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Guy re-cored the deck, put G10 where all bolts go through the deck.  Re-installed the side cleats screws (screw heads about 3/4" wide) with an impact driver.  I have an air 1/2" impact wrench.  What type of adapters and screwdriver head can I buy to use this tool to take out big flathead screws?

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Flathead screws? FFS

Is the g10 tapped or nuts inside?

Reduce the 1/2" to 3/8". Buy the biggest flat head bit you can find and then used the appropriate sized  6 point socket in 3/8 drive. Most hardware store variety screw driver bit are 1/4". See if you can find 5/16.

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25 minutes ago, Glenn McCarthy said:

Guy re-cored the deck, put G10 where all bolts go through the deck.  Re-installed the side cleats screws (screw heads about 3/4" wide) with an impact driver.  I have an air 1/2" impact wrench.  What type of adapters and screwdriver head can I buy to use this tool to take out big flathead screws?

Did he actually drive the screws into G10, and didn't drill/tap?

 

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4 minutes ago, silent bob said:

9057375F-E8D9-43A6-96C7-26BB77AF4750.jpeg

Always wanted a crescent hammer.

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23 minutes ago, F_L said:

Flathead screws? FFS

Is the g10 tapped or nuts inside?

Reduce the 1/2" to 3/8". Buy the biggest flat head bit you can find and then used the appropriate sized  6 point socket in 3/8 drive. Most hardware store variety screw driver bit are 1/4". See if you can find 5/16.

All I know is it is tighter than tight.  Can't use a screwdriver, doesn't move it.  The guy said to go impact.

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If an impact was used to tighten stainless fasteners without any anti seize you may end up having to drill out the screws or cut off the cleats with a multi tool.

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Step 1 is heat, regardless of tools.

Step 2 is a hand held hammer drill. Will give less torque but more smack for breaking the bond loose (tool of choice for cracking old stainless hardware out of aluminum rigs).

https://www.backcountrygear.com/rocpec.html?gclid=Cj0KCQjwvdXpBRCoARIsAMJSKqLd0egDCWsA6aAbZODVk9jayDL1NXrgQdNid-wjHx4igLOrpyN6WIAaAmQtEALw_wcB

Step 3 is a "brace" style hand drill. It's the only tool to use for big flatheads. Allows good torque with maximum control.

https://www.amazon.com/Stanley-5044-basic_replenishmentace-10In-1-02-715/dp/B0001IW8N8/ref=asc_df_B0001IW8N8/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=309807921328&hvpos=1o2&hvnetw=g&hvrand=5666470822801911917&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9002201&hvtargid=pla-422783056233&psc=1

 

HW

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a lot of manual impact drivers have a 1/2" to hex adaptor in the kit. Most specialist engineering shops should be able to supply these.

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image.png.76ab40226bb1ba2ccc8e1f83f3ee8234.pnglike this. You should be able to buy the adaptor and bit seperatly, however you will have to go to a propper engineering shop, not walmart.

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A "drag link socket" is my tool of choice for breaking loose big slotted screws on old tractors. 

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13 hours ago, mikegt4 said:

A "drag link socket" is my tool of choice for breaking loose big slotted screws on old tractors. 

You can find assortments of "drag link" socket that fit the really large slotted screws. 

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Just now, IStream said:

I wouldn't use those with an impact driver.

A few reviews said they did use them with an impact driver and they held up.

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Drag link socket... If you have a bench grinder you can do a bit of fitting work.

If you've got slotted oval heads, the flat bottom of the flat head, isn't always totally flat, so you can grind both a little radius, and a negative draft into the sides of the face so they key up a bit better.  You want just a touch of negative draft in the sides, rather than a taper or dead nuts square.  Sharpie mark the end, rub it in the slot and look for contact til you are happy... 

 

 

 

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5 hours ago, Glenn McCarthy said:

Ya'all gave me the course I needed, I think this is what will work.  And for Harbor Freight, the reviews are pretty darn good!

https://www.harborfreight.com/search?q=1/2" drive screwdriver

I had ones of those and it shattered in my face, I wouldn't recommend it. You will need this a drag link socket which is impact rated like this: https://shop.snapon.com/product/A26A

 

Then again, you loose one eye using an inferior tool you always have a second right? 

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4 hours ago, Glenn McCarthy said:

A few reviews said they did use them with an impact driver and they held up.

Depends on how tight the fasteners are. If they're not super tight or corroded, you may get away with it due to the fastener moving and reducing the shock load. If the fastener is tight or frozen, the irresistible force will compromise with the immovable object by shattering your tool. Your call.

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On our last boat the previous owner EPOXIED flat head 1/2" diameter fasteners for the chainplates through the topsides.

Impact driver + local pin point torch to soften the epoxy. I shattered a lot of impact rated drag point type sockets

Bastard.

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17 minutes ago, Zonker said:

On our last boat the previous owner EPOXIED flat head 1/2" diameter fasteners for the chainplates through the topsides.

Impact driver + local pin point torch to soften the epoxy. I shattered a lot of impact rated drag point type sockets

Bastard.

Did you pay-it-forward and use 5200 for the next guy?

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On ‎7‎/‎22‎/‎2019 at 6:36 PM, silent bob said:

9057375F-E8D9-43A6-96C7-26BB77AF4750.jpeg

SA truly needs some sort of LOL / Spewing Coffee Out Nostrils emoji.  Because that's what just happened. 

Gotta assume this is what is meant when one of my buddies is working on his engine and asks me for the, "aaaah, you know, fukkinwrench. Gimme that fukkinwrench."  I never used to know if he meant box end, socket, adjustable, hex, whatever... but that thing sure looks like a fukkinwrench to me.  Never saw one when I was a kid but I'm sure my dad used to own one, because he asked for it all the time working on the cars, the saws, the tractor and the generator.  Probably need to buy one and keep it on the workbench near my BFH and my goddamscrewdriverNOnotthatonetheotherone. 

That's actually the answer to the flathead screw removal, BTW... he needs a goddamscrewdriverNOnotthatonetheotherone.  They're hard as hell to find though, I find myself looking for that goddamscrewdriverNOnotthatonetheotherone all the time when I'm working on deck hardware. 

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On ‎7‎/‎22‎/‎2019 at 6:14 PM, Glenn McCarthy said:

Guy re-cored the deck, put G10 where all bolts go through the deck.  Re-installed the side cleats screws (screw heads about 3/4" wide) with an impact driver.  I have an air 1/2" impact wrench.  What type of adapters and screwdriver head can I buy to use this tool to take out big flathead screws?

Whatcha need, well, some folks call it a sling blade, mmmm hhhhh, I call it a Kaiser blade. 

What? Oh, you want to remove the screws?  Sorry.  Thought you were asking for recommendations for how to kill the PO.  That'd be my first step in erasing this error.

 

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