badornato1

J105 Symmetrical Kite

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we have a long 68 mile dead downwind race in sacramento delta.  thinking about adapting our old chute from our Moore 24 to the new J105.

any thoughts?

we would need a spinaker pole and some hardware but should make doublehanding a lot easier than jibing every 15 minutes

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I suppose it depends if you can do it with 1 or 3 jibes. It might be tricky to jibe a pole with two. Not impossible, but probably harder than jibing an asym. And in heavy air, it could get pretty sloppy.

 

You'd also need a new phrf rating, right?

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7 hours ago, shubrook said:

I suppose it depends if you can do it with 1 or 3 jibes. It might be tricky to jibe a pole with two. Not impossible, but probably harder than jibing an asym. And in heavy air, it could get pretty sloppy.

It's not as hard as you might think. Pilot on, strap the kite down with lots of infucker, go forward and end-for-end the pole, then come back and drive her through the gybe. Your co-skipper can play with the main if he/she needs something to do, otherwise time to go and put the kettle on for a celebratory cup of tea once you have achieved the manoeuvre.

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Why not sail deeper angles, 150 to 170?  I have always been amazed at how dead down the boat can go.  You risk an accidental gybe but that is the case with any rig when it's sailed too deep.

If the boat is easily rigged for it could try but it seems like it would become an over engineered catastrophe.  Where do you attach the inboard end of the pole?  You will have to add guys, more clutter.  No forward halyard to use for the topping lift,  which I guess you could use the jib halyard.  Downfucker control in theory could be the tack like with more hardware.  Hmmmm

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How big is the kite on a Moore 24?

If you have a new J/105 yet you yearn for the days of end-for-end pole gybes, you just set your money on fire

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If you had a Moore 24 and you now have a J/105, you just set your money on fire

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more helpfully, there was a 105 called Walloping Swede that did a Pac Cup or two with symmetrical gear. I think it cost them 6 sec/mile though I don't know how big they went on the pole size and girths. 

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Moore 24 kite would be way too small. But if you are going to do the Ditch on a 105 Sym is the way to go.

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Take the Moore on ditch run, way easier on the way home with the Moore. 

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Would rather doublehand an OD J105 with lots of jibes versus a jury-rigged too-small symmetrical kite on a 105.  Just saying.  

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If you need to sail long DDW on a J/105, I would suggest taking the main down and sailing with just the kite. You can raise the tack 8 feet off the end of the pole.

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You can sail a J105 wing-on-wing dead down wind. It's not super-fast, and it's not super-stable, but it gives you some options. In light air you can simply throw the main across and leave the kite where it was. In heavy air you'll need to jibe the kite and leave the main.

I ran this test along the City Front in an ebb. I went inshore for relief and did the wing/wing thing, other boats did the jibe in and out thing. It turned out that wing/wing was very slightly slower - perhaps 1/2 BL from the H-beam to wave organ.

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