Black Jack

What’s it’s rate?

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I’ll start this thread with this one.

a 27’ New Haven Sharpie (Chapelle with Parker modifications).

 

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I'm thinking 80s based on photo quality and stearns life jackets. That is one hell of a centerboard. Appears to be plank built.

I have Parker's book, they look like fun simple boats. They certainly look like they're having fun with only two strings to pull.

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47 minutes ago, Norm said:

now thats a centreboard...

If you look at the Chapelle drawings in American Small Sailing Craft the centerboard as drawn is short for a Sharpie type.

Basic Sharpie guidelines say the board should be 1/3rd the overall length of the boat.

 

 

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Sweet! That’ll leave a few competitors in the “dust”...

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2 hours ago, Sail4beer said:

Sweet! That’ll leave a few competitors in the “dust”...

Upgrade the sails to a pair of square tops with load path carbon tapes.

"Everything is faster when you add carbon!"

- Stumbling

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God...never saw one before. I want one...looks perfect and better than sex with swill...have to check for slightly shorter version...I live in small-weedy lake town in MN...nice rig...made my day.

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I have recently purchased and I am restoring a cottage built in 1840 on the Goodwives river estuary/ Rings End Harbo. It was lived in by William Wood who purchased the house from his landlord in 1870. William and his son were Oystermen known as Sail Men or Growthers who ran a Sharpie out of Rings End harbor. There is an 1935 boat house on the site of the original boat house where he would have wintered his Sharpie in the off season and worked on it in the Summer off season.

At the time, the oyster trade on Connecticut was booming.  During the 19th century, oyster fishing was an engine of the Connecticut economy. By 1850, Connecticut was the epicenter of oysters for all of the USA. It is staggering to imagine but 2 million bushels of oyster were landed in New Haven in 1850.  That is one bushel of oysters for every 10 people in the USA landed at one CT port. Oyster barons arrived in Norwalk and New haven, putting together syndicates to harvest and cultivate the fertile Long Island Sound oyster beds.  It occupied a great deal of the CT’ legislature’s time as they grappled with the battle for the ownership of the sea bed between the oyster barons who were seeding cultivated oysterbeds and the local oystermen who continued to harvest wild oysters from the traditional natural beds (which were supposedly public, but vigorously defended by local oystermen)

Darien’s 1880 census showed that the shores of Pear Tree Point on Rings End Harbor was settled by oystermen where the low lying banks of the protected river allowed them to launch and store their Sharpies.  These small single family operations, usually consisting of father and son were not squeezed out by the industrialization of the oyster industry in the second half of the 19C. Far from it, the arrival of the oyster barons actually led to a boom for the sail men.   The oyster barons quickly found that the best cultivated beds grew from local CT natural seed oysters. The source for their natural seed oysters were the sail men. The local small sail men evolved from harvesting fully grown oysters to providing seed oyster (hence the term growthers or “natural growthers”) and they made a lot of money such that we see many records showing them evolving from tenants to property owners. Naturally they also reinvested in building better and faster Sharpies.

The CT oystermen or Sail Men were exclusively still using a small, fast shallow draft sail boat called a Sharpie to harvest oysters beyond the turn of the century. The first steam powered oyster sloop was not used until 1874 and its subsequent use was largely confined to the large commercial ventures out of New Haven and Norwalk. The smaller oystermen continued working the natural beds with Sharpies well into the 1900s. Henry Hall’s Report on the Shipbuilding Industry in the United States (1884) details the Connecticut shore Sharpies .  The oyster season was short. The Sharpies were light weight low displacement boats with a center board that could leave at dawn on the opening day of the season, arrive first at the natural beds, harvest the growthers and then flock around the large commercial schooners to get the best sale.

For this reason, I would love to buy a replica Sharpie if anyone knows where I can lay my hands on one.

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With that draft, where is the racing happening and what do the SI's say about having to regard government marks?  If they can cut across mud flats at mid-tide that everyone else has to avoid, they'll do well regardless of the rating. 

 

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Yes, you reminded me of a forgotten story I had read of Sharpies (large ones) racing on Chesepeak water...have not seen much since...a smaller one, as noted above makes me wish I was younger.

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11 minutes ago, Mambo Kings said:

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Mambo...am all over this...thanks.

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