Jules

Is The Thrill Gone?

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The first time I stepped aboard a sailboat I was home.  For the next 49 years it was always that way.  This year we bought a boat.  I thought I'd be in heaven but I'm not. 

Most all my sailing was on Lake Michigan.  Cruised Chicago to Mac and back no less than 8 times.  When we got back I always wanted to turn around and just sail away.  It's always been like that.  Until now.

We were out today and hit 7.5 kn SOG.  I didn't care.  All I could think of was heading back home.  This is so strange.  I don't know what it is.

Maybe it's age.  Maybe it's the goddamnfucking Florida heat.  Maybe it's shallow Charlotte Harbor that makes you tack every fucking 10 minutes.  Maybe it's all of that.  All I know is I don't care about sailing now.  This is really weird.

Has anyone else experienced this?

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I have a few suggestions.  First spend most of my life sailing on Lake Michigan although after college moved to Jacksonville, FL for 8yrs and purchased a C&C 33 which for three years lived aboard. I thought both places were great, although in very different ways.

Not sure how long you have lived in Florida but it summer there so yes, tons of heat and humidity is pretty typical (restatement of obvious I know).  You might try sailing at night for one thing.  I remember one of my nicest sails was at night on the St Johns river watching pieces of a Russian Satellite re-enter the atmosphere, a similar look to fireworks embers but they stretched from one horizon to the other-pretty cool.  Am not a fishing expert but hearing what I believe were finger mullet?  jumping around the boat on maybe same night.  Pretty memorable sail even almost 40 years later.

Ever tried to  sail on x-mas day here on Lake Michigan?  Probably for the most part not happening.  On the flip side again one of the nicest memories of my time spent South was taking the 33 out sailing on x-mas day being sunny and 72.

Try not to compare the two experiences.  They are both great but in very different ways.  No the tea colored, brackish water you find in many parts of Florida is definitely not the pristine, crystal clear, fresh water that you can easily see 20 ft or more to the bottom in the northern reaches of Lake Michigan.  From Jan to April you can have many nice days of sailing down South. Unless you do some ice boating, those are things one can only dream about during the long,  cold harsh winters that come with living in the Midwest.

Find new experiences that will energize you.  You have just purchased a new to you boat that sounds great for some cruising.  Have you done any down there?  I trailered my current  J24 down to the Palm Beach area one x-mas from Michigan and took it from there to Marathon via water over 8 days-a great trip!  Start at Charlotte harbor and cross the state via Lake Okeechobee to the other side when water levels allow.

Be grateful for every day, as our time here is limited and for what we have.  If am reading your posts correctly you have a waterfront home with your new to you 32 ft boat directly our front?  That sounds like a pretty blessed life to me.......

Rant over, good luck in finding your way, it is there in front of you, just might take some searching....

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Yes. Been doing this gig 36 years. Mostly tired of same n00bs putting in little effort and expecting miracles.  As for the weather, yes you have to travel to be year-round sailor.  I'm native Texan, so we have 9 glorious months of sailing outdoors and three blazing hot. I spend at least a month of those three elsewhere. I'm working ass off right now trying to secure lake house for the nice 9 months and a Gorge gig the other three.  Ever sailed on the Columbia in July.  Glorious.  Ever sailed there in January?  No fckn way, right?  That's why come September I'll be heading back down south with Melges in tow.

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Michigan? Florida? What's next, New Jersey? The question you should be asking is why was there ever a thrill?

Go someplace interesting and challenging. The coast of Maine, the Windward Islands, Alaska, French Polynesia, Newfoundland.

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Hey fuck you with the New Jersey dis.

Although I am on my second hiatus right now. It happens, go play golf for a few years and recharge the sailing batteries.

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2 hours ago, Jules said:

We were out today and hit 7.5 kn SOG.  I didn't care.  All I could think of was heading back home.  This is so strange.  I don't know what it is.

 

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Now, now Essex, don't get your panties in a knot. New Jersey is a fine place for Manhattan commuters and chemical refineries - it's just not really a sailing venue.

And don't get me started on golf ...

 

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Apart from playing golf you could play cricket, croquet, bowling, scrabble or bingo.

I can recommend all of them, and I know because I've played them all, once.

Quite honestly, when reading all of Jules' thread questions I sometimes wondered if there was something wrong with the poor poster, and now I am sure there is, but still no idea what exactly.

I've got one simple advice though, harden the fuck up, and go sailing...

 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Fiji Bitter said:

Quite honestly, when reading all of Jules' thread questions I sometimes wondered if there was something wrong with the poor poster, and now I am sure there is, but still no idea what exactly.

It's the heat.  It's the fucking heat.  The goddamnrentlessfucking HEAT!  We got back in at 7:30 last night and at 2AM I am still up, sitting under a fan, with the AC on, trying to cool down.  This is my fourth year is this miserable steam room and the fourth time I'm hating the goddamnfucking heat.  Did I mention the heat?  It drives you crazy.

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I feel the same way about racing. 

Lived in Florida my whole life. Went sailing yesterday. Nice sea breeze about 2 PM, beautiful sail.

Would never consider living on the west coast of  Florida. It is always oppressive heat or thunderstorms. 

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Jules, I have been sailing/racing for over 60 years - many of them in various parts of Florida. Your age could be part of all this. How do you feel? Still reasonably flexible and somewhat fit? It could be the particular boat you are sailing. I find that I continue to look for boats that are easier to sail ( physically ) yet enjoyable. I currently love my Harbor 20. Friends ( all over 60 ) and I are all buying Hobie Waves for local easy sailing. I can hear the laughter and snickering now. I too have bad-mouthed the Wave for decades and now I own one. Surprise! It offers easy and comfortable daysailing and one-design racing. My point is that you may be in the wrong boat doing the wrong type of sailing for this time in your life. Don't give up on sailing, just try a different type of sailing. There are limitless ways to enjoy the water wherever you are. Sailing is always better than bowling or cleaning your garage. Happy Sailing!

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It's Florida it just fucking sucks.The heat,shallow water,Ass hole power boaters and no wind 

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I can't say enough about how many times I've wanted to write a thread about this very topic.  So GD sick and tired of sailing, racing, the people (for the most part), etc.  Been away from it for about 4 years and don't miss a thing!  I like sitting here and checking in and spectating, reading articles, watching vids, following on YB, and all that, but actually going sailing...FCK that!  Hate it, hate it, HATE IT all down into my marrow!

But this year, life changes come around a bit, and low and behold, a good friend from childhood and I reconnect.  Wants to camp and hike on N Manitou Island.  I open my big fat fcking mouth and say how we used to sail Hobies and Lasers out to the Islands from Leland in my early/mid 20s.  Hang on the beach, eat/drink, then sail back.  I say "I can sail us out there.  We'll throw everything in dry bags and all will be fine."  I get my hands on a Weta (BIG THANKS to Gougeon Brothers!!!!), and over the July 4th long weekend, we head out of Glen Arbor area. 

Long story short, I really enjoyed myself and sailing the Weta and didn't hate it one single bit.  Great boat, easy to set up, very easy to sail, very responsive, fast!, comfortable.  And now...we got ourselves into what we call "Sail Packing."  First there was Backpacking, over the last 5 years; Bike Packing, now Sail Packing.  Gotta love it!  

Maybe going small and no stress and get out of that heat, aka taking time off and away from the whole scene, will eventually make it better for you.  But don't hesitate to take a long long time off. 

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Taking every 10 minutes.  What luxury.  On Lake Travis in Austin, when the wind is over 10, we have to tack every 90 to 120 seconds...  We never get a chance to get the sails trimmed before we have to tack back...  Maybe we need a slower boat or a bigger body of water :)

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16 minutes ago, Geff said:

I can't say enough about how many times I've wanted to write a thread about this very topic. So GD sick and tired of sailing, racing, the people (for the most part), etc. Been away from it for about 4 years and don't miss a thing! I like sitting here and checking in and spectating, reading articles, watching vids, following on YB, and all that, but actually going sailing...FCK that!  Hate it, hate it, HATE IT all down into my marrow!

I’m confused. Are you the sockpuppet for Mr. Clean, or Random? 

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21 minutes ago, Svanen said:

I’m confused. Are you the sockpuppet for Mr. Clean, or Random? 

Just my random finally chiming in.

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58 minutes ago, xonk1 said:

Jules, I have been sailing/racing for over 60 years - many of them in various parts of Florida. Your age could be part of all this. How do you feel? Still reasonably flexible and somewhat fit? It could be the particular boat you are sailing. I find that I continue to look for boats that are easier to sail ( physically ) yet enjoyable. I currently love my Harbor 20. Friends ( all over 60 ) and I are all buying Hobie Waves for local easy sailing. I can hear the laughter and snickering now. I too have bad-mouthed the Wave for decades and now I own one. Surprise! It offers easy and comfortable daysailing and one-design racing. My point is that you may be in the wrong boat doing the wrong type of sailing for this time in your life. Don't give up on sailing, just try a different type of sailing. There are limitless ways to enjoy the water wherever you are. Sailing is always better than bowling or cleaning your garage. Happy Sailing!

I'm 68.  Friends of mine down here recently sold their Bristol 35.  They are both in their early 70's.  They bought their boat new many moons ago and loved every minute of sailing when they were up north.  They moved here in 2004.  We had them over a couple of weeks ago for a sail.  They jumped at the chance.  When I asked why they sold their boat I was expecting to hear something about aging out.  He said the maintenance was too much.  She did the brightwork.  It was always gleaming.  But the constant assault of the sun and heat created too much work for them. 

I know when fall arrives my attitude will change.  It always does.  But every year, about this time, I'm crawling walls.  I don't mind the cold but the heat has always bothered me.  I moved because I was tired of shoveling snow.  Now it doesn't seem so bad.

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1 hour ago, ROADKILL666 said:

It's Florida it just fucking sucks.The heat,shallow water,Ass hole power boaters and no wind 

So.... did you all not know what Florida was like, before you moved there?

And I notice you didn't mention the bugs!

FB- Doug

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Hmmmmmm….Back to basics maybe??

Take some new sailors out with you and teach them.  It'll give meaning and satisfaction where you might otherwise not find any.*

Second idea--borrow a dinghy and go out with your creaky body and get down with it anyway.  Sailing closer to the water is more fun, even if you're more sore the next day.

 

*and you can invoke the *sixty rule" straight off--anything strenuous--halyards, genny grinding, foredeck excursions, lugging gear-- must be done by someone under sixty.   That's what I tell my sailing students when I get the occasional teaching gig.**

 

** and in three days that's going to become the "seventy rule"  ;-)

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Huh...so I’ve been sentenced to hard labor in West Palm Beach for the Summer. My boat is on the hard in Maine. 

Every day so far there’s been a nice light SE breeze - the evenings seem perfect -I’ve only seen one snipe out. How does one go sailing in Florida in the Summer?

 

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3 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Huh...so I’ve been sentenced to hard labor in West Palm Beach for the Summer. My boat is on the hard in Maine. 

Every day so far there’s been a nice light SE breeze - the evenings seem perfect -I’ve only seen one snipe out. How does one go sailing in Florida in the Summer?

 

If the Cheetard is in town, you can bet all access to the shoreline within 10 miles of Mar A Lago is shut down, so one goes sailing by avoiding that cluster fuckery.

 

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1 minute ago, ajbram said:

If the Cheetard is in town, you can bet all access to the shoreline within 10 miles of Mar A Lago is shut down, so one goes sailing by avoiding that cluster fuckery.

 

Thanks Obama! 

 

No, really. Any crew boards to sign up on? I have a decent sailing resume and can’t stand the torture of being stuck on shore. 

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1 hour ago, Geff said:

So GD sick and tired of sailing, racing, the people (for the most part), etc

Indeed.

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1 minute ago, Elegua said:

Thanks Obama! 

 

No, really. Any crew boards to sign up on? I have a decent sailing resume and can’t stand the torture of being stuck on shore. 

Bit of a drive from where you are, but there is a pretty active scene in Coconut Grove. Generally some boats looking for crew.

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23 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Huh...so I’ve been sentenced to hard labor in West Palm Beach for the Summer. My boat is on the hard in Maine. 

Every day so far there’s been a nice light SE breeze - the evenings seem perfect -I’ve only seen one snipe out. How does one go sailing in Florida in the Summer?

 

You don't. Limited beach access on the East Coast and hot with no wind on the West Coast. Florida sailing happens from October->May. Get a beach cottage on Lake MI or up in Maine for summer sailing!

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23 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Thanks Obama! 

 

No, really. Any crew boards to sign up on? I have a decent sailing resume and can’t stand the torture of being stuck on shore. 

There's a community sailing center up in Jensen Beach, for sailing on the Indian River dinghy-style.   "Real" sailing with greater displacement and draft generally involves a longish trip to an inlet, to get to the too-calm and windless ocean.  Then the return trip.  And you have to time the tide for the inlet.  So most of the sailors "outside" are cruisers rather than daysailers.

But the scuba diving is great, you drift over the reefs of WPB and Jupiter, while the boat follows you.  And golf is ubiquitous, and at least something to do on windless days...

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Find ways to stay cool. I often stop and go for a swim before we set sails, hose myself off at the dock, pour buckets over my head, swim after races etc. Does your boat have good shade? Just dipping your hat in the water makes a world of a difference.

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5 minutes ago, nolatom said:

There's a community sailing center up in Jensen Beach, for sailing on the Indian River dinghy-style.   "Real" sailing with greater displacement and draft generally involves a longish trip to an inlet, to get to the too-calm and windless ocean.  Then the return trip.  And you have to time the tide for the inlet.  So most of the sailors "outside" are cruisers rather than daysailers.

But the scuba diving is great, you drift over the reefs of WPB and Jupiter, while the boat follows you.  And golf is ubiquitous, and at least something to do on windless days...

Thanks. I don’t golf. I do scuba. I enjoy small boat / dinghy sailing too. I have to find where that snipe is coming from. 

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Get a trawler.  Makes boat live much easier which translates to fun.

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South GA.... It's the heat .....fuck.

On another note, I was starting to feel a little jaded, especially with sailing in the same phrf fleet around the same courses. I still do it on an opb, mainly because I enjoy the company of the crew and the beer.

I went on a daysail on my own in my trailer sailor last weekend, although not racing I can't help but sail like I'm racing, use the kite when I can. If there is mark I have to round for nav purposes I treat like I would in a race, call a layline, execute a neat hoist/drop/gybe etc, trying to think about all that single handed is a whole new world and great fun.

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Summer sailing on the west coast of Florida is like frostbiting up north during the winter - only the crazies do it.  Spring & fall are the sailing seasons, with winter for the more hard core.  No matter the season, it helps to have a boat appropriate for the mostly shallow, mostly light wind conditions.  With that in mind, I have happily sailed various multihulls on the west coast of Florida for over a half a century.  My current ride is a Weta, crewed by my dog.  Compared to the bigger boats that I've spent most of my life on, it's like playing with a go-cart.

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2 hours ago, Steam Flyer said:

So.... did you all not know what Florida was like, before you moved there?

And I notice you didn't mention the bugs!

FB- Doug

Move here i was born here

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16 hours ago, Jules said:

The first time I stepped aboard a sailboat I was home.  For the next 49 years it was always that way.  This year we bought a boat.  I thought I'd be in heaven but I'm not. 

Most all my sailing was on Lake Michigan.  Cruised Chicago to Mac and back no less than 8 times.  When we got back I always wanted to turn around and just sail away.  It's always been like that.  Until now.

We were out today and hit 7.5 kn SOG.  I didn't care.  All I could think of was heading back home.  This is so strange.  I don't know what it is.

Maybe it's age.  Maybe it's the goddamnfucking Florida heat.  Maybe it's shallow Charlotte Harbor that makes you tack every fucking 10 minutes.  Maybe it's all of that.  All I know is I don't care about sailing now.  This is really weird.

Has anyone else experienced this?

Keep in mind this is not a job, no need to force it unless you're making a living off of this.  If you're looking for a great way to take all the enjoyment out of something just turn it into a job.  If you have more days where you're not enjoying it compared to good days then screw it, go do something else and don't feel guilty.  Don't lose sight of the fact that this is supposed to be fun, excluding the usual small handful of days where everything just turns into a shit show, that's just part of sailing.

Maybe some time away doing something else will eventually lead you back to sailing, but maybe not and who cares if it doesn't because that just means you found something else you enjoy more.  At 68 life is too short to spend your leisure time on something you're not getting an overall good return on.  Get out there and enjoy life.  Or maybe in your current situation throw caution to the wind, crank up the AC to a comfortable 70, no, wait, fuck it, live on the edge and turn it down to 65 and don't leave the house till the temps drop and the humidity eases!

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"If you're looking for a great way to take all the enjoyment out of something just turn it into a job." Totally agree. Did volunteering with Sailability in UK for 5 years, went from fun to another job I didn't get paid for. Quit.

Found an Original Windsurfer, not going back.

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6 hours ago, Jules said:

It's the heat.  It's the fucking heat.  The goddamnrentlessfucking HEAT!  We got back in at 7:30 last night and at 2AM I am still up, sitting under a fan, with the AC on, trying to cool down.  This is my fourth year is this miserable steam room and the fourth time I'm hating the goddamnfucking heat.  Did I mention the heat?  It drives you crazy.

While I know what you mean (it was too f'ing hot to get on the boat in Carolina this weekend), you are old enough to know that in the blink of an eye it'll be October and you will once again be enjoying your boat.  Go on an extended driving vacation to Nova Scotia, PEI, the Gaspe for the next two months.  

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Have you checked for a pulse?    A fogged mirror may not be a reliable test in extreme humidity.   Florida may have trouble competing with the great lakes, but it can't be that bad.

 

 

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1 minute ago, Lark said:

Have you checked for a pulse?    A fogged mirror may not be a reliable test in Florida humidity.   Florida may have trouble competing with the great lakes, but it can't be that bad.

Have you ever wondered why Florida has so many crazies?  https://floridaman.com/ 

21 minutes ago, Israel Hands said:

While I know what you mean (it was too f'ing hot to get on the boat in Carolina this weekend), you are old enough to know that in the blink of an eye it'll be October and you will once again be enjoying your boat.  Go on an extended driving vacation to Nova Scotia, PEI, the Gaspe for the next two months.  

Now that my body temperature is almost back to normal, I'm not as miserable as I was yesterday. 

We've been talking about trying to get the hell out of here - on the boat - next year before this oppressive heat sets in next year.  I'd be good if we could sail to a place where I can shiver once in a while.

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10 minutes ago, Jules said:

We've been talking about trying to get the hell out of here - on the boat - next year before this oppressive heat sets in next year.  I'd be good if we could sail to a place where I can shiver once in a while.

Why not make it a trip that carries you up the East Coast, and then you return after the main hurricane season.  I find myself dreading in the back of my mind late August through the end of September.  Between home and boat worries, it gets to be a real annual drag for everyone from Cape Hatteras southward.

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2 hours ago, pwormwood said:

Summer sailing on the west coast of Florida is like frostbiting up north during the winter - only the crazies do it. 

Thank you.  Now I just have to get that point across to my SO.  She has an amazing talent for forgetting what it's like out there within a day or two of the last sail.

20 minutes ago, Israel Hands said:

I find myself dreading in the back of my mind late August through the end of September.

Oh yeah.  I'm with you.  The worst is yet to come.  I've been thinking if we get a hurricane pass through here this summer, that might be the straw that breaks the camel's back.

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To be sure,  this time of year I don't said mid-day unless its in an event - evenings only,  just too much sun.

That,  and - the way you participate in the sport IS allowed to change, ya know.

 

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On the Great Lakes, or in New England, folks take parts off there boat, bring them home, and repair, restore, paint, varnish, etc in the “off season.”

 

Maybe that’s what you should do during the summer?

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I don't know why some life long sailors just lose the passion for it, but some do. Lots maybe. They always look for the reasons; there are plenty, but it's just that you lose the need to do it. If you have to be sailing to know you're alive, you'll find a way around all those obstacles.

I don't live in Florida, but west coast Mexico is about the same, except fewer powerboats, fewer assholes, and nice, deep, blue water to sail in, (and good winds, all year round). OK, so it's not the same. But it's HOT in the summer.

But we still sail, even in the summer, just not as often. Right now I'm anchored in a lagoon and it is plenty hot, and no air conditioning until we get back to our base in August. But I just can't let this go. I have to sail. I always have.

So, if you lose the passion, OK, move on. No guilt. There will be others of us who haven't.

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Friend did the west to east, through the lake, last week, on a 30ft. sailboat. No AC, said the heat was brutal.

Growing up in Miami, we didn't have any AC in cars, homes or schools.

However then 86 degrees was considered a real hot day.

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What about some destination sailing?  Going out and tacking back and forth can get kinda meh, but if you have a destination I find it much more enjoyable.    Even if it's just a place for lunch.  I'm not that familiar with your area, but there's gotta be a some restaurants/shopping spots with docks and stuff around.  Do something you might normally take a car to do, just take a boat instead.  So much cooler.

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I can relate. After 65 races in mostly Porsche cup cars one day at Sebring sitting on the grid in the 5th row out of 40 I radioed my co driver that I was only doing one lap and going home. Sell the car, truck, trailer... I have lost confidence and am done. 

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That's interesting....I have been sailing for 25 yrs and just experienced about the same thing....In feb I sold my 35.5 hunter legend and in April I bought a 2003 Flying Scot to put by my dock....Boats like new....I took the cover off after owning it for two months, waxed it and sold it....never launched it...never had a desire to....boat was picked up today...I don't know whats going on....I think part of it is my age(69) and part is been there done that....right now I am ejoying playing golf.....I don't know ...After owning 9 sailboats.....the excitement might be gone....It's kinda a bummer but real....

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1 hour ago, shavdog said:

That's interesting....I have been sailing for 25 yrs and just experienced about the same thing....In feb I sold my 35.5 hunter legend and in April I bought a 2003 Flying Scot to put by my dock....Boats like new....I took the cover off after owning it for two months, waxed it and sold it....never launched it...never had a desire to....boat was picked up today...I don't know whats going on....I think part of it is my age(69) and part is been there done that....right now I am ejoying playing golf.....I don't know ...After owning 9 sailboats.....the excitement might be gone....It's kinda a bummer but real....

You mean there is some hope of a spontaneous remission from this sailing thing?

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13 hours ago, Jules said:

I'm 68.  Friends of mine down here recently sold their Bristol 35.  They are both in their early 70's.  They bought their boat new many moons ago and loved every minute of sailing when they were up north.  They moved here in 2004.  We had them over a couple of weeks ago for a sail.  They jumped at the chance.  When I asked why they sold their boat I was expecting to hear something about aging out.  He said the maintenance was too much.  She did the brightwork.  It was always gleaming.  But the constant assault of the sun and heat created too much work for them. 

I know when fall arrives my attitude will change.  It always does.  But every year, about this time, I'm crawling walls.  I don't mind the cold but the heat has always bothered me.  I moved because I was tired of shoveling snow.  Now it doesn't seem so bad.

take your boat to Maine for the summer.

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There is nothing worse than the old boxer who makes a comeback, and loses.  Or the old guy who does not know when to move on.  Act your age with grace.

I have changed classes and boats as soon as the thrill was gone.  The only exception has been my long term marriage, some things are worth sticking with, going to the next stage with, in sickness and in health.

Sold my boat last year and do not regret it.  Best tip, as soon as the maintenance becomes a chore, sell it.  Mine was starting to own me.  Before that maintenance is something you do as part of enjoying yourself.

I have been scanning the market though, I have a yearning for a small boat.

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3 hours ago, random said:

There is nothing worse than the old boxer who makes a comeback, and loses.  Or the old guy who does not know when to move on.  Act your age with grace.

Well, at my age I'm demoing walls, hanging drywall, building and installing cabinets, replumbing and rewiring the house and now fixing up an old boat, by myself.  Not sure if I'm acting my age but I am keeping busy.  Just don't ask me to do that when it's 960 outside.  And don't ask me to go out sailing with you in the middle of the afternoon either.  Sorry if I'm not showing you any grace.

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It sounds like you're bored sailing in the harbor. I found this great documentary about sailing to Mexico:

 

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23 hours ago, Jules said:

I'm 68.  Friends of mine down here recently sold their Bristol 35.  They are both in their early 70's.  They bought their boat new many moons ago and loved every minute of sailing when they were up north.  They moved here in 2004.  We had them over a couple of weeks ago for a sail.  They jumped at the chance.  When I asked why they sold their boat I was expecting to hear something about aging out.  He said the maintenance was too much.  She did the brightwork.  It was always gleaming.  But the constant assault of the sun and heat created too much work for them. 

I know when fall arrives my attitude will change.  It always does.  But every year, about this time, I'm crawling walls.  I don't mind the cold but the heat has always bothered me.  I moved because I was tired of shoveling snow.  Now it doesn't seem so bad.

 

When I was a real estate broker for 30 years, I saw many, many New Englanders come back here, after attempting to retire in Florida.  I always recommended that until you are certain you want to permanently move somewhere, you should go and rent for year, or more, before buying.  Grandfather and Grandmother went to Pompano every winter, but rented.  He had heard too many friends horror stories about dealing with vacation house problems from a 1000 miles away during the summer, so he never bought a place.  I did not follow his advise and bought a small Cape on Johns Island in greater Charleston years ago, just before daughter was going to go to college there,  had more problems than I could count, and sold a year later for quite better price, but barely got out with the shirt on my back, so lesson learned!   I hate the snow and cold also, but have the option of visiting the kids in S. Carolina for a couple weeks each in January, February and March, when retired in a couple years.  I will never retire, just work for myself, and not for piddling paycheck and healthcare.....

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4 hours ago, random said:

There is nothing worse than the old boxer who makes a comeback, and loses.  Or the old guy who does not know when to move on.  Act your age with grace.

I have changed classes and boats as soon as the thrill was gone.  The only exception has been my long term marriage, some things are worth sticking with, going to the next stage with, in sickness and in health.

Sold my boat last year and do not regret it.  Best tip, as soon as the maintenance becomes a chore, sell it.  Mine was starting to own me.  Before that maintenance is something you do as part of enjoying yourself.

I have been scanning the market though, I have a yearning for a small boat.

<hijack> W/R/T "sticking with things" - was that a 70s vintage Honda XL175 in one of your garage pics?  </hijack> 

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I blame Floriduh.

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Jules, I read plenty of suggestions for you - and from you I hear more complaining. Find a new kind of sailing or some activity you enjoy in the summer. Take a trip up north. Think of the lyrics from the sixties:   " change is gonna do me good "       I'm done.

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If you're so sick and tired of driving in the snow.... keeps driving your car and let global warming improve your property value.

I watched my parents try and snowbird. It was a disaster. My parents had money but no brains. They followed their drinking buddies to Naples. While down there for their second winter, the pipes froze and burst in their house up north. My dad gets a gigantic water bill and can't think why this is happening. He calls nobody to go check his house until he gets the second gigantic bill.

The entire house is now infested with black mold and will never retain it's original value.

When they sold their house in Naples, they took a bath. Now they're in a place in coastal NC that's basically a shack

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22 minutes ago, RATM said:

If you're so sick and tired of driving in the snow.... keeps driving your car and let global warming improve your property value.

I watched my parents try and snowbird. It was a disaster. My parents had money but no brains. They followed their drinking buddies to Naples. While down there for their second winter, the pipes froze and burst in their house up north. My dad gets a gigantic water bill and can't think why this is happening. He calls nobody to go check his house until he gets the second gigantic bill.

The entire house is now infested with black mold and will never retain it's original value.

When they sold their house in Naples, they took a bath. Now they're in a place in coastal NC that's basically a shack

 

Sounds like they needed advice that they never got, or asked for, and should have!

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On 7/15/2019 at 3:30 AM, Moonduster said:

Now, now Essex, don't get your panties in a knot. New Jersey is a fine place for Manhattan commuters and chemical refineries - it's just not really a sailing venue.

And don't get me started on golf ...

 

We actually have a ton of one design and PHRF racing out of our club on the Barnegat Bay and we have some of the top sailors in the sport come though our Junior Sailing Program. Our consistent southeasterly breeze that comes in like clockwork makes for some great national sailing regattas. 

The Raritan Bay and Sandy Hook are fun places to race with the Manhattan skyline in sight. Cape May is a very easy area to sail out of with beautiful scenery and whales. 

But, of course, the parts of the state that produce the fuels we all use and the ports that service the world are pretty unattractive to the eye. I am lucky enough to be an hour south off all of that. The rest of the state is beautiful and diverse and truly is the Garden State.

Kevin

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5 hours ago, A guy in the Chesapeake said:

<hijack> W/R/T "sticking with things" - was that a 70s vintage Honda XL175 in one of your garage pics?  </hijack> 

It's a 250.  Restored it, every single part, every nut and washer.  Great project.

 

6 hours ago, Jules said:

Well, at my age I'm demoing walls, hanging drywall, building and installing cabinets, replumbing and rewiring the house and now fixing up an old boat, by myself.  Not sure if I'm acting my age but I am keeping busy.  Just don't ask me to do that when it's 960 outside.  And don't ask me to go out sailing with you in the middle of the afternoon either.  Sorry if I'm not showing you any grace.

Seems like you have misinterpreted what I said.  I too still construct, I'm on a farm, trees fall on fences, machines stop, renovation is required.  I was talking about sailing, competing with youngsters and expecting to still do as well as they used to.  Even they don't enjoy seeing decline.

The exception in sailing is that there are now Masters and Grand Masters divisions to cater for people who really do want to compete after their physical capabilities fall off.

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<<Has anyone else experienced this?>>

Yes, sailed fanatically all my life, engineered & built boats for a living - didn't know anything else. Then somehow ended up running a s/w company and children came along, so the sailing dwindled into sporadic, but still great fun rides, all with good crews.

Then I discovered paragliding, but frankly it could have been sailplanes or hang gliders. just that PG-ing is easier to hike around with in the Austrian Alps where my wife comes from or for walking up Welsh mountain to launch.

So in the same way a foiling Moth can burn off yachts costing 100x what it does, my fairly sporty PG will clock 60kph in still air, and ≈90kph going XC on a high wind (top end day). and cost 1/5 - 1/2 of a Moth or A-Class.

A decent HG will do 100-120kph in still air, and cost about the same as a Moth.

Running costs zilch (until you crash...)

So this is like 3D sailing, as the thermals can take you upwards at 30+kph at the same time you are travelling forward at 30-40kph; you learn a heck of a lot more about meteorology than you ever need to sailing spotting lift, wind lines (and turbulence); you have to navigate whilst multi-tasking other things and moving fast over terrain; and you have to trim the wing and shift your weight about, like on a feisty dinghy.

It's like sailing a Moth on steroids, but you get to take in the scenery at 3-4-5-6-7,000 feet in the UK (or 18k over the Sierras or Himalaya) and the Eagles, Vultures and Buzzards come over to check you out then buzz off to show you the next lifty line or thermal.

The record Cross Country flight (in the Sertão, Brazil) is ≈560km in one day, all without an engine...

Florida is a great place to fly - mainly HG - and you will still be sailing, just differently. Oh, did I mention the heat - it's lovely and cool at cloudbase (the thermal tops) when it's still stinking hot on the ground.

The best bit is, I learned to love sailing again, and switch between the two as the mood takes.

Live happy.

 

 

 

 

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Mid-to Late July is always a downer time for me.  I've already done maybe 2-4 major regattas prior to July 4 and usually have 2-4 in August and September.  The thought of bobbing around LIS in 100 degree heat (this weekend) and little breeze just makes me want to take up golf.  At least there's shade in the golf cart and beer girls filling orders.  

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After surviving an aortic dissection, I sold my wonderful G32 {thanks to the great readers of SA}.  I still love the water, so I slowly got back in.  I became the boat.  I free dive like the old days.  Try It.  Just be very careful.  Since it is so hot where you are, it could be the right place to be[in the water].  You will find less BS when you are the boat.

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On 7/14/2019 at 9:17 PM, Jules said:

The first time I stepped aboard a sailboat I was home.  For the next 49 years it was always that way.  This year we bought a boat.  I thought I'd be in heaven but I'm not. 

Most all my sailing was on Lake Michigan.  Cruised Chicago to Mac and back no less than 8 times.  When we got back I always wanted to turn around and just sail away.  It's always been like that.  Until now.

We were out today and hit 7.5 kn SOG.  I didn't care.  All I could think of was heading back home.  This is so strange.  I don't know what it is.

Maybe it's age.  Maybe it's the goddamnfucking Florida heat.  Maybe it's shallow Charlotte Harbor that makes you tack every fucking 10 minutes.  Maybe it's all of that.  All I know is I don't care about sailing now.  This is really weird.

Has anyone else experienced this?

Well, it's January so the heat isn't a problem any more I suppose.

The answer to your question is yes, about half of the brokerage industry around here is built on people who have experienced this. I heard the story over and over, including from my old boss at Punta Gorda Yacht Brokers. His whole career, he relished opportunities to sail or golf, always having to go back to work too soon. When he retired, he figured it would be great to be in PGI, with his boat in the back yard and golf down the street. He could do both every day and never have to stop! This lasted a month or so and he got very bored and has been working ever since. That was about 20 years ago.

My take is that cruising boats are not for harbor day sailing. A couple have mentioned Weta's. We have Hobie Adventure Islands. Little boats are just more fun and less work. They're even less work when you don't own them. Sell your cruiser and join the Charlotte Harbor Community Sailing Center and you'll have access to an array of fun sailboats.

 

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On 7/15/2019 at 6:59 AM, Strategery said:

Try using your left hand.

This!.....this is why I stick around SA.

:ph34r:

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Late to this thread, but something to think about.

Here is my take: When you live someplace with 4 seasons and highly variable climate, you are on a mission to make the most out of it. Maine has absolutely horrid weather more often than not for sailing, but the summer months are glorious! You ARE getting out there :D Lake Michigan likewise. I was just out last weekend blasting back and forth north of the island in flat water with 25 gusting up to near 40 coming across from from the south in a long sleeved shirt. This is good stuff for Maryland in January and not to be wasted.

OTOH I used to work out of Honolulu and got bored quickly out there. Every day pretty much was the same as every other day and it was hard to get motivated to do something because the weather is nice because the weather is always nice :rolleyes: (well they do have storms and such, but mostly the wx was on repeat, high 80s,  a few clouds)  I went to flight school in Florida and though the east coast of Florida was not very interesting for sailing. Going back and forth in the ICW, well that gets old unless you are right at an inlet to escape into the ocean. I spent every spare second and dollar exploring the Bahamas, I LOVED THAT. Of course that is easier at 120 knots SOG ;)

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2 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

 . Maine has absolutely horrid weather more often than not for sailing, but the 3 days in the summer months are glorious!  

Fixed  :) 

 

oh.. and the Fking lobster pots 

oh oh and the Fking fog  

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I can happily report my attitude is improving.  Cool weather is peaking its head in and out lately.  Today is gorgeous.  But with the north winds, the boat is aground half the day.

I'm getting things done on the boat now because it's not a hot box.  Hell, I even cleaned up the dinghy yesterday.  Still have yet to use it though.  I need several days in the 60s to install the AC.  That should make evenings on the boat tolerable during the summer.  I made a replacement piece for the companionway hatch.
CompHatch_001.jpg.7014446870aa54fb8950e40f94a1201c.jpg

The new piece is just leaning against the original.  Whitish appearance is a reflection off the cockpit.  The "sail A" is the A from the Aloha insignia.  It's routed in about 1/4" deep, painted, then filled with epoxy.
CompHatch_002.jpg.6200ccb3db080684ba58bef244bd5e14.jpg
I'm considering replacing all the companionway wood.  The vertical piece on the starboard side is cracked.  Not sure it can be glued up and still hold.

I'm also working on fixing the cabin lights and installing better switching.  As it is right now, you have get to the panel and turn on the breaker, not good in the dark.  And some lights have no switch on them.  So when sleeping aboard, you have to turn the breaker off before turning in.  And I've got a few other things in the wing.

Maybe there's hope after all.

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Fix all that and get LED lights too! We have all LED lights - less heat and less battery - and good fans. Moving air does wonders on a warm night.

I used to do the "no matter WHAT" cruising that would not be stopped by heatwaves, hurricanes, or anything else. Being married kind of put an end to THAT and now we do not plan any sailing after the 4th of July and before Labor Day. If we get a nice forecast we'll go, but no long term plans that would end up with a week of Bermuda High and temps in the 90s at midnight :o Much more fun to be up in Maine in August, reading the paper while a hot coffee fights the morning chill, and looking at a "heatwave" headline thinking sucks to be you :D

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On 7/15/2019 at 11:47 AM, Jules said:

Have you ever wondered why Florida has so many crazies?  https://floridaman.com/ 

Now that my body temperature is almost back to normal, I'm not as miserable as I was yesterday. 

We've been talking about trying to get the hell out of here - on the boat - next year before this oppressive heat sets in next year.  I'd be good if we could sail to a place where I can shiver once in a while.

Seasons are good things. I can't imagine living in a place like Floriduh where the weather never really changes.

Less rain would be nice - at least during the day but...

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On 7/14/2019 at 9:17 PM, Jules said:

The first time I stepped aboard a sailboat I was home.  For the next 49 years it was always that way.  This year we bought a boat.  I thought I'd be in heaven but I'm not. 

Most all my sailing was on Lake Michigan.  Cruised Chicago to Mac and back no less than 8 times.  When we got back I always wanted to turn around and just sail away.  It's always been like that.  Until now.

We were out today and hit 7.5 kn SOG.  I didn't care.  All I could think of was heading back home.  This is so strange.  I don't know what it is.

Maybe it's age.  Maybe it's the goddamnfucking Florida heat.  Maybe it's shallow Charlotte Harbor that makes you tack every fucking 10 minutes.  Maybe it's all of that.  All I know is I don't care about sailing now.  This is really weird.

Has anyone else experienced this?

Buy a carbon bicycle and take up cycling, sailed twice in 2017, sailed once in 2018, not at all in 2019 and enjoyed it.

You can't possibly spend as much and bikes as your sailing budget, I have 4 bikes and my wife 3, we go to all kinds of races and events and compete and I don't spend a 1/4 of what I spent racing my boat. All my bikes and equipment are top end. Plus I don't have to listen to 6 guys whinning on a boat about accommodations, time away from home and other crap.

I just have to listen to the wife complain, at one time a I was able to pedal away from her, not anymore so I drop back and make the first turn I can.

 

It is not the same as was a few years ago on the water, not sure whats happening to the sport   

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Well after racing and cruising for decades, and now over 70, I've found a couple of things out about myself.  

1.  Challenge is needed.  Both physical and intellectual.  After leaving crewing on OPBs behind I've had the pleasure/ability to constantly challenge myself with more technical (and speedier) raceboats that demand a steep learning curve.  Just bought the most challenging boat of my life.  

2.  People are needed:  I've always preferred to have crew and have managed to put together a blended crew of people who have been with me for many of those decades with people we've found in the last year or so.  I also strive for at least 30% female crew.  So the sailing is always interesting.  

3.  Purpose is needed:  Sailing around in circles on a beautiful day isn't for me.  New year's day we had a great sail to a small town nearby, had a beer and a great sail home.  The destination made it interesting.  Going out practicing is interesting.  Doing destination races is interesting.  Going around cans is interesting (for about 4 weekends a year.)  Variety is interesting. 

4.  Location is needed:  Puget Sound and the Canadian Inside Passage are easily the equivalent of any sailing ground on the planet.  Sure it could be 5° warmer on average, but we sail/race all winter with Fall and Spring the high season and  cruise or do major events in the summer.  It sounds like the OP is fighting the environment as much as the sailing.  Beauty keeps it interesting.

5.  Some days just aren't gonna work:  The blahs are a real thing.  But whatever you do, do NOT go golfing, or if you do, do it barefoot with two clubs and ten balls.

New Years Day.  Latitude 48° N.  Fun was had.  

IMG_6646.thumb.jpeg.09dd0d190a85d3912ea361096be6ed8d.jpeg

IMG_6637.jpeg

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On 7/14/2019 at 6:17 PM, Jules said:

The first time I stepped aboard a sailboat I was home.  For the next 49 years it was always that way.  This year we bought a boat.  I thought I'd be in heaven but I'm not. 

Most all my sailing was on Lake Michigan.  Cruised Chicago to Mac and back no less than 8 times.  When we got back I always wanted to turn around and just sail away.  It's always been like that.  Until now.

We were out today and hit 7.5 kn SOG.  I didn't care.  All I could think of was heading back home.  This is so strange.  I don't know what it is.

Maybe it's age.  Maybe it's the goddamnfucking Florida heat.  Maybe it's shallow Charlotte Harbor that makes you tack every fucking 10 minutes.  Maybe it's all of that.  All I know is I don't care about sailing now.  This is really weird.

Has anyone else experienced this?

I feel for ya in a Florida Summer. The times I went to St Pete  in august, it was smoking hot, no wind and you had to have a 6 pack of water. Miami in Jan / Feb was pretty nice.

but I understand your frustration. Having sailed competitively since 1976 and been cruising the Islands of the Santa Barbara Channel, I now feel it is all too much work.
Of course I am in a wheelchair and cannot just up and get around the boat, Launch or Sail it with out tons of help. Working on it is work. Just sailing the Wednesday Summer Races is work, even with help. I really miss being at anchor in Frys, Alberts or Coches Prietos. Diving, hiking fishing and having a blast away from the mainland. I've thought about rigging for singlehanded sailing but then my brain kicks in and takes over from my heart strings.

Sometimes I question why why why.  It is the same boats I race against all the time. I'd love to race down south but once again, I need massive help to get the boat there and back. I wish I could just go like I used to.

Anyone want a fast 26' boat to kick ass with?

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On 7/15/2019 at 6:08 AM, Geff said:

Long story short, I really enjoyed myself and sailing the Weta and didn't hate it one single bit. 

 

2 hours ago, Left Shift said:

Challenge is needed.  Both physical and intellectual.  After leaving crewing on OPBs behind I've had the pleasure/ability to constantly challenge myself with more technical (and speedier) raceboats that demand a steep learning curve.  Just bought the most challenging boat of my life.  

^^^This

Get yourself a small fast multihull - doesn't have to be a Weta but something that gets you excited. 

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2 hours ago, jesposito said:

Buy a carbon bicycle and take up cycling, sailed twice in 2017, sailed once in 2018, not at all in 2019 and enjoyed it.

You can't possibly spend as much and bikes as your sailing budget, I have 4 bikes and my wife 3, we go to all kinds of races and events and compete and I don't spend a 1/4 of what I spent racing my boat. All my bikes and equipment are top end. Plus I don't have to listen to 6 guys whinning on a boat about accommodations, time away from home and other crap.

I just have to listen to the wife complain, at one time a I was able to pedal away from her, not anymore so I drop back and make the first turn I can.

 

It is not the same as was a few years ago on the water, not sure whats happening to the sport   

A.  You must be a fun guy to go on a ride with.  

B.  How would you know if you haven't sailed since 2016?   

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I dunno. It's much a lifestyle here. It can get cold but not freezing cold. A little wet and dreary some months but cruising is done all year for the hardy. My cruising runs from April through early Oct. Never made it out cruising for Canadian Thanksgiving. I don't have heat and I'm not sure I want too. Just hanging around the boat and the YC is fine by me. But then again we have some of the best cruising grounds on the planet. From my moorage at the club to our closest outstation is under half an hour. Then you are in toolies. We have an island for an outstation in the Gulf Islands that is 3 and a half hours away. Again, basically in the wilderness. Desolation Sound is a long day to get there but I usually do it in two or three as there are wonderful places all along. We have great racing for Wed. nite and winter series and I don't remember the last time they canceled a race because of the weather. And there is a lot of cross-pollinating between the areas in the PNW, BC SW and Vancouver Is. If you are bored? There is something wrong with you. I was very privileged to race out of the Seattle area at a high level for ten years as well. I don't race as much anymore as I don't have a local program anymore but involved with the race committee and the ilk. Again, as much a lifestyle thing and my many of my club friends are well into there '80s and '90s still doing this. We might be the anomaly here but?

The club yesterday.  And one of the outstations one summer.      

_IMG5802 (1280x818).jpg

005_3.JPG

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I sold my larger racing boat last year to dial back on the spending, recover from some serious burnout after the biggest racing year I've ever done, and get financially ready for retirement.  Just bought a small racing boat to play with - consortium with two friends.  I can't imagine never going to a spring regatta again.  It just wouldn't sit right.

Now if I can just find a decent small cruising boat the dream can come true - spending the winters somewhere warm, and the spring/summer/fall racing and cruising in the PNW. 

Thought, if push came to financial shove and I had to choose, I could give up racing, but I could never give up cruising, especially around here.

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My plan last summer was to sell the boat at the end of the season so I made it a point to hit as many of my old, favorite spots as possible and really live in the moment. I did pretty well too.

In the end everything worked out as planned for once. By the end of the summer I was sailed out, sold the boat and walked. I can honestly say I don't miss it yet. The dodging lobster pots, hurrying in to certain coves to make sure I get a good anchoring spot before the crowds arrive, waking up at 4 am to the sound and wake of passing lobster boats, the worrying that something on the boat is gonna break. Don't miss it a bit.

So why do I keep looking at boats?

Sailing-boatSlaaby-Larsen-Vampire-24-Ska

https://scanboat.com/en/boat-market/boats/Sailing-boat-slaaby-larsen-vampire-24-skal-saelges-nu-17185368?fbclid=IwAR3wrZjbqmfMDDimIRY_MzrxgCqEyNQLCbDmdTdXS9OHlw_X_Cqze_3TMZs

and

Sailing-boatKnud-Olsen-Spidsgatter-scanb

https://scanboat.com/en/boats/details/Sejlbaad-knud-olsen-spidsgatter-17354184?fbclid=IwAR1zTjITE8zMJQR2HculW9mgF12XvdRG0Fz_M9XJCAP9_NlPRmWJCrSDw_U

It's a good thing they're located in Denmark. At about $16K USD, I don't think I could prevent myself from buying that bright beauty if it was near me.

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Just caught up with this thread. We are in an interesting situation. We have returned from living on the boat for eight years and sailing around the world. We sold the Bristol 45.5 because it was just too big for most yacht clubs on Lake Ontario that we could visit. We bought a very nice Catalina 36, after my wife made it clear that she had little interest in just going for a sail. She wants to go somewhere. We have decided that we don't want to be too far away from our grandkids so living in the Caribbean or doing another rtw are not happening. We are going to the North Channel this summer and Newfoundland in 2021. After that who knows what will be next. I am leaning to a daysailer that I can singlehand - and go for a sail. Could be something like a J 100.

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23 hours ago, Left Shift said:

4.  Location is needed:  Puget Sound and the Canadian Inside Passage are easily the equivalent of any sailing ground on the planet.  Sure it could be 5° warmer on average, but we sail/race all winter with Fall and Spring the high season and  cruise or do major events in the summer.  It sounds like the OP is fighting the environment as much as the s

 

This!

We love having someplace to go that is worth the bother. I could never see the appeal of artificial lakes that just have either woods or houses down to the waterline. We are lucky here with a lot of interesting places to go near and far.

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16 hours ago, Maxx Baqustae said:

I dunno. It's much a lifestyle here. It can get cold but not freezing cold. A little wet and dreary some months but cruising is done all year for the hardy. My cruising runs from April through early Oct. Never made it out cruising for Canadian Thanksgiving. I don't have heat and I'm not sure I want too. Just hanging around the boat and the YC is fine by me. But then again we have some of the best cruising grounds on the planet. From my moorage at the club to our closest outstation is under half an hour. Then you are in toolies. We have an island for an outstation in the Gulf Islands that is 3 and a half hours away. Again, basically in the wilderness. Desolation Sound is a long day to get there but I usually do it in two or three as there are wonderful places all along. We have great racing for Wed. nite and winter series and I don't remember the last time they canceled a race because of the weather. And there is a lot of cross-pollinating between the areas in the PNW, BC SW and Vancouver Is. If you are bored? There is something wrong with you. I was very privileged to race out of the Seattle area at a high level for ten years as well. I don't race as much anymore as I don't have a local program anymore but involved with the race committee and the ilk. Again, as much a lifestyle thing and my many of my club friends are well into there '80s and '90s still doing this. We might be the anomaly here but?

The club yesterday.  And one of the outstations one summer.      

_IMG5802 (1280x818).jpg

005_3.JPG

That's some seriously pretty stuff right there! I'm not familiar with the term outstation. Is that something your club builds and maintains?

There are clubs here in Maine that place courtesy moorings in various anchorages that are first come first served, but you're supposed to vacate if a club boat shows up and wants them.

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1 hour ago, Willin' said:

That's some seriously pretty stuff right there! I'm not familiar with the term outstation. Is that something your club builds and maintains?

That's exactly it. Lots of the clubs here and in Seattle have them scattered around the coast and I understand they all have reciprocity.

RVYC is the biggest at it AFAIK - they have many.

They are also the most expensive club to belong to. If you don't join as a kid, bring money - LOTS of money.

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1 hour ago, SloopJonB said:

That's exactly it. Lots of the clubs here and in Seattle have them scattered around the coast and I understand they all have reciprocity.

RVYC is the biggest at it AFAIK - they have many.

They are also the most expensive club to belong to. If you don't join as a kid, bring money - LOTS of money.

Sadly, there is no reciprocity regarding outstations in any PNW clubs to my knowledge.  This always sticks in my craw when my club hosts hundreds of visiting boats from other clubs annually.  However, it is what it is.

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I stand corrected.

Maybe if your club has Royal in the name RVYC will let you hang around. :D

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