Zora

What have you lost overboard?

Recommended Posts

I couldn't find a thread like it and wanted to share a story / hear about the most annoying/funny/silly thing you've lost off the side of the boat... 

I often use my cockpit as a workshop and set up a bench with tools. To keep my helm wheel from damage and to give myself a bit more room, I generally remove it and stow it tied on the rail and put it back after I'm done. It's a pretty big wheel, about 38 inches. 

In a bit of a hungover haze, I forgot to tie it on this time around, which led to it slipping off the side and me watching it sink to the bottom of the marina... 

By chance, I bumped into my neighbor on the way up to the pub that overlooks the marina that evening And told him the story. He offered me his dinghy anchor to try fish it out. It's only 10 feet here at low tide and the bottom is just mud, so after 3 attempts up came the helm... I called off the diver that was coming the next day and got my neighbor a pint... Lesson learned. Although I've lost my phone over the side a couple of times so maybe not... 

Anyway, what's the worst thing you've lost over the side. And did you get it back?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Zora said:

Anyway, what's the worst thing you've lost over the side. And did you get it back?

$500,000 worth of scientific instrumentation when a cable snapped.

I know exactly where we lost it though - off of the edge of the Amery Ice Shelf........ it's still there, unless an iceberg has scraped it off somewhere else.

FKT

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brand new prescription sun glasses, swiped off my face while raising a roller-furling jib. My wallet (while dinghy sailing). Several favourite hats. Innumerable tools and fasteners. And I'm not done yet.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Winch handles (2) and a very nice sail cover that I forgot to stow 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 crew members when the lower life line parted!! 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I lost a handheld GPS off my Hobie TI sailing kayak a couple years ago during a race. But miracle of miracles, it washed up on HHI and I got it back a few months later and it still worked. Garmin allows you put anything on the start up screen of their handhelds, so I put my contact info. The lady who picked it up got it to start when she plugged it into a a USB port and was able to contact me. 

33300015_10156457370988809_3139591964907

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The absolute worst, most expensive thing?

My asymmetrical spinnaker. Somewhere between Tahiti and New Zealand.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nothing much, apart from dignity, pride, self-respect and many tens of thousands of pounds. Gone, all gone, to lie with the seals and fishes.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Embarrassing as it is to admit, while charging down a wave in a good breeze the brand new outboard on the back of my boat clipped a substantial piece of wood in the water (how the hull missed it I don't know) rotated 180 degrees like a propeller and "plop" into the ocean. Less than 6 weeks old. I can assure you its replacement was tightened so tight it was going nowhere it shouldn't

SS

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Cruiser2B said:

Lots of hats!

And watches

All but one of the phones I've dunked (or dropped) I've gotten back, including one phone I literally dove in after and grabbed when it was about 8 ft down. Managed to salvage almost all of them.

Yesterday a good friend whose boat has been on the hard for a substantial time dropped their sunglasses overboard...... said they forgot that stuff goes splash now, not klunk.

FB- Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Casio G-shock watch, halfway to Hawaii, transpac 97, boy did the the rest of the crew have fun with my sched after they found out....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having raced many years as a hungover crew member, I have lost gallons of puke overboard. 

And lots of Mt.Gay Rum hats. 

I’d rather get the puke back...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Me...sailing a beach cat off the Laguna Beach coves in the mid 60s with a crewmate who didn't know how to sail very well.  We were surfing some good size swells in 10-12 knots of wind, and broached, with me flying off the trampoline.  I had a shorty wet suit on and an old ski parka with tools and parts in the pockets...none of us had PFDs.   Had to ditch the tools and parts and they were acting as a weight belt.   With the white horses off the swell tops, I was hard to spot.  Took my crewmate about an hour to finally sail up wind to me and I climbed back aboard.  A few lessons learned that day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lost the aluminum plate daggerboard from my El Toro when I turned turtle in Georgian Bay when it got too fresh. Was rescued an hour later when a cottager saw me through binoculars way out there and rescued me or it would have been a few more hours to a lee shore.

Never forget the lanyard, never forget the lanyard, never forget the lanyard....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, B.J. Porter said:

The absolute worst, most expensive thing?

My asymmetrical spinnaker. Somewhere between Tahiti and New Zealand.

Me too, there is a asymmetrical kite on the bottom of Puget Sound somewhere. (The replacement is a much better kite so it turned out OK.)

And car keys, several cell phones and one pair of prescription glasses....a diver friend found the car keys so I got them back.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:

$500,000 worth of scientific instrumentation when a cable snapped.

I know exactly where we lost it though - off of the edge of the Amery Ice Shelf........ it's still there, unless an iceberg has scraped it off somewhere else.

FKT

The way things are heating up you may be able to retrieve that stuff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sunglasses, a watch, hats, and last weekend a brand new roll of gorilla tape.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brand new spinnaker turtle - my kid didn't clip it on. Couple of tools. Oddest one was a fuel filler deck fitting - I was below tapping it out before painting the deck and it popped out and rolled over the side before my kid could catch it.

No hats, no glasses, no wallets, no keys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, I forgot the brand new chartplotter cover that shot like a frisbee when I popped it off with one hand. Amazing the kinetic energy it released when it took flight and cleared the pushpit by several feet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sure there's at least one other thread like this, but can't find it.

Most frustrating?  The last extant winch handle (non-locking, of course) that fit those older Lewmar halyard winches that use a slightly smaller socket than all other winches in the known universe.  It was plugged into a mast-mounted winch and I had to momentarily use both hands for something else...  Wave - Slip - Bounce - Splash!  Replacing the winches turned out to be easier than finding another handle.  I've still got four #8's in the junk bin if anybody happens to want them.

Most unlikely?  Drifting around in a Zodiac, trying to start the ancient SeaKing motor, I gave an especially enthusiastic pull to the starter cord and somehow the hip action launched my car keys right out of my pocket and in a neat arc over the side.  Plop!  200 miles from home, nobody else around, no phone. 15 feet of water, fully kelp-covered sand bottom. As a desperate act, I immediately used the old boy-scout trick of of taking sights on two separate trees,  got into my scuba gear (fortunately already loaded in the Zodiac) and jumped in at the approximate spot.  And actually found the keys!

Not too long ago... coming in hot toward the marina entrance, I noticed a shackle pin for a block on the leeward genoa track had worked itself nearly all the way out.  No way I could drop the tiller to reach it at the moment.  But the thing hung on there, all the way back to the slip.  Until the moment I reached out to pick it up, and it just dropped overboard before I could touch it.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Fah Kiew Tu said:
13 hours ago, Zora said:

Anyway, what's the worst thing you've lost over the side. And did you get it back?

$500,000 worth of scientific instrumentation when a cable snapped.

I know exactly where we lost it though - off of the edge of the Amery Ice Shelf........ it's still there, unless an iceberg has scraped it off somewhere else.

Ha! I was aboard one of Uncle Sam's big gray boats when the sonar techs did something similar...... lost a variable depth sonar "fish" lowering it to ~300' while the ship was driving across 200' deep water.

I had nothing to do with it other than trying not to laugh at the sonar chief when he was bitching about it.

Unfortunately for the taxpayers, I don't think it was recovered.

FB- Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, woahboy said:

Sunglasses, a watch, hats, and last weekend a brand new roll of gorilla tape.

...and you’ve only had the boat for a couple of months;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I lost my first hat in 1965 off the Virginia coast, as a little kid aboard our family's schooner . It was a green Hopalong Cassidy cowboy hat, and I was shocked when my dad said we couldn't turn around and get it.

The last hat I lost was 2 weeks ago. It blew off my head, just like the first one did 50+ years ago. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Phones, keys, hats, glasses, shackle keys, winch handles rig pins, mast, you name it. The sea has a special gravity for expensive or uniquely sized hardware and over 55 years of sailing, I’ve probable lost many more things than I can remember. Just part of the cost of sailing. 

Wife jumped in for a swim yesterday wearing sunglasses. Gone. Tilley hat blew off in light to moderate air 1/2 way to Bermuda last month. Went on deck without the chin strap and turned aft from the wheel to check something. That one landed on deck and hung on the  pushpit just long enough to taunt me into thinking I might save it. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

...and you’ve only had the boat for a couple of months;)

@Sail4beerI know, what else will I lose? But the tape was the first thing I’ve lost off of this boat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, woahboy said:

The way things are heating up you may be able to retrieve that stuff.

Nah, claimed it on insurance and bought brand new kit. We joked about trying to think up good reasons why we should lose some more gear. Standard joke became 'Will it float? Oops it didn't better ask for a new one'..........

Mind you when you're operating gear on a cable with a breaking strain of 2000kg (not SWL, actual tested breaking strain) and the load cell is showing 1600+ kg when the ship rolls you're living on borrowed time anyway but that's deep ocean research for you. If you can't afford to lose the gear, don't put it in salt water.

Most recent annoying loss - a lousy 5mm Allen key. Swapping over a winch on the main mast, drop the key, boing, boing, straight through the freeing port in the bulwarks - splash. Only one aboard of course. Lots of swearing followed by a sulky silence then a voice from below - 'Shall I put the kettle on now, dear?'

FKT

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lost some tools overboard, nothing major.  My brother once dropped a winch off the side of my dad's boat, that went over well...  (winch, not winch handle - we were installing it...)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The last casualty was a well liked hat overboard while sailing an E-Scow last weekend. Funny how you usually lose things just as stuff starts going sideways. I look at it as an early warning system...and in  the case of  things that float, ideal practice for an MOB drill.

As for the dock, I’m still working on it. Less shades dropped over the last few years(always from when I take them off and put them in shirt pocket/collar and continue to putter) but still the odd tool drop at the least opportune time. I’m batting.500 lately w the magnet over the last couple of years. Mini ratchet fished out...large vice grips...no luck.0A6B1E50-7D83-4623-8304-DFAC191ED5B2.thumb.jpeg.c3974a69e600ccaea3ef077f10108585.jpeg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hats, sunglasses, keys, tools, a cell phone, gloves, sailbags, crew (kidding...not), did i mention tools?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Zora said:

Anyway, what's the worst thing you've lost over the side. And did you get it back?

Lost? virginity.

Did I get it back? Not really. But that's not what I told Mrs. Robinson though...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Three pairs of my sunglasses, a pair of my wife's sunglasses I'd borrowed, my 5 year old son dropped his glasses over the side at the dock (that was the worst, howled for days), winch handle which was picked up by the main sheet and neatly deposited on the toerail to ensure I heard it bounce before the splash, a boat hook that was hooked and fired about 30' in the air by a jib sheet, assorted hats, probably a bunch more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My passport, my car keys, 

5 hours ago, Innocent Bystander said:

Phones, keys, hats, glasses, shackle keys, winch handles rig pins, mast, you name it. The sea has a special gravity for expensive or uniquely sized hardware and over 55 years of sailing, I’ve probable lost many more things than I can remember. Just part of the cost of sailing. 

Wife jumped in for a swim yesterday wearing sunglasses. Gone. Tilley hat blew off in light to moderate air 1/2 way to Bermuda last month. Went on deck without the chin strap and turned aft from the wheel to check something. That one landed on deck and hung on the  pushpit just long enough to taunt me into thinking I might save it. 

Well, that's an aesthetic improvement for which the planet thanks you, at any rate.  

For me, nothing but my passport, my wallet and my car keys, in three separate incidents.  So, nothing major.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My son.  As a small child, it just seemed to be a phase he went through for a season when he was about 4.  He'd see how much he could fuck around until he fell off.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A couple of weeks ago I lost my outboard. An almost new Mercury 5 hp.

Me and my girlfriend had been out on an afternoon/evening cruise under engine in perfect weather, 25 degrees Celcius, blue sky and no wind. As we were on our way back to the marina, we hit a shallow that weren't marked on the map, only doing 4 knots or so. I tried to reverse off, and while trying to do that, the plywood part of the outboard mount broke in two pieces and the outboard went swimming.

So, there we were. Being grounded in the evening, with no engine and no wind to go back.

Fortunately, the engine was still connected to the fuel tank by the hose, and I was able to pull it back onboard. I called a friend who came out in his boat, pulled us off the shawllow and took us on a tow back to the marina. Back in the marina, I screwed the spark plug out of the engine and pulled the start cord, to get the water out of the cylinder and see if the spark plug still gave a spark. I put everything back together, and the engine started on second pull, and has since then been running as great as always.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Come to think of it, i actually lost my handheld VHF one night.

It was during storm Hannah, and the wind was blowing a good 60 knots over the marina. One of the boats near me snapped a furling line, and her headsail got loose. I was afraid it would pull the rig down so i put on my foul gear, lifejacket and clipped on my VHF incase i fell in and needed help. 

I got the sail back in, and made my way back to the boat. When i was taking off my gear, i noticed my VHF was gone. I was pretty new and wasnt a cheap one so i was pretty upset about it. I went looking the next morning and no sign of it anywhere, so i put it off as a loss. There was a pretty big swell and tide so i assumed it was long gone, but later that evening it turned up hanging on the door to the marina office... luckily it's waterproof and when its in the water it beeps and flashes. Someone must have found it on the beach nearby or on the rocks. Lucky!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two Electric shavers, first one rolled in towel along with change of clothes, clamber out of boat to use club showers, splash , shaver shoots out from towel into dyke, the dyke has avery muddy bottom no hope of finding it..

A week later clamber out of boat new shaver wrapped in towel... Splash... 

I now only take disposible wet shavers to the boat...

Many watches, waveceptor casio cheap ones. the fish must be getting annoyed at the count down timers going off..

Many hats they often stay afloat long enough to let you think you'll get it back.

 A shovel... clearing the bird crap off the decking at the front of the club, swing shovel loaded with crap, big splash , I'm left holding the T of the handle..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hats sink?    That explains the multiple failed attempts to find one after the storm passes or the capsize is recovered.    One sandal, a water bottle,    Glasses ripped off by a flogging jib sheet, the occasional batten.   I’ve slowly gotten smart.   Wallet and keys are secured before I leave dock, in the cabin or behind a deck plate.    Glasses are tied,   Water bottle has a lanyard.    Hat has a chin strap.    Note to self.    I need to use the hands free for the phone, so I don’t drop it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Left Shift said:

My passport, my car keys, 

13 hours ago, Innocent Bystander said:

Phones, keys, hats, glasses, shackle keys, winch handles rig pins, mast, you name it. The sea has a special gravity for expensive or uniquely sized hardware and over 55 years of sailing, I’ve probable lost many more things than I can remember. Just part of the cost of sailing. 

Wife jumped in for a swim yesterday wearing sunglasses. Gone. Tilley hat blew off in light to moderate air 1/2 way to Bermuda last month. Went on deck without the chin strap and turned aft from the wheel to check something. That one landed on deck and hung on the  pushpit just long enough to taunt me into thinking I might save it. 

Well, that's an aesthetic improvement for which the planet thanks you, at any rate.  

For me, nothing but my passport, my wallet and my car keys, in three separate incidents.  So, nothing major.

Since I'm basically bald, my dermo strongly suggests I wear a hat that shades hear, ears and neck. Since I've already survived a large sarcoma, it would be a PIA to develop a Melanoma.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, The Q said:

 A shovel... clearing the bird crap off the decking at the front of the club, swing shovel loaded with crap, big splash , I'm left holding the T of the handle..

How big are your birds that you need a shovel to clean the shite!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't ask me why I had them, but I had two, non-locking winch handles onboard.

Sure as shit, in rapid-fire fashion, a spinnaker sheet got hooked under one, wiggled it out of the winch and flipped it overboard. Lather, rinse and repeat for the second winch handle about 30-45 minutes later.  God's way of telling you something...

One pair of prescription eye glasses neatly flipped off my face on the bow, by a flogging jib sheet.  Another pair of eye glasses scraped off of my face because I shoved my head through the raised swim ladder to observe the exhaust water stream from the engine.  The engine was in gear, taking a strain against the dock lines so the prop wash blew those glasses straight to hell and gone.

Lost my wife (then girlfriend) overboard. We were in a marina and took showers as soon as we woke. I grabbed my towel and gear and set off to the showers ahead of my girl, completed my morning ablutions and returned to the boat.  When I returned to the boat, she was not present, assumed to be in the showers. After a short time, she returned and told me that the boat moved away from the dock just as she was stepping off, so she did "the splits,"  failed to jump to the dock or the boat, and fell in the water with her bag of gear. She looked around and flipped her duffel onto the swim platform of a neighboring power boat, climbed out and went off to the showers.

Needless to say, I was horrified. It was fall and the water was cooling off but fortunately it wasn't dangerous. We laughed about it but it could have gone very badly.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, Zora said:

How big are your birds that you need a shovel to clean the shite!!

It's not how big the birds are, (mostly pink footed geese, the occasional Canada goose and Moscovy duck + mallards))  but how many of them there are. The stupid tourists feed them.  The club is on an island all of 30ft from the mainland. But the geese have realised they are not going to be disturbed by dogs, drunks and fishermen while on the island. If there are several days between events, there can be quite a pile on the front decking at the moorings, use a shovel to scrape... a wet broom to wash off..

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The usual stuff- tools, hats while underway, nuts and bolts, but with sunglasses - only the expensive ones.  The cutoff point at which Neptune's and Zephyrus' wrath coincide and rip sunglasses off my face is around $150.  I'd lost a few things overboard under sail over the years, but the expensive glasses' tendency to leap for the water culminated in a Very Bad Week. I lost a pair of $200 Oakleys during the Wednesday night racing, lost a pair of $125 Spy glasses docking in Salty Balty after a race to Baltimore, then lost another identical pair of Oakleys in the next Wednesday night race. 

That fall, another skipper in my fleet, vastly experienced old racer, let me in on a secret - the 1/$20, 2/$35, 4/$50 twenty dollar polarized sunglasses available at one of the vendor huts at the Annapolis sailboat show.   He pointed out that they are pretty decent, and for some reason, they never seem to go in the drink.  Sure as shit, I bought four pairs on the spot and haven't lost any overboard since.  I've crushed a couple but they seem hydrophobic and always avoid going over the rail or falling off my fat head while docking. Probably the best sailboat advice I ever got.  I have to think that Neptune's daughters hate cheap sunglasses, so he never bothers snatching them from me. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/14/2019 at 4:26 AM, Fah Kiew Tu said:

$500,000 worth of scientific instrumentation when a cable snapped.

I know exactly where we lost it though - off of the edge of the Amery Ice Shelf........ it's still there, unless an iceberg has scraped it off somewhere else.

FKT

Ouch that hurt

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, sunglasses.  I can't count the number of times I've forgotten to remove them before diving into the ocean.  I need one of those big red tags, "remove before flight!"

Recently, I started wearing SeaSpecs, which are strapped on tightly enough to survive water-entry.  But that makes them impractical for everyday use - I didn't realize just how many times I pop them on and off my face during the day, until I had to unstrap them each time.

So for now, at all times: Croakies on the sunglasses, Chums on the caps (I also drive a Jeep...),  lanyards on the Leatherman and  pocket light.  

I've considered putting lanyard clips of some sort on every hand tool that might go on deck, but haven't got that figured yet.  At least the drill gun has one.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, toddster said:

I've considered putting lanyard clips of some sort on every hand tool that might go on deck, but haven't got that figured yet.  At least the drill gun has one.  

Yeah - I've only put lanyards on my tools that I take aloft. Seems the unpaid help don't like it when you drop even a shackle pin and threaten to leave you up there..... besides the tools chip the paint when they land and always bounce overside anyway.

As for phones and the like I never spend more than $200 on one and expect to lose/trash it within 2 years.

FKT

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Ajax said:

Don't ask me why I had them, but I had two, non-locking winch handles onboard.

Sure as shit, in rapid-fire fashion, a spinnaker sheet got hooked under one, wiggled it out of the winch and flipped it overboard. Lather, rinse and repeat for the second winch handle about 30-45 minutes later.  God's way of telling you something...

 

 

Far be it from me to interpret God’s message to another, that’s either for someone of a higher calling or the reason Luther put up such a fuss.

But, nevertheless I’d surmise that if God was really trying to rain down from on high and ‘tell you something’ in a more grave fashion he’d have had you close to a lee shore and done the same random spinnaker sheet wrap on a locking winch handle...just to give you a few more things to do before unraveling(cutting and skying?) the mess.

For me, unless you’re on a long tack, when the trimming’s done, if the winch becomes unattended, the handle comes off the winch until further notice. 

God told me so one day.

Short handing over all points of sail I’ve always preferred one lighter non locking winch handle to do double duty for both jib sheets...that way the handle is always on the move or in its storage slot. Spares, both locking(rarely used)and non locking are carried below.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have lost most of the above mentioned, learned early on that fate just laughs as you will see or hear it bounce before going over. The best? In the 80's we had a woman crew who was excellent -  fun, fit and talented whose bf was friendly, affable and useless. He lost 3 winch handles in one weekend (these were the good ones). We decided he had 2 left hands and the only other was being left behind.  We subsequently lost her as crew but the handle budget was out of control.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I once found an iPhone that someone on the same boat had lost overboard a few days earlier.  It was about 25 feet down right next to the mooring ball where we had been the last few days.  It was in a ziplock bag so it was still working.  A ziplock bag is a great insurance policy when getting into and out of a dingy all day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, fufkin said:

Far be it from me to interpret God’s message to another, that’s either for someone of a higher calling or the reason Luther put up such a fuss.

But, nevertheless I’d surmise that if God was really trying to rain down from on high and ‘tell you something’ in a more grave fashion he’d have had you close to a lee shore and done the same random spinnaker sheet wrap on a locking winch handle...just to give you a few more things to do before unraveling(cutting and skying?) the mess.

For me, unless you’re on a long tack, when the trimming’s done, if the winch becomes unattended, the handle comes off the winch until further notice. 

God told me so one day.

Short handing over all points of sail I’ve always preferred one lighter non locking winch handle to do double duty for both jib sheets...that way the handle is always on the move or in its storage slot. Spares, both locking(rarely used)and non locking are carried below.

 

All very true. This was a race with crew. The guy is a good friend of mine and a decent sailor but a very infrequent racer so he wasn't thinking about details like stowing the handle when not actively trimming.

It's all in the past. My current boat has winches with standard sized drive sockets and I have plenty of locking winch handles and plenty of spares below. My favorite is one of those Lewmar "one touch" handles where basically the whole length of the shaft *is* the release button.

https://www.lewmar.com/node/12185

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Ajax said:

All very true. This was a race with crew. The guy is a good friend of mine and a decent sailor but a very infrequent racer so he wasn't thinking about details like stowing the handle when not actively trimming.

It's all in the past. My current boat has winches with standard sized drive sockets and I have plenty of locking winch handles and plenty of spares below. My favorite is one of those Lewmar "one touch" handles where basically the whole length of the shaft *is* the release button.

https://www.lewmar.com/node/12185

I often race on a boat with old Barient winches.  I find locking winch handles slow me down more than help so I alway prefer the non-locking variety...but maybe thats because all the locking winch handles are old and could use some love.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The usual collection of hats and prescription glasses here too... but the 'best one' was the nut from the Magma grill.  It bounced twice, gave a final 'ping', then headed for the deep, narrowly missing a seagull, who squawked out a perfect "Ha Ha".

On my boat, I wouldn't mind losing a winch handle or two... It came with the original solid brass handles for the Barient winches, about 10 pounds apiece.  But alas, I only lose expensive alloy handles on opb's - which I replace.... Maybe someday I'll buy one for *my* boat.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/14/2019 at 2:03 AM, Zora said:

I couldn't find a thread like it and wanted to share a story / hear about the most annoying/funny/silly thing you've lost off the side of the boat... 

I often use my cockpit as a workshop and set up a bench with tools. To keep my helm wheel from damage and to give myself a bit more room, I generally remove it and stow it tied on the rail and put it back after I'm done. It's a pretty big wheel, about 38 inches. 

In a bit of a hungover haze, I forgot to tie it on this time around, which led to it slipping off the side and me watching it sink to the bottom of the marina... 

By chance, I bumped into my neighbor on the way up to the pub that overlooks the marina that evening And told him the story. He offered me his dinghy anchor to try fish it out. It's only 10 feet here at low tide and the bottom is just mud, so after 3 attempts up came the helm... I called off the diver that was coming the next day and got my neighbor a pint... Lesson learned. Although I've lost my phone over the side a couple of times so maybe not... 

Anyway, what's the worst thing you've lost over the side. And did you get it back?

Worst thing - a 100 pound Chesapeake Bay Retriever. PITA to get a large wet dog back on the boat.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Worst thing - a 100 pound Chesapeake Bay Retriever. PITA to get a large wet dog back on the boat.

Did that once with a 120lb chocolate lab. Was WAY more than 120lbs wet. He really loved to swim though. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Worst thing - a 100 pound Chesapeake Bay Retriever. PITA to get a large wet dog back on the boat.

 

When I was living in southern Dorchester County - we had a 2 step "swim platform" that we'd hang on the gunnel to get Rusty back on board.  It was hard keeping that blessed dog IN the boat, much less get her back on board. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First sail with the wifie and newborn son.  Take stroller to boat, kid and wifie on boat and off we go, Nice reach out, go around the lake a couple times and head back to slip..  Good times.  Notice a commotion by the slip, lots of people pointing and yelling.  Tie boat up..  Wifie - uuuuhh where is the stroller?  Me _ uuuuuuuhhh donno.  Apparently someone forgot to lock the wheels and a big puff came in and said stroller ends up in the drink.  Excited people see the kiddo and soon disperse.  Apparently they thought the kiddo was in the stroller when it went in the drink...  :P  Oh to be somewhere witnessing the commotion first hand.   Worst thing is that the new ish jib I had stashed under the stroller went with it...  Attempts to retrieve said sail and stroller failed...  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Worst thing - a 100 pound Chesapeake Bay Retriever. PITA to get a large wet dog back on the boat.

 

Yeah but they're great at bringing back your hat when it blow off. Or anything else.

And 100lbs is why I don't want another Chesapeake. The hunting dogs used to be about 60 lbs, which is a good size both for the dog and for practical life.... hunting etc etc. When we couldn't find a Chesapeake breeder that wasn't all excited about breeding bigger and bigger dogs, we gave up.

- DSK

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have a buddy (pediatrician actually) who bought my Nisan 3.5 dinghy motor and failed to tighten it to the push pit only to realize the mistake when it deep-Sixth Ed itself just west of St Thomas in the USVIs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/15/2019 at 11:06 PM, Tharsheblows said:

I once found an iPhone that someone on the same boat had lost overboard a few days earlier.  It was about 25 feet down right next to the mooring ball where we had been the last few days.  It was in a ziplock bag so it was still working.  A ziplock bag is a great insurance policy when getting into and out of a dingy all day.

Pro-tip I discovered (observed) is to have the ziplock puffed up with air if practical.  Sometimes it will float with the keys, phone, wallet etc.  Sometimes not...

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like many here, I scuba dive.

I've found more stuff than I've lost.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two things; a spinnaker pole. fastened in the chock a really sloppy tack with the lazy sheet around the end. Popped the pole outa the chocks bounces on the deck and under the life line before the foredeck could grab it. We were racing but it floated just long enough for me to spin the boat around and touch it with the boat hook: sunk in 90ft.

Second my jib sheets. I coiled them and put on the bow rail for cleaning. Forgot them. came back the next day to go sailing. no sheets; must of left them home; back home, searched; nope, must be on the boat; check every where. WTF where are they? Looked at the bow rail and remembered where I put them, but of course they fell off. Three try's with a dingy anchor hooked them right under the bow. Brought them still nicely coiled.

Hats don't count, not enough fingers

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Windward said:

Pro-tip I discovered (observed) is to have the ziplock puffed up with air if practical.  Sometimes it will float with the keys, phone, wallet etc.  Sometimes not...

A boathook with sharp point is not a effective for retrieving floating bag with expensive stuff in 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, 2airishuman said:

Like many here, I scuba dive.

I've found more stuff than I've lost.

I found an entire airplane underwater once! It was about 2 feet under the surface and had not been there when we left earlier that day. I dove down in my shorts to make sure no one was still in it, which was happily the case. Turned out it was the neighbor's seaplane that capsized and sank in the creek while we were out.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

Yeah but they're great at bringing back your hat when it blow off. Or anything else.

And 100lbs is why I don't want another Chesapeake. The hunting dogs used to be about 60 lbs, which is a good size both for the dog and for practical life.... hunting etc etc. When we couldn't find a Chesapeake breeder that wasn't all excited about breeding bigger and bigger dogs, we gave up.

- DSK

Thread creep alert

WTF is it with breeding huge retrievers? Labs, Chessies, and Goldens all should be 50-70 pounds or so. They are designed to be in small boats! (or at least they were)

Lighter dogs have fewer joint problems and so do I when I have to lift them.

 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:
23 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

And 100lbs is why I don't want another Chesapeake. The hunting dogs used to be about 60 lbs, which is a good size both for the dog and for practical life.... hunting etc etc. When we couldn't find a Chesapeake breeder that wasn't all excited about breeding bigger and bigger dogs, we gave up.

 

Thread creep alert

WTF is it with breeding huge retrievers? Labs, Chessies, and Goldens all should be 50-70 pounds or so. They are designed to be in small boats! (or at least they were)

Lighter dogs have fewer joint problems and so do I when I have to lift them.

 

I think it's the attempt to win dog shows. Dog show judges are simpletons, so if all else is equal the bigger dog wins. And don't tell me about field trials, they are just dog shows with more running around. A decent Chesapeake will outrun, outswim, and out-fetch, the best Lab ever born. They're not cuddly darlings though, which Labs are.

post-30927-046214000%201340853078_thumb.jpg

Cute puppy, did not like sailing but did not like being left home, eventually became cruising dog

post-30927-0-33980100-1410955133_thumb.jpg

This guy was our 3rd Chesapeake and he's been gone 17 years now. Kids liked him because he loved to play fetch, and was woolly like a lamb. As spoiled as he was, he still inspired terror among most birds with the exception of a few testosterone-laden ganders (one of whom he killed, impatient with my boneheadedness in not bringing the gun). He rescued several hats blown overboard, and would certainly have rescued a person if he'd ever had the chance. Dinghy, hell.... he'd have swum a mile to shore and back, if you just let him. When nobody would throw anything into the water for him to fetch, he'd swim around for fun and then dive down and scavenge along the bottom for something to bring up. I trained him for duck hunting out of a book, he could do all the official stuff (follow whistle signals, multiple retrieves, etc etc) but he really liked busting thru ice or sticker bushes. This amazed my wife, the few times she saw him do it, because 100% of the rest of the time, he was an effete little mamma's boy.

I still run into people around town who want to stop and reminisce about him. We've had another dog come, grow old, and pass, since this one.

I apologize for the thread drift. One of the main reasons to have a good dinghy is so you can bring your dog.

FB- Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We had a (big) Chesapeake. He was cuddly enough.  Had to swim every day, even if he broke the ice on the pond to do it.

But he didn't think that people should swim.  We accumulated a lot of lacerations from his "rescue" attempts, until I developed the technique of surface-diving and swimming underneath him to a safe distance. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

a 9.9 Honda 4 stroke. Tiller came right out of my hand as it fell off the back. Had to swim to shore!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Mark Set said:

a 9.9 Honda 4 stroke. Tiller came right out of my hand as it fell off the back. Had to swim to shore!

Youtube has a compilation video of outboards falling off of skiffs at speed, filmed by the owners' GoPro's. Fairly amusing.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Thread creep alert

WTF is it with breeding huge retrievers? Labs, Chessies, and Goldens all should be 50-70 pounds or so. They are designed to be in small boats! (or at least they were)

Lighter dogs have fewer joint problems and so do I when I have to lift them.

 

The same with Airedales which have got bigger and bigger. Sadly they seem to have got stupider as well - we had one which couldn’t work out the logic of passing lamp posts on the same side as her walker. She would look at us from the other side, tugging at the leash, baffled by what had just happened. An endearing dog nevertheless - when she stole a piece of food she would adopt her gait of invisibility. Dogs CAN walk on tiptoes.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably my fastest thinking parenting moment involves losing my son overboard.  I'm on the dock, inflating the dinghy next to the mothership.  My then 3 year old son is unstoppably climbing into the dinghy, out of the dinghy, in, out, in, trip...  sploosh!  He was of course wearing a PFD, so I reached in, grabbed the loop on the back, and hauled him out.  Before he could freak out and start crying I immediately said "Wow, you had an undersea adventure!  Did you see any fish???", which derailed him from that loop.  No fuss, no muss.  Change of clothes and all good...

It's all downhill from there, all I've got now is yelling and threats about internet access...  :D

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My fastest thinking childing (is that a word) moment was when my 88 year old mother went off the jetty into the fast flowing ebb. First thought was “Fuck, I’ve killed Mum”; second thought was “what will I tell the sisters?”  By then I was in the water beside her helping her to swim, and the launch driver got alongside after a while. She must have spent ten minutes in the water - just escaped full on hypothermia, and her Alzheimer’s went back a couple of years. She though it was a great hoot and she was certainly the queen of the grannies club for a while. She was wearing a very cool retro fleece that helped her float. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Fuck, I've killed Mum" is a hilarious quote that will stick in my berryman for awhile. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I once lost a dog and wife overboard in short order. Our schipperke mix loved boats but hated to swim. She launched herself off the boat and into the dinghy while we were at anchor and I was on the throne. She did not factor in how bouncy a RIB is and bounced right off the tube into the water.
"Dad Dad the dog fell overboard <bark bark bark bark yip yip>"

"Well she can swim around for a few minutes until I finish"

SPLASH

"Dad dad mom fell off the boat trying to get the dog back"

Well sure as hell my leisurely shit is ruined now

Had to run up and rig the ladder for my wife and fish the dog out.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

58 years of sailing and 30+ years in the boatyard puts me in the IB camp of "almost everything". but being able to dive has gotten most of the stuff lost at the dock including, but not limited to, brand new obscenely expensive sails,  nearly a grand of new battens and a set of canvas.  The best was my full toolbag loaded with Snap-On everything which did a giant stride entry off a deck while on a mooring in about 30' of water.  I about shit myself, as it was going to be very painful to replace, and there were some irreplaceables in there too.  When I found it the next morning, it was upright and the only thing not in it was the Titan winch handle which floated to the surface shortly after it went for a swim.

I continue to lose Labs over the side, although nowhere to the extent of the original. who made a sport of it.  Motto - It's cool, Dad will pull me out.  It seems as if at least in this part of the country, breeders are deliberately trying for smaller Labs.  Our latest is only 60#, which is a 40# improvement over the original.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I lost all four of our passports and copies of ships papers on my way to the customs office in Great Harbor, Jost Van Dyke BVIs.

I've told the story in SA before, so the short version is that the dinghy had six inches of rain water in it, so instead ob bailing I got on a plane and pulled the plug while running up the ferry channel and didn't notice the ziplock bag fell out of my pocket into the drink. Got to the dock, no passports. Felt that feeling of dread. Went back out to look. Saw the trash line in the current and worried that the bag sank. Went to the office told my story and the officer was awesome. He told me to hang tight and not to start the process of lost passports. Maybe, like I was speculating, they were floating in the ziplock and would turn up.

Went back to the boat to freak out in the aft cabin by laying down and telling the wife I just needed to lay down for a bit I didn't feel great. Got up, went out and saw that the trash ends up on the rocks on the west side of the channel and walked the shore line and sure enough our passports had floated on over. Checked out and headed to St. John.

 

 

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/19/2019 at 9:26 PM, Ajax said:

Youtube has a compilation video of outboards falling off of skiffs at speed, filmed by the owners' GoPro's. Fairly amusing.

As I've already posted in this thread about losing my own outboard, I had to find this video, it's always more fun when it happens to other people: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aS3ALOmIXSg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IDK what's wrong with me, but I actually sat down and read the manual.  :huh:

It says in big bold print that the screw-clamps are not sufficient to hold the motor when operating.  Through-bolts must be inserted through the holes in the lower bracket and the boat's transom.  Worth noting that those bolts have been slightly bent from the torque at least half the time when I removed the motor.  (Probably at least in part because the surfaces don't all end up exactly parallel.)  I'm wondering if some kind of clevis pin would work better in that application.

Of course, this is such a PITA that I have been known to tow the dinghy with the motor on... :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, Misbehavin' said:

As I've already posted in this thread about losing my own outboard, I had to find this video, it's always more fun when it happens to other people: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aS3ALOmIXSg

That's the one. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not the worst but the funniest.  Years ago, my folks had two college kids racing with us who were enthusiastic but green.  Just after the bottom mark, one of them starts asking where his foul weather top is.  Some searching ensued on the way to the top mark but no success.  It was breezy and when we set the chute it filled quickly and we all watched the young man's foul weather top go sailing through the air.  It seems that his buddy in his enthusiasm managed to pack his foul weather top in with the spinnaker.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Misbehavin' said:

As I've already posted in this thread about losing my own outboard, I had to find this video, it's always more fun when it happens to other people: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aS3ALOmIXSg

It's tragedy when it happens to me;

It's comedy when it happens to someone else.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎7‎/‎19‎/‎2019 at 2:09 PM, kent_island_sailor said:

Thread creep alert

WTF is it with breeding huge retrievers? Labs, Chessies, and Goldens all should be 50-70 pounds or so. They are designed to be in small boats! (or at least they were)

Lighter dogs have fewer joint problems and so do I when I have to lift them.

 

The USA Chesapeake  Breed standards say 65 to 80LBS for a male, 55 to 70lbs for a female. Any self repecting judge would throw them out of class for being heavier than that..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, The Q said:

The USA Chesapeake  Breed standards say 65 to 80LBS for a male, 55 to 70lbs for a female. Any self repecting judge would throw them out of class for being heavier than that..

Somehow that doesn't seem to happen. Also notice the Labs that are starting to look like armored cars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, toddster said:

IDK what's wrong with me, but I actually sat down and read the manual.  :huh:

It says in big bold print that the screw-clamps are not sufficient to hold the motor when operating.  Through-bolts must be inserted through the holes in the lower bracket and the boat's transom.  Worth noting that those bolts have been slightly bent from the torque at least half the time when I removed the motor.  (Probably at least in part because the surfaces don't all end up exactly parallel.)  I'm wondering if some kind of clevis pin would work better in that application.

Of course, this is such a PITA that I have been known to tow the dinghy with the motor on... :o

My dinghy motor goes in March and off in December and never comes off otherwise. I did not know it was supposed to be bolted on - need to look into this....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎7‎/‎20‎/‎2019 at 6:25 PM, lasal said:

I lost all four of our passports and copies of ships papers on my way to the customs office in Great Harbor, Jost Van Dyke BVIs.

I've told the story in SA before, so the short version is that the dinghy had six inches of rain water in it, so instead ob bailing I got on a plane and pulled the plug while running up the ferry channel and didn't notice the ziplock bag fell out of my pocket into the drink. Got to the dock, no passports. Felt that feeling of dread. Went back out to look. Saw the trash line in the current and worried that the bag sank. Went to the office told my story and the officer was awesome. He told me to hang tight and not to start the process of lost passports. Maybe, like I was speculating, they were floating in the ziplock and would turn up.

Went back to the boat to freak out in the aft cabin by laying down and telling the wife I just needed to lay down for a bit I didn't feel great. Got up, went out and saw that the trash ends up on the rocks on the west side of the channel and walked the shore line and sure enough our passports had floated on over. Checked out and headed to St. John.

 

 

 

 

Yikes! That was a lucky find. I had something similar but not from a boat. We were snorkeling at Great Harbour Cay when I asked my buddy what that bag was floating out into the ocean from the beach way over there. It was our bag with all our wallets, passports, and keys to the airplane and it was slowly sinking :o 

Arriving at customs with no ID and a hot-wired airplane probably would not be good, so we swam faster than Marl Spitz to get the bag back!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/20/2019 at 1:48 AM, Mr. Ed said:

The same with Airedales which have got bigger and bigger. Sadly they seem to have got stupider as well - we had one which couldn’t work out the logic of passing lamp posts on the same side as her walker. She would look at us from the other side, tugging at the leash, baffled by what had just happened. An endearing dog nevertheless - when she stole a piece of food she would adopt her gait of invisibility. Dogs CAN walk on tiptoes.

 

our cockapoo was obsessed with human food.  in one room we had a small round occasional table draped with a tablecloth that went to the floor.  if Sprocket got a hold of something he would run over and go under the table/cloth...but half his body would stick out...dude, we can still see you :D

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most recently lost a pair or Shady Rays Sunglass https://shadyrays.com on the start of a 3 day cruise.  Sent an email and they sent me another pair. Did I really lose anything? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites