kurio99

Eskimo Roll

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The other day, I dumped my RS700 in substantial winds with the sail 45 degrees to the windwind.  As soon as I got the sail above the water, the wind began forcing its way under the sail.  It had the makings of a hard 180 spin and recapsize.  In this case, I chickened out, turtled the rig, and moved to the other side.  I should have gone for an eskimo roll, but don't know how to position myself to do it safely.  Could you describe in detail how to do this manoeuvre?  I can't find any good descriptions on the web.

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Sorry, Jim,

The video doesn't quite capture what I need to know.  The RS700 is a much bigger boat, so I'll be standing on the board when the boat comes up.  I can't bring it up by tugging on the centreboard like he did.

I suspect that as soon as the wind fully catches the sail, I'll need to drop into the water, grab the far end of the board at the leading edge, duck my head to avoid bashing it on the hull, shift my hand position to avoid breaking a wrist as it rolls to the opposite side, at which point, I do the usual push up and climb onto board.

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You should not go out without a safety boat. Check your club rules on this !!!!!!!

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I always simply hugged the board. Usually, on a Laser, with the weight on the board after the "keel haul" under the boat, it doesn't completely flip again. 

Used to be called the Shimon Van Collie (sp?) roll.

Only problem I ever had with this method was on a Suicide when I realized near the bottom of the roll that the water was shallow enough that I was going to be squished. Adrenalin took over.

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8 hours ago, kurio99 said:

Sorry, Jim,

The video doesn't quite capture what I need to know.  The RS700 is a much bigger boat, so I'll be standing on the board when the boat comes up.  I can't bring it up by tugging on the centreboard like he did.

I suspect that as soon as the wind fully catches the sail, I'll need to drop into the water, grab the far end of the board at the leading edge, duck my head to avoid bashing it on the hull, shift my hand position to avoid breaking a wrist as it rolls to the opposite side, at which point, I do the usual push up and climb onto board.

If you're all the way and standing on the board, another option is to put one shin over the gun'l and get in the boat as it comes up. Try avoid the quick 180 capsize the other way, although in some wind conditions/angles it's probably inevitable.

Righting the boat and scooting in over the gun'l is something that's very much worth practicing in calm weather. Adds some interest to an otherwise boring light air day, too

FB- Doug

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Any chance of getting pinned between hull and the wing bars? (There's no netting, right?)

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Um, in a Musto Skiff I did get tangled up between the hull and rack. Embarrassing but not really death dealing.

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No need for eskimo rolls. On our 29er or RS800 we do the following. 

If the rig is to windward somebody gets on the daggerboard and starts righting but stops when the tip of the mast is about a metre above the water. Keep the boat balanced in this position. The wind gets under the sail and the boat will then start to spin in the water so the rig ends up downwind. Then right in the normal way. 

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Cad99uk,

I know what you're saying.  If the leading edge of the sail is pointed even the slightest angle away from the wind, then I do exactly as you describe by using the wind to pivot the boat.  In this particular case, that method doesn't work with the leading edge to wind, as hovering the sail, causes the wind to slip under the sail while pushing on the hull to pivot the mast towards windward.

Through 300 degrees of the compass, I've done many capsize recoveries and am totally good with the process.  It's just that final 60 degrees in windy days, which need improvement.  I did not even recovery this time, as flipping into a nest of mainsheet and spinnaker lines while the boat does a full 180 recapsize, is not my idea of safe.  Maybe I could have scrambled to the far side and stopped the recapsize, but I gave that low odds given the wind strength.

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22 hours ago, kurio99 said:

Sorry, Jim,

The video doesn't quite capture what I need to know.  The RS700 is a much bigger boat, so I'll be standing on the board when the boat comes up.  I can't bring it up by tugging on the centreboard like he did.

I suspect that as soon as the wind fully catches the sail, I'll need to drop into the water, grab the far end of the board at the leading edge, duck my head to avoid bashing it on the hull, shift my hand position to avoid breaking a wrist as it rolls to the opposite side, at which point, I do the usual push up and climb onto board.

Pretty much.  As you say once you get any of the rig out of the water the boat will righten it self.  If once you get the rig out of the water you lie on the board, ideally with your feet towards the boat and the end of the board roughly by your middle.  Yo can then bend round the end of the board and come up with your body on top of the board, so you don't have to pull yourself back onto it.  There's a nasty moment when the boat is upright and you're hanging around the bottom of the board when you wonder if the boat is really going to blow over again.  It always has for me...

If you do it in a double handed boat do let your mate know what you're going to do before you do it.  One guy I sailed with scared the shit out of me like that once.

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Kurio99, I find that the hovering technique works in any orientation. If the rig is pointing directly into the wind then it takes longer for the boat to start to pivot. At first nothing seems to happen and then the boat does start pivoting. 

Best wishes though for finding a safe solution. Trapeze hooks, racks and control lines on the racks make it nothing like coping with a Laser or Aero. 

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21 hours ago, cad99uk said:

No need for eskimo rolls. On our 29er or RS800 we do the following. 

Much quicker and more reliable to use the Australian Navy/Bethwaite method of having the other hand duck under the jib and wrap their arms round the shroud without trying to get in the boat. Boat flips up easy but wont capsize with all that weight with max leverage and is held hove to on beam reach by drag as sea anchor. 

Unfortunately doesn't work on single hander as no second body. Trying to get the rig to blow round is all very well when it works, but isnt very reliable IME. 

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Unless the boat is in danger of drifting onto a lee shore then I am happy to wait. Usually need a breather anyway. 

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I have this issue with my Musto Skiff. If I can't get the rig to spin downwind of the hull, I simply right the boat and let it capsize again on top of me. That way, the rig ends up down wind. I then simply swim around to the board and right as usual. However, this method doesn't work in tide or breeze. With tide or breeze on an upwind hull, the boat will quickly turtle. In this case, the eskimo roll is the only solution. For that reason, I now sail with a mast head float. I've never worked up the nerve to try the roll but I know a few Musto sailors use this technique.

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I didn't know about this maneuver so off I went and found a few videos showing a laser or aero being eskimo-rolled. And then this one which seems more relevant wrt to boat size - 

 

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the further we get into this, the more i find myself wanting sushi

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The V15 floats high. I tried to be sure I was on top at the end so I didn't have to re-lift my self like that guy did.

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As an aside, in response to the video, I would generally recommend mounting the board from the forward edge in order to avoid damaging the thinner trailing edge.

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Had the chance to 'practice' the mast hovering technique yesterday. Rig directly into the wind. I think the secret is to make sure the vang is off completely and the mainsheet is free. As the mast came up off the water the boom sank so that the sail was coming out of the water hanging down almost vertically from the mast. This gives a big area for the wind to spin the boat. 

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