SimplyDabbling

Snipe Questions: Jib Sheet and Daggerboard

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Hey guys,

Buddy of mine just bought an old snipe. No idea on the year, but it has a lot of wooden parts and looks pretty cool. I'm excited to take it out on the water.

I've never sailed a Snipe before though and I have two questions.

1.) In the picture, is that greenish thing protruding from the daggerboard housing a cleat of some sort for the jib sheets? Or does it have some other use which I can't decipher.

2.) How do you rig the daggerboard to prevent it from falling out and sinking to the bottom in the event of a capsize/turtle?

Thanks.

 

unnamed.jpg

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Yes... that is the Jib sheet cleat. It was considered “the thing to have” in the fifties.

is the board the 80 pound bronze board or the  newfangled aluminum board ( a mid fifties class rule change) 

Tie a good strong rope to the board and make certain the boat end is fastened or tied around something so it will hold when the runaway board yanks on it. 

Tte ither way to loose a board it to drop it rather than ease it down. The fasteners holding  the handle  can  shear off and it keeps going down 

 

 

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The daggerboard preventor would be a line on the board handle that clips onto to an eye bolt or other fitting attached to the cowl.  It will need to be long enough to raise the board for downwind.  You will also need to rig a line to keep the board up.  Run the line in front of the board and cleat off.  After rounding the leeward mark, blow the line and let the board drop.

Congrads on a fun boat.

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4 hours ago, Gouvernail said:

Yes... that is the Jib sheet cleat. It was considered “the thing to have” in the fifties.

is the board the 80 pound bronze board or the  newfangled aluminum board ( a mid fifties class rule change) 

Tie a good strong rope to the board and make certain the boat end is fastened or tied around something so it will hold when the runaway board yanks on it. 

Tte ither way to loose a board it to drop it rather than ease it down. The fasteners holding  the handle  can  shear off and it keeps going down 

 

 

I haven't seen it in person, just photos. But I think it's the 'newfangled' aluminum board (using the term newfangled lightly here) rather than the bronze one.

Any advice on what best to tie the daggerboard line to that will hold specifically?

And that's some great advice on the fasteners shearing off if we drop it right in. Although Surf_N_Turf does pose an interesting argument against you for the leeward mark....

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4 hours ago, Gouvernail said:

Is it all wood?? What number ?? 

Ehhh I don't know if it's all wood. Certainly mast, boom and spinnaker pole are all wood from the photos I've seen.

Where should my buddy look to find a hull number on the boat?

We're gonna go sailing sometime here in the near future on it. I'll throw some more photos up here when we do.

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Sails may have numbers. 

Lots of Snipes’  numbers were “written” using a 3/16” drill..   lots of little holes in the “hangy down part of the deck” at the back of the cockpit 

my guess is you will find a number under 20,000. If it is under 10,000 odds are good it is a wood boat. 

We had 5525 in wood from 1946

and

A fiberglass boat 11463 from around 1957

13000 was ( not ours) new for the 1958 Nationals at Chautauqua Lake

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Called a “rope eater” because that’s what they did. Pretty cool devise actually, essentially a two way cleat.

SHC

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5 hours ago, Steve Clark said:

Called a “rope eater” because that’s what they did. Pretty cool devise actually, essentially a two way cleat.

SHC

My Father was an engineer at American Sterilizer and a Snipe Fleet Captain... 

He spend a bunch of evenings in the factory messing around and created his own version of that cleat. And kept refining it until he had a version that was only about an inch tall. Eventually he came up with a ratcheting  roller that hung from the top rather than the spring loaded cam which pushed up from the bottom . It ratcheted on whichever side it was pulled toward but it didn’t completely cleat the sheet. It made it possible to play the jib but it wasn’t nearly as nice as a Harken Hex a Ratchet  .... so he quit messing around with his own cleats and blocks 

 

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On 8/2/2019 at 7:28 PM, Gouvernail said:

Sails may have numbers. 

Lots of Snipes’  numbers were “written” using a 3/16” drill..   lots of little holes in the “hangy down part of the deck” at the back of the cockpit 

my guess is you will find a number under 20,000. If it is under 10,000 odds are good it is a wood boat. 

We had 5525 in wood from 1946

and

A fiberglass boat 11463 from around 1957

13000 was ( not ours) new for the 1958 Nationals at Chautauqua Lake

Cool. I'll let you know what number I find.

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On 8/3/2019 at 11:45 AM, Running with Scissors said:

That's the Jiffy Jib Jam!

Image-1.jpg

The old Jiffy Jib Jam!

I should've known....

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What!?! No photos of miter-cut cotton sails? Rubber-band-y 3 strand halyards on wooden Herreshoff cleats?

O the joys of sailing back in the '50s!

I didn't realize the jiffy jib jammer was an actual fitting, made like that. I always thought they were somebody's idea of what to do with a broken spinnaker pole and a Freudian desire to de-nut their crew.

God I hated all that shit...... but sailing was (and still is!) so much fun....

FB- Doug

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29 minutes ago, Steam Flyer said:

What!?! No photos of miter-cut cotton sails? Rubber-band-y 3 strand halyards on wooden Herreshoff cleats?

O the joys of sailing back in the '50s!

Snipes were even better back in the 30's.

1935PassAGrilleRegatta_Tampa_Bay_Times_Fri__Jul_5__1935_SnipePhoto.jpg

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On 8/6/2019 at 8:44 AM, Steam Flyer said:

What!?! No photos of miter-cut cotton sails? Rubber-band-y 3 strand halyards on wooden Herreshoff cleats?

O the joys of sailing back in the '50s!

I didn't realize the jiffy jib jammer was an actual fitting, made like that. I always thought they were somebody's idea of what to do with a broken spinnaker pole and a Freudian desire to de-nut their crew.

God I hated all that shit...... but sailing was (and still is!) so much fun....

FB- Doug

“A Freudian desire to de-Nut their crew” is truly an all time line. 

Ill make sure to keep my jewels hugged tight. 

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Got some more photos. 

Up close and personal with the Jiffy Jib Jam!

534EECC8-DDD2-42F7-A8D5-BA3A80D7D752.jpeg

DE39D8AB-D8A7-40B3-8713-DF25900CDEAF.jpeg

3B226FC7-DD1B-41E9-9270-0F756240DF8C.jpeg

226270DA-FA5A-44AB-900B-F3C8F2A6F6D8.jpeg

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It looks like a homemade replacement board and if you don’t get some varnish on that wood Before exposing it to a ride that 70-year-old Boat is going to die on you

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That looks like a pretty cool (and complete) old Snipe.  Love the old fashioned whisker pole.  How/where does that get stowed? What kind of shape is the rudder in?

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6 hours ago, SimplyDabbling said:

“A Freudian desire to de-Nut their crew” is truly an all time line. 

Ill make sure to keep my jewels hugged tight. 

Thanks.... keeping 'em tucked in safely is good advice most of the time!

It's probably not historically correct, but you can stow the whisker pole on the boom. Keeps it out from under foot.

FB- Doug

 

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On 8/7/2019 at 12:06 PM, Gouvernail said:

It looks like a homemade replacement board and if you don’t get some varnish on that wood Before exposing it to a ride that 70-year-old Boat is going to die on you

Hey there!  Owner of the boat here.  I did replace the wood on the top of the board, as the old stuff was literally falling off from rot.  The rest of the wood on the boat (mast, rudder, trim, splashguard) is in pretty decent shape, but could absolutely use some varnish.  Any suggestions on a quality product to use?

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Saying “Varnish is varnish” is not quite accurate but not totally a lie.

As long as you purchase a varnish that has some UV inhibitors and put on nice full wet coats, you are doing your job.

Generally the words “spar varnish” on the label means that company considers their product to be fine for protecting outdoor wood like flagpoles and sailboat masts. 

No varnish holds up well outside in the sun. 

it is obvious  that boat has lived indoors. If it had been outdoors all these years it would have had to be varnished a couple to five times a year or it would already be compost. 

The very best of the  Minwax, Rustoleum, Valspar  or similar brands is just fine if you see words about UV protection.

you can go to a marine store and pay extra for products like Interlux Schooner varnish but I swear it is no better.

Cetol brand Varnish at about $50 a quart does hold up a little better but they put so much UV protection in that even their “Marine Clear” is not clear and its caramel color hides the grain of the wood. 

Summary: I would varnish the wood with a good spar varnish and find a way to store that showpiece indoors between uses.

People will gather around and flatter you wherever you take it. 

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Holy Moly! I thought my snipe collection was old.  Glad you got a old girl to mess with, there is a huge difference between a fun sailor and a class racer.  If you have any Q's shoot me a line as I resurrected a early 80's snipe and am loving the hell out of it, fun sailing.

Eric

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The newest and last Snipe  on which I sailed was a 17000 series boat. It was the fall of 1965. 

I crewed for Whitey Johnson and we won the Silver Lake Harvest Regatta. Fritz Graham was second and Red Garfield was Third. 

If my memory were a little better I would know all about Snipes of the vintage of the boat in this thread. 

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Fair enough.  I have been looking at some varnishes and have come up with similar stories.  I've spent a fair amount of time with a heat gun and putty knife at this point, so I am excited to actually put some fresh varnish on her this week.  The hull actually was stored outside.  When I found her she was leaning against a shed, but the hull is fiberglass, and the mast, rudder, and other components were indeed in a garage.  

Still cant find a serial number though.  Looked all over the inside and came up empty.  You are right though, once she is back in order she will be a beauty.  Need to figure out how to paint her once I get everything pieced back together.

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54 minutes ago, burnt chef said:

Holy Moly! I thought my snipe collection was old.  Glad you got a old girl to mess with, there is a huge difference between a fun sailor and a class racer.  If you have any Q's shoot me a line as I resurrected a early 80's snipe and am loving the hell out of it, fun sailing.

Eric

I will take any and all suggestions.  The OP was my sailing instructor in a beginner course, so I have limited experience with sailing as well as restoration.  The story of this coming my way is actually pretty interesting,  would you believe I got her with a trailer for free?

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