Israel Hands

Wheel wrap at a reasonable cost?

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The original 32-y-o leather wheel wrap on the boat is finally failing. 

Google yielded a replacement at.... $269!  You have got to be kidding me.

Any thoughts on replacement wheel wrap, of a material that is easy on the hands (AKA not rope) and also is available at a reasonable cost?

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^^ That depends a good deal on the rope. Also, many folks varnish the rope to keep it nice, which is ... stupid in my opinion. Also, if comfort matters, skip the fancy knot work. It's just irritating.

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Less than $8.50 a year?  Israel Hands must mean your Jewish?  

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2 hours ago, silent bob said:

Less than $8.50 a year?  Israel Hands must mean your Jewish?  

No, but $269 sounds like slip rent, not what a little strip of leather that I have to stitch on should cost.

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Try a local boot shop or tannery. Much of the cost in pre-made wheel covers is in lack of demand and cutting to size/punching holes.

 

An alternative that is common on race wheels is a glued on neoprene cover. Softer, grippier, warmer and holds up nicely in UV.

 

Actually cheaper than 270$ in Newport also...

 

HW

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EVA foam with PSA is really nice stuff. Used on windsurfer booms, and was common on Volvo steering wheels. 

A nice trick is to bevel the two longitudinal edges - makes the edge almost invisible and the wheel looks like it has been dipped.

not expensive and not time-consuming to install - a windsurfer shop can do for you if you and not so handy

 

you can get all sorts of colors. The really bright ones (like hot pink) tend to bleed a little at the start - I personally used simple grey. 

 

edit - like this https://isthmussailboards.com/chinook-boom-grip.html or https://www.ebay.com/i/264269580284?chn=ps

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3 hours ago, ice9a said:

EVA foam with PSA is really nice stuff. Used on windsurfer booms, and was common on Volvo steering wheels. 

A nice trick is to bevel the two longitudinal edges - makes the edge almost invisible and the wheel looks like it has been dipped.

not expensive and not time-consuming to install - a windsurfer shop can do for you if you and not so handy

 

you can get all sorts of colors. The really bright ones (like hot pink) tend to bleed a little at the start - I personally used simple grey. 

 

edit - like this https://isthmussailboards.com/chinook-boom-grip.html or https://www.ebay.com/i/264269580284?chn=ps

I have done MANY eva grips.  The material is inexpensive.  To put it on properly takes a lot of time and effort.  Large wheels take time due to their size. Smaller wheels are harder to deal with the radius.   A windsurfer boom is quite simple,  as it is gently bowed. A 9’ diameter wheel takes me a full day!  The eva is not PSA, you have to use contact cement.  You have to use the right contact cement, or it will peel up in days.  

 

Good leather runs $25 a square foot. You’ll want Chrome tanned leather, not Vegetable tanned, or it will fall apart in weeks.  To make a leather grip, you need to trim everything exactly.  You have to measure and punch the holes precisely, or it will buckle up and look like shit!  Those tools to measure and punch aren’t inexpensive!  Again, putting it on takes a lot of time, often costing more than the material.  If you want it done right, double sided tape will be your friend!  He got 32 years out of the old one.  That’s less than $8.50 per year in today’s dollars!  Yes, I work in leather, too!  Quality takes time, time takes money !

 

 

Do you know how Copper Wire was invented?

Two Jews were fighting over a penny!

 

Oy Fucking Vey!

 

 

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5 minutes ago, justsomeguy! said:

Agree with the OP. Too expensive.

Go commando.

My fingers are still frozen after a overnight sail on a bare metal wheel, 20 years ago!

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2 minutes ago, silent bob said:

My fingers are still frozen after a overnight sail on a bare metal wheel, 20 years ago!

Gloves mon.

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As a stopgap (now likely permanent) I used this tape to cover a partially decomposing elk hide Edson cover. I just did not have time this spring to do another leather job. Now I like it and it was cheap:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HWROIW0/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I used 3.5 rolls to do a J/35 wheel and I really do like it enough that it's probably a permanent 'fix'. $25 and 1/2 hours and it came out very good.

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8
7 hours ago, silent bob said:

The eva is not PSA, you have to use contact cement.

I apply 3m psa to the eva - use transfer tape. it is much cleaner and faster than contact cement.

You have to use the right contact cement, or it will peel up in days.

Well sure you have to use the right product - lol. But if you do, one of the only 'problems' with the eva solution is actually getting it all cleanly off a wheel years later when you want to redo it. It is usually stuck on real good.

To put it on properly takes a lot of time and effort. Large wheels take time due to their size. Smaller wheels are harder to deal with the radius.  A windsurfer boom is quite simple, as it is gently bowed. A 9’ diameter wheel takes me a full day!

How long does it take you to lace leather on a 9' wheel?  I takes me 3 or 4 hours start to finish to put eva on. You need to take care to get the first edge on straight (especially if you are using the beveled edge technique, and you need to press it around each spoke carefully/smoothly. But otherwise . . . hmmm . . . pretty easy. 

It lasts quite well. I have one 12 years old - has a couple of descrete stains on it, but feels and looks better than a similar age leather one. Leather seems like a solution for people who like varnished wood - otherwise it is pretty much obsolete.

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Fleetwood said:

boatleather.com

 

This is who I used. I replaced what was probably an OEM wheel wrap. I figured for that kind of longevity, I could justify the price.

I paid for the wrap at the boat show and got a discount, so that helped. Totally worth it in my opinion.

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So let me understand this...your complaining about $269 (every 25 or so years) to cover the most oft used and important item on your boat to make it safer (less slippery) and more comfortable (warmth)? 

Wow even this cheap-ass yankee sprung for it. 

And it was fun sewing it on during the winter.  

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16 hours ago, ice9a said:

a windsurfer shop can do for you

I'd like to see a windsurf shop do this!  Seams are sanded,  you have to look for the seam!  If there’s a noticeable seam, the drivers will pick it with their fingernails.  It took over an hour just to trim around the spokes, so that no adhesive was showing.  Each wheel took about 8 hours, start to finish, there are two wheels!  The owner and crew were very happy with the finished product.  Sure, you can put it on in an hour, but if you don’t take the time to finish it properly, it’ll look like a ADHD preteen did it!  You get what you pay for!  If he wants cheap, wrap the wheel in bike grip.  If he wants a proper, nautical wheel he will need to pony up!

 

E35310C6-A28D-41AF-B80A-4485985204BE.jpeg

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4 hours ago, Ajax said:

This is who I used. I replaced what was probably an OEM wheel wrap. I figured for that kind of longevity, I could justify the price.

I paid for the wrap at the boat show and got a discount, so that helped. Totally worth it in my opinion.

Hmm...the light-blue (untanned) wrap looks very nice. 

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38 minutes ago, silent bob said:

I'd like to see a windsurf shop do this!  Seams are sanded,  you have to look for the seam!  If there’s a noticeable seam, the drivers will pick it with their fingernails.  It took over an hour just to trim around the spokes, so that no adhesive was showing.  Each wheel took about 8 hours, start to finish, there are two wheels!  The owner and crew were very happy with the finished product.  Sure, you can put it on in an hour, but if you don’t take the time to finish it properly, it’ll look like a ADHD preteen did it!  You get what you pay for!  If he wants cheap, wrap the wheel in bike grip.  If he wants a proper, nautical wheel he will need to pony up!

 

E35310C6-A28D-41AF-B80A-4485985204BE.jpeg

Was just gonna mention bike handlebar tape.  That wheel looks sweet.  

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2 hours ago, shaggy said:

Was just gonna mention bike handlebar tape.  That wheel looks sweet.  

When one wheel got chewed up, he had me redo both, so that they would match. 

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Vinyl-dipped is another choice - thick and linear coating with a slightly "unsmooth" finish for great tactile feel, long lasting, doesn't get funky when wet, and lotsa colour choices.  We did one on our previous boat and were very pleased with the results...

http://colorwheelz.com/

Cheers!

20150920 CP.14.JPG

20150920 CP.17.JPG

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Leather? Elk Hyde? What's the material? Seems like a nice off-season project beside the fire on a nice wintr'y Sunday.

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Yeah bicycle bar tape - lots of colours cheap and dirty.

Why wrap a carbon wheel? They don't really feel cold like metal.

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34 minutes ago, Zonker said:

Why wrap a carbon wheel? They don't really feel cold like metal.

Grip, especially when wet!  Painted them with matte, painted with non-skid, still slippery when wet. The windsurfer boom grip is great , even when soaking wet!

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21 hours ago, CriticalPath said:

Vinyl-dipped is another choice - thick and linear coating with a slightly "unsmooth" finish for great tactile feel, long lasting, doesn't get funky when wet, and lotsa colour choices.  We did one on our previous boat and were very pleased with the results...

http://colorwheelz.com/

Cheers!

20150920 CP.14.JPG

20150920 CP.17.JPG

That's a very neat looking solution. Assuming that you can ship a wheel for $35-40 each way to have it dipped, it is comparable in cost to leather wrap. Looks like it would be easy on the hands.

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On 6/10/2019 at 10:30 PM, silent bob said:

I have done MANY eva grips.  The material is inexpensive.  To put it on properly takes a lot of time and effort.  Large wheels take time due to their size. Smaller wheels are harder to deal with the radius.   A windsurfer boom is quite simple,  as it is gently bowed. A 9’ diameter wheel takes me a full day!  The eva is not PSA, you have to use contact cement.  You have to use the right contact cement, or it will peel up in days.  

 

 

 

a 9 foot wheel ? that must be one hell of a boat...

 

if you want to go cheap,  go the hardware store and buy some self seal rubber pipe insulation and put it on yourself.. or you can use the foam stuff too

 

armacell-pipe-insulation-hst07812-64_100

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On ‎6‎/‎11‎/‎2019 at 7:02 AM, DrewR said:

As a stopgap (now likely permanent) I used this tape to cover a partially decomposing elk hide Edson cover. I just did not have time this spring to do another leather job. Now I like it and it was cheap:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HWROIW0/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I used 3.5 rolls to do a J/35 wheel and I really do like it enough that it's probably a permanent 'fix'. $25 and 1/2 hours and it came out very good.

 

I guess the responsive handling of the tiller was getting you down.  LOL. Haven't seen many with wheels.  Original or after market?

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On 6/10/2019 at 4:22 PM, silent bob said:

Less than $8.50 a year?  Israel Hands must mean your Jewish?  

 

On 6/10/2019 at 11:30 PM, silent bob said:

...

 

Do you know how Copper Wire was invented?

Two Jews were fighting over a penny!

 

Oy Fucking Vey!

 

 

SilentBob sharing your knowledge about boats makes for some good contributions to this (and other) threads.

Perpetuating racist stereotypes, on the other hand...

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20 minutes ago, KC375 said:

 

SilentBob sharing your knowledge about boats makes for some good contributions to this (and other) threads.

 

Perpetuating racist stereotypes, on the other hand...

 

It’s not a stereotype if it’s true!  I raced with two Jewish sailors, they, in their own words, used to have “Jew Offs”, an informal contest to decide which one acted more Jewish.  Israel Hands is griping about a reasonable expense for a object that nobody really “needs”. 

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On 6/11/2019 at 4:40 PM, silent bob said:

I'd like to see a windsurf shop do this!  Seams are sanded,  you have to look for the seam!  If there’s a noticeable seam, the drivers will pick it with their fingernails.  It took over an hour just to trim around the spokes, so that no adhesive was showing.  Each wheel took about 8 hours, start to finish, there are two wheels!  The owner and crew were very happy with the finished product.  Sure, you can put it on in an hour, but if you don’t take the time to finish it properly, it’ll look like a ADHD preteen did it!  You get what you pay for!  If he wants cheap, wrap the wheel in bike grip.  If he wants a proper, nautical wheel he will need to pony up!

 

E35310C6-A28D-41AF-B80A-4485985204BE.jpeg

Exactly, bitching about less than $300!!

its a days labour and materials. Fuck sake, no wonder people get out of the boat business. 

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3 hours ago, Lex Teredo said:

 

I guess the responsive handling of the tiller was getting you down.  LOL. Haven't seen many with wheels.  Original or after market?

Original. I wouldn't have converted it but... it has the J/40 forepeak option, running water, 2 water tanks, hot water heater, refrigeration and a bunch of other stuff that other J/35's don't have. It ain't no racer, impossible to sail to it's rating. 

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21 minutes ago, mad said:

Exactly, bitching about less than $300!!

its a days labour and materials. Fuck sake, no wonder people get out of the boat business. 

Three local sailing shops are loosing their leases, as their buildings are being sold out from underneath them for amounts over triple what they can afford.  All do excellent work, and charge reasonable rates for their work, but it’s not enough to keep up with elevated costs.  I recently relocated my shop, partly as an attempt to keep my expenses down.  But, a lot of my expenses are rising out of my control.  Utilities, insurance, taxes, supplies, all up double digits in the last few years.  My rates have barely gone up, in attempt to keep them low.  Most of my customers understand my hourly rate.  They see and understand my overhead.  So many of my tools are specialty tools for the marine industry, not available at Harbor Fright!  I have thousands of dollars tied up in quality leather tools, to fabricate custom items.  That’s just a small fraction of my shop!  It’s taken me a long time to learn many of my crafts, stuff that’s not taught in any school. Crafts that most people don’t put any thought into, until they want or need them!  So, I do get a little grumpy when people gripe about a quality product at a reasonable cost.  

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25 minutes ago, silent bob said:

Three local sailing shops are loosing their leases, as their buildings are being sold out from underneath them for amounts over triple what they can afford.  All do excellent work, and charge reasonable rates for their work, but it’s not enough to keep up with elevated costs.  I recently relocated my shop, partly as an attempt to keep my expenses down.  But, a lot of my expenses are rising out of my control.  Utilities, insurance, taxes, supplies, all up double digits in the last few years.  My rates have barely gone up, in attempt to keep them low.  Most of my customers understand my hourly rate.  They see and understand my overhead.  So many of my tools are specialty tools for the marine industry, not available at Harbor Fright!  I have thousands of dollars tied up in quality leather tools, to fabricate custom items.  That’s just a small fraction of my shop!  It’s taken me a long time to learn many of my crafts, stuff that’s not taught in any school. Crafts that most people don’t put any thought into, until they want or need them!  So, I do get a little grumpy when people gripe about a quality product at a reasonable cost.  

we seem to have a few businesses here that actually operate out of self-storage  units..

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1 minute ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

we seem to have a few businesses here that actually operate out of self-storage  units..

The local North Sails shut down their full service loft, and moved into a 1200 square foot office.  They have a very small area where they can do very small repairs. They run a van to the nearest loft, a minimum of two hours each direction, twice a week.  The property values in the coastal area have gone up triple digits. I believe the old North loft will get knocked down to build condos.  I am very fortunate that we were in a position to purchase the property.  Unfortunately, we won’t really see the increase in property values until we sell out.  We’re hoping, like Barry Carroll, that the property value will make more than the business.  We found the right place at the right time, out of sheer luck!  In California, a lot of property is being bought up by the Marijuana industry.  They come in with suitcases of cash, at or above the asking price, with no contingencies.  Who can resist that?  

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1 hour ago, DrewR said:

Original. I wouldn't have converted it but... it has the J/40 forepeak option, running water, 2 water tanks, hot water heater, refrigeration and a bunch of other stuff that other J/35's don't have. It ain't no racer, impossible to sail to it's rating. 

Sure.  But I bet it sails hella for a cruiser. 

You guys run a furler or some downsized sails?  Even with the weight I can't imagine running the usual 155 headsail shorthanded.  (Maybe in under 7-8 kts wind). 

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I'm not going to read this entire thread just to check if this or something like it has been posted so here it is.

I think it looks very salty, it's cheap and it's DIY. You can choose from a multitude of colours too.

Re: Wrapping a Steering Wheel

I posted this project in the low-bucks project thread, and am happy to repeat it here.

The leather wrap on our wheel had seen better days. I searched online and in books for an easy, good-looking wheel wrap, and then played with some line for a few days. I came up with a simple solution.

My daughter and I wrapped our 42" wheel in a couple days with paracord. It feels good under the hands, with plenty of friction to get a good grip but not so much that it's uncomfortable. I think it looks pretty good too. smile.gif

20130626_165034-003.jpg

It looks like a braid, but was very simple to do:

P1010764.jpg

It's just what it looks like, a single line that never wraps all the way around the wheel. It just loops back and forth. I suggest using a sailing glove, as blisters develop quickly when you're pulling paracord tight again and again and again.

No frustration with keeping multiple lines untangled, no handling of the spool of line. I hung the spool under the wheel so that the line unrolled without twisting because I think it looks better when the line doesn't have a twist in it. When we were doing the wrap, we kept the "braid" on the outside of the wheel so we could fit more wraps on. I sewed the beginning and end of the line together under the turk's head. Afterwards we moved the braid to the side for a more comfortable grip.

It took 300 feet of paracord to wrap the 42" wheel. We could have made it tighter with a bit more line, but I only had 300'. The blue matches our canvas and doesn't show dirt like the traditional white does.
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4 hours ago, silent bob said:

Three local sailing shops are loosing their leases, as their buildings are being sold out from underneath them for amounts over triple what they can afford.  All do excellent work, and charge reasonable rates for their work, but it’s not enough to keep up with elevated costs.  I recently relocated my shop, partly as an attempt to keep my expenses down.  But, a lot of my expenses are rising out of my control.  Utilities, insurance, taxes, supplies, all up double digits in the last few years.  My rates have barely gone up, in attempt to keep them low.  Most of my customers understand my hourly rate.  They see and understand my overhead.  So many of my tools are specialty tools for the marine industry, not available at Harbor Fright!  I have thousands of dollars tied up in quality leather tools, to fabricate custom items.  That’s just a small fraction of my shop!  It’s taken me a long time to learn many of my crafts, stuff that’s not taught in any school. Crafts that most people don’t put any thought into, until they want or need them!  So, I do get a little grumpy when people gripe about a quality product at a reasonable cost.  

Seems to be this strange idea that boat maintenance should cost half what you pay for other specialist services,  like car servicing, appliances, aircon, fixing a fucking iPhone issue......etc 

I’ve got a shitload money and years tied up with all the kit in my workshop, pretty much all of it is custom made.its expensive to make and it needs maintenance and certification.   I’ve made a conscious effort to move out of the boat business about 10 years ago and I’m much happier for it. 

The practical skills that you get from boats, boat building and sailing work well in other industries. 

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6 hours ago, silent bob said:

It’s not a stereotype if it’s true!  I raced with two Jewish sailors, they, in their own words, used to have “Jew Offs”, an informal contest to decide which one acted more Jewish.  Israel Hands is griping about a reasonable expense for a object that nobody really “needs”. 

The stereotype of racists is to be below average intelligence. It's not a stereotype if it's true!

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a. Is the fee reasonable for the work?

b. Does the item cost more than is worth to me?

These are two VERY different questions. I'm not interested in custom designer pointy shoes. I am willing to pay good money for an ice ax that swings just right, because there is a safety factor in that.

And oh, if the wheel were the only expense... but it is not. There are 100 items that add up to thousands each year.

I've used leather and line wrapped wheels, and which I like better depends on how it is done. Generally, I like line better, because it fattens the wheel more. EVA/rubbers feels sweaty, so I give that no value. See how received value varies with the customer?

Rather than moan about the state of the industry, figure out why people are getting out of sailing. The average age of boaters is climbing years by year, and by-and-by, there will be less. My feeling is that subsequent generations are simply more interested in other things. Tastes change. This affects many businesses. I can think of numerous friends whose careers came apart because tech or tastes changed and the industry simply evaporated.

 

 

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I would suggest a trip to your local bike shop. Handlebar wrap is available in lots of different materials.

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13 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

I

Re: Wrapping a Steering Wheel

I posted this project in the low-bucks project thread, and am happy to repeat it here.

The leather wrap on our wheel had seen better days. I searched online and in books for an easy, good-looking wheel wrap, and then played with some line for a few days. I came up with a simple solution.

My daughter and I wrapped our 42" wheel in a couple days with paracord. It feels good under the hands, with plenty of friction to get a good grip but not so much that it's uncomfortable. I think it looks pretty good too. smile.gif


 

I like this solution. Makes my wrap look ghetto. I think I have a new winter project.

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16 hours ago, Lex Teredo said:

Sure.  But I bet it sails hella for a cruiser. 

You guys run a furler or some downsized sails?  Even with the weight I can't imagine running the usual 155 headsail shorthanded.  (Maybe in under 7-8 kts wind). 

That it is and since I retired her from racing last season, that's how she is going to live out her remaining days, fast cruising.

I run a 133 North on an RF. I have 110 also that I sometimes swap over to in the fall, Buzzards Bay can get nasty in the fall. I also have a North cruising cut asym with a sock. I toy with adding a fixed mount for the kite but I doubt I will.

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14 hours ago, mad said:

Seems to be this strange idea that boat maintenance should cost half what you pay for other specialist services,  like car servicing, appliances, aircon, fixing a fucking iPhone issue......etc 

I’ve got a shitload money and years tied up with all the kit in my workshop, pretty much all of it is custom made.its expensive to make and it needs maintenance and certification.   I’ve made a conscious effort to move out of the boat business about 10 years ago and I’m much happier for it. 

The practical skills that you get from boats, boat building and sailing work well in other industries. 

 

13 hours ago, thinwater said:

a. Is the fee reasonable for the work?

b. Does the item cost more than is worth to me?

These are two VERY different questions. I'm not interested in custom designer pointy shoes. I am willing to pay good money for an ice ax that swings just right, because there is a safety factor in that.

And oh, if the wheel were the only expense... but it is not. There are 100 items that add up to thousands each year.

I've used leather and line wrapped wheels, and which I like better depends on how it is done. Generally, I like line better, because it fattens the wheel more. EVA/rubbers feels sweaty, so I give that no value. See how received value varies with the customer?

Rather than moan about the state of the industry, figure out why people are getting out of sailing. The average age of boaters is climbing years by year, and by-and-by, there will be less. My feeling is that subsequent generations are simply more interested in other things. Tastes change. This affects many businesses. I can think of numerous friends whose careers came apart because tech or tastes changed and the industry simply evaporated.

 

 

That is the beauty / reality of a market economy.

If what a supplier needs to charge to earn a return or to compete with the opportunities they have elsewhere is more expensive than what a buyer is willing to pay then no sale takes place.

If buyers of a service won’t pay a supplier what the supplier can get elsewhere the supplier leaves.  

Transitions / market adjustments can be painful. If buyers leave the market then sellers need to leave the market (or possibly stimulate demand by charging less). If sellers leave the market then buyers need to go without or pay up to induce suppliers back into the market.

For a business to be entering and especially to be exiting a market is a lot of work and pain but way less pain than in command economies where one or both parties are forced to stay in the market.

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15 hours ago, SloopJonB said:
My daughter and I wrapped our 42" wheel in a couple days with paracord.
 

At two people for two days that makes $300 for someone else to do it seem very good value.

...

On the other hand, two days with your daughter on a joint project with a lasting visible reminder of your work and time together...priceless!

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1 hour ago, KC375 said:

And oh, if the wheel were the only expense... but it is not. There are 100 items that add up to thousands each year.

This pretty much sums up why I made the original post.  I like good design, but there have to be trade-offs.  Keeping the boat up is expensive. While the craftsmanship in a specialized leather solution may represent fair value, maybe there is an attractive alternative for half that?

I have a collection of hand-sewn lace Christmas ornaments that I bought over years of traveling to Belgium. We've probably seen the last generation of women who would sew this way by hand, because it can be done with automation now. It was worth it to me to buy them at the time, because in toto the items and their story meant something. But to another generation, who cares? 

I just don't think the wrap on a wheel should cost what a piece of radio equipment costs...it just represents a bridge too far.

 

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3 hours ago, DrewR said:

That it is and since I retired her from racing last season, that's how she is going to live out her remaining days, fast cruising.

I run a 133 North on an RF. I have 110 also that I sometimes swap over to in the fall, Buzzards Bay can get nasty in the fall. I also have a North cruising cut asym with a sock. I toy with adding a fixed mount for the kite but I doubt I will.


Sounds awful nice.  Low on the list but we need to get a decent cruising sail, thinking about a 120 or 130.  

Hey, tell me how it is getting into and out of Cuttyhunk on that thing - have you done it?  Kinda shallow pond there.  We love spending a week there with friends from time to time and I've been thinking about trying to sync up an Annapolis-Newport, BIRW and an early July week at Cuttyhunk a few years from now.   

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49 minutes ago, Israel Hands said:

I just don't think the wrap on a wheel should cost what a piece of radio equipment costs...it just represents a bridge too far.

Radios are mass produced, assisted by automation and Asian Slave Labor!  If each wheel was identical, same diameter, same grip, and same spokes, and there were millions that needed grips each year, the price would probably come down a significant amount. You are dealing with a custom item for a luxury. 

 

If if you cut the grip too small, there’s a gap.  If you cut it too large, it won’t grip the wheel and will twist.  Either way, if it’s not made properly, it’ll look like hell, just like a cheap suit!

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50 minutes ago, silent bob said:

Radios are mass produced, assisted by automation and Asian Slave Labor!  If each wheel was identical, same diameter, same grip, and same spokes, and there were millions that needed grips each year, the price would probably come down a significant amount. You are dealing with a custom item for a luxury. 

 

If if you cut the grip too small, there’s a gap.  If you cut it too large, it won’t grip the wheel and will twist.  Either way, if it’s not made properly, it’ll look like hell, just like a cheap suit!

Oh c’mon, I am sure that you purchase “Asian slave labor” items under that definition in your weekly household shopping. I will leave the wheel wrap with the price tag that reflects an artisanal aura to the medical millionaires. After all, we Americans are slaves to the medical-industrial complex.

But that’s not what this is about. I just want an inexpensive, functional wheel wrap. It’s not rocket science or politics.

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23 hours ago, silent bob said:

The local North Sails shut down their full service loft, and moved into a 1200 square foot office.  They have a very small area where they can do very small repairs. They run a van to the nearest loft, a minimum of two hours each direction, twice a week.  The property values in the coastal area have gone up triple digits. I believe the old North loft will get knocked down to build condos.  I am very fortunate that we were in a position to purchase the property.  Unfortunately, we won’t really see the increase in property values until we sell out.  We’re hoping, like Barry Carroll, that the property value will make more than the business.  We found the right place at the right time, out of sheer luck!  In California, a lot of property is being bought up by the Marijuana industry.  They come in with suitcases of cash, at or above the asking price, with no contingencies.  Who can resist that?  

The same has happened in the UK,  many boat builders are now on industrial estates, inland.  Their old boat yards sold off for "executive " river side homes. 

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23 hours ago, silent bob said:

The local North Sails shut down their full service loft, and moved into a 1200 square foot office.  They have a very small area where they can do very small repairs. They run a van to the nearest loft, a minimum of two hours each direction, twice a week.  The property values in the coastal area have gone up triple digits. I believe the old North loft will get knocked down to build condos.  I am very fortunate that we were in a position to purchase the property.  Unfortunately, we won’t really see the increase in property values until we sell out.  We’re hoping, like Barry Carroll, that the property value will make more than the business.  We found the right place at the right time, out of sheer luck!  In California, a lot of property is being bought up by the Marijuana industry.  They come in with suitcases of cash, at or above the asking price, with no contingencies.  Who can resist that?  

 

good for you...      hey the purpose of your business is to make enough money so you don't have to work..  if a suitcase of cash shows up, then you've met your goal... 

 

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3 hours ago, Lex Teredo said:

 


Sounds awful nice.  Low on the list but we need to get a decent cruising sail, thinking about a 120 or 130.  

Hey, tell me how it is getting into and out of Cuttyhunk on that thing - have you done it?  Kinda shallow pond there.  We love spending a week there with friends from time to time and I've been thinking about trying to sync up an Annapolis-Newport, BIRW and an early July week at Cuttyhunk a few years from now.   

 

i've seen some awfully big boats in the cuttyhunk mooring field..  why do you think it's shallow,  just stay out of the way of the float plane..

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44 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

 

i've seen some awfully big boats in the cuttyhunk mooring field..  why do you think it's shallow,  just stay out of the way of the float plane..

Sure. I've seen 60 footers up in there.  That are probably 5' draft.  We go 7' before loading up with crew and a week's worth of supplies. 

I was axing the question because I've kayaked it and fished it and could read the words on a dime dropped in some places in the pond, and walked most of the way across the channel at low tide.  Plus as a Chesapeakeian, I have a dread of running aground somewhere rocky. Give me nice muddy weeds and uncharted sand (mud-) bars any day. 

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4 hours ago, Lex Teredo said:

 


Sounds awful nice.  Low on the list but we need to get a decent cruising sail, thinking about a 120 or 130.  

Hey, tell me how it is getting into and out of Cuttyhunk on that thing - have you done it?  Kinda shallow pond there.  We love spending a week there with friends from time to time and I've been thinking about trying to sync up an Annapolis-Newport, BIRW and an early July week at Cuttyhunk a few years from now.   

Easy as can be getting in and out of Cuttyhunk. I've zero problems and go at least 3 times a year. Just follow the channel and you'll have no issues. I was heading this past Sat actually but the wind wasn't the best so we did Hadley, another excellent place to hang out.

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1 hour ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

 

i've seen some awfully big boats in the cuttyhunk mooring field..  why do you think it's shallow,  just stay out of the way of the float plane..

The float plane is long gone, maybe 10 years now? Decent anchorage where the 'runway' used to be. I draw 6 1/2" and rarely have a problem anchoring inside. There is always outside to anchor as well. As long as it's the prevailing SW wind its nice outside. From the N-NE its Tarpaulin Cove the place to be. 

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3 hours ago, Israel Hands said:

But that’s not what this is about. I just want an inexpensive, functional wheel wrap. It’s not rocket science or politics.

https://www.biketiresdirect.com/product/serfas-woven-handlebar-tape?v=wbtbt36&adl=1&gclid=Cj0KCQjwi43oBRDBARIsAExSRQH-eFZc_Uov5dnbej4tgvVMXk6WxQ-qCPmjTYffSVuSwTLDkvUQKewaAsiYEALw_wcB

Stand out with Serfas' eye-catching Woven Handlebar tape. Its available in multiple multicolor combinations with adhesive backing for easy, secure installation. EVA foam cushions and absorbs vibration for increased comfort and reduced hand fatigue.

https://shop.advanceautoparts.com/web/SearchResults?storeId=10151&catalogId=10051&langId=-1&searchTerm=exhaust wrap

Reduce under hood temperatures a realistic 50%   Decreases exhaust density & increases exhaust flow   Improves horsepower  Withstands 1200°F direct/2000°F radiant

Added durability and heat retention  Only exhaust wrap with installation guide lines

 

added HP  is great benefit...

 

or just go by some nylon webbing  https://www.amazon.com/Heavy-Webbing-available-Widths-yards/dp/B01MQGGQMY

 

honeslty if you dn't want a conventional leather wrap or a neoprene,  strike out on your and do try something unique.  who know  you my stuble onto something great.   Alsoth the paraparacod looks pretty good and para cord is pretty cheap

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Madame wrapped one of the wheels with paracord and it works well but the UV resistance isn’t all that; even covered, the colors have faded and the texture roughened. Also holds dirt and doesn’t clean easily.

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On ‎6‎/‎14‎/‎2019 at 2:59 PM, DrewR said:

Easy as can be getting in and out of Cuttyhunk. I've zero problems and go at least 3 times a year. Just follow the channel and you'll have no issues. I was heading this past Sat actually but the wind wasn't the best so we did Hadley, another excellent place to hang out.

Thanks for the intel, Drew.   May have to check out Hadley, based on your recommendation.  

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Wrapping something around the wood simply makes it rot more quickly. 

I would either keep the teak wheel well oiled and enjoy the feel of the thing or 

switch over to a nice stainless steel wheel. There is no need to regularly refinish stainless or wrap something around it as you don’t have to worry about splinters 

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Only frozen fingers.

But you wouldn't know about that. ;)

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