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Meat Wad

I'm your Captain (aka Skipper)

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How many times have you had a  crew or invite on board that tried to take over your show?

God knows as a disable sailor and someone who has done it all as an Able Sailor (prior to the accident), who has had people on board who have tried to take over and do nothing but fuck everything up. And of course this makes me want to just walk away (that is a joke), but the love of the sport keeps tugging you back.

Everything I have done do date, makes me love this song more and more.

 

 

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Grand Funk...from the town where the water isn't drinkable.  Great tune.  

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Hey, Shea stadium, named after the Cuban revolutionary, Shea Stadium!

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52 minutes ago, justsomeguy! said:

Hey, Shea stadium, named after the Cuban revolutionary, Shea Stadium!

I thick it wase actualley Che Stadio of Playa Giron                :)

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3 hours ago, Meat Wad said:

How many times have you had a  crew or invite on board that tried to take over your show?

God knows as a disable sailor and someone who has done it all as an Able Sailor (prior to the accident), who has had people on board who have tried to take over and do nothing but fuck everything up. And of course this makes me want to just walk away (that is a joke), but the love of the sport keeps tugging you back.

Everything I have done do date, makes me love this song more and more.

 

 

Interesting perspective.

One a few (fortunately few) occasions I have taken over other peoples boats for them, when out for a fun sail and things got a bit exciting. All but one thanked me sincerely.

Of course, none of them were me grabbing the helm (and the mantle of "skipper") and taking the boat directly back to shore to cut the sail short. I've heard of people doing that.

Great song too, thanks!

FB- Doug

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I "nudged" aside a dufus  (not the owner but his friend) off the helm of a 25' powerboat...after he rammed the dock twice head-on trying to dock the boat.  My future wife was on-board and at the time I didn't give a crap what he thought.   He was appreciative of being relieved of duty though.

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   I have been of a couple of trips when it was handy to have this song on the IPod to fire up when things got stupid.

 

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22 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

   I have been of a couple of trips when it was handy to have this song on the IPod to fire up when things got stupid.

 

 

Thanks for that!  I can't believe that I don't recall ever hearing that, but it's probably a later product, after I had moved on Zeppelin to other genres..

  What album?

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32 minutes ago, billy backstay said:

 

Thanks for that!  I can't believe that I don't recall ever hearing that, but it's probably a later product, after I had moved on Zeppelin to other genres..

  What album?

Official Music Video for Robert Plant, 'Ship of Fools', from the album "Now And Zen" (1988) Website: www.robertplant.com

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On 8/9/2019 at 9:51 PM, Steam Flyer said:

Interesting perspective.

One a few (fortunately few) occasions I have taken over other peoples boats for them, when out for a fun sail and things got a bit exciting. All but one thanked me sincerely.

Of course, none of them were me grabbing the helm (and the mantle of "skipper") and taking the boat directly back to shore to cut the sail short. I've heard of people doing that.

Great song too, thanks!

FB- Doug

Same here. Oddly, there’s an art to doing it tastefully where no one notices, but the owner tends to thank you later on. Alcohol is often involved. 

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I don't race so I can see where its different in that setting - you gotta have one person calling the shots. That person can seek or accept wide input (which I have found in other settings is always a good idea), but at the end of the day there is only one "decider". That's how I ran both incidents and administrative issues. I had some absolutely excellent and experienced Captains working for me. I ALWAYS looked for their input and made sure they were comfortable in their knowledge that I welcomed their unsolicited input as well. That saved my ass more than once. "All of us is smarter than one of us". But at the end of the day everybody knew at some point there would be a decision and who the "decider" was and off we would go to "git er dun."

On my boat day sailing or cruising I have always been pretty laid back and if someone who has some sailing experience wants to drive or trim or both....have at it......I'm perfectly happy to sit back. However there have been a couple occasions over the years when something got dicey (details not important) and I would reassert control. I would step to the wheel and my phrase was firmly  "I have the boat" and then I would pass out instructions. Never once got an argument. A lot has to do with your demeanor.

YMMV

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On 8/9/2019 at 3:57 PM, Meat Wad said:

How many times have you had a  crew or invite on board that tried to take over your show?

God knows as a disable sailor and someone who has done it all as an Able Sailor (prior to the accident), who has had people on board who have tried to take over and do nothing but fuck everything up. And of course this makes me want to just walk away (that is a joke), but the love of the sport keeps tugging you back.

Everything I have done do date, makes me love this song more and more.

 

 

When I single hand (sailing) there are a few voices constantly  telling me what to do.

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The opposite. We went out for a daysail. The Captain-owner and his two buddies may have had a few too many of the Margaritas at Yelapa. On the crossing home the two buddies passed out below. The Captain was crying on my shoulder at the helm blathering some deep-to-him philosophical nonsense too-close-to-my-face about not knowing where he was or what he was doing. Then, fortunately, he went below and passed out as well. My GF of the moment and I were left to make an relatively unfamiliar nighttime crossing on an unfamiliar boat into an unknown marina in a not entirely sober state. It all worked out okay. Boat in proper slip. All put away reasonably. Didn’t wake any of the drunken sailors up. They were unresponsive. Next day the Captain is in a bit of a rage because obviously he remembers nothing after about noon the day before. Cannot understand why they are not still in Yalapa. Plus he says nobody is allowed to pilot his boat into the slip and tie her up (it was trivial). Good times!

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12 hours ago, VWAP said:

When I single hand (sailing) there are a few voices constantly  telling me what to do.

a bit of rum will silence those voices.

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3 minutes ago, Meat Wad said:

a bit of rum will silence those voices.

Its a delicate balance though.........too much and the voices get louder.....and you start having arguments with them.

Never mind how I know that............

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I teach as a part-time gig, so I'm letting the students take everything from the get-go, if weather conditions allow it.  They learn more from doing it wrong, then fixing it, or from oversteering at first then getting "quieter' at the tiller.

But I had to suppress my old racing instincts to be this patient.  In my head, I hear "Good God, you've got that jib strapped in way to far, it's stalled, you're STRANGLING us!! Can't you see it??  GAAAAAHHHHH!!", but what comes out of my mouth is "Try letting that jibsheet out about six inches; it's a little tight".  

I've gotten a lot better at this translation process.  Racing ruins you.  But then they get everything trimmed right, we're humming along on a nice close reach, and I get to tell them "NO ONE could sail this boat better than you're sailing it right now!".  

In a social situation, I still offer helm over to my guests, I've sailed a lot, they havent'.

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Never seen it happen.

We called that band Grand Junk Railroad.

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I raced on a nice carbon F-31R a couple of times. Blowing like stink and coming down the south side of St Croix in the Round the Island race really opened up my eyes to the F-boats capabilities. The older guy was a pretty good sailor and had been an Navy carrier pilot as a Marine so my sailing buddy and I showed him the respect that entailed. For an old fart he had a really hot much younger wife but she didn't sail with us and really wasn't too fond of the tri. As we sailed through the Lee of the island, a much older Newick with plain vanilla sails caught up to us in the lulls. I wasn't really surprised as the skipper of the Newick was a West Indian native born on Nevis and had spent more time in a trimaran in the waters around St Croix than anyone that ever lived. He was truly a Wind Rasta Ninja and a hell of a Calypsonian as well. When we started the beat back up the full length of the Island I noticed that our skipper could hold his own against the local wizard on one tack but would lose on the other. I checked the rig and boat for something obvious and was pretty upset that I hadn't really made note that the skipper always sailed from the same side of the cockpit! As long as he was helming from the windward side where he could feel the wind and see puffs coming he could even gain back some of what he lost against our trial horse on the other tack. I finally asked if I could spell him for a bit in a tactful way as he had been driving for nearly 3 hours and he seemed really grateful to take a break. It took about two short tacks in 10 minutes for me to sail over the Newick and put them well in our wake and I settled into the long haul for a podium finish. The Newick was obviously the slower boat but if you didn't cover him he could find a little seam in the wind as we rounded the bluffs and he knew every little current and counter current and would be right back on your ass in no time if you didn't keep a tight cover on him. I had seen him sail INTO a rain squall which is generally avoided in the tropic trades winds as the wind goes light after the rain but he would use the rain like a fog back so you couldn't see where he was getting to pick up big lifts and as the mist cleared he would somehow magically be ahead of you once more. 

    The skipper got pretty excited at our possibility of a podium finish and after a piss over the side and a big bottle of GatorAide he was asking for the helm once again. I tried to tell him that if he wanted the helm back he would have to get off his ass and helm from the high side as that was what had kept us from having line honors and he was shocked! He didn't understand what I was on about and I asked him if he always sat on the same side and he said that in fact he did and it never occurred to him to switch sides on EVERY TACK! Seems that he had never sailed monohulls and no one had ever mentioned sitting on the high side. He asked if it really made that much difference so I turned over the helm and let him do two tacks without changing and showed him how much he lost while sitting to leeward and then he was amazed that he could keep the margin on the other boat on both tacks by simply staying on the high side.  He did a fine job sailing up to a class handicap win and was very grateful for my having spoken up when I did. He said something about 'You can tell a Marine, but you can't tell him much...'  I did a couple more Round St Croix races with him and I never saw him do his one sided thing again. He even got the hang of helming from leeward reaching and especially running in light conditions. 

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17 hours ago, nolatom said:

I teach as a part-time gig, so I'm letting the students take everything from the get-go, if weather conditions allow it.  They learn more from doing it wrong, then fixing it, or from oversteering at first then getting "quieter' at the tiller.

But I had to suppress my old racing instincts to be this patient.  In my head, I hear "Good God, you've got that jib strapped in way to far, it's stalled, you're STRANGLING us!! Can't you see it??  GAAAAAHHHHH!!", but what comes out of my mouth is "Try letting that jibsheet out about six inches; it's a little tight".  

I've gotten a lot better at this translation process.  Racing ruins you.  But then they get everything trimmed right, we're humming along on a nice close reach, and I get to tell them "NO ONE could sail this boat better than you're sailing it right now!".  

In a social situation, I still offer helm over to my guests, I've sailed a lot, they havent'.

The next step is to ask your student to diagnose the boats' "feelings" and what might be wrong.

There is always something that can be adjusted better, partly because it is such a dynamic situation. But being able to sail well is a very complex skill, and going around the cycle of observe/correct is a habit that can make any other complex task more successful..... and once you've gained it, it's hard habit to break!

FB- Doug

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On 8/14/2019 at 1:04 AM, El Boracho said:

The Captain-owner and his two buddies may have had a few too many of the Margaritas at Yelapa.

LOL a group of us were on the ferry boat to Yelapa some 40 years ago, boat was doing a bit of a yaw and you could see some people had that queasy look.  A Welch buddy of mine cut a fart (a product of heavy drinking the night before) that defoliated the entire deck.  I've never seen so many people vomit at once.

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On 8/14/2019 at 10:34 AM, Point Break said:

Its a delicate balance though.........too much and the voices get louder.....and you start having arguments with them.

Never mind how I know that............

Arguing with them was never a problem for me. But as I have aged I do find myself asking them to repeat it.....

 

WL

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On 8/9/2019 at 3:57 PM, Meat Wad said:

How many times have you had a  crew or invite on board that tried to take over your show?

God knows as a disable sailor and someone who has done it all as an Able Sailor (prior to the accident), who has had people on board who have tried to take over and do nothing but fuck everything up. And of course this makes me want to just walk away (that is a joke), but the love of the sport keeps tugging you back.

Everything I have done do date, makes me love this song more and more.

 

 

Not everyone is a natural leader, but just about anyone can be trained to do the job well enough on occasion. 

 The problem I see with this song as an example is that if it's gotten to the point you have to whine for control back you've already screwed it up. Some people need to be led, some people need to be contained, and with the latter it's all about nipping it in the bud. 

 When someone starts barking orders who shouldn't be barking them you need to start giving them orders immediately. Can be anything..."Come sit here", "Check backstay tension", hell, even "Get me a beer". Just about anything will do, and you've got to establish that when shit is quiet. Before you are "in action". You've got yourself a person who must be contained and right from the get-go you have to get them thinking about listening to you. This sort of personality needs to feel in the loop, so the very next thing you need to do initially is constantly direct their attention. Ask questions that focus them on what you want them focusing on, so again, they get in the habit of wondering what you might be thinking before they talk to others. That's the basics of how you nip it in the bud, and it IS necessary. 

  At first you may feel a little guilt about manipulating people, or irritation at having to act in a way that is not natural. Fight through that shit. It's not completely unlike the absolute need to train you dogs. There is no dog more miserable than those nippy lap poodles who think they are the ones making the big decisions but are completely out of position to be making them.  The person knows he or she doesn't own the boat and isn't the skipper, so they feel significant stress about if what they are doing is appropriate. You are doing them a big favor here. 

  This "difficult" person is the stuff that some of the very best crew and crew bosses are made of. In time you will relish the opportunity. 

 

  

 

 

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2 hours ago, Mark K said:

Not everyone is a natural leader, but just about anyone can be trained to do the job well enough on occasion. 

 The problem I see with this song as an example is that if it's gotten to the point you have to whine for control back you've already screwed it up. Some people need to be led, some people need to be contained, and with the latter it's all about nipping it in the bud. 

 When someone starts barking orders who shouldn't be barking them you need to start giving them orders immediately. Can be anything..."Come sit here", "Check backstay tension", hell, even "Get me a beer". Just about anything will do, and you've got to establish that when shit is quiet. Before you are "in action". You've got yourself a person who must be contained and right from the get-go you have to get them thinking about listening to you. This sort of personality needs to feel in the loop, so the very next thing you need to do initially is constantly direct their attention. Ask questions that focus them on what you want them focusing on, so again, they get in the habit of wondering what you might be thinking before they talk to others. That's the basics of how you nip it in the bud, and it IS necessary. 

  At first you may feel a little guilt about manipulating people, or irritation at having to act in a way that is not natural. Fight through that shit. It's not completely unlike the absolute need to train you dogs. There is no dog more miserable than those nippy lap poodles who think they are the ones making the big decisions but are completely out of position to be making them.  The person knows he or she doesn't own the boat and isn't the skipper, so they feel significant stress about if what they are doing is appropriate. You are doing them a big favor here. 

  This "difficult" person is the stuff that some of the very best crew and crew bosses are made of. In time you will relish the opportunity. 

 

  

 

 

Pretty good advice. Not my style but pretty good advice nonetheless.

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On 8/15/2019 at 9:25 PM, White Lightnin' said:

Arguing with them was never a problem for me. But as I have aged I do find myself asking them to repeat it.....

When I had a big staff with attendant performance reviews to write I found a performance scale that I was tempted to use.

Exceptional - Walks on water

Exceeds req's - Passes water in emergencies

Meet Req's - Talks to self

Improvement Req'd - Argues with self

Unsatisfactory - Loses those arguments

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2 hours ago, Mark K said:

Not everyone is a natural leader, but just about anyone can be trained to do the job well enough on occasion. 

 The problem I see with this song as an example is that if it's gotten to the point you have to whine for control back you've already screwed it up. Some people need to be led, some people need to be contained, and with the latter it's all about nipping it in the bud. 

 When someone starts barking orders who shouldn't be barking them you need to start giving them orders immediately. Can be anything..."Come sit here", "Check backstay tension", hell, even "Get me a beer". Just about anything will do, and you've got to establish that when shit is quiet. Before you are "in action". You've got yourself a person who must be contained and right from the get-go you have to get them thinking about listening to you. This sort of personality needs to feel in the loop, so the very next thing you need to do initially is constantly direct their attention. Ask questions that focus them on what you want them focusing on, so again, they get in the habit of wondering what you might be thinking before they talk to others. That's the basics of how you nip it in the bud, and it IS necessary. 

  At first you may feel a little guilt about manipulating people, or irritation at having to act in a way that is not natural. Fight through that shit. It's not completely unlike the absolute need to train you dogs. There is no dog more miserable than those nippy lap poodles who think they are the ones making the big decisions but are completely out of position to be making them.  The person knows he or she doesn't own the boat and isn't the skipper, so they feel significant stress about if what they are doing is appropriate. You are doing them a big favor here. 

  This "difficult" person is the stuff that some of the very best crew and crew bosses are made of. In time you will relish the opportunity. 

 

The song has nothing to do with it. I just like it.

The problem is when I give an directive or command or an order and someone on the crew, whop thinks they are the hot dog, says No NO the pros are doing it this way but he is thinking of a crew of 15 on a TP52 that trains, yea that is an issue when you have a 26' boat with 6 and 3 are learning.

I have not launched my boat once this year and everyone is asking why. Well, I do not feel comfortable going out with people who think that just because I cannot walk, I do not know what I am dong on a boat, even though I have over 40 years racing (doing everything from bow to stern) and 11 of those sail making and racing almost every weekend. If I had lots of money and a big fancy boat, I doubt it would be an issue. I sailed once with the owner of Cheval and I was walking at the time. Who would have thought.

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Things get fuzzy when the rules aren't clear.

For my kids and their friends, I print up the twenty-some rules on a single card, and the last rule is that anything not specifically mentioned for the crew is left up to the cox (erg/boat) or captain (circuit race). It's like the Tenth Amendment ... whatever isn't specifically mentioned is a power reserved to the state/captain. Some kids want to captain without the experience, they get their chance with the ergs, or circuit races. They screw up, but they own it, there is no shame in a disqual or a loss.

It's different with sailing, the abundance of outside of influences from wind and water. But rowing and circuits are more controllable, easier to lead because the cap/cox can see the immediate effect of his/her decision, but harder to lead because there is nothing to cover up a mistake, can't blame the wind or a misplaced swell.

If the crew's goal is to win, feelings get hurt constantly, kids don't enjoy it. If the goal is to stay safe and have fun, then bad decisions lose their venom, and the kids enjoy themselves regardless. One of my son's captain quirks is that he has the crew pick up trash/flotsam whenever he sees it, even if it slows the crew.  I've taken to bringing a trash bag with me, and I give the desired "okay cap" when directed to pick it up. It's a weird thing, following the instructions of my own son, like he's the superior. But in a race/row, he is the superior, after a while it feels normal. He's more patient with the other kids when his old man toes the line.

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On 8/18/2019 at 4:24 PM, Meat Wad said:

The song has nothing to do with it. I just like it.

The problem is when I give an directive or command or an order and someone on the crew, whop thinks they are the hot dog, says No NO the pros are doing it this way but he is thinking of a crew of 15 on a TP52 that trains, yea that is an issue when you have a 26' boat with 6 and 3 are learning.

I have not launched my boat once this year and everyone is asking why. Well, I do not feel comfortable going out with people who think that just because I cannot walk, I do not know what I am dong on a boat, even though I have over 40 years racing (doing everything from bow to stern) and 11 of those sail making and racing almost every weekend. If I had lots of money and a big fancy boat, I doubt it would be an issue. I sailed once with the owner of Cheval and I was walking at the time. Who would have thought.

 You have to talk to him. Let him know. It's a common problem with crew-boss types. Some folks need to be led, some contained, this guy is the latter type. At this point I think you got to get him alone and let him know something's gotta change. I'd keep it short and sweet myself, no long lecture, no whining, no getting into technicalities about whether or not what he says is actually a better way (I'll bet that's where he will try to take it), limit it to just the fact that you can't go on forever getting your balls busted in front of the crew. He may well not be aware he's harshing the boat's mellow. Type A's are blind in certain ways. 

 

 

 

  

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On 8/18/2019 at 3:41 PM, Mark K said:

Not everyone is a natural leader, but just about anyone can be trained to do the job well enough on occasion. 

 The problem I see with this song as an example is that if it's gotten to the point you have to whine for control back you've already screwed it up. Some people need to be led, some people need to be contained, and with the latter it's all about nipping it in the bud. 

 When someone starts barking orders who shouldn't be barking them you need to start giving them orders immediately. Can be anything..."Come sit here", "Check backstay tension", hell, even "Get me a beer". Just about anything will do, and you've got to establish that when shit is quiet. Before you are "in action". You've got yourself a person who must be contained and right from the get-go you have to get them thinking about listening to you. This sort of personality needs to feel in the loop, so the very next thing you need to do initially is constantly direct their attention. Ask questions that focus them on what you want them focusing on, so again, they get in the habit of wondering what you might be thinking before they talk to others. That's the basics of how you nip it in the bud, and it IS necessary. 

  At first you may feel a little guilt about manipulating people, or irritation at having to act in a way that is not natural. Fight through that shit. It's not completely unlike the absolute need to train you dogs. There is no dog more miserable than those nippy lap poodles who think they are the ones making the big decisions but are completely out of position to be making them.  The person knows he or she doesn't own the boat and isn't the skipper, so they feel significant stress about if what they are doing is appropriate. You are doing them a big favor here. 

  This "difficult" person is the stuff that some of the very best crew and crew bosses are made of. In time you will relish the opportunity. 

 

  

 

 

Sounds like Jedi mind tricks a Marine officer would play on a young hard charger. :)

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Then there's the converse of sailing with people who could do better with coaching... 

and the graceful art of determining if they are receptive to it and providing it in a non threatening manner. 

 

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On 8/9/2019 at 3:57 PM, Meat Wad said:

Everything I have done do date, makes me love this song more and more.

It's a terrible song. Crap music.

Don't let those bastards get you down, however.

Edit- now I've got that fuckin' tune in my head. Thanks!

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     I taught sailing at a tender young age to grown folks. I couldn't believe that the lady who owned the commercial sailing school at the Long Beach marina would have a wet behind the ears kid like myself teaching at that level but she sort of tricked me into it in the beginning. I think the thing that convinced her to give me a chance at the job was on a 'test run' with her in the boat I saw right away that the married couple taking a full course needed to be taught separately. When I had the wife at the helm and would ask her to do a maneuver I had just demonstrated, I would see her look to her husband for his approval and direction. He knew less that she did about sailing but it was one of those things about relationships that keep people from reaching their potential. When he was at the helm it was if everything he did was to impress her and he wasn't really listening to my instructions. This went on for about 30 minutes and we hadn't gotten far from our dock so I said that we should return to the dock and take a breather. They went to get coffees and my new boss wanted to know what I was up to and I told her that she should take the husband back in the classroom and beat the basics into his thick skull at the chalkboard while I took the wife back out in the boat to go do the drills on the water without worrying what her husband would think. Boss lady said sure and that is what we did with a but of protest from the husband. Then we swapped out and I put the guy thought his paces on the boat while he wife got a follow up in the classroom.

     After the session was over I told the boss lady that we should put the two of them separately into a couple of other group lessons for the rest of their course and she agreed wholeheartedly. Much easier to teach someone without any relationship baggage getting in the way. 

    I used the same thinking when working decades later as a Divemaster.

    Once couples have the basic skills down then they can learn faster and have more fun when re-united on the boat or in the water. Save with Windsurfing but I was always surprised that for some reason women were always much more receptive to learning Windsurfing. They just always seemed to be more 'centered' and men tended to try and make it work by brute force.

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9 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

     I taught sailing at a tender young age to grown folks. I couldn't believe that the lady who owned the commercial sailing school at the Long Beach marina would have a wet behind the ears kid like myself teaching at that level but she sort of tricked me into it in the beginning. I think the thing that convinced her to give me a chance at the job was on a 'test run' with her in the boat I saw right away that the married couple taking a full course needed to be taught separately. When I had the wife at the helm and would ask her to do a maneuver I had just demonstrated, I would see her look to her husband for his approval and direction. He knew less that she did about sailing but it was one of those things about relationships that keep people from reaching their potential. When he was at the helm it was if everything he did was to impress her and he wasn't really listening to my instructions. This went on for about 30 minutes and we hadn't gotten far from our dock so I said that we should return to the dock and take a breather. They went to get coffees and my new boss wanted to know what I was up to and I told her that she should take the husband back in the classroom and beat the basics into his thick skull at the chalkboard while I took the wife back out in the boat to go do the drills on the water without worrying what her husband would think. Boss lady said sure and that is what we did with a but of protest from the husband. Then we swapped out and I put the guy thought his paces on the boat while he wife got a follow up in the classroom.

     After the session was over I told the boss lady that we should put the two of them separately into a couple of other group lessons for the rest of their course and she agreed wholeheartedly. Much easier to teach someone without any relationship baggage getting in the way. 

    I used the same thinking when working decades later as a Divemaster.

    Once couples have the basic skills down then they can learn faster and have more fun when re-united on the boat or in the water. Save with Windsurfing but I was always surprised that for some reason women were always much more receptive to learning Windsurfing. They just always seemed to be more 'centered' and men tended to try and make it work by brute force.

I witnessed something similar that wasn't handled as well by the instructor.  The wife was an average student and picking things up at a normal pace.  The husband wasn't quite as good/quick.  However the husband would get nervous and to quell his nerves would direct the wife or even grab the tiller.  I guess feeling in control quelled his nerves even if he was the wrong person to be in control. The instructor finally noticed and tried to work around it with positioning, but was not nearly as effective as you.

 

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On 8/20/2019 at 3:04 PM, LionessRacing said:

Then there's the converse of sailing with people who could do better with coaching... 

and the graceful art of determining if they are receptive to it and providing it in a non threatening manner. 

 

absolutely, after I got hurt and started sailing the Sonar and 2.4mR, I thought I was pretty good.
USS provided some great coaching by some top sailors and World Champions. It is amazing how much more there is to learn when you have some eyes watching you and letting you know what is right and wrong. It is mostly small things but ir raises the bar. And having competition that is top level does not hurt.

So, after leaving the campaign and getting back into sailing locally, It was like, gee did everyone forget how to race? The difference was that great, IMHO.

A coach will raise your level a dozen notches, if you are open to it.

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I witnessed something similar that wasn't handled as well by the instructor.  The wife was an average student and picking things up at a normal pace.  The husband wasn't quite as good/quick.  However the husband would get nervous and to quell his nerves would direct the wife or even grab the tiller.  I guess feeling in control quelled his nerves even if he was the wrong person to be in control. The instructor finally noticed and tried to work around it with positioning, but was not nearly as effective as you.

One of the recently new racing crew showed up last night with wife of 30 yrs in tow. We had invited her previously, but it had never quite worked out. At one point, while she was running foredeck (non-spinnaker) I had to make the comment, "XXX will now re-explain it to you, using different words, but generally the same concepts" and fortunately her husband was at least not trying to participate in the coaching, nor notably posturing. Also had to tell the other crew to keep an eye out and be ready to assist, but "assist" does not mean grabbing rope out of hands, unless safety issue. 

 

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On 8/20/2019 at 4:24 AM, chum said:

Sounds like Jedi mind tricks a Marine officer would play on a young hard charger. :)

Officers don't have to play tricks, but moreover...they shouldn't.  

 

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