, 1) now 4 years later what didn’t improve in the first few months (and there was some improvement) never came back, and 2) I almost never notice anymore - although that took a year or more to happen. I play pickleball with great reaction time at the net, golf (and the problems there are not related to vision.......:lol:).........so all is good. Another thing the Doc said was it was a bit of poor luck it went to the eye. It had to be SO small to obstruct in that fine vascular bed that had it driven off almost anywhere else, likely nothing would have happened. 

BTW, since mine was in the blood supply to the eye and yours was in the vision center in the brain those are different and perhaps not completely analogous experiences. 

 

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hey P - just tried to send you a DM, and got the following response.  

P_Wop cannot receive messages.

is you mailbox full or turned off ?

ML

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On 5/15/2019 at 3:04 PM, P_Wop said:

No, not that sort of stroke, you evil-minded buggers.

Well, I had one, 3½ weeks ago.  0800 and on the way out to a biz meeting, when suddenly I couldn't see much out of my right eye, and the stuff on the laptop screen in front of me made no sense whatever.  I just couldn't read or parse what I was seeing.

Anyway, being me, I thought 'detached retina, what a pain' and went down to the car and off 15 miles to the meeting, thankfully with friends.  I got completely lost in a town in which I've lived for 25 years and had to call them to say I was late, and why.  As soon as I arrived at the breakfast joint (Bucks in Woodside CA, which is a most excellent place BTW) they insisted they take me at once to Stanford Hospital, which they did.  Good guys.

Hours of CT and MRI scans and drugs, and they located two clots in the back of my brain, which explained the aphasia and sight loss.  Meds and advice, and more tests, and after me flirting with the very nubile nursing (and medical) staff they ejected me in 36 hours.

Two serious lessons:

1. If you or anyone you know gets suddenly hit with stroke symptoms, get to hospital AT ONCE.  If it can be caught and treated within the first hour or two, then some sort of recovery is possible.  If not, some permanent disability is inevitable.

2. If you have a stroke and lose peripheral vision out of your right eye, make sure that any pretty girls are seated to your LEFT.

And a question for any of you neuro medical peeps out there.  I believe the brain has a degree of ability to recover and rebuild.  Is this possible in the occipital lobe, and if so, may there eventually be some sort of return of lost vision?  I can't get any definitive answers on this at all.  FYI, I'm 63 and pretty healthy otherwise.

Thanks be to The Flying Spaghetti Monster, who has touched me with His Noodly Appendage.  RAmen.

That is the absolutely the truth.

I had a stroke a year ago while driving to my office on a Friday, and lost the ability to speak or drive straight.  Just a couple of blocks to my office, but I was swerving from lane to lane and took 5 tries to get into my garage.  Stumbled into my office on hands and knees, tried to say "Something is wrong" and couldn't.  They got on the phone and 5 minutes later the ER guys show up.  5 minutes later, I'm in the ER of a major hospital with the head of the neurology department asking me questions.  Showed me a picture of a canoe and an umbrella and I couldn't say the words for the life of me.  

Quick dash into the MRI - its not good when they run on the way to the MRI - and back out and the doc offers me tPA a major-league clot buster, but not without potential side effects.   Recited the statistics on outcomes (which included a 6% chance of really, really, really not good) and I gave her the gesture to stick me, because I couldn't talk.  Total time from symptoms to getting tPA in my bloodstream less than 25 minutes.  The effectiveness drops off dramatically after 30 minutes apparently and, as noted above, is ineffective after a couple of hours.

Into intensive care and the next morning, I'm chatting with the docs making the rounds, doing the NYT crossword and walking around (supervised) with a PT nurse.  

Out of the hospital that afternoon.  Feeling fine.

On Monday I was back at work, and went in to my regular doc, jokingly asked if I could play hoops that evening.  She said sure.  "You don't have anything any more."  Then she said that if my stroke had hit me while up hiking in the mountains or out on the water I would be a vegetable or dead.  It was in a bad spot.

Another lesson...it really matters where you are when you stroke out.

Lucky me.  Very lucky me.

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Get well P_Wop, I'll keep posting pics to keep you entertained while you're getting yourself healthy again.

:)

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2 hours ago, Left Shift said:

Another lesson...it really matters where you are when you stroke out.

Lucky me.  Very lucky me.

All great advice.  Well done on getting in earlier than I did. 

I'm such an idiot sometimes.  I think in hindsight that if I'd got to Stanford Hospital in the first 20 minutes (quite possible, it's 3 miles away) rather than drive 25 minutes up to Woodside (and back) then I might be in better shape now.

The key phrase is F.A.S.T.

F – Face drooping
A – Arm weakness
S – Speech difficulty
T – Time to call 911

http://secondscount.org/heart-condition-centers/info-detail-2/act-fast-to-identify-stroke-in-progress#.XN9rUI6pGUk

 

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27 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

All great advice.  Well done on getting in earlier than I did. 

I'm such an idiot sometimes.  I think in hindsight that if I'd got to Stanford Hospital in the first 20 minutes (quite possible, it's 3 miles away) rather than drive 25 minutes up to Woodside (and back) then I might be in better shape now.

The key phrase is F.A.S.T.

F – Face drooping
A – Arm weakness
S – Speech difficulty
T – Time to call 911

http://secondscount.org/heart-condition-centers/info-detail-2/act-fast-to-identify-stroke-in-progress#.XN9rUI6pGUk

 

Male denial syndrome is apparently a very real thing.  I now try to be a wimp and ask for help.  

I also have survived actually asking for directions while driving ... with my ego intact.  Who knew!

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5 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

I also have survived actually asking for directions while driving ... with my ego intact.  Who knew!

:o

I just felt a disturbance in the force.........

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42 minutes ago, P_Wop said:

All great advice.  Well done on getting in earlier than I did. 

 

 

We both should credit friends/co-workers for our recovery.  I probably couldn’t have gotten help on my own.

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28 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

We both should credit friends/co-workers for our recovery.  I probably couldn’t have gotten help on my own.

Yes, we're lucky.  My colleagues Roger and Art had both had a stroke before and were adamant that we go NOW to Stanford.  I was resistant and a bit woolly, as is quite normal, but thanks to both of them for taking command.  God forbid if it had happened while I was a sleep......

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Just a thankyou to all friends here and elsewhere for support and ideas and suggestions in this rather frightening time. It's massively appreciated.  Onwards, and let's go sailing!

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As a youngster compared to most here, I want to thank all you old fellas for your health related advice.

Now, if I can just be smart enough to take heed.......

 

 

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Yup, the leading cause of death in men is stubbornness. 

And 

Just because you are in your 40's doesn't mean you're not having a heart attack  . . . 

Trust me on that second part. 

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3 hours ago, Dorado said:

Yup, the leading cause of death in men is stubbornness. 

And 

Just because you are in your 40's doesn't mean you're not having a heart attack  . . . 

Trust me on that second part. 

I was 38 years old, just out of the Army and in pretty good shape.  I was a CPR instructor, and EMT, had worked in several medical clinics and 2 level 1 trauma centers, so I had a bit of medical experience.  I woke up in the morning with nausea and crushing chest pain.  I went to the bathroom, threw up, took 2 800 mg ibuprofen (soldiers take ibuprofen for everything and anything) and went back to bed.  Woke up a couple of hours later and felt OK.

That night I was sitting in a chair reading a book and the chest pain returned and I started to feel like I would die.  Called 911, and they took me to the hospital.  The ER doc was puzzled, most of my vitals were reasonable.  This was before they could run cardiac enzyme tests very quickly.  They put me on IV nitro and heparin just in case.  They called in a cardiologist due to some small changes in the EKG.  He was on the fence as well.  So they sent me up to a telemetry unit, I wasn't on any IV meds anymore.  By the time I was in the telemetry unit, it was about 3 a.m.  At 9 a.m., a nurse came in with heparin and nitro again.  The cardiac enzyme levels were quite high indicating some damage to the heart muscle.  I had a heart cath and there were no blockages.  It turned out that I had a rare condition caused by a viral infection in the heart as a result of a small bacterial infection I had in my leg a few days before the infarct.  For some reason, in some people a bacterial infection in the body, which causes a high fever, can create conditions for common viruses in the body to grow rapidly in the cardiac muscle.  The virus causes inflammation in the heart muscle which then restricts the blood supply in the same way a blockage in a coronary artery does.  I had a repeat occurrence of the same thing 11 years later.  This time I was already in the hospital for a severe bacterial leg infection, so that was convenient.  I had a bit of left ventricular dysfunction, most of which resolved with time.  Unfortunately there is no treatment for a virus in the heart, only supportive care to reduce the strain on the damaged muscle.  It either kills you or it goes away.

So yes, male denial is quite the thing.  here I was, a person that knew the signs and symptoms of an MI better than a lot of people.  But I was young, healthy, no family history of hear disease, etc.  Even the doctors in the ER weren't sure what was happening.  It is always best to go to the nearest hospital if you have signs of a stroke or heart attack, timely treatment can make a big difference.  Needless to say, now I am very attentive whenever I feel a twinge of chest pain.  

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8 hours ago, Dorado said:

Yup, the leading cause of death in men is stubbornness. 

And 

Just because you are in your 40's doesn't mean you're not having a heart attack  . . . 

Trust me on that second part. 

Had a 58 YO Senior Engineering Tech. Slim, active and seemingly in good shape. Had excellent health insurance and had not been to the doctor in 15 years because he couldn’t be bothered. Massive stroke at work while talking to a couple of coworkers. In an ambulance within 10 minutes and in the local hospital (stroke center) ER 10 minutes later. MRI showed stroke of a type and location where tPA was not an option. Helicopter transfer to one of the best stroke centers in the country. Ended up retired on full disability with vision, right side paralysis and speech problems. Barely able to shuffle from one room to another. Not the life he and his wife had planned  

Really sad part?  Turns out his BP was very high and his cholesterol was off the charts. Walking stroke about to happen. Was just a matter of when. 

ETS and you other guys.  Don’t be an idiot. Don’t be a hypochondriac but get regular check ups.  We are not as “bullet proof” as we think we are and enough folks feel just fine until they drop dead from a treatable condition they don’t know that they had. 

Hell, I’m racing to Bermuda this summer with 5 other guys. Average age is 65. We decided yesterday that we would take an AED and we will all carry personal AIS beacons. Just because. We have all raced offshore before without all of the modern safety gear but individually and collectively decided to gear up a bit more this year. 

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25 minutes ago, Innocent Bystander said:

Had a 58 YO Senior Engineering Tech. Slim, active and seemingly in good shape. Had excellent health insurance and had not been to the doctor in 15 years because he couldn’t be bothered. Massive stroke at work while talking to a couple of coworkers. In an ambulance within 10 minutes and in the local hospital (stroke center) ER 10 minutes later. MRI showed stroke of a type and location where tPA was not an option. Helicopter transfer to one of the best stroke centers in the country. Ended up retired on full disability with vision, right side paralysis and speech problems. Barely able to shuffle from one room to another. Not the life he and his wife had planned  

Really sad part?  Turns out his BP was very high and his cholesterol was off the charts. Walking stroke about to happen. Was just a matter of when. 

ETS and you other guys.  Don’t be an idiot. Don’t be a hypochondriac but get regular check ups.  We are not as “bullet proof” as we think we are and enough folks feel just fine until they drop dead from a treatable condition they don’t know that they had. 

Hell, I’m racing to Bermuda this summer with 5 other guys. Average age is 65. We decided yesterday that we would take an AED and we will all carry personal AIS beacons. Just because. We have all raced offshore before without all of the modern safety gear but individually and collectively decided to gear up a bit more this year. 

Good advice here. Because of my profession, I had annual physicals most of my adult life. Being "in shape" helps but as in the example IB told....it isn't a promise....anybody remember Jim Fix? Our (Mrs PB & I) annual physicals have caught more than one health issue early, long before any symptoms might have tipped us off. I still see my cardiologist annually, dermatologist every 6 months, get scoped (colon) on schedule, and my GP annually for a overall physical. Given my profession, I fully expect cancer will be my ride out but depending on the type hope that some extension of my life with quality can be gained by early detection.

Don't piss away a perfectly good life through inattention.......................

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Modern medicine gets all sort of criticism but thank your lucky stars you had access .... I am running with an expired warranty these days one never knows when something will pop up. A few weeks back I had (Google Dx) a migraine aura, without a headache...freaked me out for 20 minutes …looked pretty much just like this...no other sensations...just out of caution I checked into a  Holiday Inn Express for the night

aura.jpg

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5 hours ago, Point Break said:

Good advice here. Because of my profession, I had annual physicals most of my adult life. Being "in shape" helps but as in the example IB told....it isn't a promise....anybody remember Jim Fix? Our (Mrs PB & I) annual physicals have caught more than one health issue early, long before any symptoms might have tipped us off. I still see my cardiologist annually, dermatologist every 6 months, get scoped (colon) on schedule, and my GP annually for a overall physical. Given my profession, I fully expect cancer will be my ride out but depending on the type hope that some extension of my life with quality can be gained by early detection.

Don't piss away a perfectly good life through inattention.......................

I've had physicals.  They reflect my choices.  I don't believe in the medical industry.

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3 minutes ago, hasher said:

I've had physicals.  They reflect my choices. I don't believe in the medical industry.

LOL....you will one day looking up from a gurney

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2 minutes ago, BravoBravo said:

LOL....you will one day looking up from a gurney

As we all will.  I like life.  That's why I try to be rational about it.

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12 minutes ago, hasher said:

I've had physicals.  They reflect my choices.  I don't believe in the medical industry.

I agree.  I refuse to take pills (I do take some vitamins) and my dad was a pharmacist and got that from him.  I feel great and don't want to become one of those that takes 20 pills a day to get by.  If I go young because of that choice, so be it. 

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My father just turned 92.  He wants to outlive my mother, because she has some form of dementia.  I think it is noble of him.  

Life is short.  The soul is eternal.

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2 minutes ago, Point Break said:

We all make choices...........

I lied, I already missed my opportunity to go young.  

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13 minutes ago, Cal20sailor said:

I agree.  I refuse to take pills (I do take some vitamins) and my dad was a pharmacist and got that from him.  I feel great and don't want to become one of those that takes 20 pills a day to get by.  If I go young because of that choice, so be it. 

LOL...how old are you...no one WANTS to take 20 pills a day... I've resisted but when labs come back indicating a control that is not coming from a heathy lifestyle and you research what can happen at ever greater odds by not addressing with (20 pills a day) you may change your mind.....absolutely your choice...  

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17 minutes ago, BravoBravo said:

LOL...how old are you...no one WANTS to take 20 pills a day... I've resisted but when labs come back indicating a control that is not coming from a heathy lifestyle and you research what can happen at ever greater odds by not addressing with (20 pills a day) you may change your mind.....absolutely your choice...  

61 and I was a partner on a plane with the guy from Pfizer who made Lipitor happen.  It is my choice, but I believe once you get on pills, you never get off.  I have no debts and will leave money to my survivors.  

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Just now, Cal20sailor said:

61 and I was a partner on a plane with the guy from Pfizer who made Lipitor happen.  It is my choice, but I believe once you get on pills, you never get off.  I have no debts and will leave money to my survivors.  

You gotta be young to think like that...I'm 10 years ahead of you and thought the same way, 2 years ago BP med...2 months ago a statin...what is  that  Satchel Paige quote ?..in my case the answer is father time ...other than the pills I pop I feel great and enjoy good health...I kind of what to keep it going

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25 minutes ago, BravoBravo said:

You gotta be young to think like that...I'm 10 years ahead of you and thought the same way, 2 years ago BP med...2 months ago a statin...what is  that  Satchel Paige quote ?..in my case the answer is father time ...other than the pills I pop I feel great and enjoy good health...I kind of what to keep it going

Satch had several great lines.  Perhaps you were thinking of “how old would you be if you didn’t know how old you was.”

I’m75. Meds for BP and cholesterol. Had double bypass in 2016 and a stent in 2017. One knee replacement and the other one probably needs it as well.  Survived malignant melanoma and prostate cancer.  See my gp every 6 months and my cardiologist when she decides it is time.  Time for a colonoscopy.  GI doc is a sailor. Last two were perfectly normal.  My dermatologist left the area and have had no luck in finding someone as thorough and personable as she was. Feel fine.  Still cut my own grass and shovel my own snow (with snowblower).  Father died at 50, mother at 93.

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My view is folks who don't engage the medical surveillance and care available are sorta like the anti-vaxer's. The notion that modern medicine is bad for you is ill conceived. That is of course as long as you are engaged and thoughtful in your own care plan and research/ask questions. People who say they don't really care in various cavalier manner most often are not close to the actual precipice. Actually reconciling the notion of doing nothing in the face of something that can be treated effectively is harder when its real.

Anyway, I still think its a personal decision and have no problem with folks who decide to check out early. Improves the insurance costs.

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8 minutes ago, Ease the sheet. said:
4 hours ago, Point Break said:

We all make choices...........

And everyone has been perfect so far............

thack you                                                 :)

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1 hour ago, Ease the sheet. said:

And everyone has been perfect so far............

Perfect? That’s not the way life is.........still, a person must choose and then live with the consequences of those choices. In order to choose one has to decide one thing is a better path than another. Few people choose a path they judge the inferior one. 

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On 5/15/2019 at 6:04 PM, P_Wop said:

No, not that sort of stroke, you evil-minded buggers.

Well, I had one, 3½ weeks ago.  0800 and on the way out to a biz meeting, when suddenly I couldn't see much out of my right eye, and the stuff on the laptop screen in front of me made no sense whatever.  I just couldn't read or parse what I was seeing.

Anyway, being me, I thought 'detached retina, what a pain' and went down to the car and off 15 miles to the meeting, thankfully with friends.  I got completely lost in a town in which I've lived for 25 years and had to call them to say I was late, and why.  As soon as I arrived at the breakfast joint (Bucks in Woodside CA, which is a most excellent place BTW) they insisted they take me at once to Stanford Hospital, which they did.  Good guys.

Hours of CT and MRI scans and drugs, and they located two clots in the back of my brain, which explained the aphasia and sight loss.  Meds and advice, and more tests, and after me flirting with the very nubile nursing (and medical) staff they ejected me in 36 hours.

Two serious lessons:

1. If you or anyone you know gets suddenly hit with stroke symptoms, get to hospital AT ONCE.  If it can be caught and treated within the first hour or two, then some sort of recovery is possible.  If not, some permanent disability is inevitable.

2. If you have a stroke and lose peripheral vision out of your right eye, make sure that any pretty girls are seated to your LEFT.

And a question for any of you neuro medical peeps out there.  I believe the brain has a degree of ability to recover and rebuild.  Is this possible in the occipital lobe, and if so, may there eventually be some sort of return of lost vision?  I can't get any definitive answers on this at all.  FYI, I'm 63 and pretty healthy otherwise.

Thanks be to The Flying Spaghetti Monster, who has touched me with His Noodly Appendage.  RAmen.

39 days ago, I was sitting at my office computer after having taught a class.  One day later, I woke up in the hospital.  I experienced two periods of heart stoppage, one for 6 minutes in the office and another for 2 minutes in the ambulance.  My office mates saved my life by hooking me up to an AED and performing CPR until the paramedics arrived. 

Long story short, I'm in rehab and I'm allowed to walk on my own now.  I occasionally swap words around, but I catch it immediately and the doctors say my brain will rewire that stuff after a while. 

Good luck on the vision.  I know I was terrified that I was brain damaged, but I still seem able to program computers and perform math functions in my head.  I was lucky.  It's amazing what modern medicine can do.  The spaghetti monster visited me that day. I'm one of the lucky ones. 

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47 minutes ago, Grrr... said:

39 days ago, I was sitting at my office computer after having taught a class.  One day later, I woke up in the hospital.  I experienced two periods of heart stoppage, one for 6 minutes in the office and another for 2 minutes in the ambulance.  My office mates saved my life by hooking me up to an AED and performing CPR until the paramedics arrived. 

Long story short, I'm in rehab and I'm allowed to walk on my own now.  I occasionally swap words around, but I catch it immediately and the doctors say my brain will rewire that stuff after a while. 

Good luck on the vision.  I know I was terrified that I was brain damaged, but I still seem able to program computers and perform math functions in my head.  I was lucky.  It's amazing what modern medicine can do.  The spaghetti monster visited me that day. I'm one of the lucky ones. 

Dadgummit, you had a tough one, but thanks to your colleagues you're here to talk about it. 

It's absolutely no joke, and rehab I'm told will take time.  Above all behavior modification seems to be the key to survival.  Who knew?

My habit of a large slosh of Mount Gay in the morning triple espresso with sugar and honey is now history.  Actually, I don't miss it.

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12 hours ago, Point Break said:

60524248_10213588429053303_7939898829418004480_n.jpg

High Blood Pressure is better than No Blood Pressure!

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58 minutes ago, Grrr... said:

39 days ago, I was sitting at my office computer after having taught a class.  One day later, I woke up in the hospital.  I experienced two periods of heart stoppage, one for 6 minutes in the office and another for 2 minutes in the ambulance.  My office mates saved my life by hooking me up to an AED and performing CPR until the paramedics arrived. 

Long story short, I'm in rehab and I'm allowed to walk on my own now.  I occasionally swap words around, but I catch it immediately and the doctors say my brain will rewire that stuff after a while. 

Good luck on the vision.  I know I was terrified that I was brain damaged, but I still seem able to program computers and perform math functions in my head.  I was lucky.  It's amazing what modern medicine can do.  The spaghetti monster visited me that day. I'm one of the lucky ones. 

The daughter of a FD Captain/Paramedic I worked with for many years (who succumbed to job related cancer a few years ago) is a Detroit Paramedic. Wouldn’t that be a small world if it was her. Congrats on your second life. I’ve participated in that dance many many times but it never fails to amaze me. 

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2 minutes ago, silent bob said:

High Blood Pressure is better than No Blood Pressure!

For a while....but one inevitably leads to the other. ;)

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54 minutes ago, Dorado said:

Enjoy every sandwich  !

Good ole Warren.......irreverent to the end. 

I’m especially fond of the video he did just before he passed for his song “Keep Me in Your Heart” Very touching. You might notice any number of familiar faces to say goodbye for his last recording sessions. 

 

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I guess I should contribute with my little saga.

About 8 years ago I was in well-known racing program and the thick of our season and besides colds or flu I have been in excellent health for most of my life. Actually a carded professional skier in youth but I thought I was getting a cold or something but isn't getting better. I thought it was odd and perhaps it was pneumonia or something. My doctor from a young age had retired or passed on so I didn't have a regular physician for years. But I finally went to a new doctor as I wasn't getting better. He checked me over and there is something very wrong here heart rate very high an erratic so para-medics arrive at the clinic and I'm off to emergency. Almost a month in the hospital later I'm home. Turns out I had a bicuspid aortic valve go on me from a birth defect. It took me weeks to be well enough to do open heart surgery. Spent ICU for 10 days (they don't put you in the ICU for no reason!). The surgery involved an artificial/porcine valve put in (ya, I know - pig valve! My crew and friends said: Imagine that - spare parts for you!). After some rehab and therapy to make sure I was doing fine. No marathons for me anymore but I'll live. 18 months later, my internist, said you have pretty high afib and recommended to give me a shot with the electrical paddles which is normal fair to stop the flutter. We did that and it worked well. But 6 months later I was out cruising in Howe Sound at our club outstation and I woke up feeling a little funky more than a hangover from the night before. Slurring my words (than normal) and next thing I know I'm on the hovercraft to Vancouver general. Maybe a little of denial but I was able to jump on to the beach and walk to the waiting ambulance. They kept me overnight for observation reasons and released me as there weren't real symptoms and probably they were too busy to deal with me. Next morning still feeling funky so off to the emergency room near home. My internalist showed up as well as my GP. Turns I had a T.I.A. or mini-stroke. Stayed in the hospital for several weeks as it was a bad one. Barely speak but walking was there, albeit slow and my balance went for a shit. The balance came back but the speech wasn't great at all. I have developed aphasia too and probably caused some brain damage. I was able to get back on the boat but and went for therapy for 18 months. It helped a bit but not enough as I'm a sales professional as I have to talk for a living and it wasn't there. Therapists after 18 months they said there is nothing more we can do for you. So I had to do something and live like for the rest of my life? But Vancouver is an Asian city these days so we found a full-on Chinese traditional chinese medicine or TCM that dealt with neuro acupuncture. My first session I already felt it. 6 months of sessions, every 2 weeks, my speech was coming back. 8 months in, although still not perfect, my GP did a check up generally and he said your speech as come along and shouldn't have happened. I said: Doctor - I couldn't even say "remarkable" months ago but here I am. Again, still not perfect and a struggle when I'm tired under stress but? I'm going in the right direction anyway. Don't worry much about picking up the phone so much and I used to lecture on racing/tactics so I'm almost ready to do that again. So thank you Dr. Chen.

One of the side benefits of my acupuncture sessions he's helped me with my aphasia, balance and general wellness. 

Sorry to bore you with this but it might help others.                  

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Thanks, Maxx.  Excellent history.  And a reminder to look outside the box for longer term cures.  Yours seems to have been most beneficial.

Onwards!

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1 minute ago, P_Wop said:

Thanks, Maxx.  Excellent history.  And a reminder to look outside the box for longer term cures.  Yours seems to have been most beneficial.

Onwards!

Thanks mate. I have had excellent care and not for a moment to walk away from traditional medicine as my recent check-ups that my blood pressure and are vitals are in great shape but partly to do my sessions for Dr. Chen. It's a different thought process for general wellness. I do take medication to blood thinners etc to avoid another T.I.A. to be safe but my internalist is cutting them down. One of the side benefits of acupuncture that I had forgotten that I had an arthritic hand from my pro ski days. Not some much to have surgery, therapy or popping more pills but in my second session with my Chinese doctor I asked: While you're up - can you do anything with hand? It's bugging me since my early 20's. Sure he said. He did. Two sessions, along with my regular sessions, not better - totally gone! Never a problem since.     

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An old girl friend recently had a stroke. Her sister was with her at the time but she was too slow and couldn't reach....

Hat, Coat, see ya...

Cheers P Wop, hang in there mate. I'd like to say I was rooting for you but that sort of thing is frowned upon here in Australia.

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On 5/18/2019 at 10:13 AM, Left Shift said:

Another lesson...it really matters where you are when you stroke out.

Lucky me.  Very lucky me.

I still laugh at the use of "Carpe Diem", if i had been "Carpere Diem" 2 years ago I would have been fish or worm food (apologies to any latin experts, best guess at past tense) :)

I was lucky and collapsed at home with my wife around when 2 aneurysms burst in my head, 80% mortality rate, 80% chance of needing permanent hospitalization, 12 days in an ICU.  EDIT: and my first ride in a helicopter but I was in an induced coma. grrrr lol.  If you don't like headaches you don't want to experience a craniotomy, they run a circular saw lengthwise along your skull and split it in two, I watched a video of one after getting out of hospital, ha ha  :) 

So a 4% chance of getting to my self rehab where I walked 1,000 km (200 meters would originally put me back in bed for a few hours) then graduating to pushbike which I have now pedaled 3,000 km.

To complete how conflicting Carpe Diem is I still wake up every day and go "wow, no tubes, sweet" put some Pendulum or Prodigy on and dance with my kids before setting off alone for a 3 hour ride in the bush.

So if anyone can translate this to latin it would be a better saying:

"Seize the day unless you are going to have a major medical emergency where you should go and play canasta in the waiting room of a well equipped hospital..."

Perhaps not quite as pithy as the original but more accurate :) :)

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@P_Wop  I am curious about three things:

1) Are you enjoying Doidge?

2) Has your blind spot to starboard changed at all yet?***

3) Have you found someone who believes you can recover function, and who is helping you in that?

Cheers and good luck...
ben

*** This "disability" could yet prove to be a strategic advantage, if you let it become well-known at your club...

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On 5/18/2019 at 12:46 PM, hasher said:

I've had physicals.  They reflect my choices.  I don't believe in the medical industry.

Good thinking there.  Clear, rational thought process in action.  Dropped right into a thread discussing how the medical "industry" has kept people alive and healthy and enjoying life. 

I had one shot in the arm provided by a medical "industry" co-conspirator and I went from a mumbling, semi-paralyzed lump to a walking, running, sailing, back-at-work-in-two-days person who should take a few pills a day to minimize a possible recurrence.  But I'm sure you would make the opposite choice.

How do you feel about climate change?  The future of coal as a preferred energy source?  Heavy metals in drinking water?  The ozone layer?  Are you in denial on those as well?

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45 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

Good thinking there.  Clear, rational thought process in action.  Dropped right into a thread discussing how the medical "industry" has kept people alive and healthy and enjoying life. 

I had one shot in the arm provided by a medical "industry" co-conspirator and I went from a mumbling, semi-paralyzed lump to a walking, running, sailing, back-at-work-in-two-days person who should take a few pills a day to minimize a possible recurrence.  But I'm sure you would make the opposite choice.

How do you feel about climate change?  The future of coal as a preferred energy source?  Heavy metals in drinking water?  The ozone layer?  Are you in denial on those as well?

I have had routine physicals.  All the tests indicate I am healthy.  It is not from just luck.  I eat according to best science backed information.  I exercise regularly.  I sleep well.  I have some excellent social relations.  I avoid excessive alcohol and I don't use tobacco products.  I live a science based life.

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1 hour ago, bacq2bacq said:

@P_Wop  I am curious about three things:

1) Are you enjoying Doidge?

2) Has your blind spot to starboard changed at all yet?***

3) Have you found someone who believes you can recover function, and who is helping you in that?

Cheers and good luck...
ben

*** This "disability" could yet prove to be a strategic advantage, if you let it become well-known at your club...

Thanks, mate.  Answers:

1. Doidge is awesome.  I'm 1/3 of the way through and have learned so much already.  A great resource.

2. Nope.  Blind spot still there.  Going in tomorrow to talk to the 'experts' about that.  In the meantime changing how I walk and live and drive.  The pain is that my right eye is the dominant one, and a load better than my left one.  -0.5 rather than -2.0.  This leads to some confusion.  Hot girls to the left, though.

3. Yes.  You and me and others on this thread, and a buddy who re-generated some ability after his issue.  And some reading and study.

I'm not sure about the strategic advantage?  Perhaps I could be like Lord Nelson who put his telescope to his blind eye: "I see no ships."

 

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38 minutes ago, hasher said:

I have had routine physicals.  All the tests indicate I am healthy.  It is not from just luck.  I eat according to best science backed information.  I exercise regularly.  I sleep well.  I have some excellent social relations.  I avoid excessive alcohol and I don't use tobacco products.  I live a science based life.

Gee, I did & do all that too.  And, yet, amazingly, I stroked out due to a small congenital heart defect.  I also now live a science-based life.  Science repaired the damage before it cost me my life.

Good luck.  

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Just now, Left Shift said:

Gee, I did & do all that too.  And, yet, amazingly, I stroked out due to a small congenital heart defect.  I also now live a science-based life.  Science repaired the damage before it cost me my life.

Good luck.  

I do admire the advances in modern medicine.  The legal system has not changed much.

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55 minutes ago, hasher said:

I do admire the advances in modern medicine.  The legal system has not changed much.

And that's relevant because ...

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Just now, Blue Crab said:

And that's relevant because ...

Perhaps I just should have taken this out of the thread and continued the discussion privately.

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2 hours ago, hasher said:

Perhaps I just should have taken this out of the thread and continued the discussion privately.

No...I'm done here.  How you can "admire" something you "don't believe in" is a viewpoint that I will have to ponder...no I won't.  

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On 5/19/2019 at 11:30 AM, Point Break said:

Perfect? That’s not the way life is.........still, a person must choose and then live with the consequences of those choices. In order to choose one has to decide one thing is a better path than another. Few people choose a path they judge the inferior one. 

Even my truly awful decisions are perfect.

 

It's how I roll grandpa!

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7 hours ago, Cal20sailor said:

Well, at least strokes are not discriminatory based on wealth.  Dan Gilbert (Quicken Loans and owner of Cleveland Cavs and only 57) suffered one a few days ago.

https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/detroit/2019/05/28/dan-gilbert-stroke-family-net-worth/1256265001/

None of us are getting out of here alive!

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7 hours ago, Ease the sheet. said:

It's how I roll grandpa!

Waitte, our you donig thisse to dissorientte hime or robb hime?                                          :)

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42 minutes ago, Snaggletooth said:

Waitte, our you donig thisse to dissorientte hime or robb hime?                                          :)

Missig a coma?

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14 hours ago, Ease the sheet. said:

Even my truly awful decisions are perfect.

 

It's how I roll grandpa!

:lol:

Well played! WFD indeed.

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19 hours ago, Cal20sailor said:

Well, at least strokes are not discriminatory based on wealth.  Dan Gilbert (Quicken Loans and owner of Cleveland Cavs and only 57) suffered one a few days ago.

https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/detroit/2019/05/28/dan-gilbert-stroke-family-net-worth/1256265001/

There are dozens of businesses here in the D holding their breath

DG is the biggest benefactor for the whole region, and his projects and companies seem to be a pretty big portion of the GDP of this place!

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Late to the 'response' party here but...  another avenue to investigate in rehabilitation is HBOT (hyperbaric oxygen therapy) The premise is getting oxygenated blood to and around damaged areas that could otherwise be blocked /disabled. There is much supported data indicating improved function after HBOT.  We saw some improvement with my son after his stroke.....  We were skeptical at first, but decided that, if nothing else, it couldn't hurt. I'm pleased with the result. My only regret is we didn't know about HBOT sooner... Recovery might have been even more thorough had we started earlier...

My $.02 worth...

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