Atkinson Grey

Bulker leaving Vancouver Harbour

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There goes Kerrisdale...those nasty trees blocking the view on Spanish Banks won't be a problem anymore either.

Wheat germ. More dangerous than you think.

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reported as some type of pressure relief hatch blow off...

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15 minutes ago, Keith said:

reported as some type of pressure relief hatch blow off...

 

Yes, and she's back on her way to Singapore.

 

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I understand the sound frightened a few people on the local beaches     lol.......:lol:

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Likely blew out a deck steam line.

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3 minutes ago, Veeger said:

Likely blew out a deck steam line.

Did we just get in the way back machine.  Steam on deck?

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1 minute ago, Matt DI said:

Did we just get in the way back machine.  Steam on deck?

Possibly.  How old is the ship?  Sometimes steam is used still for x-over bulker/tankers that want to keep liquid cargos warm.  Admittedly, most ships use hydraulic these days.  For me, the 'tell' is the reference to noise.  Steam lines blowing are VERY noisy....initially.

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Not steam. Vancouver exports lots of bulk cargoes like sulphur, potash, wheat, soybeans (well not right now 'cause we detained a Huawei 2nd in command at behest of US).

So no liquid export cargoes that require steam on deck (why wouldn't you run the steam lines through a pipe tunnel?)

maybe a minor wheat dust explosion ?

 

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4 minutes ago, Moonduster said:

detained a Huawei 2nd in command at behest of US for international sanction violations.

Detained a Huawei 2nd in command for international sanction violations when US forced Canada to observe international laws by bringing it to their attention.

 

 

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As I understand it, the charges themselves are for bank fraud by NY state because her presentations assured bankers that they would not be in in violation of sanctions. 

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My contractor saw it from West Van and got it on his phone camera.

He said there was a hell of a bang.

I've never seen or heard of anything like it in 48 years of living here. And that includes a grain elevator exploding from grain dust.

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https://www.skuld.com/topics/cargo/solid-bulk/agricultural-cargoes/fumigation-and-ventilation-of-soybean-cargoes/

 

Fumigation of soybean cargo may be required because of insect infestation found at loading, compliance with contractual specifications, or to issue a phytosanitary inspection certification. Voyage times between countries where soybeans are grown and countries where soybeans are in demand, can range from three to six weeks. Rather than undertaking a lengthy fumigation at the port of origin, soybeans are normally fumigated on passage.

...

Aluminium phosphide, the most common in-transit fumigant, is a solid that reacts with moisture in the air to liberate phosphine.

 

So - nothing to worry about, because there wasn't a fire?  Um... let's have that picnic up-wind, eh?...

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is there any way to see the bridge camera video?

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2 hours ago, toddster said:

https://www.skuld.com/topics/cargo/solid-bulk/agricultural-cargoes/fumigation-and-ventilation-of-soybean-cargoes/

 

Fumigation of soybean cargo may be required because of insect infestation found at loading, compliance with contractual specifications, or to issue a phytosanitary inspection certification. Voyage times between countries where soybeans are grown and countries where soybeans are in demand, can range from three to six weeks. Rather than undertaking a lengthy fumigation at the port of origin, soybeans are normally fumigated on passage.

...

Aluminium phosphide, the most common in-transit fumigant, is a solid that reacts with moisture in the air to liberate phosphine.

 

So - nothing to worry about, because there wasn't a fire?  Um... let's have that picnic up-wind, eh?...

So I was trying to understand what might pressurize things enough for the hatch to blow off.  Well, phosphine is extremely explosive it would seem.

https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/ershdb/emergencyresponsecard_29750035.html

(See!   I CAN do a quick goog-lay type research besides simply pulling an opinion out of my arse...but it's not nearly as much 'fun'...)

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Given that they are continuing their voyage, I guess this all in a day's work for commercial mariners. 

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53 minutes ago, luminary said:

Have they left the environment yet?

Hopefully they do before the front falls off

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https://www.skuld.com/topics/cargo/solid-bulk/agricultural-cargoes/us-gulf-fumigation-of-grain-cargoes---risk-of-explosion  

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/transport-canada-investigating-hatch-explosion-aboard-cargo-ship-in-vancouver-harbour-1.5239415

This isn't the first fumigation foul up in the port, there was a cloud of poisonous phosphine gas drifting across the inner harbour within sight of the convention centre a number of years ago; a rain shower activated the Aluminum Phosphide tablets that were on the deck of a ship at anchor in preparation for a cargo hold fumigation. A fumigator exposed me and himself to Methyl Bromide while I was supervising his treatment of an import shipping container that was found to have live insects in the wooden packaging when it was inspected by the CFIA. Shortly after these incidents the BC Ministry of Environment did an audit of fumigators and found over 90% were non-compliant on their safety procedures. The young son of a ship's captain died due to a phosphine gas leak on a grain ship that was fumigated in Montreal, similar to this case: https://www.gov.uk/maib-reports/phosphine-poisoning-on-general-cargo-vessel-monika-with-loss-of-1-life
 

 

 

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