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Am I reading it right that it looks like there's a 4kt eddy going South into the teeth of a 25-30kt breeze coming in the opposite direction?

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9 June 0800 - The following was reported:
Cepheus - Lark and Cepheus checked in at 7am. All well on both boats although the ride is bumpy. cheers
Lark - Wind 116, lots of bangin off waves. 16 kts 117 degrees.
Alchemy - The fishing line hit the boat while I was looking at radar and sailing about 7.5 knots. It ripped the rudder out of both bearings. I’m taking on water but the hole is above the waterline so it’s manageable. Alas the wiggly rudder overpowers my emergency rudder when I either sail or power, so I’m waiting for a coast guard tow. I’d appreciate your putting a status update on the website so my friends that are tracking know I’m ok. One of those unlucky breaks.
Cepheus emailed: I heard from Cepheus and Lark relayed through flying Turtle. All good, no issues. same here with Seriana. 15 k wind lumpy seas.
Yeah Baby text: Things are very bumpy out here. I have a first reef and 115% for a jib.  20 knot wind close hauled.
Dragon emailed: It's gotten more sporty at the front end of the fleet. Winds are now are low 20s with puffs to 25 and we are close hauled into a short choppy wave state which is making the slamming increase. Nothing horrendous but its wet and a bit uncomfortable. On the plus side it's clear skies and things are warming up. Everything is good on Dragon, and I heard from Marauder and Privateer during the morning chat. All good there. I also heard from Kyle around 0100 or so. He had blown out his solent and was turning around to head back to Newport. 
Trouble No Trouble - 22 kts close hauled, lumpy. Heard from Rodolphe but not from 806. Tried texting 806 sat phone but no reply.
Corvus - 0830 hours Winds 17 knots at 121 magnetic. Course 185. Seas somewhat lumpy with water coming into cockpit occasionally. Missed radio call at 0700, was busy retrieving my code zero after my carbon fiber sprit failed . Retrieved sail I damaged sail successfully and retrieved sprit pieces.

9 June 0555 - Impulse left a message that we could not understand. Realized he was on the way back to Newport moving pretty good. Called Kyle back. Still had a hard time understanding via the sat phone but he said something about having to get a new main and jib.

9 June 0130 - Alchemy called me that his rudder caught a fishing line and that it broke his rudder. Took his sails down and will wait till the morning to investigate more and switch to his emergency rudder and head back to Newport, RI. He is fine otherwise.  USCG First District Command Center Boston, Marine Safety Office and Tracking was alerted to his status.

8 June 2000 - The following was reported tonight:
Corvus called that he has heard from Bluebird, Nimros, Gryphon and Bolero.  Gryphon is having autopilot problems but the wind vane is working fine. Wind is 138 at 14 kts.  All good.  Nice sailing.
Dragon emailed: All good out here. The five Class40s are all in visual range. Moving well, close hauled in breeze from 10 to 14. Shifting through 20 degrees or so. No boats reporting issues, couple of whales sited by one boat. 
Seriana text: have reports from all class 2 except Zipporah. All are doing well, beautiful afternoon. 10-12K close hauled, Lark leading the pack.
Dirigo emailed: Having instrument electronics problems. Working through them. Otherwise, all else is good and nice sailing along close hulled trying to climb or stay close to the rhumb. I will attempt to send this out later tonight. It's 1440 now.
Caroline text: Hello hello all is well here. Class 3 reporting. Aggressive is all good, yeah baby is all good, he just switched his headsail from 150 to the 115. I also spoke to wild goose and alchemy. Everybody reported great sailing, no known problems. Once again all good great sailing 9 knots of wind. Highlander also checked in and is doing great. Zipporah also a.o.k.
Lark text: Ck in. Wind 125 10 kts.

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So far, Flow, Cepheus, Nimros, Alchemy, Highlander, and Caroline have retired. Caroline lost his autopilot, Cepheus lost his headstay but not the rig. Highlander lost their engine. Alchemy lost their rudder, CG helped him get it out of the boat so he can use his emergency rudder to return home. Not sure why Nimros turned back.

And Privateer has thus far had better boat speed than all of the other C40s, usually by about half a knot. He's opened a 22 mile lead on Marauder and Dragon, will be interesting to see what happens when they hit the light spots tomorrow.

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pretty high percentage of withdrawals / breakdowns between this and Annap/Newport race

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Agreed. the Gulf Stream has a really deep meander and a lot of cold eddies. Winds were predicted to be more of a reach and not 20+ knots. It's beat up a lot of people so far.

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Is it the gulf stream that has caused all of these problems or is it the fact that the B1-2 is going south in a north wind and A-N is going north?

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1 hour ago, rmgeis said:

Is it the gulf stream that has caused all of these problems or is it the fact that the B1-2 is going south in a north wind and A-N is going north?

The withdrawals mostly were before the B 1-2 boats got to the GS.  Equip failures.  Upwind slog.

A2N, looks like many of them just aren't a very salty bunch overall . 

Conditions for ocean races to Bermuda  in last several years have been relatively calm. I think some folks aren't well prepared  or
experienced for snotty weather.

   

 

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Dang, Railmeat has been on a roll lately.  Top 10 in the RTR last fall, now looking like FTF in the 1 of 1-2.  Nice work.

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Yes, Railmeat sailed a great race. That hitch to the west was an excellent move, but must have been nerve wrecking while actually doing it (and basically sailing away from Bermuda...)

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Thanks.  It was excellent Class40 racing -  really, really tight and working all the way to the last tiny bit of water.

The stream had a massive meander aligned with the rhum line but a decent ways to the west of the line.  Imagine it running parallel and bout 30 or so miles to the west of the line.  It was a deep meander too... quite the ride.  Then it was complicated by an eddy at the top that was on course and two massive eddies, one cold and one hot that completely filled the space between the bottom of the stream and the island.  And they were right on the rhum line.  Normally I think that weather and distance trump the Stream, but this was a year where it could not be ignored.

Then add in the meteo which was really complicated to forecast in the week leading up to the start.  There had been a few days where the conditions were being dominated by some very large high pressure systems, and then there were a couple of very small lows that added a bunch of uncertainty to the modeling.  The results disagreed across the models and then even in the same model day over day.

That all settled out the morning of the race, and remarkably the GFS ensemble had 18 of 19 models agreeing on the conditions going 5 days out.  I never have seen that... it was remarkable.

The resulting routing took you down the west side of the rhum to grab the stream and to do so in a bit of a shy reach, then hardening up and being forced out further to the west below the stream as the wind clocked to the south, then ultimately sending you over to the other board and into the Finish.

Which is exactly how it played out.  The only difference was that on Monday night, the gribs started showing a southwesterly that was real, but also refused to come south to north and bring us the lift.  So that was when I flopped over to down to the shift.  And yes, it was nerve wracking to make the decision, and nerve wracking to wait for it to play out afterwards and see if it worked. I gave a hard fought 2nd place position and several miles to both boats in front of me at the time to make the investment, which is on top of the counter intutitive decision to sail away from the island to get to the island..    

It played perfectly.  those coming in from the west did so on a nice broad reach, while those on the rhum paid a price in tighter angles and also counter current.  All of us, however, struggled with the amount of weed.  It is everywhere, and I nearly lost the race today when I picked up some weed and then forgot to floss it off because I was damn tired.

 

Short version, a great race against some great sailors on a great platform.  Class40 sailing at its best.

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11 hours ago, Rail Meat said:

Thanks.  It was excellent Class40 racing -  really, really tight and working all the way to the last tiny bit of water.

The stream had a massive meander aligned with the rhum line but a decent ways to the west of the line.  Imagine it running parallel and bout 30 or so miles to the west of the line.  It was a deep meander too... quite the ride.  Then it was complicated by an eddy at the top that was on course and two massive eddies, one cold and one hot that completely filled the space between the bottom of the stream and the island.  And they were right on the rhum line.  Normally I think that weather and distance trump the Stream, but this was a year where it could not be ignored.

Then add in the meteo which was really complicated to forecast in the week leading up to the start.  There had been a few days where the conditions were being dominated by some very large high pressure systems, and then there were a couple of very small lows that added a bunch of uncertainty to the modeling.  The results disagreed across the models and then even in the same model day over day.

That all settled out the morning of the race, and remarkably the GFS ensemble had 18 of 19 models agreeing on the conditions going 5 days out.  I never have seen that... it was remarkable.

The resulting routing took you down the west side of the rhum to grab the stream and to do so in a bit of a shy reach, then hardening up and being forced out further to the west below the stream as the wind clocked to the south, then ultimately sending you over to the other board and into the Finish.

Which is exactly how it played out.  The only difference was that on Monday night, the gribs started showing a southwesterly that was real, but also refused to come south to north and bring us the lift.  So that was when I flopped over to down to the shift.  And yes, it was nerve wracking to make the decision, and nerve wracking to wait for it to play out afterwards and see if it worked. I gave a hard fought 2nd place position and several miles to both boats in front of me at the time to make the investment, which is on top of the counter intutitive decision to sail away from the island to get to the island..    

It played perfectly.  those coming in from the west did so on a nice broad reach, while those on the rhum paid a price in tighter angles and also counter current.  All of us, however, struggled with the amount of weed.  It is everywhere, and I nearly lost the race today when I picked up some weed and then forgot to floss it off because I was damn tired.

 

Short version, a great race against some great sailors on a great platform.  Class40 sailing at its best.

Awesome.

 

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Well done Michael!  Wish I had been able to do this year, but other things in life intruded.  Maybe 2021

 

 

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Privateer is shot from a cannon.  Wondering about the max speed difference in the class 40 now. I didn't think Privateer was a 

current or even last generation boat.  Seahorse talking about newest scow-inspired boats upping the ante again and I see on the class association site

there is a 'classics' class of 40's.  Very cool boats hope the class doesn't do the exponential price thing. 

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1 hour ago, vikram said:

Privateer is shot from a cannon.  Wondering about the max speed difference in the class 40 now. I didn't think Privateer was a 

current or even last generation boat.  Seahorse talking about newest scow-inspired boats upping the ante again and I see on the class association site

there is a 'classics' class of 40's.  Very cool boats hope the class doesn't do the exponential price thing. 

Unfortunately I think the era of new class 40 production boats are over. Whether Lombard Lift 40 or Manuard Mach 40.3 - we're seeing new boats being built on one-off contracts or a small batch w/ hull costs shared by a few programmes. 

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Certainly have mixed feelings bout the fleet bifurcation (trifurcation?). Meanwhile beating in 30kts. Oof.

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