NOCALSAILOR

Cat tails from over the horizon

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Really like the Grainger lines, dagger boards, nice to see shafts rather then legs, don't like the sun awning setup looks like a box and doesn't fit the lines of the boat.

Also built under survey in Australia, that gives you someone else to chat to about the build.  It looks like there is some type of ventilation built into the forward top of the bridge-deck.

Gary Martin was building Cut-loose in a shed next to me, while i was hauled out at Bruce's yard in Aus. Very cool Grainger design.

https://www.graingerdesigns.net/video-and-photo-galleries/cut-loose/

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, @Keith, I read the line about ‘nothing forward of the mast bulkhead’ and then see the IMO rather exaggerated (and I’d bet fragile) sterns. Which to me equals the all too frequent weights by astern, and then adding length to the transom to alleviate the ass-heaviness. Which I bet is what the article referred to about ‘broadly adapted,’ the Manta pax have almost all done that and it’s so obviously an add-on

ive got my old girl just a little by the bows, and she is sailing damn near as well as before we moved aboard (ergo added a lot of weight).

It’s long been known it’s best to sail dinghy cats as bows down as you can, and that doesn’t change as they get bigger, within seaworthiness constraints, of course

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35 minutes ago, Max Rockatansky said:

, @Keith, I read the line about ‘nothing forward of the mast bulkhead’ and then see the IMO rather exaggerated (and I’d bet fragile) sterns. Which to me equals the all too frequent weights by astern, and then adding length to the transom to alleviate the ass-heaviness. Which I bet is what the article referred to about ‘broadly adapted,’ the Manta pax have almost all done that and it’s so obviously an add-on

ive got my old girl just a little by the bows, and she is sailing damn near as well as before we moved aboard (ergo added a lot of weight).

It’s long been known it’s best to sail dinghy cats as bows down as you can, and that doesn’t change as they get bigger, within seaworthiness constraints, of course

catamaran-cutloose.jpg

I thought the transoms were a finishing styling flourish. A bit like of a certain era of car design.

001.jpg

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14 hours ago, KC375 said:

catamaran-cutloose.jpg

That has got to be one of the best looking boat "rears" going :D

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7 minutes ago, Waynemarlow said:

That has got to be one of the best looking boat "rears" going :D

It definitely is pretty cool looking! But I think the sterns/transoms are somewhat impractical. They could be useful for coming alongside inboard with the dinghy to get in and out, though handholds will be needed. The problem is that bottom step is too close to the waterline, and out in the real world with the boat a little loaded down and a harbor chop that bottom step will be frequently wet, and probably get some growth on it too, and it will be slippery. It will turn into a frequent maintenance item....

Plus neither side has a swim ladder. Plus it's hard to tell, but I'm guessing there's not much hull volume under those extended sterns, so they don't do much for buoyancy and load carrying aft.

And while I'm on a roll - there's nowhere near enough shade for that cockpit.

For liveaboard cruising, the devil is in the details to be comfortable and safe and sufficiently convenient to keep everybody happy. 

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8 minutes ago, CapDave said:

The problem is that bottom step is too close to the waterline,

Its basically a tell tale to the wife, when to stop loading more bits & pieces on board.

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27 minutes ago, CapDave said:

...

And while I'm on a roll - there's nowhere near enough shade for that cockpit.

...

I think there is a certain design elegance to on demand shad, but you might still argue for more.

image.jpg

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44 minutes ago, KC375 said:

I think there is a certain design elegance to on demand shad, but you might still argue for more.

image.jpg

Clean lines are beautiful, can't argue with the look. But a truly successful liveaboard cruising design (the topic of this thread) delivers all the cruising amenities and still retains clean lines. That awning is great for a quiet afternoon. We've just had 5 days in a row of 20-25, gusting higher - that awning would be a disaster and have to come down. And you can't sail with that awning either, as the mainsheet is holding up the aft end. Tropical cruising without shade is too brutal, and skin cancer is a real thing. And those wet-foot sterns will get old fast too - a small nuisance in the tropics, but at higher latitudes suddenly your shoes get wet every time.....etc., etc. I don't mean to be a curmudgeon, but there's a really big gap between full time multi-year liveaboard cruising and everything else - daysailing, weekending, holidays, crewed charter, bareboat charter etc., etc. It's the old old gap between design intent and actual application....that's why out here cruising you see so many boats that look like flea markets they've got so much crap strapped and hung and cantilevered and etc. on deck.

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1 hour ago, CapDave said:

But I think the sterns/transoms are somewhat impractical. They could be useful for coming alongside inboard with the dinghy to get in and out, though handholds will be needed. The problem is that bottom step is too close to the waterline, and out in the real world with the boat a little loaded down and a harbor chop that bottom step will be frequently wet, and probably get some growth on it too, and it will be slippery. It will turn into a frequent maintenance item....

Plus neither side has a swim ladder. Plus it's hard to tell, but I'm guessing there's not much hull volume under those extended sterns, so they don't do much for buoyancy and load carrying aft.

I'm guessing the boat is already loaded down as shown and that the whole point of doing that is to add volume below the surface where it's useful.  No reason to assume it's not there.  And no need for a swim ladder when the first step is so close to the surface.  The only downside I see is being pooped by a following sea, but it looks like the first two long steps have substantial slope to drain them quickly.

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1 hour ago, CapDave said:

Clean lines are beautiful, can't argue with the look. But a truly successful liveaboard cruising design (the topic of this thread) delivers all the cruising amenities and still retains clean lines. That awning is great for a quiet afternoon. We've just had 5 days in a row of 20-25, gusting higher - that awning would be a disaster and have to come down. And you can't sail with that awning either, as the mainsheet is holding up the aft end. Tropical cruising without shade is too brutal, and skin cancer is a real thing. And those wet-foot sterns will get old fast too - a small nuisance in the tropics, but at higher latitudes suddenly your shoes get wet every time.....etc., etc. I don't mean to be a curmudgeon, but there's a really big gap between full time multi-year liveaboard cruising and everything else - daysailing, weekending, holidays, crewed charter, bareboat charter etc., etc. It's the old old gap between design intent and actual application....that's why out here cruising you see so many boats that look like flea markets they've got so much crap strapped and hung and cantilevered and etc. on deck.

Without taking away from your general observation, the main sheet does not appear to be holding up the awning. (If you go to the web site you can see a blown up version of photo). I’m not sure what props it up so you may be right that it is not usable underway.

How much cover you like I think is a bit cultural and climate and usage (as you point out). The French cat builders were for many years resistant to covering the cockpit until the charter fleet demand just over came their resistance. I’d personally opt for permanent cover...go to the tramp if you want to work on your skin cancer. I’d also organize an awing for up front at anchor.

Having said that, Cutloose would meet my needs better than the vast majority of cats in the size range.

Interesting to note the variations on davits from none to metal ones pointing up (photo above)to more elegant ones...

image.jpg

catamaran-cutloose.jpg

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26 minutes ago, KC375 said:

Without taking away from your general observation, the main sheet does not appear to be holding up the awning. (If you go to the web site you can see a blown up version of photo). I’m not sure what props it up so you may be right that it is not usable underway.

How much cover you like I think is a bit cultural and climate and usage (as you point out). The French cat builders where for many years resistant to covering the cockpit until the charter fleet demand just over came their resistance. I’d personal opt for permanent cover...go to the tramp if you want to work on your skin cancer. I’d also organize an awing for up front at anchor.

Having said that, Cutloose would meet my needs better than the vast majority of cats in the size range.

Interesting to note the variations on davits from none to metal ones pointing up (photo above)to more elegant ones...

image.jpg

catamaran-cutloose.jpg

 

 

Obviously I've got time on my hands this afternoon in Grenada.....Day 29 of 24/7 curfew. Every boat is a compromise, no doubt. I made compromises choosing my Atlantic 57 that I wish I didn't have to, but wasn't ready for a 3-year design and custom build program, and no other set of compromises in any other boat on the market at the time in my price range looked better. You're right about the awning, I think it's tied to those apparently now-defunct spikey davits. 

ProaSailor - can your wife exit the deep end of the pool without ladder or stairs? Your kids? That's the same move to get on to those sterns without a ladder; maybe harder because there's no wall.

BTW we added lots of shade to A57 Boundless - aft we copied sistership Cerulean with the addition of a stern drop-screen, and forward we made up our own. And we have a tramp awning too, one side with a center drop curtain. All awnings are designed for 40 knots, and work sailing - except the tramp awning which blocks the staysail, though could be used with the genoa.

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7 minutes ago, CapDave said:

Obviously I've got time on my hands this afternoon in Grenada.....Day 29 of 24/7 curfew. Every boat is a compromise, no doubt. I made compromises choosing my Atlantic 57 that I wish I didn't have to, but wasn't ready for a 3-year design and custom build program, and no other set of compromises in any other boat on the market at the time in my price range looked better. You're right about the awning, I think it's tied to those apparently now-defunct spikey davits. 

ProaSailor - can your wife exit the deep end of the pool without ladder or stairs? Your kids? That's the same move to get on to those sterns without a ladder. 

BTW we added lots of shade to A57 Boundless - aft we copied sistership Cerulean, and forward we made up our own. And we have a tramp awning too, one side with a center drop curtain. All awnings are designed for 40 knots, and work sailing - except the tramp awning which blocks the staysail, though could be used with the genoa.

The Atlantic57 is pretty much the reference I benchmark cats against for my needs. It is my dream boat.

The Atlantic 57 (Bugatti version) It’s also the benchmark I use for what I’d want in my driveway for weekend use.

1936_Bugatti_Type57SCAtlantic3.jpg

Like Cutloose, it has a distinctive rear profile.

4089-12.jpg

 

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1 hour ago, KC375 said:

The Atlantic57 is pretty much the reference I benchmark cats against for my needs. It is my dream boat.

The Atlantic 57 (Bugatti version) It’s also the benchmark I use for what I’d want in my driveway for weekend use.

A simple man, with simple tastes... 

:)

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21 minutes ago, socalrider said:

A simple man, with simple tastes... 

:)

image.thumb.png.ae536446cab6c8e89121e88b7a50abeb.png

My neighbor had one of these in the late 70's, let me drive it for 30 minutes one day - that was fun!!

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26 minutes ago, CapDave said:

image.thumb.png.ae536446cab6c8e89121e88b7a50abeb.png

My neighbor had one of these in the late 70's, let me drive it for 30 minutes one day - that was fun!!

In the words of Road & Track magazine "the greatest crumpet collector known to man".

None other than Enzo Ferrari proclaimed it "the most beautiful car ever built".

The closest I ever got was

151915079566fc8586dfaDSC_0082-940x629.jp

But for a young man in college what more did you need.

Room for my dog (Great Dane) and camping gear. The laser could go on the roof (kind acted like an oversized sun visor).

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Hey, I had an MGB in college too!  Its still in my garage, nearly 50 years later.  

If you're ever in Basel Switzerland cross the border to Mulhouse France and visit the Bugatti Museum.  Its relatively new and has every Bugatti ever built plus scores of other makes from the 19th century right up to the latest million dollar job.   I think they said they have 400 collector cars on display and they have many, many more that rotate in.  I think their marketing said its the largest collection in the world.  Many are drivable.  I'm not a car nut but it was a truly amazing place and a full day just to breeze thru the acres of indoor displays, with English descriptions, too.  If its dry you can drive one around their track for a reasonable amount.   Click the building's picture on the right and thumb through them.

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On 4/28/2020 at 4:39 PM, CapDave said:

image.thumb.png.ae536446cab6c8e89121e88b7a50abeb.png

My neighbor had one of these in the late 70's, let me drive it for 30 minutes one day - that was fun!!

I’ve clocked a couple of miles in a lime green early to mid(?) 60s Jag E-type. As a teenager, a buddy of mine’s dad might as well have been Ferris Buehler’s buddy’s dad.

When the divorce came, dust settled gradually(parents gifting children type of dust) but my buddy’s second car, in his name, was the e-type.

To this day, I can’t believe we rolled around in that car. 

 

 

 

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As an apprentice mechanic, I worked for a Jaguar Dealership and would see the occasional E type in for servicing, sorry although they are iconic cars, they were truly horrible to work on and not a lot better in their road manners with our tuned Mk1 Escorts of the day able to run rings around them in all aspects.  

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1 hour ago, Waynemarlow said:

As an apprentice mechanic, I worked for a Jaguar Dealership and would see the occasional E type in for servicing, sorry although they are iconic cars, they were truly horrible to work on and not a lot better in their road manners with our tuned Mk1 Escorts of the day able to run rings around them in all aspects.  

it's about, always and forever, the crumpet.

Like an old Nic 43 - tragically impractical boat for cruising, but, whew!

Screen Shot 2020-04-30 at 8.15.33 AM.png

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I'm stuck with Soma here in the USVI...………..Dave, have you seen Alan on Skylark?

Soma has been very protective of his dang beer and wine!!!

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20 minutes ago, mpenman said:

I'm stuck with Soma here in the USVI...………..Dave, have you seen Alan on Skylark?

Soma has been very protective of his dang beer and wine!!!

Is there a liquor shortage in the USVI! Oh no!! They actually banned the sale of any alcoholic beverage for the first week of the lockdown here in Grenada, then they allowed off premises...

We've seen Skylark a bunch of times, and chatted with Alan & Liz in Bequia and Woburn and St. George's before the lockdown, they were a bit disappointed to have Pacific plans derailed. They spent the first part of the lockdown near St. George's, and then on the 18th we saw them sail past Woburn and swapped some email, said they were going to hang out at Frigate island near Carriacou. A57 Cerulean is on the hard here in Woburn.

How is your gang coping?? How's the new boat coming?

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We're doing great. Boat still on schedule. Looks like we ALL may be heading back to the NE for the summer.

Groceries have been great here. Just giving Nils a hard time :D

Starting to get warmer. Time to head north.

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On 4/28/2020 at 3:58 AM, KC375 said:

catamaran-cutloose.jpg

 

Practical or not, that's a f*cking stunning picture of a stunning boat. What a creation.

 

While I'm in here, wishing all you guys best of luck and safety with the current situation. Stay safe out there, but don't quarantine yourselves to death either! There's a healthy balance to be found, just like with load carrying and performance in a catamaran.

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7 hours ago, mpenman said:

We're doing great. Boat still on schedule. Looks like we ALL may be heading back to the NE for the summer.

Groceries have been great here. Just giving Nils a hard time :D

Starting to get warmer. Time to head north.

Summer has arrived, sun is north of us now! That said, it's been blowing for weeks and the temps have been very comfortable. I think we might stay in Grenada for the summer, sailing back into 10X - 20X case counts/population and constantly shifting rules state to state, with a foreign-flagged boat no less, doesn't look too attractive. And would also hate to get stuck in the States next winter....I think it's going to be quite some time before these small island nations (or maybe any nation) are going to allow the free movement of yachts - just too hard to police and too low on the priority list for them. 

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1 hour ago, Tylo said:

Practical or not, that's a f*cking stunning picture of a stunning boat. What a creation.

 

While I'm in here, wishing all you guys best of luck and safety with the current situation. Stay safe out there, but don't quarantine yourselves to death either! There's a healthy balance to be found, just like with load carrying and performance in a catamaran.

Agreed it's a fantastic creation, I admire it.

Thanks for the best wishes. Grenada is a small island with 110,000 mostly quite frightened people and they have been very aggressive in trying to stamp out the virus on island while firmly closing the borders - the advantage of an island. The yachties - there are said to be as many as 600 people - have been a bit of a wildcard in that plan, and there have been some rumblings of throwing us all out, especially each time one of us gets caught breaking the rules. I think the healthy balance is to follow the rules of the country in which I'm a guest, and not try to find ways to shade them or cut corners.

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1 hour ago, CapDave said:

Agreed it's a fantastic creation, I admire it.

Thanks for the best wishes. Grenada is a small island with 110,000 mostly quite frightened people and they have been very aggressive in trying to stamp out the virus on island while firmly closing the borders - the advantage of an island. The yachties - there are said to be as many as 600 people - have been a bit of a wildcard in that plan, and there have been some rumblings of throwing us all out, especially each time one of us gets caught breaking the rules. I think the healthy balance is to follow the rules of the country in which I'm a guest, and not try to find ways to shade them or cut corners.

Does the St George's med school provide an improved ability for Grenada to deal with c19 vs. other islands?

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5 hours ago, KC375 said:

Does the St George's med school provide an improved ability for Grenada to deal with c19 vs. other islands?

Hasn't really been making the news here, aside from an item about donating medical supplies. But the President of SGU is an infectious disease specialist, and I have to believe that Nicholas Steele,  Minister of Health, is consulting him. Steele has been really on top of this, and they're obviously looking hard at what other countries have done and trying to adapt the best practices to local circumstances to get best outcomes here. 

SGU hustled all its students off the island back in March - chartered a bunch of planes after the borders were closed and sent them all off.

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32 minutes ago, CapDave said:

Hasn't really been making the news here, aside from an item about donating medical supplies. But the President of SGU is an infectious disease specialist, and I have to believe that Nicholas Steele,  Minister of Health, is consulting him. Steele has been really on top of this, and they're obviously looking hard at what other countries have done and trying to adapt the best practices to local circumstances to get best outcomes here. 

SGU hustled all its students off the island back in March - chartered a bunch of planes after the borders were closed and sent them all off.

I was hopping the students might be available as extra resources (on the job training so to speak) but maybe ability to tap into the staff without them being encumbered by neophytes might even be better.

Hope it works out. Best of luck.

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8 hours ago, CapDave said:

Agreed it's a fantastic creation, I admire it.

Thanks for the best wishes. Grenada is a small island with 110,000 mostly quite frightened people and they have been very aggressive in trying to stamp out the virus on island while firmly closing the borders - the advantage of an island. The yachties - there are said to be as many as 600 people - have been a bit of a wildcard in that plan, and there have been some rumblings of throwing us all out, especially each time one of us gets caught breaking the rules. I think the healthy balance is to follow the rules of the country in which I'm a guest, and not try to find ways to shade them or cut corners.

Of course, I would never encourage breaking rules, but I do think it's important to try and get what changes of environment and physical activity one can within the rules. Not following the recommendations of authorities and people in the know about this stuff is very counter-productive.

I'm stuck here at home in Sweden, our government has had a pretty relaxed approach to the whole thing but somehow we've still managed to plateau at an average of maybe 500 or 600 new cases a day in April. The last 10 days we've even had a downward-trend going, that is, every person who gets Covid passes it on to less than one person on average. I still hope we'll all get this whole thing under control in the summer. I have extensive cruising plans in the Med this autumn, leading up to the ARC, which would be a damn shame to miss...!

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Just now, Rasputin22 said:

Haha that's actually my home town, where I'm at right now.

The 30th of April is a normally a huge party day here, people come from all over the country (and neighboring countries even) to sit in the town's big park and get drunk. I'm pretty sure the population of this city almost doubles during the Walpurgis celebrations.
I think it was a stroke of genius, pesky fences and a few police officers wouldn't have stopped people from going to that celebration but chicken shit did the trick.

It also makes me really happy that this is an international piece of news.  Something to lighten the mood in the world a bit maybe.

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Best of luck to your hometown, let's hope that those hearty Vikings and herd mentality can prove a match for the Covid! 

 

revelers celebrate walpurgis night

 

I'd gladly endure the chickenshit to take a roll with these girls!

 

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Question for the forward cockpit guys - I'm really interested in how traveller and mainsheet controls work/are rigged and what it's like trimming the main from there.

Anyone wanna help me out?

Ta

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31 minutes ago, tp#12 said:

Question for the forward cockpit guys - I'm really interested in how traveller and mainsheet controls work/are rigged and what it's like trimming the main from there.

Anyone wanna help me out?

Ta

You can kind of see one solution to it on this Chris White cat, the main sheet is the big line that runs more diagonally forward (with green arrows pointing to it) and the traveller control is the blue line that hugs the bridgedeck roof (with red arrows pointing to it). I'm guessing this boat has a "German system" for sheeting the main, that is, these controls are mirrored on the starboard side as well. I guess you could say they're sort of run in the reverse of what you'd find on a monohull and leading up to the cockpit sides rather than the aft coaming like on most aft-cockpit cats. I have no idea if this is the best solution, take Gunboat for example, there seem to be all variants of traveller solutions on those. Some have them on the roof, some have them on the aft coaming (new GB68 for example), some have a "dual mainsheet" solution with one sheet leading to each aft quarter. I suspect a lot of the Gunboats have electric traveller controls though, like the one Soma installed on his Outremer 55, but I'm not sure.

image.thumb.png.f2b308de0f584e8a04dde2611eaa64cc.png

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Here's a thread about the Antal Line Driver (the thing I was talking about that I *think* Soma has installed on his Outremer 55):

 

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15 minutes ago, Tylo said:

Here's a thread about the Antal Line Driver (the thing I was talking about that I *think* Soma has installed on his Outremer 55):

 

Ah cool, thank you. I'll have a look.

I'd be keen to see the simplest option available. Which is likely more in line with Cerulean's rig. Seeing more options around that would be instructive.

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27 minutes ago, tp#12 said:

Ah cool, thank you. I'll have a look.

I'd be keen to see the simplest option available. Which is likely more in line with Cerulean's rig. Seeing more options around that would be instructive.

I may have been wrong about what was the main sheet - it might just go forward through the boom and come out at the mast base. Looks to be done that way on both CW48 "Zen" and CW55 "Iron Wing".

Here's the ad for Iron Wing, there are some pretty high res pics (in Google Chrome you can right-click the picture and press "Open image in new tab" and it'll show you the un-cropped image in the original resolution) so it's a bit easier to see. Looks like the traveler control lines go down the side but the main sheet actually goes forward through the boom. The lines going to port and starboard from the boom must just be preventer lines or something like that? I don't know really. On Iron Wing they have dedicated blocks both on the boom and deck so they must be a permanent solution for something.

Have a look: https://multihullcompany.com/boat-details/?catid=7086203

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7 hours ago, Tylo said:

You can kind of see one solution to it on this Chris White cat, the main sheet is the big line that runs more diagonally forward (with green arrows pointing to it) and the traveller control is the blue line that hugs the bridgedeck roof (with red arrows pointing to it). I'm guessing this boat has a "German system" for sheeting the main, that is, these controls are mirrored on the starboard side as well. I guess you could say they're sort of run in the reverse of what you'd find on a monohull and leading up to the cockpit sides rather than the aft coaming like on most aft-cockpit cats. I have no idea if this is the best solution, take Gunboat for example, there seem to be all variants of traveller solutions on those. Some have them on the roof, some have them on the aft coaming (new GB68 for example), some have a "dual mainsheet" solution with one sheet leading to each aft quarter. I suspect a lot of the Gunboats have electric traveller controls though, like the one Soma installed on his Outremer 55, but I'm not sure.

image.thumb.png.f2b308de0f584e8a04dde2611eaa64cc.png

The red arrows point to traveller control line, comes to brake and winch in the cockpit. The green arrows point to the preventer, comes to brake and same winch. The mainsheet runs forward along the boom, down to the mast base, through a brake to port and on to a large electric winch shared with the main halyard. All the same as my boat. The reefing lines all come to the mast base with brakes in the boom - and can be easily led to the smaller utility electric winch to starboard.

It's all pretty easy to use, especially with the main sheet on the electric winch, and the reef lines on an electric winch.

We have Antal line drivers - manual - to control the daggerboards. They are a little bit fussy, but effective. One complaint - to strip, clean, and grease them you have to disturb the fasteners that mount them - not a great design. 

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On 5/2/2020 at 9:59 AM, CapDave said:

The red arrows point to traveller control line, comes to brake and winch in the cockpit. The green arrows point to the preventer, comes to brake and same winch. The mainsheet runs forward along the boom, down to the mast base, through a brake to port and on to a large electric winch shared with the main halyard. All the same as my boat. The reefing lines all come to the mast base with brakes in the boom - and can be easily led to the smaller utility electric winch to starboard.

It's all pretty easy to use, especially with the main sheet on the electric winch, and the reef lines on an electric winch.

We have Antal line drivers - manual - to control the daggerboards. They are a little bit fussy, but effective. One complaint - to strip, clean, and grease them you have to disturb the fasteners that mount them - not a great design. 

Yea multiple people told me to stay away from the Antal line drivers on our tri. The rich and famous like em but if maintaining your own boat maybe not so great. But I have not used myself so it’s all second hand. Only one person ever did recommend them to me. 

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Just had a video walkthrough with the seller of an Outremer 55 Light. He asked me how tall I was and when I answered 6'3" he said he reckoned the boat was too cramped for me. He's 6'0" and finds it barely tolerable. While there is 6'4" headroom in the centre of the saloon it tapers off quickly due to that curved deckhouse. He says he can't even sit at the foreward end of the saloon, under the downward curving roof. Now I've never been aboard a 55 Light, only a 55 Standard which I found acceptable. If I were able to travel I would've already been to view the boat in person, but that's not possible right now. Does anyone (preferably tall!) have any experience of the head room in a 55 Light? I plan to be living aboard this thing for a few years and don't want to step ashore looking like Quasimodo!

Thanks,

Mike

 

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Hey Insolent,

I noticed Barrocka was "Under offer", figured you had bought her seeing that you had posted here. However I think at 6'3 you would have struggled in a Waterline 1480!

I can't offer any advice on O55L headroom, only wish you the best of luck.

 

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Nope, not me, though I wanted to go up and see her now that Queensland travel restrictions have lifted. Too late!

I went aboard another 1480 here in Brisbane and didn’t find it too cramped actually.

Cheers.

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On boats it sucks being tall. Even on our 57, I'm close to the ceiling around the corners but not in the hulls. 

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On 6/5/2020 at 10:15 AM, mpenman said:

On boats it sucks being tall. Even on our 57, I'm close to the ceiling around the corners but not in the hulls. 

I used to work for Ted(s) Hood in the 80’s when they were building their Little Harbor series. The joke was I was the closest to Taiwanese size Ted could find in the US!! I put a lot of miles on a few different 53s, they were fun boats to sail. And being small really did help when it came to keeping all the systems working!

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