Mid

Hong Kong

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Authorities in Hong Kong have delayed debate on a controversial extradition bill after tens of thousands of demonstrators surrounded the city’s legislature.

 

 

 

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In an NPR piece, the interviewer said that the population of Hong Kong was approximately 7 Million people, and that the estimated size of the demonstration was 1Million people.  That's a pretty strong statement - it'll be interesting to see how the mainland government responds. 

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10 minutes ago, phillysailor said:

China doesn’t back down to protesters. Eventually the Borg will assimilate all 7 million. Or six mill, if it came to that.

I hear ya - but, Tienanmen Square seemed to cause a change - it'd be encouraging if this does as well.   

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I hope they win the trade war. I really like the cheap shit and counterfeit goods they produce. I fully support the chinese government! Biden 2020 MAMA!

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the protests will be crushed. the world will be mostly silent.

funny, looks like a whole bunch of non-Whities protesting. I thought that their "culture" meant they didn't believe in human rights?

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1 minute ago, Mismoyled Jiblet. said:

the protests will be crushed. the world will be mostly silent.

funny, looks like a whole bunch of non-Whities protesting. I thought that their "culture" meant they didn't believe in human rights?

Not sure I understand the intent of this comment.  Care to explain? 

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1 hour ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

I hear ya - but, Tienanmen Square seemed to cause a change - it'd be encouraging if this does as well.   

I’m more pessimistic: student activists paid a heavy penalty for the actions then, and now this facet of history is hardly known by Chinese youth. They are staggered when they learn if it.

China imprisons whole ethnic groups into re-education camps. They will have worked out the HK strategy a decade ago.

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1 minute ago, phillysailor said:

I’m more pessimistic: student activists paid a heavy penalty for the actions then, and now this facet of history is hardly known by Chinese youth. They are staggered when they learn if it.

China imprisons whole ethnic groups into re-education camps. They will have worked out the HK strategy a decade ago.

While I suspect you're right - I'd be happy if you're not.  The idea of HK is what mainland china should be striving to achieve - not suppressing. That said - the party has always felt that HK was a petulant stepchild, and has been offended by its recognition in the world.  It wouldn't be beyond consideration for them to decide that its time to prove their point. 

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Add to that recent advancements they’ve made in facial recognition and digital behavioral ranking systems with real-world implications... I’d hate to be under their jurisdiction.

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1 hour ago, phillysailor said:

China doesn’t back down to protesters. Eventually the Borg will assimilate all 7 million. Or six mill, if it came to that.

Lots of prison space on the mainland. The Chinese are not afraid to use it.

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5 minutes ago, Saorsa said:

And Paris, New Zealand, and elsewhere.

A lot of people are getting fed up with over-reaching governments.

When people on the left say that Trump's worse than Xi Jinping, I think they are pretty fucking stupid, but kudos for outdoing that garbage take.

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End of the day, Hong Kong and Macau are part of China. I lived in HK, love the city, but in some not-to-distant future the history of Hong Kong as a vassal state of a foreign power with be relegated to the footnotes of history. I think what keeps China from just "taking over" is that they don't really want 7 million potential sources of dissent flowing through the country.

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2 hours ago, Raz'r said:

End of the day, Hong Kong and Macau are part of China. I lived in HK, love the city, but in some not-to-distant future the history of Hong Kong as a vassal state of a foreign power with be relegated to the footnotes of history. I think what keeps China from just "taking over" is that they don't really want 7 million potential sources of dissent flowing through the country.

That's right, they just want to take a few to make examples of and cow the rest of the city.

 

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On 6/13/2019 at 1:28 AM, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

I hear ya - but, Tienanmen Square seemed to cause a change - it'd be encouraging if this does as well.   

Not sure what you think the change was, but it was not good. The deal was simple. The government will make people wealthy and improve their quality of life. In exchange the people surrendered all political thought and accepted full censorship. When Xu arrived on the scene he just doubled down on the deal. 

Feel proud of the protesters, know some of them. But they are on a hiding to nowhere. Xi is flexing his muscles. He knows most of the world is to desperate for his money and trade to openly stand up to him. Short term bad publicity doesn’t worry him at all. It will just be spun to the population as the world trying to slow China down. HK, will be crushed and bankrupted. Until this has happened it will be kept as a seperate area with border controls. Once done it will be subsumed into the greater China, its history as a successful entity expunged from history. 

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Hong Kong government announces suspension of divisive extradition bill

Quote

In one of the most significant climbdowns by the government since Hong Kong was returned to Chinese rule in 1997, Lam said the city’s legislature would stop all work on the bill. Next steps would be decided after consultations with various parties, she said.

https://www.france24.com/en/20190615-hong-kong-reports-government-suspend-divisive-extradition-bill-china

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that one , I did not see coming.

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On 6/12/2019 at 11:04 AM, Mismoyled Jiblet. said:

When people on the left say that Trump's worse than Xi Jinping, I think they are pretty fucking stupid, but kudos for outdoing that garbage take.

Not sure who is saying that Trump is 'worse' then Xi. That T is incredibly less competent that Xi goes without saying, but I just said it I guess.

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On 6/12/2019 at 9:28 AM, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

I hear ya - but, Tienanmen Square seemed to cause a change - it'd be encouraging if this does as well.   

Not so sure that Tienanmen really had that big an impact. I think we in the West tend to overestimate it because it was on our TV screens so much. Perhaps more important were the protests in 1976 in the Square after the death of Zhou Enlai. These helped hasten the end of the Cultural Revolution and bring Deng Xiaoping (and his reforms) to power. The fact that these protests are not well known in the West is evidenced by the fact that the Wikipedia article is quite skimpy. BTW, my wife was in the Square for parts of both protests.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiananmen_Incident

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3 hours ago, Mid said:

that one , I did not see coming.

The communist regime needs to hire some american propaganda consultants. The unopposed ruling class has become complacent. Setting up a duopoly as in the US would serve them well. 

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5 hours ago, Mid said:

that one , I did not see coming.

It'll be suspended for a little bit. The protesters and those who sided with the protesters will be arrested, shunned, dealt with (hong kong police weren't sent to Xinjiang for counterterrorism training, it was for full on civil repression). The bill will be reintroduced in 6 months or a year and  woe befall any foe of the regime that transfers planes in Hong Kong.

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Canada is bracing for a large scale return of ex-pats.

They're talking hundreds of thousands.

I guess all those empty condos and houses will be occupied soon.

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22 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Canada is bracing for a large scale return of ex-pats.

They're talking hundreds of thousands.

I guess all those empty condos and houses will be occupied soon.

Guess the strategy of having a safe landing spot could pay off. I taught in an area of Toronto with a very large Chinese population (sucked for coaching basketball, a team of point guards, but that is a different story). Prior to the handover of HK we had many, many people from there set up homes in the area. They generally continued their businesses in HK and gave frequent flyer a special meaning. At the same time they became Canadian citizens so covered their bets. Newspapers here are saying that the recent events could result in a bump of new HK migrants. Generally good folks who are educated, hard working and more westernized in their attitudes than most mainlanders. Also bring a lot of money into the country which bumps up real estate values but also provides for investment here.

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Probably like high density real estate permits here - when they are proposed there is a huge negative response from the public. They shut it down for 3 to 5 years and then bring it up again and miracle of miracles, there is "widespread support" for it.

WTF does anyone want to live in that ant colony anyway? Most of the people are so poor they have to live in what would be a walk in closet here.

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I commend their efforts but I don't see how they're going to win in the end.   The Chinese have already demonstrated that they have no problem sending 1.5 million Chinese off to be 're-educated'.   https://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-xinjiang-rights-idUSKCN1QU2MQ  What's a few more million from Hong Kong? 

Hopefully, they can get some concessions keep the censorship to character assassinations and deplatforming without going full gulag. 

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10 minutes ago, cmilliken said:

I commend their efforts but I don't see how they're going to win in the end.   The Chinese have already demonstrated that they have no problem sending 1.5 million Chinese off to be 're-educated'.   https://www.reuters.com/article/us-china-xinjiang-rights-idUSKCN1QU2MQ  What's a few more million from Hong Kong? 

Hopefully, they can get some concessions keep the censorship to character assassinations and deplatforming without going full gulag. 

China has a problem. Between Taiwan and Hong Kong, they have the potential to blow up their authoritarian master class. The 1.5 million Uighurs never could fight back, the economically powerful Taiwanese and Hongkongers can bring much more to the fight. If China wants to roll out the tanks to the streets of Hong Kong, they already lost the war, the resulting slam to the Chinese economy could take care of the rest.

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I wonder if the protesters are as tidy as last time?

Also wondering about this:
 

Quote

 

Thousands of protestors took to the streets of Hong Kong this week. Police responded with tear gas, rubber bullets, and pepper spray against the umbrella-wielding crowds gathered near the province's legislature to protest a bill that would allow extradition to mainland China.

Residents of Hong Kong see the extradition bill as a major erosion of the city's quasi-independent status. Since Great Britain returned it to China in 1997, Hong Kong's justice system has been fully independent from its parent country's. That has made the city an appealing destination for those fleeing prosecution in China. While Hong Kong's judicial system is widely regarded as one of best in the world, China's ranks 82nd out of 126 nations in the World Justice Project's Rule of Law Index, scoring particularly poorly for "fundamental rights." Prosecutors in mainland China achieved a 99.9 percent conviction rate last year, which should explain why Hongkongers are worried.

 

Makes me wonder which prosecutor actually managed to somehow fail to get a conviction?

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56 minutes ago, Importunate Tom said:

I wonder if the protesters are as tidy as last time?

Also wondering about this:
 

Makes me wonder which prosecutor actually managed to somehow fail to get a conviction?

Probably this guy.. Meet Mr. 0.07%-er himself!

 

"Such problems were on full display in 2011 when a Henan Province farmer named Zhao Zuohai was released from prison after serving 11 years because the woman he was convicted of murdering was actually very much alive and living at home."

 

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always love how the legacy umbrella of colonial whiteness lends the proper color to libertarians views on anti-drug anti-gun hong kong. Not so amusing is the irony that this is exactly one of the reason why Hong Kong must be crushed in Beijings mind.

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