Varan

Transat Jacque Vabre 2019

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Pip Hare is still out there but getting close and still enjoying it, about 480 miles to go. Great attitude. I agree with her, outdoor yachting. 

 

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Gotta feel for Seguin and Richomme on Apicil in the doldrums: 

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So, there was talent, desire, a lot of know-how and great friendship on board Groupe Apicil, and they needed all of it because on paper this 2006 Finot-Conq design with daggerboards could not compete with the newer boats. From Le Havre to the Doldrums, Seguin and Richomme were faultless. They showed excellent speed upwind, a controlled strategy, a smart passage through the ridge of high pressure around Gibraltar and they were incredibly always  in the lead pack, never lower than 10th place. With Banque Populaire and Corum L'Epargne, the race between the “daggerboard boats” was exciting and high level.

It was only when approaching the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone, when Groupe Apicil shifted to the west, as theory and routing necessitated, that the trouble started. This year, the Doldrums needed to be passed to the east or it was going to be especially sticky. Entering in eighth neck-and-neck with Corum L'Epargne, Groupe Apicil came out 13th with a deficit of 70 miles. “There were clearly two races for us: before the doldrums, it was very interesting, but our passage through them was catastrophic, we lost as much as Charal!” Seguin said.
The end of the course – with its south-easterly trade wind reaching angles - was never likely to be favorable to the daggerboard boats and Groupe Apicil finally finished 14th in Salvador de Bahia. Third in the match between the 13 daggerboard IMOCAs, Seguin and Richomme also left three foilers behind them.

https://www.transatjacquesvabre.org/en/news/newswire/2040/groupe-apicil-finishes-fourteenth-in-the-transat-jacques-vabre-normandie-le-havre-imoca

And, anyone have a link about how Sequin's mods to Apicil worked out?  I found mention in an old VG article of the pedestal, but wondered about such adaptations worked out. 

Quote

What is special about the 60-foot boats is that there is a pedestal winch. We needed to adapt the winch handle to my left arm, so as I can use the full power of the top half of my body. We made a prototype working with the Kerpape Centre (a centre in Ploemeur near Lorient, which specialises in physiotherapy): the system is a bit like a sleeve, which allows me to push and pull the handle. We’ll be trying it out when we get out there sailing again.”

 

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18 hours ago, jb5 said:

The 20/21 VG NOR is attached.  Nothing about this type of penalty situation that I can see, but attendance of the boat in Les Sables (page 24) was a bit of a surprise. 10,000 EUR/ HR. Best not be late.

notice-of-race-vendee-globe-2020.pdf

Thanks for that doc JB. Sidestep; missing the VG chairman's lunch on Oct 18th, 2020 will cost a skipper EUR 2.000 :lol:

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3 hours ago, Herman said:

Thanks for that doc JB. Sidestep; missing the VG chairman's lunch on Oct 18th, 2020 will cost a skipper EUR 2.000 :lol:

Summary on the financial implications for IMOCA class to take part in this race:

Reimbursable is EUR 20.000 to get on the waiting list, max 30 participants
You have to pay EUR 10.000,=  as an entrance fee.
And later on you can be penaltized by the following rules. 
136451671_penaltiesimocatransat2.PNG.4c27eb8d9c76238eab99dc3634561ed1.PNG
1210890814_penaltiesimocatransat3.PNG.5fdb7d37c334892c19fb7aebcac62aa5.PNG
Winners take :
1st: EUR 200,000 incl. taxes
2nd: EUR 140,000 incl. taxes
3rd: EUR 100,000 incl. taxes
4th: EUR 80,000 incl. taxes
5th: EUR 50,000 incl. taxes
6th: EUR 40,000 incl. taxes
7th: EUR 30,000 incl. taxes

189479975_winnerstransatjacquesFabvre.jpg.90a334660d19a71a76b1ade36103e973.jpg
 

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Advens for Cybersecurity dropped to fifth place after receiving a 2 hour time penalty according to the TJV website.

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https://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/transat-jacques-vabre/transat-jacques-vabre-le-cleac-h-tout-en-maitrise-12-11-2019-12431624.php

Short interview with Armel Le Cléac'h.


Teaming up with Clarisse Crémer: "It was busy on board and we did not get to know each other much. It was not the goal. I wanted to focus on learning and so as we spent the days together on the boat I passed on some knowledge like: "The way I see things, how to control the boat, how to anticipate ..." But without being a lecturer (?) or getting upset, screaming, being more relaxed. The watchword was rigor. Because I know that afterwards when I'm off the boat she will do what she wants. "

"It was interesting. I was afraid it would be a race only about speed, we would get left behind and maybe place between 10 and 15. However, the weather was favorable. There were options to choose from. We were in front and behind, we have taken advantage of opportunities and made fewer mistakes than some. With non foiling boats, whether it's "Corum" or "Apicil", as soon as you make a small mistake, you pay it, while the foilers, if they made a mistake they can accelerate and recover. If you want to be in front it means zero errors! We made very few. I liked it. I spent time watching the strategy. I would say that to win we would have needed a lead of 300 miles at the Doldrums. "We could hardly have done better. I said between 5th and 10th place.  As there were very few abandons it means that our result was earned.

"I followed the start of Brest Atlantiques and it makes you want to be there. When you spend five days to go to the equator ... It's nice but it's not the same. 
I am looking forward to getting back on a multihull.

The new VPLP designed boat is under construction: "Once we have launched in early 2021, it will be followed quickly with the crewed world race. Basically, at the same time as when Clarisse will finish her Vendée Globe.


In the meantime, he will again do a Figaro season with a Transat ag2r.  "I will try to get a triple crown in one of the two. It is the objective. Being the first to win three times in the ag2r would be great.  I did the Solitaire this year, I saw how it went and I know what I have to improve. I want to have a good season next year.  And as with the for Imoca, Le Figaro is not forgotten!

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12 hours ago, stief said:

Gotta feel for Seguin and Richomme on Apicil in the doldrums: 

https://www.transatjacquesvabre.org/en/news/newswire/2040/groupe-apicil-finishes-fourteenth-in-the-transat-jacques-vabre-normandie-le-havre-imoca

And, anyone have a link about how Sequin's mods to Apicil worked out?  I found mention in an old VG article of the pedestal, but wondered about such adaptations worked out. 

 

https://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/transat-jacques-vabre/transat-jacques-vabre-seguin-un-pas-de-plus-vers-le-vendee-globe-13-11-2019-12432168.php

Rough translation only.  Nothing about modifications.  This guy is very impressive.

Damien Seguin will be at the start of the Vendée Globe in a year. He builds his projects step by step to take them to the highest level (he is triple Paralympic medalist) and took advantage of the Transat Jacques Vabre with Yoann Richomme to refine his preparation. 


Damien Seguin will be the first handicapped person to participate in the Vendée Globe. The Multi Paralympic Champion and skipper of "Groupe Apicil" has the ability to lead professional projects at the highest level: "I am very humble about my Paralympic profile. I give myself 100% to be successful and it worked. I started the race off with little pretension. And as and when I learn about these boats and today is in Imoca. With Yoann (Richomme), it is also proof that I know how to surround myself with the right people to continue to progress. I'm doing things quietly at my level, at my own pace. And today, I have the impression that it pays off.


His 60 foot boat is not from latest generation and was launched in 2008. Sixth of the Route du Rhum last year, it has arrived 14th in the Transat Jacques Vabre. His boat has no foils but "We made a lot of effort. There is not much that I regret in the first part of the race. After the Doldrums, it was no longer favorable. We managed to use 100% of the boat's potential almost all the time. I continued to learn about this magnificent boat looking forward to the Vendée Globe. With Yoann Richomme they would have liked to do better with the other non foiling boats however one of the objectives was to continue the preparation for the solo world race: "It's going to be wet. These are great boats. A Vendée means preparing a lot and even if I do not have a non foiling boat and will not be able to fight with the boats with foils, I will have the satisfaction of being able to use 100% of the potential of the boat,


To be ready on the day, there is still a little work to do this winter but Seguin knows how to surround himself with the right people that are necessary to fully understand this 18 m boat. "The Imoca are complex. It's big, it's physical, but when we get organized, we do things simply and I start to understand the boat and understand how the race goes, it's not more complicated than other things (?). I rather feel that I'm doing things in a good way. Do not rush the steps. I have always worked like that, "says the 40-year-old skipper who will realize one of the dreams: go around the world alone. "I'm not afraid of having high goals. When I said a few years ago that my goal would be to do the Vendée Globe there were not many people who believed in it. But it was the same when I said I wanted to be a Paralympic champion. I gave myself the means to get there, to surround myself with good people and I learnt. This trans atlantic is a step closer towards the Vendée Globe.

A step closer to the challenge that his co-skipper, Yoann Richomme, knows he can achieve: "The efforts are intense and Damien just started last year with the Imoca. He begins to understand how to manage his effort. To know how to use his boat, his sails, organize all that. He will soon be ready. He will be able to do something beautiful because the Vendée Globe is long. It also requires a lot of reliability and it is technical: he will be able to prepare his boat well, manage it well during the event and it would not surprise me to see Damien at the finish. The pleasure of being at sea will surely serve him well too.

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C40; Lipinsky Hardy;
They peaked at 415.86 miles at average speed of 17.3 knots over 24 hours between 03:30 on 4.11.19 and 03:30 on 5.11.19. That beat the old record of 377.7 miles at average speed of 15.7 knots.

Crédit Mutuel covered the theoretical course of 4,350 nautical miles at an average speed of 10.25 knots but actually sailed 4,714.35 nautical miles at an average speed of 11.11 knots

Good article;
https://www.transatjacquesvabre.org/en/news/newswires/2144/credit-mutuel-wins-the-transat-jacques-vabre-normandie-le-havre-class40

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And another one about Mutual; the prep;

After first training sails, we realised that the boat was not a dud. We could see that there was potential, but it did not set our world on fire either. It was not going to be easy; the start of qualifying, some DIY, other training  - then it was already time to go to Le Havre!

Madintec's autopilot, the "Madbrain" has also behaved perfectly. After coming out of the Channel, we never touched the helm again, and beat the 24-hour record under autopilot! The “Third Man” was clearly a key factor in this performance.

Written by Ian while sailing, nice job, autopilot must  have been very good, he got bored and started writing...
https://www.transatjacquesvabre.org/en/news/newswires/2126/skipper-s-log-ian-lipinski-france-credit-mutuel-class40

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2 hours ago, LeoV said:

And another one about Mutual; t

Madintec's autopilot, the "Madbrain" has also behaved perfectly. After coming out of the Channel, we never touched the helm again, and beat the 24-hour record under autopilot! The “Third Man” was clearly a key factor in this performance.

New to me:

https://madintec.com/en/

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1 hour ago, r.finn said:

They have been working under the radar for a while (pre 2013). But they got now a lot of exposure;
imoca_fleet.jpg

It started when Oracle software engineers met an NKE guy.
Not sure if you even can buy the goodies in a store.

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50 minutes ago, LeoV said:

It started when Oracle software engineers met an NKE guy.
Not sure if you even can buy the goodies in a store.

Ah, yes.  I've heard their origin story, but never a company name.  Just sort of dock talk.

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1 hour ago, LeoV said:

They have been working under the radar for a while (pre 2013). But they got now a lot of exposure;

It started when Oracle software engineers met an NKE guy.
Not sure if you even can buy the goodies in a store.

Thanks for posting.  They have some premium customers.

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3 hours ago, r.finn said:

On their website, they explain that their autopilot controls not only the rudder, but also the foils... I assume, either rake of the ama foils and/or flaps on the main daggerboard T foil, and/or rudder T foils...

I thought that servo control of the foils was forbidden in some of those classes. Wasn't it a point of disagreement of the Gitana team with the rest of the Ultim teams? Gitana team wanted to have that option, and the rest of the teams did not???

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2 minutes ago, Laurent said:

On their website, they explain that their autopilot controls not only the rudder, but also the foils... I assume, either rake of the ama foils and/or flaps on the main daggerboard T foil, and/or rudder T foils...

I thought that servo control of the foils was forbidden in some of those classes. Wasn't it a point of disagreement of the Gitana team with the rest of the Ultim teams? Gitana team wanted to have that option, and the rest of the teams did not???

Yup exactly that. Gitana has some controls they say, 32/23 doesn't allow. Interestingly, Gitana isn't a customer. Go figure.  But maybe that part is under development? Macif "A Bravo systems solutions is also aboard and we collaborate actively to design the new 3D pilot for foiling yachts."

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1/2 a mile in it with 19 to go.

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, jb5 said:

Yup exactly that. Gitana has some controls they say, 32/23 doesn't allow. Interestingly, Gitana isn't a customer. Go figure.  But maybe that part is under development? Macif "A Bravo systems solutions is also aboard and we collaborate actively to design the new 3D pilot for foiling yachts."

That must be some incredible algorithms to work on and figure out.

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1 hour ago, Laurent said:

On their website, they explain that their autopilot controls not only the rudder, but also the foils... I assume, either rake of the ama foils and/or flaps on the main daggerboard T foil, and/or rudder T foils...

I thought that servo control of the foils was forbidden in some of those classes. Wasn't it a point of disagreement of the Gitana team with the rest of the Ultim teams? Gitana team wanted to have that option, and the rest of the teams did not???

Just because they can do it doesn't mean its "turned on" for those classes which prohibit it! Some good ML models going on there for sure.

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37 minutes ago, Geff said:

That must be some incredible algorithms to work on and figure out.

Yeah, they seem to have some very smart people.

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15 hours ago, LeoV said:

C40; Lipinsky Hardy;
They peaked at 415.86 miles at average speed of 17.3 knots over 24 hours between 03:30 on 4.11.19 and 03:30 on 5.11.19. That beat the old record of 377.7 miles at average speed of 15.7 knots.

Crédit Mutuel covered the theoretical course of 4,350 nautical miles at an average speed of 10.25 knots but actually sailed 4,714.35 nautical miles at an average speed of 11.11 knots

Good article;
https://www.transatjacquesvabre.org/en/news/newswires/2144/credit-mutuel-wins-the-transat-jacques-vabre-normandie-le-havre-class40

Impressive. Thanks for posting. 

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So the last two Class 40s finished today, and their finishing reports were completed.

Good race; well run, and appreciated the English translations--probably thanks to Matthew Pryor (if he's the one who said  another boat stuck in the doldrums was "Charaled;)

One oddity that was puzzling: why so many seal failures this race? I can't recall so many in other races. The six, 7?, of the IJ's 8 cases were for "Rupture Accidentelle Du Plomb D’Arbre D’HéLice "

4 IMOCAs, 2 out of the 3 Multi 50s, and NONE of the Class 40s. (page 1 example below).

11355

Class 40 finishers were all inspected and cleared for seals, so seemed odd that so many of the others had problems.

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The IMOCA 60s are mostly sailing back, several class 40s will likely go do the Caribbean season then sail back depends on sponsor requirements etc...

Are any being shipped anyone know?

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https://voilesetvoiliers.ouest-france.fr/course-au-large/vendee-globe/vendee-globe-le-prix-des-bateaux-les-37-pretendants-et-les-lecons-de-la-transat-jacques-vabre-40a449aa-0950-11ea-acf5-57e5aa86cbff

The above article is in French and looks at the IMOCA after the TJV how they are shaping up for the VG. 

The following is a rough edited summary. The full thing is well worth a read. 

The final countdown has begun for the Vendée Globe 2020. Lessons from the Transat? The new IMOCA prototypes - boats that cost at least 5 million euros per unit! - are above the lot, but most of them still need work. In addition, there will be more than two "divisions": the Vendée Globe will not be limited to an opposition between foilers and straight boards. But who can really participate?

A year of development was needed to draw the quintessence of Charal, the fastest in the fleet at (almost) all gaits.  But still it is necessary to arrive and not to be trapped by the doldrums.

Price of a new boat: between 5 and 7 million euros
When we start to change the foils, 600,000 euros a pair. 

The Vendée Globe remains the Grail
But it's the same for the other classes: who imagines that a prototype Class40 600 000 euros before taxes (or more) is manufactured without going through the Route du Rhum box? Who designs a prototype of 6.50 meters without participating in the Mini-Transat, when it costs nearly 200 000 euros, excluding taxes, without the foils?i

Qith 37 candidates for 34 places there will inevitably be three left out ...

Which candidates seem least prepared ?
Conrad Colman who took over the former Roland Jourdain Sill designed in 2004 by Lombard. Didac Costa who plans to use the former Kingfisher Ellen MacArthur. Denis van Weynberg, who for the moment has only participated in the Bermuda race and the Fastnet Race on the former Spirit of Hungary from 2014 that is slower than a new generation Class40..Sebastien Destremeau announcing his participation on the former Galileo from 2005.

We must add the special case of Yann Elies who hopes to build a prototype very quickly. 

By winning the Transat Jacques Vabre, Apivia is becoming a very serious candidate for the next Vendée Globe. As for the others, everyone still has time to train and sail The Transat CIC between Brest and Charleston, leaving May 10. But the route has completely changed and the departure of the New York-Vendee on June 16 may mean some may not line up: there is 700 miles between the two US cities and assuming an arrival between May 22nd and 25th, this leaves only two weeks... It is best not to have damage. 

What is certain is that some will be keen to finish both races to accumulate miles since to date, seven candidates for the Vendée Globe are on the waiting list.

The difficulty for those who have not performed is to really know why the results are not up to their expectations: a strategic mistake in the West, a "dumpling" in the doldrums, a speed deficit due to the boat, foils poor performance, lack of resources, poor sailing?

Undoubtedly, Charal is currently above the lot in pure speed. But their result in Salvador de Bahia also indicates that some passages (like the doldrums) can be very expensive if they are poorly done. On the other hand, Hugo Boss did not totally convince and their damage impacts their preparation and confirms that on a world tour, there can also be unforeseen obstacles ...

Apivia and aDvens have shown a very interesting potential particularly upwind and are very flexible. As they have just been launched there are like improvements to come before they are fully assessed. 

As for Arkéa-Paprec , there is probably a design problem with two foils breaking without impact and for the moment, its performance did not impress. This leaves a doubt as to the forecast on the performance of the boat. 

What about the 2015 foilers? If we eliminate their detour by the Azores, or even their hazardous option in the West to the doldrums, only Master CoQ and Malizia 2 offer skipper-boat capabilities in the "top ten" around the world.

Although they have often achieved great speeds the boats with straight boards have no chance to win in the round the world solo non-stop!

The foilers of the previous edition have trouble following the pace of the latest prototypes: should they look at the profile of the foils?

Even if Banque Populaire X was with the best until the doldrums, even if Group Apicil has bluffed some until the Cape Verdi islands, they have no chance in reaching conditions.

In reality, there are not two "divisions" that will participate in the Vendée Globe, but at least five "leagues" or "philosophies" and different projects: the podium contenders who are certainly among the new prototypes, the foilers of the last edition with some Imoca modified with foils, the boats with straight boards, those with new foils that are not performing, the latecomers with constrained budgets and the "adventurers" who hope to tell a story  ...

The fact remains that on the whole it appears to be a superb fourteenth edition of the VG. Even if, on average, 40% of the participants are forced to retire along the way, it is hoped that around 20 sailors will be able to complete the world tour in Les Sables d'Olonne, in the middle of next winter... 

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This edition has so many new boats, folks who finished the last, a lot of Corinthians are going be pushing to the end to qualify on miles. 

There are also a lot more women participating this edition and even if they’re out qualified on miles, I cannot see Davies or Cremer not given discretionary invitations even if for some reason they fall behind on miles  

 

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In the deliver-the-coffee-race, 11th eventually overtook Apivia, but the IC delivery team is 'leading', even without Sam

1071287280_ScreenShot2019-11-24at11_32_15AM.png.f37304cd053c86b95c6ac758bb5c1d6d.png

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1 hour ago, stief said:

In the deliver-the-coffee-race, 11th eventually overtook Apivia, but the IC delivery team is 'leading', even without Sam

1071287280_ScreenShot2019-11-24at11_32_15AM.png.f37304cd053c86b95c6ac758bb5c1d6d.png

Apivia is supposed to be headed to the Azores to pick up crew for the last part of the trip. At least that's what they said when they left Brazil. 

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3 hours ago, stief said:

but the IC delivery team is 'leading', even without Sam

Without Sam, but with Tanguy. He will be pushing the boat to optimise it's potential and to find any weak points. And because it's fun...

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Kevin E reporting some problems with sail and rigging  yesterday  . .  . I think. Sounds like another boat helped 

 

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35 minutes ago, stief said:

Kevin E reporting some problems with sail and rigging  yesterday  . .  . I think. Sounds like another boat helped 

 

Kevin explains that his J2 split in half and he had to take it down; problem, the stay for the J2 is a permanent stay, so he had to get up the mast to do some repair  (if I understood properly) to lower the sail. But he was missing some part/hardware to be able to climb up the mast by himself, under autopilot. He waited for Banque Populaire which was behind him, with Clarisse Cremer on board. She had the part he needed, attached it toba long line behind her boat and he crossed behind her to grab the line with a gaff!

He got the part, climbed the mast in solo mode, and lower his torn J2. First time up the mast in solo  mode for Kevin. 

Another positive point is that he now has done his 2000 miles solo on his boat, part of the qualification for VG.

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Once again, thanks Laurent.  Couldn't tell from the auto-translate captions what 'forestay' broke and Clarisse's role. Cheers.

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1 hour ago, stief said:

Once again, thanks Laurent.  Couldn't tell from the auto-translate captions what 'forestay' broke and Clarisse's role. Cheers.

Apparently it is not the forestay that broke, but the sail that split in two, and for some reason, he could not lower the sail without climbing in the mast, and he did not have the right hardware to climb the mast solo...

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2 hours ago, stief said:

re other returns, Ari Huusela is back at work :D 

Yeah his boat is being shipped back. 

 

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14 minutes ago, Laurent said:

Apparently it is not the forestay that broke, but the sail that split in two, and for some reason, he could not lower the sail without climbing in the mast, and he did not have the right hardware to climb the mast solo...

Right. The part that made me think he had a rigging problem/ forestay problem was at 00:52 when the auto transcribe/  translate captions showed  "si vous voyez le câble noirs ici m'ont approché ce câble là qui tient le met" as:  

2122649968_ScreenShot2019-11-24at5_43_40PM.png.ed5a0e229d39cbb2632e7730b668d133.png

Every year I find it rather interesting to see how google tries and tries to get machine translations to work, especially with the specialized vocab of sailing.  Cheers.

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2 hours ago, Laurent said:

Apparently it is not the forestay that broke, but the sail that split in two, and for some reason, he could not lower the sail without climbing in the mast, and he did not have the right hardware to climb the mast solo...

All of the J2's in that fleet are on the only permanent shroud forward of the mast, the J2 forestay.  Other headsails are on locks.  The J2 is raised on a spinnaker halyard and lashed to the stay, and remains that way until the end of the race, hopefully.  It's a terrible situation if the sails fails and unfortunately for Kevin, and for North, it did.  Anyway, that's why he couldn't get it down without going up.  There's no halyard to release.

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8 hours ago, r.finn said:

All of the J2's in that fleet are on the only permanent shroud forward of the mast, the J2 forestay.  Other headsails are on locks.  The J2 is raised on a spinnaker halyard and lashed to the stay, and remains that way until the end of the race, hopefully.  It's a terrible situation if the sails fails and unfortunately for Kevin, and for North, it did.  Anyway, that's why he couldn't get it down without going up.  There's no halyard to release.

I wouldn't be worried about the sails, Escoffier said few days ago those are delivery sails, probably well worn out. 

On the other hand, not having the equipment to climb in the mast alone is quite a thing... 

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Prusik knot could always been a last solution.

surprised Huusela ships his back, on the other hand it cost more but less risk.
Last time he was preparing an Imoca, for one reason Tolkien did a race on it, and he lost the boat. Ari really wants this adventure.

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1 hour ago, LeoV said:

 

surprised Huusela ships his back, on the other hand it cost more but less risk.
Last time he was preparing an Imoca, for one reason Tolkien did a race on it, and he lost the boat. Ari really wants this adventure.

Possibly not having much mainsail left was a factor.  Maybe he also wants to earn some money for a new one?

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https://www.scanvoile.com/2019/12/louis-duc-secours-helitreuille-class40-dematage-CROSS-convoyage-retour-acores.html#.Xft5f_LYqow

Some of the boats still on the way home.  Louis Duc and his team mate have been hoisted off their Class 40 near the  Azores during the return trip.

35 to 40 kn winds were forecast, rough seas: they were planning a stopover in the Azores before reaching Lorient in better weather conditions. Their beacon was triggered around 8 a.m. The two men are now safe.


CROSS forwarded the information to the Lisbon MRCC. A commercial boat was diverted, also an airplane and a helicopter immediately took off to reach the area where the boat had been positioned at 8:00 UT.

Around 7:00 p.m. the plane had spotted the Class40 and managed to contact Louis: they were both on board and in good health. Half an hour later, as night fell on the Atlantic, the two sailors were helicopter-bound and en route to the hospital in Terceira where they were immediately taken care of.


Their boat had capsized. The mast is broken and pierced the cockpit. They were unable to take out their life rafts. The two sailors waited for help on the deck of their Class40 all day.

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Reports on French news from people who have spoken them them say the boat did a 360.  Windy apparently showing 7m seas in the area

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Fun fact I found looking at CDK;

IMOCA goes hand in hand with CDK: four-time Vendée Globe winner, the Breton yard has pulled off the amazing feat of having all the boats built behind its doors since 2006 take the start line of this Transat Jacques Vabre, prompting observers to announce that "a boat built at CDK never really dies".

 

  • Former generation boats with classic straight daggerboards (Banque Populaire X, Corum, Fortil),
  • First generation foiling boats (Bureau Vallée, Maitre Coq), Former generation boats with daggerboards transformed into foilers (PRB, Initiatives Cœur),
  • Latest generation foilers (Charal, Apivia, Arkea),
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