Bull City

Galley equipment

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21 hours ago, stumblingthunder said:

Really mess with them, ask how much would a "Last", "Sack" or "Amphora" of the divine product would cost.

- Stumbling

In  'straya the 'goon can still be found... https://www.liquorland.com.au/redwine/pleasant-valley-sweet-apera-flagon-2lt_101943 

It predates cask or box wine and these days is mainly port or sweet sherry... back in the dream time I seem to recall sweet white wines... the ones that used glycol for added sweetness....

As the blurb for the one linked to above says...'Perfect for cooking or mixed drinks' or that two dog night on a park bench with only a copy of the Sporting Globe for company...... 

 

That was why Stanton the Elder went gaga

 

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So his neighbours baked bungarra on a barbie on the lawn
And invited all their relatives from Meekatharra to come down
'Hey, Edwin, don't you forget to bring a big flagon of woobla
There's a party on at my 'ouse!'

 

 

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Something everyone should have, a Kenmore Cooker Fryer with Automatic Heat Control. This one belonged to my in-laws and was probably purchased in the 1950s. It is now in our "infrequently used appliance room." Although we cannot locate the user manual, I suspect that you can plug this baby in and do anything. Note that in addition to the SS frying basket, it has a real glass lid. It is very substantial.

I apologize for this sideways view. (Maybe Ish can fix it.)

IMG_4214.JPG.aa7cd449c26fd3faa352d89951ba99a4.JPG

Here  is the amazing range of things you can do: baked beans to fish balls. The rectangle above the temperature dial is just a light - like a waffle iron light - not a digital read out. I felt that this reference plate should be updated for cheese fondue. I sent a letter to Sears, Roebuck & Co., but no answer yet.

IMG_4215.JPG.d493690e246a5a7cf643b7bbb46ff551.JPG

PM me if you'd like to borrow it for a party. :D

 

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On 5/27/2019 at 12:23 PM, B.J. Porter said:

Not. Not even if I didn't have space issues.

I have some regret for a mini food processor we sold at a yard sale before moving on the boat, but that's more pesto related. We still don't have room for one.

Since you live on a boat, this would be more appropriate.

 

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15 minutes ago, Bull City said:

Something everyone should have, a Kenmore Cooker Fryer with Automatic Heat Control. This one belonged to my in-laws and was probably purchased in the 1950s. It is now in our "infrequently used appliance room." Although we cannot locate the user manual, I suspect that you can plug this baby in and do anything. Note that in addition to the SS frying basket, it has a real glass lid. It is very substantial.

I apologize for this sideways view. (Maybe Ish can fix it.)

IMG_4214.JPG.aa7cd449c26fd3faa352d89951ba99a4.JPG

Here  is the amazing range of things you can do: baked beans to fish balls. The rectangle above the temperature dial is just a light - like a waffle iron light - not a digital read out. I felt that this reference plate should be updated for cheese fondue. I sent a letter to Sears, Roebuck & Co., but no answer yet.

IMG_4215.JPG.d493690e246a5a7cf643b7bbb46ff551.JPG

PM me if you'd like to borrow it for a party. :D

 

That Kenmore would definitely merit a place of honor in my kitchen.

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That is oddly reminiscent of one of my laboratory heating baths, but probably less precise.  You fill it with water or antifreeze, or oil, or sand, depending on what temperature you want and for what.  It's part of my rotary evaporator set.

e028682-medium.jpg

I think the only "vintage" kitchen appliance that I've kept from the ancestors is this 1920's percolator set... I think this is the same one, but mine is on a silver tray.  It works, though it takes a long time to perk.  The cord looks awfully sketchy.  Can't imagine who I'd actually deploy it for.  Yacht Club Nobs in blue blazers, I suppose. Would look OK on something with a lot more brightwork and LOA than my boat.

Ah.  Just had to keep scrolling down to find a better image:

51891299_1_x.jpg?auto=webp&format=pjpg&v

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

Since you live on a boat, this would be more appropriate.

 

If there's a larger "Tuna-matic" I'm in.

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When I can find it I buy McCormick disposable pepper grinders because they are adjustable  

Sure I would like a nice tall matched polished set for posh but McCormick do me just fine. My morning baguette stuffed with bacon and egg needs that sprinkle of coarse ground pepper and it tastes just as good posh grinder or plebeian.

BTW if you are desperate it is possible to pry off the top of the McCormick and refill it. My success rate is about 60 %   

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I would not for a minute say it's as wonderful as Bull's Cooker Fryer, but we do have a Crocker Cooker Fryer. We didn't use it for a long time, but I've gotten it out recently for pulled pork. Ours is the same attractive olive color as in the picture, but our lid is metal, not glass. We did throw away the fry basket since it got disgusting with cooked-on oil plus dust.

Instant Pots (and imitators) are the current succès fou.

2019-06-23_0954.png

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18 hours ago, TQA said:

When I can find it I buy McCormick disposable pepper grinders because they are adjustable  

Disposable is a bigly No-No.

7 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

Ours is the same attractive olive color as in the picture,

I think that olive color was known as Avocado.

7 hours ago, SemiSalt said:

We did throw away the fry basket since it got disgusting with cooked-on oil plus dust.

Fortunately, my late mother-in-law, who was a wonderful woman, was also a fierce enemy of dirt and grime.

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21 hours ago, TQA said:

When I can find it I buy McCormick disposable pepper grinders because they are adjustable  

 

The Kirkland pepper grinder from Costco is adjustable and refillable.

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11 hours ago, weightless said:

The Kirkland pepper grinder from Costco is adjustable and refillable.

And in a pinch you can use it to repel boarders.

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That's impressive. No way I could grind fast enough to produce a spray.

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6 hours ago, IStream said:

That's impressive. No way I could grind fast enough to produce a spray.

I noticed that there are some electrically driven pepper grinders on the market. Maybe you would need that.

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i just got a couple of sizes of these

Charles Viancin Lily Pad Silicone Lid

silicone "lids" that grab on to the rim of bowls and stuff going into microwave, oven or fridge.  a quick rinse when they come off the bowl...pretty handy.

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16 hours ago, Bull City said:

I noticed that there are some electrically driven pepper grinders on the market. Maybe you would need that.

I used to have one. It also had a light on the bottom so you could see how much you'd put on.

Took six AAA's though and probably would not have survived long living on the boat.

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We use a rechargeable drill on our manual coffee grinder.

its a pink ladies Makita, so that’s all right, lives in the kitchen and Sweet Hart has found a variety of uses...

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8 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

I used to have one. It also had a light on the bottom so you could see how much you'd put on.

Took six AAA's though and probably would not have survived long living on the boat.

We had one like that at home.  It didn’t adjust very well, and took forever.  Eventually your meal was covered in fine pepper dust.

It didn’t survive long at home, but probably for different reasons.

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OK, so this is an ingredient question. Mrs. Bull and I occasionally make pasta with a simple clam sauce, using canned clams. I've used Bumble Bee baby clams. There OK, but I wonder if you chaps have found a better alternative. Now I know that some of you lucky fellows have access to remarkably fresh bi-valves, but I don't. 

Thank you.

BTW, Mrs. Bull and I had some scrumptious mussels from Costco the other night. Very clean, very fresh, and very few duds.

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4 minutes ago, Bull City said:

OK, so this is an ingredient question. Mrs. Bull and I occasionally make pasta with a simple clam sauce, using canned clams. I've used Bumble Bee baby clams. There OK, but I wonder if you chaps have found a better alternative. Now I know that some of you lucky fellows have access to remarkably fresh bi-valves, but I don't. 

Thank you.

BTW, Mrs. Bull and I had some scrumptious mussels from Costco the other night. Very clean, very fresh, and very few duds.

I can mail you some live clams if you like.

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Just now, Ishmael said:

I can mail you some live clams if you like.

Kind of you to offer, but by the time they get here, I will probably be able to smell them coming up the street.

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I saw this thread heading, "Galley equipment" just after downloading some photos during a recent solo overnight. We've owned this galley for over 20 seasons now and it occurred to me that despite countless (seriously) meals, our galley equipment is spare.

Much of it - the 60's fashion plate ware (that matches the 60's style Formica), several of the pots and pans and a few of the hand tools - came with the boat, inherited from the PO.

I also recognize a Revere fry pan that came from our last boat, which came from our home kitchen,...that one of us 'brought to the marriage', as my partner is fond of saying. Not a matching piece yet over decades, all have managed to find a nesting orientation within the small cave lockers. 

This was a simple meal for one; 2 local organic lamb sausages, fresh picked corn on the cob, local greens with a small jar of dressing I wouldn't have a clue how to create. Simple, delicious. 

Everything you ever need to cook a lavish meal, if you are so inspired and experienced with a boat, is tucked somewhere in this tiny space still floating out on the harbor today. 

1390586070_Galley2020.thumb.jpg.687b6bc2c2f79c369475ccd58df733e6.jpg

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I am bemused by all this talk of kitchen machinery.

The older I get, the more I have come around to the view that the best equipment set is small and simple, but of the highest quality you can afford.  These days I just have a few very good knives, well-maintained, and a few very good pans.  Overall, they let me do a better faster job than the machines.

The only electrical gadget I have retained is my cheap electric pepper mill (~€8 in LIDL). When I am tired and have thrown together a quick meal, not having to sweat the pepper mill is a joy, and with rechargeable AA batteries it works fine.  I keep meaning to buy a few more of them for other spices, but have a knack of missing their arrival in LIDL.

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On 5/24/2019 at 11:01 AM, Israel Hands said:

IDK about the best home vacuum cleaner, but for a sailboat the Dyson Car & Auto vacuum cannot be beaten.

Image result for dyson auto vacuum

Perfect for keeping crumbs off the cabin sole and dirt out of hard-to-reach corners.

What calibers do they come in?

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7 hours ago, sailpower said:

What calibers do they come in?

I think that's a phased plasma rifle in the 40 watt range.

 

@Kris Cringle I too have a Reverware pan I brought into the marriage as well as some Buffalo China my parents bought in the 70's. The Revereware are some of the pans that can stand constant salt water washing and heat up fast and evenly. 

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11 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

I am bemused by all this talk of kitchen machinery.

The older I get, the more I have come around to the view that the best equipment set is small and simple, but of the highest quality you can afford.  These days I just have a few very good knives, well-maintained, and a few very good pans.  Overall, they let me do a better faster job than the machines.

The only electrical gadget I have retained is my cheap electric pepper mill (~€8 in LIDL). When I am tired and have thrown together a quick meal, not having to sweat the pepper mill is a joy, and with rechargeable AA batteries it works fine.  I keep meaning to buy a few more of them for other spices, but have a knack of missing their arrival in LIDL.

+1. I'd swap the electric pepper grinder for a small hand-held blender tho'.

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12 hours ago, TwoLegged said:

I am bemused by all this talk of kitchen machinery.

The older I get, the more I have come around to the view that the best equipment set is small and simple, but of the highest quality you can afford.  These days I just have a few very good knives, well-maintained, and a few very good pans.  Overall, they let me do a better faster job than the machines.

The only electrical gadget I have retained is my cheap electric pepper mill (~€8 in LIDL). When I am tired and have thrown together a quick meal, not having to sweat the pepper mill is a joy, and with rechargeable AA batteries it works fine.  I keep meaning to buy a few more of them for other spices, but have a knack of missing their arrival in LIDL.

You had me up until the pepper grinder. How much work is it to crank a grinder? I find it satisfying to feel the corns cracking and dropping onto the food.

About the only machines I use anymore are a countertop cheese grater (manual) and an electric pressure cooker. For all the rest, it's Japanese and French carbon knives kept razor sharp, French copper pans, a powerful gas stove, and fresh ingredients as much as possible.

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Funny I still have yet to install a 110v outlet in the galley, there are only two on the boat and they always get pushed back.  The wife is not amused but about the only electrical thing that ever gets used is a blender or juicer and they are too high of load for the inverter.

We have a assortment of Lecruse (sp)? And it all has held up fantastic, other than the kettle which is annoying.

My only thing would be the electrical coffee pot, so nice to wake up to coffee waiting... Need to train the offspring

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When we lived aboard and were generally tied to the dock, I had an electric coffee maker in the galley. It was nice to have the coffee maker turn itself on at a set time every morning so all I had to do was crawl out of bed and pour it before going to work.

When we're just cruising, I prefer our big, insulated French press. Our inverter can handle the load of an electric coffee maker and it's more work to heat the water, let it steep, etc, but it's a nice morning ritual and lets me get away with a smaller battery bank. 

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3 hours ago, SASSAFRASS said:

Funny I still have yet to install a 110v outlet in the galley, there are only two on the boat and they always get pushed back.  The wife is not amused but about the only electrical thing that ever gets used is a blender or juicer and they are too high of load for the inverter.

We have a assortment of Lecruse (sp)? And it all has held up fantastic, other than the kettle which is annoying.

My only thing would be the electrical coffee pot, so nice to wake up to coffee waiting... Need to train the offspring

there are 3 AC wall outlets in my pop-up truck camper.  WTF?  At shoulder height there is a bout 70 Sq ft of space. i could have 6 AC appliances ready to go at the same time.  Who were/are rec vehicles designed for?

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12 minutes ago, chester said:

there are 3 AC wall outlets in my pop-up truck camper.  WTF?  At shoulder height there is a bout 70 Sq ft of space. i could have 6 AC appliances ready to go at the same time.  Who were/are rec vehicles designed for?

Electric heater, a couple cell phone charging bricks, a laptop power supply, coffee maker, etc. It doesn't take long to fill them up these days. I'm not saying whether it's right or wrong but that's the use case.

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8 minutes ago, IStream said:

Electric heater, a couple cell phone charging bricks, a laptop power supply, coffee maker, etc. It doesn't take long to fill them up these days. I'm not saying whether it's right or wrong but that's the use case.

Built in 96 so the computer and cell phone thing wasn't as big..i'm just palyin'...they are built for a population which instinctively uses electric tools...popcorn makers, hair dryers, hitachi magic wands... :D

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Just to be pedantic, a principal used in designing AC lay-outs, beyond the number of devices to be powered, is that cords should never cross doorways or walkways, (or obviously, in the galley sinks or ranges) and adequate power should be available at each potential work station without long cord runs or extension cords. So sometimes you end up with what seems like an excessive number of outlets.  In practice, this usually just gets reduced to rules like “put in an outlet every six feet around the perimeter and at least every four feet along counters, and don’t leave any orphan walls.” 

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3 hours ago, IStream said:

When we lived aboard and were generally tied to the dock, I had an electric coffee maker in the galley. It was nice to have the coffee maker turn itself on at a set time every morning so all I had to do was crawl out of bed and pour it before going to work.

When we're just cruising, I prefer our big, insulated French press. Our inverter can handle the load of an electric coffee maker and it's more work to heat the water, let it steep, etc, but it's a nice morning ritual and lets me get away with a smaller battery bank. 

Up north the dickenson is usually going which makes for the oh so decadant galley world, always have hot water at the ready and usually something super tasty going on the stovetop, which of course you are supposed to stay out of but....

 

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6 hours ago, chester said:

there are 3 AC wall outlets in my pop-up truck camper.  WTF?  At shoulder height there is a bout 70 Sq ft of space. i could have 6 AC appliances ready to go at the same time.  Who were/are rec vehicles designed for?

And I bet to use them you need to be plugged in at a campsite.  

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1 hour ago, seaker said:

And I bet to use them you need to be plugged in at a campsite.  

Which i never am! I always use it off grid and off solar panel  and batteries.

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9 hours ago, IStream said:
9 hours ago, chester said:

there are 3 AC wall outlets in my pop-up truck camper.  WTF?  At shoulder height there is a bout 70 Sq ft of space. i could have 6 AC appliances ready to go at the same time.  Who were/are rec vehicles designed for?

Electric heater, a couple cell phone charging bricks, a laptop power supply, coffee maker, etc. It doesn't take long to fill them up these days. I'm not saying whether it's right or wrong but that's the use case.

I use my caravan only off-grid, and power it by an hour or so of low-output genset in the evenings.  When the genset running, my base load is:

  • two phone chargers
  • two or three battery chargers 
  • two laptop chargers (I keep a dead laptop on hand as a charging dock for my spare battery)

I need less charging in the summer, but that's the load on the shorter days.  I have no TV, hair dryer, electric cooking gadgets etc.  So sockets are welcome, even tho they are unused for 22 hours a day.

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1 hour ago, TwoLegged said:

I use my caravan only off-grid, and power it by an hour or so of low-output genset in the evenings.  When the genset running, my base load is:

  • two phone chargers
  • two or three battery chargers 
  • two laptop chargers (I keep a dead laptop on hand as a charging dock for my spare battery)

I need less charging in the summer, but that's the load on the shorter days.  I have no TV, hair dryer, electric cooking gadgets etc.  So sockets are welcome, even tho they are unused for 22 hours a day.

I'm almost a gentleman, so I'm not going anywhere near that.

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23 hours ago, SASSAFRASS said:

Funny I still have yet to install a 110v outlet in the galley, there are only two on the boat and they always get pushed back.  The wife is not amused but about the only electrical thing that ever gets used is a blender or juicer and they are too high of load for the inverter.

We have a assortment of Lecruse (sp)? And it all has held up fantastic, other than the kettle which is annoying.

My only thing would be the electrical coffee pot, so nice to wake up to coffee waiting... Need to train the offspring

Unlike the spare boat galley, at home, we have more pots and pans than you could shake a stick at. That includes a large collection of Le Cruset that my partner has collected over the years at yard sales (people don't know good stuff).

 

I never thought of it for the boat but it would work well as it's all enameled.

 

At one time we had a shrine in the pantry to discarded Le Cruset, and the old battle-ax of pots and pans herself. 3 feet wide, it's a scary little nook. 

 

Pantry (1 of 1).jpg

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An embarrassingly large percentage of my dirt kitchen storage is devoted to classic Corningware. It's not great cookware but the incredible material science behind it must be respected.

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On 10/24/2020 at 8:44 AM, Kris Cringle said:

I saw this thread heading, "Galley equipment" just after downloading some photos during a recent solo overnight. We've owned this galley for over 20 seasons now and it occurred to me that despite countless (seriously) meals, our galley equipment is spare.

Much of it - the 60's fashion plate ware (that matches the 60's style Formica), several of the pots and pans and a few of the hand tools - came with the boat, inherited from the PO.

I also recognize a Revere fry pan that came from our last boat, which came from our home kitchen,...that one of us 'brought to the marriage', as my partner is fond of saying. Not a matching piece yet over decades, all have managed to find a nesting orientation within the small cave lockers. 

This was a simple meal for one; 2 local organic lamb sausages, fresh picked corn on the cob, local greens with a small jar of dressing I wouldn't have a clue how to create. Simple, delicious. 

Everything you ever need to cook a lavish meal, if you are so inspired and experienced with a boat, is tucked somewhere in this tiny space still floating out on the harbor today. 

1390586070_Galley2020.thumb.jpg.687b6bc2c2f79c369475ccd58df733e6.jpg

My galley layout and equippage is similar except that I have a strong preference for cast iron skillets. I do have 2 SS sauce pans and a pressure cooker.  Contrary to what you'd expect, the cast iron doesn't rust if you season it the way you're supposed to.  The cast iron makes for very efficient cooking because it retains heat so well and spreads it evenly.

Your spice rack is much better loaded than mine.  For salt, pepper and a "provincial blend" I use these glass replica US Navy mustard/pepper bottles with cork stoppers. They do a first-rate job of keeping the stuff dry and un-caked from the humidity. Best container I've found.  https://shop.americasnationalparks.org/store/category/26/303/Colonial/

Modern materials technology has yielded great space saving tools such as silicone "squishable" dish drying racks, colanders and leftover food containers. They collapse flat, are light, tough and stow well. All this stuff used to be rigid and bulky.  https://www.amazon.com/Squish-41001-Colander-2-Quart-Green/dp/B007TWKMLE

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