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LionessRacing

Hoist by your own...

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We had a minor mishap and sky'ed the mizzen staysail halyard when the boom caught it during a gybe last night. 

The Mizzen halyard is available, but nobody else on Saturday  to either grind the #10 winch, or sit on a chair while I do it, so I am  looking to hoist myself up about 15 feet. 

We have a 6:1 main sheet tackle that would be more than sufficient, and I am thinking to hoist it up on the halyard, secure it and then hoist self with the tackle, as compared to using Prussik knots or buying some Jumars and going up on a mooring line hung off the mizzen halyard.

Any better ways? 

 

 

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Hire a pro rigger. It’s a 1 hr service call. Besides, aren’t you an older person ? 

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6:1 ? You pull in 2 ft and move 4 in with that set up. My gantline is 2:1. 

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I'm not only > 60, I'm over 250 lbs as well, so finding a volunteer to do the grinding is a bit more of a challenge than otherwise.

Your point is not unreasonable,  I could ask my rigger to retrieve it, or just take 30 mins to do it myself. 

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Just now, Al Paca said:

6:1 ? You pull in 2 ft and move 4 in with that set up. My gantline is 2:1. 

6 part tackle, you pull in 6 to move 1. 

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10 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

there's an easier way

 

post-2180-014479600%201324492951.jpg

Yah but I gave my step son the extension ladders and he's in Myrtle Beach for the week. I've used a small one to get to the radar mount. 

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15 minutes ago, LionessRacing said:

6 part tackle, you pull in 6 to move 1. 

That's what he said.  You pull 2 feet to raise yourself 4 inches.  

If you decide to do this please video it for the inevitable deposition.

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Pretty sure this is on the old AVALON catamaran. Sure was a sweet boat in the day. Etienne knows his shit, buy on of his Topclimber units if you are serious about getting yourself up the mast safely.

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28 minutes ago, LionessRacing said:

I'm not only > 60, I'm over 250 lbs as well, so finding a volunteer to do the grinding is a bit more of a challenge than otherwise.

Your point is not unreasonable,  I could ask my rigger to retrieve it, or just take 30 mins to do it myself. 

You pull yourself up. It’s a one man operation. 

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4 minutes ago, Al Paca said:

You pull yourself up. It’s a one man operation. 

that's the point.

  • Can theoretically do without assistance.
  • Or write a check 
  • or win the Club's  "Rusty Shackle" award and a trip to the emergency room while the wife is 2500 miles away.

 Seems like prudence is to let the professional do it.

 

 

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52 minutes ago, LionessRacing said:

We had a minor mishap and sky'ed the mizzen staysail halyard when the boom caught it during a gybe last night. 

The Mizzen halyard is available, but nobody else on Saturday  to either grind the #10 winch, or sit on a chair while I do it, so I am  looking to hoist myself up about 15 feet. 

We have a 6:1 main sheet tackle that would be more than sufficient, and I am thinking to hoist it up on the halyard, secure it and then hoist self with the tackle, as compared to using Prussik knots or buying some Jumars and going up on a mooring line hung off the mizzen halyard.

Any better ways? 

 

 

Find a kid an let him shinny up and pull it down...gesshhh

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I retrieved a Knarr's jib halyard, using two telescoping boat hooks lashed end-to-end.  It was probably about the same height.

I wouldn't go up my boat's mizzen and trust its much-smaller sheave and halyard (and I'm <200 lbs.)

 

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2 minutes ago, BravoBravo said:

Find a kid an let him shinny up and pull it down...gesshhh

This. Its how most pro riggers get their start. 

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2 minutes ago, BobJ said:

I retrieved a Knarr's jib halyard, using two extendable boat hooks lashed end-to-end.  It was probably about the same height.

I wouldn't go up my boat's mizzen and trust its much-smaller halyard (and I'm <200 lbs.)

 

At a buck 38, I can go up most anything. 

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1 hour ago, LionessRacing said:

We had a minor mishap and sky'ed the mizzen staysail halyard when the boom caught it during a gybe last night. 

The Mizzen halyard is available, but nobody else on Saturday  to either grind the #10 winch, or sit on a chair while I do it, so I am  looking to hoist myself up about 15 feet. 

We have a 6:1 main sheet tackle that would be more than sufficient, and I am thinking to hoist it up on the halyard, secure it and then hoist self with the tackle, as compared to using Prussik knots or buying some Jumars and going up on a mooring line hung off the mizzen halyard.

Any better ways? 

 

 

We never send someone up (any distance) without a secondary restraint.  Should a shackle fail, a rope part, a pin break, or a pulley let go you could be in for a real hurting.  It isn't worth it for a halyard.  See if you can rig some kind of secondary line to make it safe.

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45 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

there's an easier way

 

post-2180-014479600%201324492951.jpg

you know , he's not really being safe there,  you shouldn't be on the top step of a step ladder

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4 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

you know , he's not really being safe there,  you shouldn't be on the top step of a step ladder

Good point.  I missed the step ladder finale.

If you have a neighbor with a taller rig you can increase participation and make a more entertaining video.

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15 feet - try an extending boot hook with a bunch of duct tape wrapped inside out.

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28 minutes ago, LionessRacing said:

 

 Seems like prudence is to let the professional do it.

 

 

Here's your man for the job(credit to Point Break from GA tree climbing thread)

 

 

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1 hour ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

there's an easier way

 

post-2180-014479600%201324492951.jpg

Yes lets do this and get darwin award 

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1 hour ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

there's an easier way

 

post-2180-014479600%201324492951.jpg

Don’t knock it. I used to be stupid and do just that as a painter with 40’ extension ladders on tall buildings. At 150lbs, it wasn’t much of a load. Early on at that kind of work I would have to take a shot of rum or whiskey in the morning to settle my nerves and brace for a lot of leg exercise.

Now I get vertigo just looking up a ladder...

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Over 250 Lbs on a #10 winch?

:lol::lol::lol:

You'll need that winch AND a 6-1 tackle.

Trust me.

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1 hour ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

there's an easier way

 

post-2180-014479600%201324492951.jpg

I hope he used an adequate amount of duct tape to lash those ladders together.

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1 hour ago, ropetrick said:

If you have a neighbor with a taller rig you can increase participation and make a more entertaining video.

I have an adjacent (18' away)  42' Mainmast, problem is where to put the camera. 

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Forget the camera, how are you going to hold your beer?

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This would be recommended as it will provide cranial protection and hold two beers and has a microphone to call for help in the parking lot when you get stuck up the mast. Also I think Go-Pro has a camera mount accessory to fit as well.

Image result for beer hard hat

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That also frees up a hand so you can have a smoke while you’re working aloft 

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There's a gimballed  camera on the Radar mount about half way up, have to make sure to NOT wear shorts. 

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On a 1/4 tonner I had a spreader base casting break( SparCraft )  as I was standing on the spreader, I dropped and found myself looking at the deck with the spreader across my waist. The broken end of spreader came back directly on the side of the mast, had it slipped forward or aft I would have face planted into the deck...we were about 10 miles from shore, it was light air and I was looking for wind...that one haunts me

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1 hour ago, fufkin said:

Here's your man for the job(credit to Point Break from GA tree climbing thread)

 

 

Or in this case - men for the  job.  To the top and bottom of an 80 ft spar in under 20 seconds.

 

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Years ago I managed a Captain's Locker in Dana Point. This little old guy comes in and buys 150' of three strand nylon rope. I didn't ask what he planned to use it for. A couple hours later I got a call from him n his cell phone. He had made a block and tackle rig to hoist himself up the rig. But, the 3-strand had so much memory that it balled up underneath him as he hoisted himself up the rig. There was no one around to lower him down. So, I had to jump on my motor cycle and ride down there to get him down. I'll never forget upon arriving in the parking lot hearing him calling from the top of the mast "Assistance! Assistance!"

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2 hours ago, Grrr... said:

We never send someone up (any distance) without a secondary restraint.  Should a shackle fail, a rope part, a pin break, or a pulley let go you could be in for a real hurting.  It isn't worth it for a halyard.  See if you can rig some kind of secondary line to make it safe.

^^^ this, or pay someone else. If you are over 60 and 250, please pay someone else. You will be sore as crap for days after clutching with arms and legs the whole time you are doing it.

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Surely you could rig up some kind of catapult/trebuchet or air cannon to propel you into the air, just make sure you aim it well and are quick enough to grab the halyard as you sail passed gracefully. 

Remember to make sure the lost halyard is uncleated & free to run as well.

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3 hours ago, LionessRacing said:

We had a minor mishap and sky'ed the mizzen staysail halyard when the boom caught it during a gybe last night. 

The Mizzen halyard is available, but nobody else on Saturday  to either grind the #10 winch, or sit on a chair while I do it, so I am  looking to hoist myself up about 15 feet. 

We have a 6:1 main sheet tackle that would be more than sufficient, and I am thinking to hoist it up on the halyard, secure it and then hoist self with the tackle, as compared to using Prussik knots or buying some Jumars and going up on a mooring line hung off the mizzen halyard.

Any better ways? 

 

 

Ultimate Unassisted Mast Climbing http://l-36.com/

 

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9 minutes ago, SF Woody Sailor said:

Ultimate Unassisted Mast Climbing http://l-36.com/

 

It's the mizzen, what, maybe 25'.  Go the reverse duct tape and a couple boat hooks route.  Or go to home depot and get 25' of PVC and do the reverse duct tape thing.  If you want to get fancy, google "tree branch grabber".  Lots of commercial and DIY ideas.  

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This seems to be one of the better ideas, though only a 1 shot at a time deal.  

 

Edit: I didn't watch it, it looks like he took off the lock on the clamp, so it actually works like a traditional grabber.  Harbor freight is cheap, buy a short one and just make it longer.  

 

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&amp;source=images&amp;cd=&amp;ved=2ahUKEwjvj8bEoOfiAhVCMnwKHd5-AV8QjRx6BAgBEAU&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DBGMrGiEBl_I&amp;psig=AOvVaw3MPZnmeTBcX-u3PHmTmeS6&amp;ust=1560542407578491

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I do this all the time with a 4:1 fiddle blocks w/ratchet and cleat - it was a boomvang in it's previous life.  Haul the top block to the top, attach a bosuns chair to the bottom block and hoist away.

 

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1 hour ago, 12 metre said:

Or in this case - men for the  job.  To the top and bottom of an 80 ft spar in under 20 seconds.

 

:blink: I can't cover 160' on a downhill lawn in 20 seconds.

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21 minutes ago, lamorak said:

I do this all the time with a 4:1 fiddle blocks w/ratchet and cleat - it was a boomvang in it's previous life.  Haul the top block to the top, attach a bosuns chair to the bottom block and hoist away.

Are you over 60 and 250?

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Any high piers you could tie up to at low tide?  That might get you within reasonable boathook distance.

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Ahem, like to object to the 'over 60' parameter, does not equate to unfit.

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3 minutes ago, Essex said:

Ahem, like to object to the 'over 60' parameter, does not equate to unfit.

 

6 hours ago, LionessRacing said:

I'm not only > 60, I'm over 250 lbs as well, so finding a volunteer to do the grinding is a bit more of a challenge than otherwise.

Your point is not unreasonable,  I could ask my rigger to retrieve it, or just take 30 mins to do it myself. 

SJB's comment was with regards to what the OP himself stated upthread.  No slight was intended as far as I can tell.

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  1. Haul the boat
  2. dig a hole next to the boat
  3. hire crane to drop boat in hole
  4. use boat hook to retrieve halyard
  5. reverse process
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42 minutes ago, 12 metre said:

 

SJB's comment was with regards to what the OP himself stated upthread.  No slight was intended as far as I can tell.

None taken, "boat yoga" is generaly harder than it used to be, and getting into places with bifocals to work on wiring and stuff is much more difficult being larger than it once was. The mind remembers going to the mast head back a few years, but realistically it's probably better done with a long pole, the PVC pipe suggestion or the Painter's extensions are the first I'll try. 

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1 hour ago, Your Mom said:

Any high piers you could tie up to at low tide?  That might get you within reasonable boathook distance.

Our big tides here are on the order of 7', there are restaurant decks we could sneak up to, or go to the haul out slip and work from there... 

 

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Many years ago was setting up an old fishing boat that hadn't raised  a sail in years for a Tall Ships race.  Need to run a new external main halyard through the existing block at the masthead with all of the old halyards having fallen  down somewhere in the distant past.

Tried a ladder from the deck but was well short,  standing around thinking (with obligatory thinking beers) when this crazy french guy walks up.  He offers to climb up and run the halyard for us,  problem solved!

Nothing is ever quite that easy,  for reasons long since forgotten he couldn't climb higher than the spreaders,  so he tried standing on them,  still not high enough.  At this point he spots a chair on the dock and asks us to get it for him,  not quite sure how this will help we pass him the chair,  he puts the back 2 legs on the spreader and steps up on to the seat, still short,  so he stands on top of the back of the chair which is balanced on it's back legs on the speaker and leads the halyard.

He climbed down helped us finish the carton of beer and went on his way!

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8 hours ago, LionessRacing said:

We had a minor mishap and sky'ed the mizzen staysail halyard when the boom caught it during a gybe last night. 

The Mizzen halyard is available, but nobody else on Saturday  to either grind the #10 winch, or sit on a chair while I do it, so I am  looking to hoist myself up about 15 feet. 

We have a 6:1 main sheet tackle that would be more than sufficient, and I am thinking to hoist it up on the halyard, secure it and then hoist self with the tackle, as compared to using Prussik knots or buying some Jumars and going up on a mooring line hung off the mizzen halyard.

Any better ways? 

 

 

15 feet!  Just fucking climb with a harness and a strop to hold you up while you sort. 

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8 hours ago, LionessRacing said:

I'm not only > 60, I'm over 250 lbs as well, so finding a volunteer to do the grinding is a bit more of a challenge than otherwise.

Your point is not unreasonable,  I could ask my rigger to retrieve it, or just take 30 mins to do it myself. 

Lose weight or grind someone that’s skilled and lightweight up. 

Why should they winch you up?

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Treble fish hook tied to adjacent halyard with down haul, you'll snag it.

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2 hours ago, TUBBY said:

Many years ago was setting up an old fishing boat that hadn't raised  a sail in years for a Tall Ships race.  Need to run a new external main halyard through the existing block at the masthead with all of the old halyards having fallen  down somewhere in the distant past.

Tried a ladder from the deck but was well short,  standing around thinking (with obligatory thinking beers) when this crazy french guy walks up.  He offers to climb up and run the halyard for us,  problem solved!

Nothing is ever quite that easy,  for reasons long since forgotten he couldn't climb higher than the spreaders,  so he tried standing on them,  still not high enough.  At this point he spots a chair on the dock and asks us to get it for him,  not quite sure how this will help we pass him the chair,  he puts the back 2 legs on the spreader and steps up on to the seat, still short,  so he stands on top of the back of the chair which is balanced on it's back legs on the speaker and leads the halyard.

He climbed down helped us finish the carton of beer and went on his way!

was his name Philippe  ?

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I went to great lengths to pen a story here about a surveyor who met my crew and I at the boatyard for a survey. We had taken the short delivery job from St John to St Thomas and the travelift was supposed to be in the slip awaiting our arrival and then we could return home on the ferry. When we pulled up there was a boat in the slings and it was obvious that things were not in place for that to happen. The agreed on price for us getting the boat to the yard with no further responsibilities on our part was marginal so I said to my crew, 'Fuck this, I'm calling a cab to the ferry boat dock and we are out of here.' 

     I docked the boat at the yard work dock in from of the chandlery and went to the phone booth to make the cab call. When I got back I saw that the surveyor had convinced my crew that he could get a 'head start' on the survey since the slip was not available and put on his bosun chair and had my crew grinding his lazy ass to the mast head.  He was just sitting there dead weight and not grabbing the shrouds or even trying to help make the hoist less effort on my crew so I came on board and gave the crew some shit for even getting sucked in on that task. He finally got the surveyor to the mast head who started scrutinizing the various bits up there and I grabbed out bags as I heard the taxi honk out the other side of the chandlery. I told the crew he was welcome to stay and join the surveyor but I was headed for the ferry. He joined me and we headed home.

    The next morning I went into the company office to pick up our measly check for the short task to get the boat to the yard and the boss had a funny smile on his face. He asked if we had run into the surveyor while at the yard and I said we had. He then asked if we had left the surveyor up the mast and left to come home. I said that we had. He asked why we had left him up the mast and I said the hoisting him up the mast wasn't part of the agreed on job and waiting for him to complete his work and them bringing him down in stages (spreaders and forestay and such) was even further from the responsibilities on our part. He agreed and then reached over to his answer machine and played a message he had gotten the evening before from the yard manager. The story from him was that his store manager was totalling up and closing down for the day and he kept hearing a sort of whispery voice out on the work dock saying, 'Osama! Osama!' The manager went out and looked around and didn't see the source of this strange plea and went back inside. He heard the voice again and went out and finally noticed the guy at the mast head trying to direct his voice down the still open companionway. The manager asked if he could be of help and the surveyor suddenly got busy once more critiquing the masthead gear. Just before closing the doors and driving home the manager checked on the guy up the mast with not apparent means of returning to the deck and yelled up "Osama? Osama? What does Osama mean?  Does Osama mean come down now?'

BTW, Osama was my crews name...

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2 minutes ago, Saro Scimitar Sunshine said:

15'. Smallfry !

 

 

uh, big difference , he has a flat surfaces for  the rails to brace against!  ever use an extension ladder on a round pole..  rungs and round surfaces don't play well.

 

 

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Several years later I was managing the refit of Eagle the 12M. We had just stepped the rig earlier in the week. The customer was coming down for a trial sail. So, was at the yard early Saturday morning checking the systems. I raised the main and found the slugs on the head board had worn to the point that they rotated and got stuck in the mast groove at the crane. Unfortunately, there aren't any more mast head halyards on a 12M mast and our crane wouldn't reach above the hounds. So, I hauled my ass up to the top of the forestay and free climbed to the masthead. I clipped into the crane and then proceeded to drive the pin that held the headboard to the top of the main. When that pin popped out the main fell to the deck and unloaded I could then get the slugs to unbind and brought the main halyard back down. But, it was a hell of a rush as that main slid down the mast between my knees. 

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30 minutes ago, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

 

uh, big difference , he has a flat surfaces for  the rails to brace against!  ever use an extension ladder on a round pole..  rungs and round surfaces don't play well.

Yes, I have. I know it ain't nautical but I've used ladders get part way up masts a number of times on masts where the fittings were small enough to make using them for lifting marginal. Just the other day I used one to inspect a problem at about the height the OP is contemplating. I'm not going to advise it but perhaps a halyard to the top of a latter with its rails made fast to shrouds is something that a person might, in theory, use to get high enough to grab or hook a wayward halyard.

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12 hours ago, Fleetwood said:

Is he still up there?

    I guess the yard manager went and let the guy down. He was pretty miffed and asked to use the phone and called my boss and left a long recorded message. I got to listed to that one too with my boss the next day. I thought I was in hot water but finally my boss could no longer keep his 'stern boss' face and started snickering at the long invections coming from the surveyor. 

    He turned off the answer phone with a smile and gave me two checks for $50 over the agreed upon fee for the afternoons efforts, one for myself and one for my crew. He said the one for my crew was for cranking that deadweight up the mast and the delay when getting the boat to the yard. He then told me that the extra $50 on my check was for making the decision to leave him up there!

    The next big regatta out on the start line, there were lots of racers yelling at the boat with the surveyor on the crew.

    "OSAMA? OSAMA? Means to come down now?"

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On 6/13/2019 at 9:29 AM, LionessRacing said:

I'm not only > 60, I'm over 250 lbs as well, so finding a volunteer to do the grinding is a bit more of a challenge than otherwise.

Your point is not unreasonable,  I could ask my rigger to retrieve it, or just take 30 mins to do it myself. 

I use a 4:1 to get up on my boat (on it's trailer. About 8' from sitting in my chair to the deck.
Pain in the Arms but I get a great view once up on deck.

 

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We did a major overhaul on the Farr 65' "Winterhawk" (ex Ceramco) New keel, new rig, lots of other stuff. Got the boat back in the water, stuck the new spar in, dock tuned it, & went out to sail tune it. Not 5 minutes off the dock the boat capt somehow managed to sky the main halyard. With 1/4" gal wire, it makes a large tangled mess on the deck. Get that all straightened out, everyone's looking at ME to do something. So I had them hoist me to the hounds, then tied a made up version of a prussic around the spar & started to shimmy up. Had to stop at the jumps & tie a 2nd hatchet knot above the jumps to continue on. Made it to the top & got lowered down on the main halyard.

Much, much further in the past, while still working as a rigger in Hawaii. We serviced almost all of the tourist cats, & most had no spreaders, just 4 wires at the middle & 4 wires at the masthead. Got a call to go to one of the big cats berthed in Kewalo basin, 60' (?) two masted thing. All the local boys were standing around looking sad, they'd skyed the main (only) halyard. They looked at me, the haole boy, and told me to climb the rig for them. I looked up, (a long ways), into the light rain, and said no way, you guys grew up climbing coconut trees, you figure it out. So, after a bit of bitching (mostly about how much work it was) one of them lashed his ankles together & jumped up the rig quite quickly.

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29 minutes ago, Meat Wad said:

I use a 4:1 to get up on my boat (on it's trailer. About 8' from sitting in my chair to the deck.
 Pain in the Arms but I get a great view once up on deck.

 

I suspect your upper body strength is far more developed than mine, hence my expectation of using the 6:1. 

FWIW,  My late wife went from 34 B to 40A  chest over the 4 yrs when she went into her chair. She was able to climb Nob Hill in SF from Ghiradelli Sq to the Mark Hopkins... All I did was back stop her wheels on the two blocks where the sidewalk is cross grooved so she could rest. 

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Any dock, restaurant, small boat crane, travelift pit (after hours), pole with tape, small ladder, kid will do.  Plenty of options.

Even a low tide at any of the first 4 would help.

Could you list the boat?

A low probability of success method is a ball of tape on the shackle of another halyard and hoist it up to the same level. (with a retrieval line of course.)  smack the tape into it and "flip the tail of the lost halyard to ease the pressure while lowering.

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I'm pretty sure the PVC tubes coupled together with inverted duct tape will suffice, and if I use 1" tubing, will subsequently provide an extension to elevate the SmartWeather wind sensor a bit higher. 

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7 minutes ago, Windward said:

Could you list the boat?

Suggesting that he sell it and have the new owner fix the problem?

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Buy me a rt ticket from Phoenix to La this weekend and u can grind me up. I'm about 190. And at 52 I still find it fun. 

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Isn't  your spinnaker pole long enough to reach?  Maybe I missed something....

 

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Come on SA, this is boating 101. If you cant work out how to retrieve a fucking halyard then you probably shouldnt be out there without your babysitter. But wait lets start a 17 page thread on it....

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3 hours ago, weightless said:

Suggesting that he sell it and have the new owner fix the problem?

Heh. Once upon a time, way out in Majuro, a typhoon was approaching. I suggested to the friend on the adjacent boat that he strike the genoa from his furler. His reply was "The broker put the sail on when I bought it. The next owner can take it down." And so it goes.

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On 6/13/2019 at 1:38 PM, lamorak said:

I do this all the time with a 4:1 fiddle blocks w/ratchet and cleat - it was a boomvang in it's previous life.  Haul the top block to the top, attach a bosuns chair to the bottom block and hoist away.

 

^^^ this.  It’s not hard. Done it many times while an independent rigger, and many times since.

I use a climbing chair so I can’t fall out (plus it gets me a bit higher than a standard bos’n’s chair)

I tie the tackle to the halyard, and to the chair, and tape the tails.  I don’t trust shackles (or snap shackles, ever)

i usually add a climbing “arrester” on an adjacent halyard as fall prevention, but it doesn’t sound like that would be an option here.

PS: i just turned 60, was well over 300 a couple of years ago. Now 195.  Can’t tell you how much difference it has made in getting into small places in the boat.  Not to mention feeling better.  No criticism, just a personal observation...

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7 hours ago, Tom O'Keefe said:

Several years later I was managing the refit of Eagle the 12M. 

The Eagle that was the NHYC entry for 1987?  Fun boat.  Except for the gigantic, obscenely-draggy frisbee-shaped chunk of lead at the bottom of the keel that they thought was a logical evolution of a wing....

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Sell it and be done with it. Safest

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1 hour ago, sledracr said:

The Eagle that was the NHYC entry for 1987?  Fun boat.  Except for the gigantic, obscenely-draggy frisbee-shaped chunk of lead at the bottom of the keel that they thought was a logical evolution of a wing....

We were in charge of fairing that thing before the launch - with no templates! was told to 'make it smooth'

After a couple of weeks of training, the drivers discovered that the rudder could turn almost twice as much to one side vs the other. Many feared crooked rudderpost. We set the boat up, leveled it out & started using a theodolite. Rudder was true, started measuring hull. One side of stern was 2" or so outside the as drawn sections, so the rudder hit the hull at that point. When we had to put in the permanent measuring point marks, we found the stbd side of the hull had filler up to 3" thick.

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2 hours ago, toad said:

Come on SA, this is boating 101. If you cant work out how to retrieve a fucking halyard then you probably shouldnt be out there without your babysitter. But wait lets start a 17 page thread on it....

We didn't all start life with a graduate degree in boat handling skills like you.

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42 minutes ago, longy said:

We were in charge of fairing that thing before the launch - with no templates! was told to 'make it smooth'

After a couple of weeks of training, the drivers discovered that the rudder could turn almost twice as much to one side vs the other. Many feared crooked rudderpost. We set the boat up, leveled it out & started using a theodolite. Rudder was true, started measuring hull. One side of stern was 2" or so outside the as drawn sections, so the rudder hit the hull at that point. When we had to put in the permanent measuring point marks, we found the stbd side of the hull had filler up to 3" thick.

Who built it?

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3 hours ago, bodega87 said:

Sell it and be done with it. Safest

"85% complete"

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On 6/13/2019 at 12:33 PM, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

there's an easier way

 

post-2180-014479600%201324492951.jpg

That is pretty much the most terrifying thing I have ever seen in my life . .  

It's gonna haunt my dreams. 

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On 6/14/2019 at 11:52 AM, Grande Mastere Dreade said:

was his name Philippe  ?

After this many years & rums I can't confirm or deny this, which is why I didn't use his name originally.

But, yes it was the first name I thought of but wasn't sure.  This was in Hobart 1988.

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6 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

We didn't all start life with a graduate degree in boat handling skills like you.

Lioness has been sailing for years

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On 6/14/2019 at 4:15 AM, Al Paca said:

At a buck 38, I can go up most anything. 

Wow. I poop bigger than that. Good on ya.

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There is one halyard free to use... attach a block, hoist a bunch of filled jerrycans (or hoist a drum with water hose attached to it, open water tap) up till it compensates for your weight and up you go.

or try first the block hoisting, and a line through it with a few hooks taped to it. You can steer it easier to catch it.

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I went to a climbing gear store and made up a self climbing rig. Then went to a climbing gym to practice. Too much hard work and was much harder when I tried on the boat.

 

2 hours ago, LeoV said:

There is one halyard free to use... attach a block, hoist a bunch of filled jerrycans (or hoist a drum with water hose attached to it, open water tap) up till it compensates for your weight and up you go.

A scary but actually a good idea.

If you have 2 halyards you can haul yourself up on one and the other for the jerry can weights. Water seems to weigh 1kg per litre, so even 2 20litre jerry cans would give you a 40kg assistance when hauling yourself up

 

 

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