2airishuman

Hard dinks, nesting dinks, and why we like them

Recommended Posts

4 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

I thought is was 'Hard Drinks, Nesting Twinks, and why we like them' when I first glanced at the title of this thread.

And how entertaining seeing someone who’s had hard drinks, dealing with Nesting Twinks and why we are attracted to said spectacle!

- Stumbling 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, stumblingthunder said:

And how entertaining seeing someone who’s had hard drinks, dealing with Nesting Twinks and why we are attracted to said spectacle!

- Stumbling 

This is special!   I’m posting from airplane WiFi ands it posted twice...

- Stumbling 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So special it is like the fish that was so nice they had to name it twice, Mahi-Mahi!

At least we made it to Page 2.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 hours ago, Alex W said:

Unstayed marconi rig.  Here is a photo of a friend sailing a Gig Harbor Ultralite 8 that I used to own, the 9 is just the same boat with a rear bench.  

P1030955-X3.jpg

That boat needed a lot of work and I gave it away, but I probably should have kept the mast and sail from it (even though that sail was pretty blown out).  The one in the photo was apparently a prototype (I emailed the owner of GHBoats) and was very flexible, the newer ones gave up the teak gunwale for a rolled lip that gave them much more stiffness.

The mast would be pretty easy to make, it was just 2" aluminum pipe with an internal sleeve bonded in the middle.

I liked that the mainsail was on a halyard, though this seems less common on small sailing tenders.  It allowed me to row out of my slip then put up the sail when I had a little more room.

Assuming that it isn't too big and that you are ready to forego the halyard, a laser 4.7 sail, sail mast and boom might do the trick. That's the sail to teach youngsters to sail lasers, the ones manufactured by laser are not worth their price but there are cheap copies sold as "training sails" and "training rigs" that would be good enough.

Without a halyard, you need step / unstep the mast instead of raising the sail. As a 10 years old I was quite good at it as I was sometimes using my optimist as a tender to my dad's boat.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎7‎/‎24‎/‎2019 at 11:30 PM, Alex W said:

Anyone have a good source for a mast and sail for 9-10' sailing dinghies?  It seems like there would be something a little better than the Walker Bay kit.  Maybe a used El Toro or Opti rig (CLE might be a bit far aft on the Opti sail for my boat).

This is to retrofit sailing onto my Gig Harbor Ultralight 9.  It would be great to start taking my son out it in later this fall or next spring.

A couple of years ago I sailed an approx 10' tender that had been rigged with a little dipping lug.  I was amazed how well it sailed.  The boom and gaff were just very large bamboo poles, the mast was 'proper'.  I think it may have come out of a MIrror, one of the old ones that still used a gaff.  No idea where the sail came from.

It had a couple of benefits.  All the spars could easily fit onto the yacht.  It was very easy to raise and lower the sail.  The short mast helped minimise wobble when moored behind the yacht.

https://www.yachtsandyachting.com/news/162669/Get-sailing-like-the-Swallows-and-Amazons

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, European Bloke said:

A couple of years ago I sailed an approx 10' tender that had been rigged with a little dipping lug.  I was amazed how well it sailed.  The boom and gaff were just very large bamboo poles, the mast was 'proper'.  I think it may have come out of a MIrror, one of the old ones that still used a gaff.  No idea where the sail came from.

It had a couple of benefits.  All the spars could easily fit onto the yacht.  It was very easy to raise and lower the sail.  The short mast helped minimise wobble when moored behind the yacht.

https://www.yachtsandyachting.com/news/162669/Get-sailing-like-the-Swallows-and-Amazons

That is tempting.  Could it point (not that any sailing tender points that well, but you do need to go back upwind at some point)?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Alex W said:

That is tempting.  Could it point (not that any sailing tender points that well, but you do need to go back upwind at some point)?

The standing lug rig is an excellent rig for a dinghy.  Low center of effort, easy to stow, short spars,  wayyy better than trying to put a tall Marconi rig with stays and shrouds on a small boat.  I have a 12’8” Poohduck (Joel white dingy) slowly fading away in my driveway since I downsized the mothership, but the rig was simple and fun to handle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Veeger said:
15 hours ago, Alex W said:

That is tempting.  Could it point (not that any sailing tender points that well, but you do need to go back upwind at some point)?

The standing lug rig is an excellent rig for a dinghy.  Low center of effort, easy to stow, short spars,  wayyy better than trying to put a tall Marconi rig with stays and shrouds on a small boat.  I have a 12’8” Poohduck (Joel white dingy) slowly fading away in my driveway since I downsized the mothership, but the rig was simple and fun to handle.

Yep

gis-square.jpg

( ^Goat Island Skiff^ )

Technically I think this is a balanced lug, which is nicer in some ways because the luff tension acts like a vang. But let there be no doubt that a boat with this rig can get up and move, and be a lot of fun to sail, if done right.

The problem of course is that sails are complex and expensive. Even if you go the blue-tarp and bamboo route, it will end up costing you a lot of time and dignity to get it close enough to right to be fun.

FB- Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/24/2019 at 7:58 AM, Rasputin22 said:

  Russ's joining design and hardware for the PT truly are yacht jewelry. I tried to buy a set for a prototype for my nester while he was off on a R2AK or something and let me say that his wife is like one of the Viking wives in the series I have been watching. By that I mean that while the husband is off voyaging in the fjords of the Northland any usurper showing up at the homestead looking for plunder has to deal with the friendly but protective scrutiny of the shield maiden. We had a delightful chat over the phone but it was clear I was not going to be using their beautiful hardware machined by a neighbor and partner Turnpoint Design. Oh well, I guess McMaster Carr is my next resort for knobs and flanged bushings and such.

I just about blew beer out my nose when I read this. Ashlyn wants to use it for her resume. It's true that neither of us wants to part with a set of the connective hardware. It's kind of a big deal when we have a run of hardware made and assembled. The guy who makes them, Paul Zuesche, (not Turn Point) is a master, but he'd rather work on his own stuff than do work for money. So far, no one has talked Ashlyn out of a set of hardware, so it's not personal. However, if you build one of your prams I might sneak a set out of the safe.

I think the pram has legs as a production boat. It's the first pram I've really liked and I think it could appeal to a lot of people. It would be substantially larger and more stable than our PT 11. As far as making kits for them, it's not a good idea if you want to make some money, but the second, 5 panel version could be good for a plans only version (with full sized patterns for the panels). The second version probably has the biggest market, even if it's designed for an outboard. Does it need to be a full 5' wide? 

I just got back from a cruise with my buddy Alex and we had some good dinghy excursions, including fully planing around an anchorage on a windy evening. He tows his Spear and I nest my 11 on the back of the boat. We have been buddy-boating for more than 25 years now and the adventures in dinghies have often been the best part. We've never carried outboards.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Alex W said:

That is tempting.  Could it point (not that any sailing tender points that well, but you do need to go back upwind at some point)?

It went upwind much better than expected, even short tacking against the tide.  It's not a racing rig by any means, but very convenient around the yacht.

There was a rope from the end of the boom to the bottom of the gaff on each side.  After a tack you pulled the rope to pop the gaff to leeward of the mast.  I can't remember exactly how the boom was set up, but I don't think there was a vang or gooseneck, just a down haul.  It was all very simple.  Halyard, downhaul, sheet.  No lacing anywhere, sail just fixed to both ends of the boom and gaff, and halyard from the top of the mast to somewhere roughly half way along the gaff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all of the ideas on adding a sail rig to my dinghy. I'm curious about the lug rig, and sail kits for the nutshell pram are cheap on sailrite, so I think I'll go in that direction. I've always wanted to make a sail. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've wanted to see how the Dyer sails in rougher water and stronger breezes, and I got my chance this past Sunday.

We had gusty conditions of 5-15 which gave me some real dinghy training, and I sailed through a huge amount of powerboat wakes and slop. I sailed for over 3 hours and it was great fun. I really had to play the mainsheet due to all the puffs.  I did ship a bit of water over the bow while crossing the powerboat wakes but no big deal. I also had a hand pump onboard.

The Dyer can make decent progress to windward, especially if there's a decent breeze. The downwind runs were a blast. I pulled the centerboard up and the boat left a pretty good wake!  If I were to bring the Dyer on a real cruise, I would find a way to bundle the spars and rigging and suspend them from the overhead in the quarterberth. They are light and would take up very little room. The sail is just a scrap of cloth. 

It would be pretty handy to have a tender that is easily driven and multi-fuel:  oars/electric/wind.  It wouldn't be the fastest, but it would be the most reliable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I've wanted to see how the Dyer sails in rougher water and stronger breezes, and I got my chance this past Sunday.

We had gusty conditions of 5-15 which gave me some real dinghy training, and I sailed through a huge amount of powerboat wakes and slop. I sailed for over 3 hours and it was great fun. I really had to play the mainsheet due to all the puffs.  I did ship a bit of water over the bow while crossing the powerboat wakes but no big deal. I also had a hand pump onboard.

The Dyer can make decent progress to windward, especially if there's a decent breeze. The downwind runs were a blast. I pulled the centerboard up and the boat left a pretty good wake!  If I were to bring the Dyer on a real cruise, I would find a way to bundle the spars and rigging and suspend them from the overhead in the quarterberth. They are light and would take up very little room. The sail is just a scrap of cloth. 

It would be pretty handy to have a tender that is easily driven and multi-fuel:  oars/electric/wind.  It wouldn't be the fastest, but it would be the most reliable.

Reliable, a surprising amount of capacity, light, and durable. Get one of those dodgers over the bow and it will ship a lot less water. Not hard to make or buy - sailcloth, a bungie over the rub-rails that clip to some eyes and then ties to the mast. The fancy ones use a batten. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Reliable, a surprising amount of capacity, light, and durable. Get one of those dodgers over the bow and it will ship a lot less water. Not hard to make or buy - sailcloth, a bungie over the rub-rails that clip to some eyes and then ties to the mast. The fancy ones use a batten. 

Hey, I'm glad you chimed in.

How do you sit in the boat when working upwind? I can't seem to get my leg over the mid-thwart fast enough when tacking so I've taken to sitting with both legs in the forward end of the boat, and sliding my ass from one side to the other. My head is kind of along side the boom unless I'm hiking out.

Downwind, this puts way too much weigh forward and the bow starts plowing. I hook my feet under the bow thwart/mast step and lean way back to partially correct this. Is there a better way?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ajax said:

Hey, I'm glad you chimed in.

How do you sit in the boat when working upwind? I can't seem to get my leg over the mid-thwart fast enough when tacking so I've taken to sitting with both legs in the forward end of the boat, and sliding my ass from one side to the other. My head is kind of along side the boom unless I'm hiking out.

Downwind, this puts way too much weigh forward and the bow starts plowing. I hook my feet under the bow thwart/mast step and lean way back to partially correct this. Is there a better way?

Caviat: I was much lighter and younger when I raced these..  :D  What I recall is the middle seat is the right place going upwind - kind of straddling the CB, legs in-front of the seat in lighter air - you want the ass out of the water in light air and a bit of heel - and behind the seat in heavier so it doesn't plow - exactly where depends upon your weight and the wind.  They respond very well to roll-tacks / roll-gybes and the one flattening roll you get coming out of a tack - leaning your body to roll and sliding your butt from one side to the other.  Some switch legs aft - some forward. For me it depends on the strength of the breeze. DW in any kind of breeze they like to nose-dive, as you noticed, so just keep moving for-and aft enough to keep the boat level and not plowing with the puffs.  Most of the time you can get the right trim moving for and aft on the middle seat. In big breeze you're hiking with your feet under the middle seat and your butt on the aft corner.  In the light move forward enough to get the ass out of the water and heel to windward.  They sail by-the-lee very nicely - make sure your main-sheet in long enough to let the boom go a little past 90 degrees. 

If you're serious about getting the last 10th, get an multi-part adjustable forestay, a nice low stretch clew-tie-down and a multi-part cunningham and vang. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think we probably all really know that each type has pros and cons, and "what's best" depends greatly on cruising grounds and intended use - right? I've had hard dinks, air and wood floored inflatables, and RIBs, with large, medium and small outboards, and they were all good at some things and sucked at others. Have not had a nesting hard dinghy, but have seen a couple that were pretty cool. Rowing is great exercise and can be peaceful and enjoyable... until you find yourself rowing a fair distance in the rain, against the wind, waves and current with a heavier payload than you planned on (ask me how I know). RIBs are expensive, heavy, coveted by thieves, row poorly, usually start leaking air after a few years in the sun, and are prone to chafe (although chaps help). The quintessential 10' RIB and 15hp outboard does indeed make many things easier, like getting to a far away snorkel spot (that may not have a safe anchorage for the mother ship) in just a few minutes. Making a quick last minute run into town for ice/rum/beer/snacks after inviting new/old friends aboard for sundowners is no problem. Ferrying guests and luggage to/from your boat that's anchored just off your favorite beach doesn't faze you.

So my advice is to get what you think is right for you and use it. If the shortcomings don't bother you, great. If they do, get something different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Caviat: I was much lighter and younger when I raced these..  :D  What I recall is the middle seat is the right place going upwind - kind of straddling the CB, legs in-front of the seat in lighter air - you want the ass out of the water in light air and a bit of heel - and behind the seat in heavier so it doesn't plow - exactly where depends upon your weight and the wind.  They respond very well to roll-tacks / roll-gybes and the one flattening roll you get coming out of a tack - leaning your body to roll and sliding your butt from one side to the other.  Some switch legs aft - some forward. For me it depends on the strength of the breeze. DW in any kind of breeze they like to nose-dive, as you noticed, so just keep moving for-and aft enough to keep the boat level and not plowing with the puffs.  Most of the time you can get the right trim moving for and aft on the middle seat. In big breeze you're hiking with your feet under the middle seat and your butt on the aft corner.  In the light move forward enough to get the ass out of the water and heel to windward.  They sail by-the-lee very nicely - make sure your main-sheet in long enough to let the boom go a little past 90 degrees. 

If you're serious about getting the last 10th, get an multi-part adjustable forestay, a nice low stretch clew-tie-down and a multi-part cunningham and vang. 

Nah, I'm not going crazy for the last 10th of a knot. Just having fun. I do want the bimini for the bow, though.

One last(?) question-  My mainsheet simply runs through blocks on the underside of the boom. After awhile, pulling "down" to get the necessary tension is awkward and a bit fatiguing. It would be better to run the mainsheet through a tiny block down low somewhere, so that I'm pulling "up" or on the horizontal, which is more common. The centerboard trunk is in the ideal location but I'm not sure how I'd attach one of those little, metal eye-straps to the trunk. There's no way to attach the strap to the bottom of the boat without drilling holes in the hull and I'm not doing that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Ajax said:

Nah, I'm not going crazy for the last 10th of a knot. Just having fun. I do want the bimini for the bow, though.

One last(?) question-  My mainsheet simply runs through blocks on the underside of the boom. After awhile, pulling "down" to get the necessary tension is awkward and a bit fatiguing. It would be better to run the mainsheet through a tiny block down low somewhere, so that I'm pulling "up" or on the horizontal, which is more common. The centerboard trunk is in the ideal location but I'm not sure how I'd attach one of those little, metal eye-straps to the trunk. There's no way to attach the strap to the bottom of the boat without drilling holes in the hull and I'm not doing that.

They all run off the boom. My PT11 is the same.  I'f I'm "cruising" and on the same tack for several hours, I just trap the sheet somewhere - my butt, my foot. I'd hesitate to add more hardware as the available spots are pretty tight. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Ajax said:

Nah, I'm not going crazy for the last 10th of a knot. Just having fun. I do want the bimini for the bow, though.

One last(?) question-  My mainsheet simply runs through blocks on the underside of the boom. After awhile, pulling "down" to get the necessary tension is awkward and a bit fatiguing. It would be better to run the mainsheet through a tiny block down low somewhere, so that I'm pulling "up" or on the horizontal, which is more common. The centerboard trunk is in the ideal location but I'm not sure how I'd attach one of those little, metal eye-straps to the trunk. There's no way to attach the strap to the bottom of the boat without drilling holes in the hull and I'm not doing that.

screw an eyestrap to a peice of starboard/plxi/ply and 5200 that to the trunk

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/18/2019 at 12:03 PM, Ajax said:

@Elegua What's the carrying capacity of a PT11?  I can't find anything about it on their website.  I see that the boat itself is 90lbs.

PT Watercraft claims a USCG Safe Capacity Rating of 600 pounds for the PT11. I have one for sale if you're interested.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We can help you find a buyer for your PT 11 if you want. Write to: info@ptwatercraft.com. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/27/2019 at 6:53 PM, Alex W said:

Thanks for all of the ideas on adding a sail rig to my dinghy. I'm curious about the lug rig, and sail kits for the nutshell pram are cheap on sailrite, so I think I'll go in that direction. I've always wanted to make a sail. 

I’ve got the whole sailing kit for the Gig Harbor 10’ Navigator. PM me if interested. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/27/2019 at 9:53 PM, Alex W said:

Thanks for all of the ideas on adding a sail rig to my dinghy. I'm curious about the lug rig, and sail kits for the nutshell pram are cheap on sailrite, so I think I'll go in that direction. I've always wanted to make a sail. 

 

I bought my Nutshell sail from Center Harbor Sails almost 30 years ago. It's proven to be tough and well built! 

 

The rig works well with this boat. I haven't adjusted the lacing on the yard or the foot on the boom (or reefed it), in at least a decade. I simply roll the yard and boom up with the sail laced on. Wrap the halyard/sheet around it a bit, and stow it (and mast) on deck or in the vee berth long term. 

 

For the Nutshell, the mast is 2 - 2x4" clear-ish spruce lumber yard stock epoxied together and rounded to about 2 3/4" at the butt. The mast tapers to about 1 3/4" at the head. 

 

The boom and yard are made from the same stock without gluing up. The real stress is in the mast step and forward seat that the mast goes through. You can feel it twisting the whole front half of the boat, if you're sitting up there. But apparently the build was designed for it as it's good as new after nearly 30 years of use. 

428401837_Shiversanchoragedinghysailing2.thumb.jpg.8eb15d58760c1eb35c8f6610959af5d4.jpg

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Kris Cringle said:

 

I bought my Nutshell sail from Center Harbor Sails almost 30 years ago. It's proven to be tough and well built! 

 

The rig works well with this boat. I haven't adjusted the lacing on the yard or the foot on the boom (or reefed it), in at least a decade. I simply roll the yard and boom up with the sail laced on. Wrap the halyard/sheet around it a bit, and stow it (and mast) on deck or in the vee berth long term. 

 

For the Nutshell, the mast is 2 - 2x4" clear-ish spruce lumber yard stock epoxied together and rounded to about 2 3/4" at the butt. The mast tapers to about 1 3/4" at the head. 

 

The boom and yard are made from the same stock without gluing up. The real stress is in the mast step and forward seat that the mast goes through. You can feel it twisting the whole front half of the boat, if you're sitting up there. But apparently the build was designed for it as it's good as new after nearly 30 years of use. 

428401837_Shiversanchoragedinghysailing2.thumb.jpg.8eb15d58760c1eb35c8f6610959af5d4.jpg

 

your k9 companions seem to be enjoying the ride...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/20/2019 at 9:57 PM, Kenny Dumas said:

I’ve got the whole sailing kit for the Gig Harbor 10’ Navigator. PM me if interested. 

I'm interested and sent you a PM.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can’t say enough good things about my 1950’s era Cape Cod shipbuilding MK9.  Rows great.  Sails great.  Outboards great.  Tows like a dream and takes on no water or very little.  

The downside is that they are hard to find. Cape cod shipbuilding still has the molds but I believe they are reluctant to make more unless there’s an order for a few of them.  

I believe Sydney Herreshoff designed them  

9C5BEBA0-E999-41E1-90AD-020A4D2842B0.jpeg

EB39CDFD-E869-4892-869C-9DA53B7B7142.jpeg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, nebe said:

I can’t say enough good things about my 1950’s era Cape Cod shipbuilding MK9.  Rows great.  Sails great.  Outboards great.  Tows like a dream and takes on no water or very little.  

The downside is that they are hard to find. Cape cod shipbuilding still has the molds but I believe they are reluctant to make more unless there’s an order for a few of them.  

I believe Sydney Herreshoff designed them  

9C5BEBA0-E999-41E1-90AD-020A4D2842B0.jpeg

EB39CDFD-E869-4892-869C-9DA53B7B7142.jpeg

I recognize that spot. 

856797915_Cuttyhunkshoalanchorage2(1of1).thumb.jpg.2208be834285213e18705f50220fb566.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Kris Cringle said:

I recognize that spot. 

856797915_Cuttyhunkshoalanchorage2(1of1).thumb.jpg.2208be834285213e18705f50220fb566.jpg

Ha! Good eye.  

I was there 2 weeks ago for the fireworks.    That place is a mandatory dinghy sailing spot. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On July 29, 2019 at 10:42 AM, Ajax said:

Nah, I'm not going crazy for the last 10th of a knot. Just having fun. I do want the bimini for the bow, though.

One last(?) question-  My mainsheet simply runs through blocks on the underside of the boom. After awhile, pulling "down" to get the necessary tension is awkward and a bit fatiguing. It would be better to run the mainsheet through a tiny block down low somewhere, so that I'm pulling "up" or on the horizontal, which is more common. The centerboard trunk is in the ideal location but I'm not sure how I'd attach one of those little, metal eye-straps to the trunk. There's no way to attach the strap to the bottom of the boat without drilling holes in the hull and I'm not doing that.

Another option is to run it forward and then down to the thwart and put a block with a cleat.  A second option is to use a ratchet block.  Both setups are used in frost biting fleets

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, Bryanjb said:

At the dinghy dock 

9E14E6F5-0DAB-4FDA-8970-0A475C11B777.jpeg

Bonus points on the construction!   Very attractive interior.

- Stumbling

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Bryanjb said:

At the dinghy dock 

9E14E6F5-0DAB-4FDA-8970-0A475C11B777.jpeg

Very nice bronze connection fittings!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can I have opinions from sailing tenders lovers on the fair market value of a PT 11 with all the sailing rig, foils, oars, the works.

New =

Good used =

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rustylaru said:

Can I have opinions from sailing tenders lovers on the fair market value of a PT 11 with all the sailing rig, foils, oars, the works.

New =

Good used =

 

The price of the kit, all the options, plus the cost of 500 hours of skilled labour. So I guess it depends whether you're building in Seattle or Bangladesh.

edit: What a great boat and would love to hear from the designer and/or a couple of guys around here who have built one. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rustylaru said:

Can I have opinions from sailing tenders lovers on the fair market value of a PT 11 with all the sailing rig, foils, oars, the works.

New =

Good used =

 

Considering selling one?

Our Zodiac / WM 9' Cadet is 11 years old, and the tubes are starting to go.  It nestles pretty perfectly on the foredeck of our Lancer 36, even forming a sort of protective vent cover for the forward hatch (we can keep it open in just about any weather condition when not underway).  With the high-pressure floor, it's also light enough to hoist on deck by hand.  So this model has a lot going for it, and I am open to comparable models as well. 

That said, I am a bit tempted by the hard dinghy.  Obviously there's the benefit of rowing better and generally avoiding gas and grease.  I also have children who would be approaching the age of learning to sail and becoming more independent (the older already rows a little), and the thought of switching to a dinghy that could offer them this experience is tempting, not to mention one that could ground on rougher shores.  If I could obtain a dinghy that nestles forward and offers space for the hatch, all while being light enough to hoist by hand, then it would be a win/win.  My guess is the better move is probably still the inflatable, but the idea of the hard dinghy is tempting...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rustylaru said:

Can I have opinions from sailing tenders lovers on the fair market value of a PT 11 with all the sailing rig, foils, oars, the works.

New =

Good used =

 

I’m interested if you are selling and are near Seattle.  They look like a great boat to take my son out in when I don’t have the energy to take out our big boat. 
 

Simon Miles (206 Composites) built at least a few of them, I’d look at his price for a new kit as your new price. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes I'm selling a new one I have just finished and have a buyer.

Just trying to access fair market value. That is a different from "what the market will bear" perhaps but, influenced by it.

$10500 with everything, sails, foils, oars,bumper, back seat, graco oarlocks, two part paint, west system epoxy 207 clear coat interior with 4coats of spar vanish.  Opinions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rustylaru said:

Yes I'm selling a new one I have just finished and have a buyer.

Just trying to access fair market value. That is a different from "what the market will bear" perhaps but, influenced by it.

$10500 with everything, sails, foils, oars,bumper, back seat, graco oarlocks, two part paint, west system epoxy 207 clear coat interior with 4coats of spar vanish.  Opinions?

Sounds fair. I costed it out a couple of years ago and that was the ballpark. I live in Canada so there were some additional duty and shipping costs(but options to retrieve it to alleviate said costs)...alas...got busy with other stuff and couldn't find the time so had to shelve it. But I love this little rocket so might revisit. The price might seem high, but when you consider its a bespoke semi-one-off(kit that needs to be built)  type boat with not much out there to match it in weight and performance...it makes more sense. With this type of small craft, the price is the price...if somebody wants something else or a different price point...then they can go get something else. This one's not for tire kickers.

(again: would love to hear from those who've built and also comments from the designer!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, rustylaru said:

Yes I'm selling a new one I have just finished and have a buyer.

Just trying to access fair market value. That is a different from "what the market will bear" perhaps but, influenced by it.

$10500 with everything, sails, foils, oars,bumper, back seat, graco oarlocks, two part paint, west system epoxy 207 clear coat interior with 4coats of spar vanish.  Opinions?

Pic's? I already have one, but I'd love to see what yours looks like. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Pic's? I already have one, but I'd love to see what yours looks like. 

Admiralty seating

PT 11 back seat.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, rustylaru said:

Admiralty seating

PT 11 back seat.JPG

Oh wow! Looks like you went all out...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It depends on the build quality. We've sold lots of prototypes for 7- 9000 dollars with rigs and foils. I think a really carefully built PT 11 should be worth $10,000, but that seems a bit nuts. It's an expensive kit, especially with the rig and foils. It's also a labor intensive build, so building one for profit is not easy. I'm not proud of how much these boats cost, but not sure what to do about that.                               It's a complex little boat and producing the kits is very labor intensive and expensive. We make money on the kits, but only because we have no employees and work our asses off.  Right now we are taking orders for the fall as we have shipped too many kits recently to stay sane and we have a backlog of foils kits and rigs to produce. I'm working on a run of 12 rigs right now and I think they are all sold.

  • Like 8

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Perfect little beaty , still love her !

D26E0F1B-20BC-4BAA-B48A-65668DBBB914.jpeg

186B21AF-D225-4BCE-91BC-BBEF5C9A79A6.jpeg

313BFA48-3296-4648-A0C5-BC5869ED5BA0.jpeg

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Remind me of which design was my 'original dink'. The 9' split V is what I consider the progenitor of the rest of the variations.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

It depends on the build quality. We've sold lots of prototypes for 7- 9000 dollars with rigs and foils. I think a really carefully built PT 11 should be worth $10,000, but that seems a bit nuts. It's an expensive kit, especially with the rig and foils. It's also a labor intensive build, so building one for profit is not easy. I'm not proud of how much these boats cost, but not sure what to do about that.                               It's a complex little boat and producing the kits is very labor intensive and expensive. We make money on the kits, but only because we have no employees and work our asses off.  Right now we are taking orders for the fall as we have shipped too many kits recently to stay sane and we have a backlog of foils kits and rigs to produce. I'm working on a run of 12 rigs right now and I think they are all sold.

I think you pricing assumes getting the kits a cost. Perhaps you have an inside line on them :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Paranda said:

Perfect little beaty , still love her !

D26E0F1B-20BC-4BAA-B48A-65668DBBB914.jpeg

186B21AF-D225-4BCE-91BC-BBEF5C9A79A6.jpeg

313BFA48-3296-4648-A0C5-BC5869ED5BA0.jpeg

That is very amazingly cool. I love the inside painted like that and just a wee bit of bright work. The raptor grip foam for the floor would have a similar look and a little knee protection. Anyone added nonslip foam?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

Remind me of which design was my 'original dink'. The 9' split V is what I consider the progenitor of the rest of the variations.

This is the one you built for yourself? Your description of its handling and carrying ticked my boxes. The only thing for me is weight... the WB Lite RIB I now have comes in at something like 9 feet and about 70 lb... I miss the Takacat I had, and I've been pondering getting an old Livingston and seeing if I could gut/rebuild it into something lighter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, Paranda said:

Perfect little beaty , still love her !

D26E0F1B-20BC-4BAA-B48A-65668DBBB914.jpeg

186B21AF-D225-4BCE-91BC-BBEF5C9A79A6.jpeg

313BFA48-3296-4648-A0C5-BC5869ED5BA0.jpeg

what model is this trimaran?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

Remind me of which design was my 'original dink'. The 9' split V is what I consider the progenitor of the rest of the variations.

 somersault 26 Newick

6A1BBD09-814A-4910-A033-2317DEF134E6.jpeg

60E304AE-E5D1-4D63-88AB-4060D96D6E3D.jpeg

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Paranda said:

somersault 26 Newick

DECBD545-6FE7-4BC5-88A8-8965768866E9.jpeg.9c867ec9e04332accf90276d17c950aa.jpegThe launch pad on the rear aka is very cool.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Paranda.  That somersault looks as beautiful on the trailer as it does on the water.  The curve of the float deck matching the underside of the bridge deck is wonderful.  Bravo.  NL has so many cool multihulls, but I've spent a lot more time poking around there than where I live.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Bruno said:

No love for the Pudge?

That made me laugh.

Getting caught in the lens rowing a Pudge is like getting caught with your pants down. 

534361127_PudgyJim(1of1).thumb.jpg.233c4587b82ff16f4cccb1c2033e390a.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still around! The VW Beetle of dinghies?

19933720_1500.03022020013007.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I traded up my Gig Harbor Ultralite 9 with no sail rig to a Gig Harbor Navigator 10 with the “performance rig” (has a tiny bow sprit with main and jib). 
 

We haven’t used it as a dinghy yet, but my son and I are having tons of fun sailing and rowing around the marina in it.

Since the upgrade was cheaper than my budget I also splurged and got some 7.5’ spoon blade Sawyer composite oars. They are so nice, a lot more power without a lot more strain. 
 

The sail rig is great for puttering around and the boat moves in very light puffs.  It can’t point very well without the job though. The completely flat fouls can’t be helping. 

791F0628-FFCC-455F-9CD7-D956C1A0A6CC.jpeg

 

FB76EF7C-3901-4450-BA75-BD8CEC6E0A6D.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Alex W  Is your son growing up to like sailing? Do you think he'll stick with it or will it end up being one of "dad's lame hobbies?"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Ajax said:

@Alex W  Is your son growing up to like sailing? Do you think he'll stick with it or will it end up being one of "dad's lame hobbies?"

So far he loves cycling and sailing, two of my favorite things.  He has more fun sailing on the dinghy where he can touch the water and handle the sheets and tiller than on our big boat where he can't do much.

He's only 3, so he has a lot of time to change his mind.

That photo was taken on a Sunday.  On Monday (Memorial Day) it was raining and we were trying to figure out what to do and he got so excited when I said we could go out on the little boat again.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Alex W said:

So far he loves cycling and sailing, two of my favorite things.  He has more fun sailing on the dinghy where he can touch the water and handle the sheets and tiller than on our big boat where he can't do much.

He's only 3, so he has a lot of time to change his mind.

That photo was taken on a Sunday.  On Monday (Memorial Day) it was raining and we were trying to figure out what to do and he got so excited when I said we could go out on the little boat again.

 

Aw, that's fantastic. Enjoy it before he turns 13 and says things like "I hate you."

It is so freaking difficult to get my adult daughters to set aside a day to go sailing. When they finally do, they always love it and wonder aloud why they don't do it more often. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Alex W said:

So far he loves cycling and sailing, two of my favorite things.  He has more fun sailing on the dinghy where he can touch the water and handle the sheets and tiller than on our big boat where he can't do much.

He's only 3, so he has a lot of time to change his mind.

That photo was taken on a Sunday.  On Monday (Memorial Day) it was raining and we were trying to figure out what to do and he got so excited when I said we could go out on the little boat again.

 

That Sunday was spectacular. I think all of Seattle decided that was the day to go outside, social distancing be damned.

Savor these times, Alex.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/18/2019 at 7:43 AM, Ajax said:

I love the CLC Passagemaker. That fits the bill but I'd have to get the nesting version to fit it on deck.

Anyone with experience with the Passagemaker?

I hadn't been considering it previously because it doesn't really nest -- the front 1/3 comes off but won't fit in the aft 2/3 because the daggerboard case and aft seat are in the way.  The aft seat is structural and is part of the reason the boat is lightweight for its capacity.  It will fit within an 8' footprint on the foredeck though, and the heaviest piece is (as near as I can figure) around 70 lbs which is light enough for me to portage.

Admiral and I total 500 lbs without boots on so that the design payload of the Passagemaker at 650 lbs would be about right for us.  She doesn't dive but our adult children and I do and that would push us closer to the payload limit also. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, Man!  I must be losing it with all the crazy ass strange days we are living in, I just thought this thread was "Hard Drinks, Nesting instincts and Why We Love Them.  It must be 1700hrs somewhere, I think maybe a stiff Hard Boat Drink is in order.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/2/2020 at 6:59 PM, IStream said:

That Sunday was spectacular. I think all of Seattle decided that was the day to go outside, social distancing be damned.

A friend saw us two weekends ago and took this photo:

image.png.8b43ac28b8f67e214f3fe4a573fcbde7.png

That was our first time hoisting the jib.  I'm loving this little boat, though I think the tiny sprit is a bit comical.  I need to figure out how to properly tension the jib luff, in that photo you can see that it's really sagged out.

It points a lot better with the jib up, though it's still very slow upwind compared to downwind (downwind the boat gets to hull speed really fast -- it's a good amount of sail area for a little boat).  I'm curious if anyone has noticed improvements when properly shaping the foils on dinks like this vs just using a flat piece of stock.  I'd probably have to make a new/acquire daggerboard to shape it (the stock one is solid G10), but it might be worth the effort.  I was going to measure and see if an Opti daggerboard would fit in.

alex

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Alex W said:

A friend saw us two weekends ago and took this photo:

image.png.8b43ac28b8f67e214f3fe4a573fcbde7.png

That was our first time hoisting the jib.  I'm loving this little boat, though I think the tiny sprit is a bit comical.  I need to figure out how to properly tension the jib luff, in that photo you can see that it's really sagged out.

It points a lot better with the jib up, though it's still very slow upwind compared to downwind (downwind the boat gets to hull speed really fast -- it's a good amount of sail area for a little boat).  I'm curious if anyone has noticed improvements when properly shaping the foils on dinks like this vs just using a flat piece of stock.  I'd probably have to make a new/acquire daggerboard to shape it (the stock one is solid G10), but it might be worth the effort.  I was going to measure and see if an Opti daggerboard would fit in.

alex

Is that Cascadia in the background?  One of Carl Schumacher's big ones, I always wanted that boat in an unrealistic dream like way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup, that is Cascadia, on the end of M dock.  Sorry about the terrible photo quality, I used the worst possible tool to reduce it in size (MSPaint).

alex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Alex W said:

Yup, that is Cascadia, on the end of M dock.  Sorry about the terrible photo quality, I used the worst possible tool to reduce it in size (MSPaint).

alex

Bad Alex. No biscuit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 6/25/2020 at 3:16 PM, Alex W said:

A friend saw us two weekends ago and took this photo:

image.png.8b43ac28b8f67e214f3fe4a573fcbde7.png

That was our first time hoisting the jib.  I'm loving this little boat, though I think the tiny sprit is a bit comical.  I need to figure out how to properly tension the jib luff, in that photo you can see that it's really sagged out.

It points a lot better with the jib up, though it's still very slow upwind compared to downwind (downwind the boat gets to hull speed really fast -- it's a good amount of sail area for a little boat).  I'm curious if anyone has noticed improvements when properly shaping the foils on dinks like this vs just using a flat piece of stock.  I'd probably have to make a new/acquire daggerboard to shape it (the stock one is solid G10), but it might be worth the effort.  I was going to measure and see if an Opti daggerboard would fit in.

alex

That is very cool! Looks like a powerful rig, all right.... but no worries holding it flat, at that scale.

Usually there is little to be gained with refined foil sections, but a rounded leading edge and chamfered trailing edge is enough of an improvement to be worth making. For a few years I sailed an AMF Puffer in the creek behind our house, and experimented with rudder and daggerboard... I made the rudder too small and efficient, needs to swept back to be able to scull the transom around some times... but IMHO most small boat daggerboards are too small. I put a board about a foot longer than stock on it, and it went upwind MUCH better, then I put one that was 2 feet longer....that was not an improvement partly because t ran aground too much, but I shortened it a bit less than a foot and it was great. Not quite double the area of the original.

The jib really really helps for accelerating out of tacks, and also backing away from docks or other obstacles.

FB- Doug

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@kent_island_sailor reminds me that my Dyer Dhow isn't self bailing and has poor flotation. There are ancient blocks of flotation foam built under the thwarts.

What could be done to improve this? Is there a modern, superior foam or product that I could put under the thwarts? Could I cut out the foam and use spaces for Optimist flotation bags with small holes to access the inflation valves?  The flotation bags would be hidden by the solid panels that hide the old foam.

I'd like to get the Dyer to the point where it would float with water just below the gunnels so I could de-water it with a manual double-action bilge pump that I carry.

What say the quorum?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The two usual choices are:

-- Closed cell polystyrene board, from a home center, such as the pink Foamular board and competing products.

-- Two-part pour-in foam, available from Jamestown Distributors among others.

Foamular is inexpensive and works OK, received wisdom is to cover exposed portions with glass, epoxy, and paint for protection from UV and kicks and bumps.  Comes in thicknesses up to 2".  It can be glued in place but my experience is that in a wet environment with thermal cycling and vibration it will eventually come off unless you use mechanical fasteners.  I like fender washers and screws for that or depending on your situation you can strap it in place or have the fiberglass and epoxy hold it.

The advantages of the pour-in stuff are that it conforms to odd shapes without a lot of work and you can fill areas only accessible through a hole or small window.  It's expensive and messy.

A drawback of any foam is that it will tend to trap moisture behind it where it contacts the hull or thwart.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Ajax I will second what 2airishuman says re. foam, with the additional comment that the pour in place foam takes some experience and thought. It is VERY sticky, and if you pour it into an enclosed space with only a small exit it will exert extremely powerful ripping-out-seams and breaking fastenings level force as it expands. It won't necessarily squirt out through the holes like you wanted it to. Give it plenty of room to expand. 

Also second the comment re. trapping water. I used pour in place foam in the bottom of a rowing boat, and even though it seemed solidly bonded to the wood of the hull, moisture got into the interface between wood and foam and did damage before I ripped it out. My philosophy now is to always allow for an air circulation space wherever there is an interface with wood. 

What about a sealed box with a waterproof port, to provide both dry storage and flotation? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Oceanconcepts I think the boat is too flexible to seal the thwarts in the manner you suggest.  I'd lose the seal quickly. 

I guess the foam board may be the way to go. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Ajax said:

@Oceanconcepts I think the boat is too flexible to seal the thwarts in the manner you suggest.  I'd lose the seal quickly. 

I guess the foam board may be the way to go. 

Definitely the easiest and least expensive, and you always have the option of covering the foam for protection if needed.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Ajax said:

@kent_island_sailor reminds me that my Dyer Dhow isn't self bailing and has poor flotation. There are ancient blocks of flotation foam built under the thwarts.

What could be done to improve this? Is there a modern, superior foam or product that I could put under the thwarts? Could I cut out the foam and use spaces for Optimist flotation bags with small holes to access the inflation valves?  The flotation bags would be hidden by the solid panels that hide the old foam.

I'd like to get the Dyer to the point where it would float with water just below the gunnels so I could de-water it with a manual double-action bilge pump that I carry.

What say the quorum?

I replaced the foam on our Dyer and it still couldn't really float high enough to self rescue. It's just not enough buoyancy. I'd think you'd want something with better abrasion resistance than the Optimist stuff.  

What about those walker bay floaty tubes?  Industrial dunnage bags? Pool noodles on your rail?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Elegua said:

I replaced the foam on our Dyer and it still couldn't really float high enough to self rescue. It's just not enough buoyancy. I'd think you'd want something with better abrasion resistance than the Optimist stuff.  

What about those walker bay floaty tubes?  Industrial dunnage bags? Pool noodles on your rail?

I did think about flotation on the rails similar to the Walker Bay setup. I was considering a ring of small fenders but ruled that out.  On the surface of it, pool noodles sounds silly but I've learned that there are now larger sizes that will easily keep a 200lb person afloat.  If I could find a color that wasn't obnoxious, I might try that out.

You know, I'm not looking for extreme flotation all the time, I'm most concerned about it when the anchorage/harbor is rolly or windy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
54 minutes ago, Ajax said:

I did think about flotation on the rails similar to the Walker Bay setup. I was considering a ring of small fenders but ruled that out.  On the surface of it, pool noodles sounds silly but I've learned that there are now larger sizes that will easily keep a 200lb person afloat.  If I could find a color that wasn't obnoxious, I might try that out.

You know, I'm not looking for extreme flotation all the time, I'm most concerned about it when the anchorage/harbor is rolly or windy.

You're just looking for something to keep the rail above water consistently so you can bail, right? So maybe something on the rail might make sense and would serve as an ok bumper.  You can get foam noodles in grey :D 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Elegua said:

You're just looking for something to keep the rail above water consistently so you can bail, right? So maybe something on the rail might make sense and would serve as an ok bumper.  You can get foam noodles in grey :D 

Yeah, I'm scanning for the largest diameter that I can find. 3.25" so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pool noodles degrade pretty quickly from UV exposure (ask me how I know). I wrap them with the outer core of recycled fire hose (that also degrades but I get several years of service before replacing the whole combination). The flotation is a benefit to be sure but the biggest benefit is as a bumper when you don't kiss the mothership just right on your approach when loaded with groceries, kids, dogs, booze, ice, etc. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, Anomaly2 said:

Pool noodles degrade pretty quickly from UV exposure (ask me how I know). I wrap them with the outer core of recycled fire hose (that also degrades but I get several years of service before replacing the whole combination). The flotation is a benefit to be sure but the biggest benefit is as a bumper when you don't kiss the mothership just right on your approach when loaded with groceries, kids, dogs, booze, ice, etc. 

The Dyer currently has a wooden toe rail that is wrapped in a thin foam covered by a firehose like material. I have no troubles with bumping the mothership but it doesn't provide any flotation.

@Elegua reminded me that some Dyer owners put a canvas dodger of sorts over the bow to keep water out during Dyer Frostbite races. I think that's also a good idea- keep water from getting in, in the first place.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had a Dyer Midget and it had pretty paltry amounts of foam under the transom seat and in the bow.  I think you could get double the flotation just by completely filling the space instead of leaving most of it open to collect water.  I had to rebuild the transom on my boat (the bond between the mahogany bench and fiberglass failed) and found those photos, but it doesn't look like I have any showing the tiny scraps of foam.

The simplest but least elegant solution might just be a big floatation bag forward of the main bench.  That space doesn't really get used while sailing and is often empty when rowing too.  You could also make a bag that goes under the main bench.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Alex W said:

I had a Dyer Midget and it had pretty paltry amounts of foam under the transom seat and in the bow.  I think you could get double the flotation just by completely filling the space instead of leaving most of it open to collect water.  I had to rebuild the transom on my boat (the bond between the mahogany bench and fiberglass failed) and found those photos, but it doesn't look like I have any showing the tiny scraps of foam.

The simplest but least elegant solution might just be a big floatation bag forward of the main bench.  That space doesn't really get used while sailing and is often empty when rowing too.  You could also make a bag that goes under the main bench.

The Dhow has 2 thwarts. I'm going to put something under both of them. Bags, foam boards, something.  The pour-in foam sounds problematic if one is unskilled in its application and messy to replace when it degrades.  Filling the bow with a floaty bag reduces my cargo carrying capacity. I mean, if the purpose of going ashore doesn't involve bringing stuff back, that's fine.

I should say that none of this is really a problem on the Chesapeake, I'm thinking of future, longer range cruises. We're really a fan of the Dyer these days and less so of the inflatables.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Ajax said:

Yeah, I'm scanning for the largest diameter that I can find. 3.25" so far.

You might consider looking at the foam rollers used for exercise, therapy, or yoga. They are available in many densities of polypropylene, including very firm, and are pretty durable. Colors are also available. Would hold up to fasteners with fender washers. Full round or half round, typically 4" or 6" diameter, though the length maxes out at 36". 

Could be cut and trimmed to fit, or half inside, half outside, or??

Search for "foam rollers" and you will be inundated. 

https://www.amazon.com/CanDo-White-Foam-Roller-Round/dp/B001RQ3WPG/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=Foam+Rollers+4+inch&qid=1594925796&s=exercise-and-fitness&sr=1-4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Ajax said:

The Dhow has 2 thwarts. I'm going to put something under both of them. Bags, foam boards, something.  The pour-in foam sounds problematic if one is unskilled in its application and messy to replace when it degrades.  Filling the bow with a floaty bag reduces my cargo carrying capacity. I mean, if the purpose of going ashore doesn't involve bringing stuff back, that's fine.

I should say that none of this is really a problem on the Chesapeake, I'm thinking of future, longer range cruises. We're really a fan of the Dyer these days and less so of the inflatables.

I'll play devils advocate and save you the trouble,...

 

The 9'+ Dyer Dhow is a real boat. Unless you're planning to dangerously overload it (and I know you're not), you'll not find yourself swamped in your Dhow. The flotation under the seats, is adequate, or will be once you install that. 

 

Here is an overloaded dinghy: (Midget I think). 

Dyer.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites