Recommended Posts

2 hours ago, MR.CLEAN said:

which has happened to the Juanker...three times now?  One of the crazy ones from the 90s, plus the TP52 Origin, and now the O60.  Any other Juan abortions about there?

Don’t get me started!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Chimp too said:

Don’t get me started!!!

Lol

do those NDAs ever run out?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, MR.CLEAN said:

which has happened to the Juanker...three times now?  One of the crazy ones from the 90s, plus the TP52 Origin, and now the O60.  Any other Juan abortions about there?

The Wiley K-yote IMS 50 was the 90’s first trip down this road for JK I think. 
.....the 100 footer counts as another embarrassing fuckup, though not from rule interpretation.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Chimp too said:

They are all well and truly expired!!

A good coffee table book for you to write: "Greatest Failures in Yachting Vol. I"

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, MR.CLEAN said:

which has happened to the Juanker...three times now?  One of the crazy ones from the 90s, plus the TP52 Origin, and now the O60.  Any other Juan abortions about there?

There was something with the Volvo 70's. They had to change a keel at the last moment and Juanker went ballistic.

He later did not get the Volvo 65 commission...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Fiji Bitter said:

There was something with the Volvo 70's. They had to change a keel at the last moment and Juanker went ballistic.

He later did not get the Volvo 65 commission...

That was a long story, and not the only one with the Juan K 70s

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yachtdesigner grifter perhaps?

Just asking...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Juan K not getting the VO65 commission was nothing to do with his VO70 work. He was asked and said to take one of his existing VO70 designs and make multiples of it. The problem with that was that they were not designed to be built as OD. So the build time would be too long to be able to build the fleet in time and with so much uni and secondary bonding, the variation though the fleet potentially too high.

One of the real winners wit the 65s was that they were designed from scratch as a OD. So the engineering and design was based around repeatability. That would not have been the case with Juan's solution. 

The VO65 ended up a proposal from the consortium that built them, which included FYD in the agreement. No other proposal came close to what was asked for.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

83296144_2697402943688314_7015760160970768384_o.thumb.jpg.27910b806ef69820dedc44614f40b5e4.jpg

From Team Malizia's Facebook page, does that look like winch bases to anyone else? It must just be ballast tank inspection ports though?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Chimp too said:

Just ballast lids

I thought it had to be something more sensible, you can but dream of the crazy ideas though :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Water ballast drains? I'm assuming the big hole is for a life raft.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, remenich said:

Exhaust and/or intake for the motor? Which seems to sit way back under the cockpit.

Possibly the main triangle is for the sail drive prop shaft but very far aft compared to typical placement.  The rough area to port just looks pretty unprofessional.  Like they made the opening late and made a mess of it.  Overall from these pictures the boat doesn't seem as revolutionary as I would have expected compared to some of the other new boats, despite the late launch. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is a lot of boat for a small builder / new imoca designer - you got to start somewhere but one wonders if this was perhaps a too large leap of a design/fabrication learning process.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, jb5 said:

Possibly the main triangle is for the sail drive prop shaft but very far aft compared to typical placement.  The rough area to port just looks pretty unprofessional.  Like they made the opening late and made a mess of it.  Overall from these pictures the boat doesn't seem as revolutionary as I would have expected compared to some of the other new boats, despite the late launch. 

I see two ovaled cockpit drains, a raft garage and the stern safety hatch. It is very interesting how far aft the prop is. The strut for the prop is faired in which is normal but this one looks a bit larger than others but could be camera tricks. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know this one is not designed to fly high like some of the other new designs but that prop shaft fairing looks awfully like the fin on a surfboard!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, jb5 said:

Possibly the main triangle is for the sail drive prop shaft but very far aft compared to typical placement.  

keeps the prop in the water longer for regen purposes when foiling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, jb5 said:

 

 

tripon_occitane.jpg

 

 

Interesting angle on the rudders. I could (most likely) be wrong but I don't believe the current IMOCA rules have any limitations on what axis the rudders are allowed to operate in. If this is true, could occitanie have rudders capable of being angled in such a way that they create a bit of lift, enough to lift the stern just a teeny bit more out of the water. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Miffy said:

It is a lot of boat for a small builder / new imoca designer - you got to start somewhere but one wonders if this was perhaps a too large leap of a design/fabrication learning process.

Early days. At least let it splash and see if it floats! ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Raptorsailor said:

Interesting angle on the rudders. I could (most likely) be wrong but I don't believe the current IMOCA rules have any limitations on what axis the rudders are allowed to operate in. If this is true, could occitanie have rudders capable of being angled in such a way that they create a bit of lift, enough to lift the stern just a teeny bit more out of the water. 

Don't know how you can see that from this photo!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
16 hours ago, Raptorsailor said:

Interesting angle on the rudders. I could (most likely) be wrong but I don't believe the current IMOCA rules have any limitations on what axis the rudders are allowed to operate in. If this is true, could occitanie have rudders capable of being angled in such a way that they create a bit of lift, enough to lift the stern just a teeny bit more out of the water. 

That’s already in practise on the current boats. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Chimp too said:

Don't know how you can see that from this photo!!

the rudders aren't perpendicular. And yes, I know they are in the upright position. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Transat CIC teasers. Not long now. 

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
55 minutes ago, Raptorsailor said:

the rudders aren't perpendicular. And yes, I know they are in the upright position. 

most twin rudder boats are designed so the leeward rudder is close to vertical when in use. These rudders probably look especially wonky as there are no linkages yet attached to them so the blades are free to move on their own

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So no pic of the cockpit yet for l'occitane ?

 

A bit there :

EPhVOzaXsAIjabZ?format=jpg&name=4096x409

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is the launch. The cockpit is very far aft and pretty small compared to some others. All about weight distribution and ergonomics plus allowing space inside the boat for easier stacking. Video quality is very dark. Link will not embed. 

https://instagram.com/stories/armeltriponskipper/2233436259200684643?utm_source=ig_story_item_share&igshid=rrl12fgpp3vb

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some cockpit images here. 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

According to an interview with the designer the design goals included-

Reducing weight through less beam (~5.2m)

Carrying the beam as far forward as possible so the boat is more rectangular than triangular (Charal/HB/etc) when viewed from above.

Adding volume in the bow to help reduce burying when coming off the semi-foiling state and into waves and hence (maybe) maintaining better momentum.

The hull form is full at the waterline and is supposed to help offset the lost power (rm) from the narrower beam.

The foils fully retract from the water.  They are supposed to be very long.

The cockpit size is small as per the skippers wishes, most things close to hand. 

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.scanvoile.com/2020/01/armel-tripon-occitane-imoca-bateau-neuf-nantes-mise-eau-foil.html#.XjRMQsPYqow

Armel Tripon launches his new IMOCA L'Occitane in Nantes: "It's fabulous to see the dream come true!"


"In the next three months, we have to pass the boat to the gauge, (IMOCA rule)  I also have to qualify for The Transat and, little by little, be in tune with my boat."

Armel Tripon: " I've been waiting for this moment for so long, it's fabulous to see the dream come true! Never before had I seriously imagined putting a new Imoca in the water. And what an Imoca! the opening of the gauge, we change the era and with L'Occitane en Provence, we are getting ahead. The boat is magnificent. "


"The boat's foils will be put in place in Lorient or La Trinité sur Mer, once the gauge test has been carried out (righting the boat to 90 degrees). It is easier to test the boat without foils, then reintegrate (weight and center of gravity) numerically into the stability calculation; this avoids biasing the results, especially if there is current or wind when the boat is lying down. This test will be carried out as soon as the weather will allow. "


"Our objective is The Transat CIC departing from Brest on May 10, so 3 months to take charge, prepare, understand, optimize a new boat that is both complex with its foils and very simple in its general architecture.  In these three months, we have to pass the boat to the gauge, I also have to qualify for the race and gradually be in tune with my boat. "

Source: A. Tripon

Credit: P Bouras

PIERRE_BOURAS_pbo_6411.jpg

PIERRE_BOURAS_pbo_6496.jpg84384781_816130062234750_5360562056665759744_n.jpgPIERRE_BOURAS__bo_0293.jpg

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like how she sits in the water sans foils - be curious to see the geometry of them once they're installed - looking at the structure, almost expect a Figaro 3 style. the cockpit looks better concept than some others & the hull is definitely unique amongst this generation of boats. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was something about the foils being more similar to Apivia than say HB but the exit point is higher so probably a lot longer. Actually the opposite of how HBs are supposed to work in some respects. They deck exit is supposed to be more inboard as well. Should be interesting. Are the others with new boats worried? I doubt it. They all have new foils coming as well. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, jb5 said:

There was something about the foils being more similar to Apivia than say HB but the exit point is higher so probably a lot longer. Actually the opposite of how HBs are supposed to work in some respects. They deck exit is supposed to be more inboard as well. Should be interesting. Are the others with new boats worried? I doubt it. They all have new foils coming as well. 

I have not seen any deck exits for the foils in the pics to date, did they show up? I am suspecting the foils will have a long downward curving shaft with the end being both upswept and having a short downward foil somewhat like the first foils on Maitre Coq Image result for Maitre Coq open 60

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Courtesy of France 3. Comments in French. There is a reasonable deck shot with no obvious exits for foils. 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, jb5 said:

Courtesy of France 3. Comments in French. There is a reasonable deck shot with no obvious exits for foils. 

 

Thanks, seen these. From your earlier post it mentioned deck exits which I took to mean Occitane. There are some interior pics showing the bulkhead forward of the mast which supports the foils. In the pic there are openings but no visible foil boxes. This hints that the cases run above the openings along the underside of the deck, like the Figaro 3. It would not a huge surprise of the foils slide past each other inside the case so that, when retracted, the head of the foil will be at hull on the opposite side. Here is one of the pics, it is looking forward from the companionway. The two tunnels come together at the point beneath the mast step with the closest bulkheads angling back to offset the deck spreaders. The next forward bulkhead supports the foils, no visible cases. Based on exterior pics the cases would be above the egg shaped openings  

image.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"The first new boat in my life as a skipper", smiles the Nantais Tripon

'The scow hull, a daring bias
“We will be expected on the Vendée Globe, finally confessing the Nantes skipper, who already sets himself the objective of“ finishing ”. Because we have innovated on many things. The first and most striking is the choice of the hull of the boat. “Very round in front with volume behind like an ice cream cone, details Armel Tripon. "With this type of hull, we see that in strong winds with bearing gaits, the boat, when it catches a wave, instead of charging, tends rather to surf on the back of it. There is thus clearly less jolts, clearly less stress, and one can hope for a more regular and higher constant speed." '

https://www.tellerreport.com/news/2020-01-31---"the-first-new-boat-in-my-life-as-a-skipper"--smiles-the-nantais-tripon-.r1k4MLZG8.html

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A better image of L'Occitane's cockpit:

Screen Shot 2020-02-02 at 8.45.47 AM.png

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Found this old vid, which is a reasonable guide to a 'Spaghetti Junction'. Apologies if already posted.

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

31st January 2020, Paris – A partnership agreement between UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) and the International Monohull Open Class Association (IMOCA) was signed today at UNESCO headquarters in Paris, France.

Over the next two years, the two partners will carry out joint projects to support marine scientific research and to raise awareness about the importance of ocean science for the protection of the ocean and the sustainable use of marine resources.

https://www.imoca.org/en/news/news/science-sets-sail-new-partnership-between-unesco-s-ioc-and-imoca-class-signed-in-paris

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Further from above link (thanks @Sailbydate ) 

To mark the signing of the partnership agreement, five renowned skippers (Fabrice Amedeo, Alexia Barrier, Boris Herrmann, Stéphane Le Diraison and Paul Meilhat) participated this morning in a “Campus UNESCO” with young students from French schools to share their experience as professional sailors committed to promoting science for the protection of our shared ocean.

Notably missing from that list are 11th Hour Racing, nor is there any sign of support from them. Neither is there any mention on their website, and no mention on the TOR website either.

I wonder why, maybe they are just not quite with it...

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/1/2020 at 11:56 AM, ctutmark said:

Thanks, seen these. From your earlier post it mentioned deck exits which I took to mean Occitane. There are some interior pics showing the bulkhead forward of the mast which supports the foils. In the pic there are openings but no visible foil boxes. This hints that the cases run above the openings along the underside of the deck, like the Figaro 3. It would not a huge surprise of the foils slide past each other inside the case so that, when retracted, the head of the foil will be at hull on the opposite side. Here is one of the pics, it is looking forward from the companionway. The two tunnels come together at the point beneath the mast step with the closest bulkheads angling back to offset the deck spreaders. The next forward bulkhead supports the foils, no visible cases. Based on exterior pics the cases would be above the egg shaped openings  

image.png

Can you imagine being trapped inside this thing upside down somewhere near 52° 0′ 0″ S, 100° 0′ 0″ E.  

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

HIgh on my list of worst nightmares.  Mind you upside down in anything there is not great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking forward to seeing L'Occitane's foils fitted. Their geometry seems likely quite different to most IMOCA 60's, as they exit the hull at just below deck level. So, they must be very long and curved downward. In the pics attached you can clearly see the case exits. They will be very, Dali. ;-)

According to designer, Manuard, Nat Shaver (currently with AC team, American Magic) is their foils expert.

Says, Manuard, "Our foils are pretty big, so in terms of the total beam with both foils deployed we are one of the biggest, that is one thing. The shaft has some radius in it so when we deploy or retract the foil it kind of acts on the cant of the foil. So depending on the actual heel of that we are sailing we will be able to adapt the cant of the foil by just adapting the extension of the foil. Our foils are not really designed to foil deep in the water, in that sense we are closer to the Verdier philosophy than the VPLP, so the idea is not to fly high above the water but to keep in touch with it."

"Our foils can be completely retracted and that can help in the light transition zones and can also help when you are sailing in super strong conditions and you want to no accelerate too much, you want a safe mode. That was a basic feature we get."

Interesting stuff and a quite different design perspective to the Verdier VPLP boats.

MjAxOTExYmY2YTU3NzdlNTUzYjU4ZDQ1ZmU2YjY5NDY2ZDAzZDE.jpeg

PIERRE_BOURAS__bo_0293.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, terrafirma said:

Can you imagine being trapped inside this thing upside down somewhere near 52° 0′ 0″ S, 100° 0′ 0″ E.  

 

Honestly it looks about as ""easy"" to manage upside down as right way up, lots of bulkheads to climb on...

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, JonRowe said:

Honestly it looks about as ""easy"" to manage upside down as right way up, lots of bulkheads to climb on...

Actually looks pretty open compared to some IMOCA!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, JonRowe said:

Honestly it looks about as ""easy"" to manage upside down as right way up, lots of bulkheads to climb on...

I was going to say the same! It looks to me that it would be easier to move around on the less cluttered upside down roof, than on the actual floor!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Sailbydate said:

Looking forward to seeing L'Occitane's foils fitted. Their geometry seems likely quite different to most IMOCA 60's, as they exit the hull at just below deck level. So, they must be very long and curved downward. In the pics attached you can clearly see the case exits. They will be very, Dali. ;-)

According to designer, Manuard, Nat Shaver (currently with AC team, American Magic) is their foils expert.

Says, Manuard, "Our foils are pretty big, so in terms of the total beam with both foils deployed we are one of the biggest, that is one thing. The shaft has some radius in it so when we deploy or retract the foil it kind of acts on the cant of the foil. So depending on the actual heel of that we are sailing we will be able to adapt the cant of the foil by just adapting the extension of the foil. Our foils are not really designed to foil deep in the water, in that sense we are closer to the Verdier philosophy than the VPLP, so the idea is not to fly high above the water but to keep in touch with it."

"Our foils can be completely retracted and that can help in the light transition zones and can also help when you are sailing in super strong conditions and you want to no accelerate too much, you want a safe mode. That was a basic feature we get."

Interesting stuff and a quite different design perspective to the Verdier VPLP boats.

MjAxOTExYmY2YTU3NzdlNTUzYjU4ZDQ1ZmU2YjY5NDY2ZDAzZDE.jpeg

PIERRE_BOURAS__bo_0293.jpg

I am puzzled... Apparently, there is no deck "exit" for the foils.

At the same time, from your quotation above, they claim "our foils can be completely retracted" which is seen as a plus for light wind (less drag) or very strong wind (you have some kind of throttle control, without launching the boat airborne every other wave...).

Does it mean that they can be retracted simultaneously? If yes, that means that either the shaft of the foil is not longer than half the beam of the boat and they go "head to head" on centerline below deck when they are both retracted, or they overlap when retracted.

The first option seems to be mechanically a challenge when the foil is extended... How much of the shaft is left inside the boat??? It is not like this part of the structure is not already enough loaded as is, to shorten the shaft held in the case and make things worse!

The second option leads to a different geometry for the foil on port and starboard, one is in front of the other, or one is above the other...

Does not make sense... What am I missing?

Or more likely, they can fully retract only one foil at a time, have a constant curvature case going all across the boat below deck... with both foil sharing it...

Anybody in the know???

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You put a curved radius in the initial arm of the foil before the foil makes the transition to horizontal - retract the curved radius arm into the hull and the foil will clear the water. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The www.armeltripon.com website talks about foils being "déportés"  which means offset. But I don't think he means offset to each other but instead offset from the boat. He says thay they will be very long, and will be in a flow of water away from the bow wave. It is in that sense that they should be considered offset. Armel Tripon claims that it will be a mode of operation somewhat similar to a trimaran... I am curious...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
56 minutes ago, Laurent said:

 

At the same time, from your quotation above, they claim "our foils can be completely retracted" which is seen as a plus for light wind (less drag) or very strong wind (you have some kind of throttle control, without launching the boat airborne every other wave...).

Since it seems that foil shape has a great impact on which conditions the boat excels in and with most of the new boats and maybe 1-2 older ones getting new foils over the winter I'm wondering if some teams will forego complete foil retraction for gains in other conditions that can be expected to be more common on the race route.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can imagine that the external part of the foil is relatively straight or with a large radius of curvature and the inboard end is more tortured so that as the foil is retracted the outboard bearing is allowed to rotate a long way and the foil raises up rather than disappears into the hull. This would mean that the foil doesn’t have to move inboard too much if the elbow passes through the outer bearing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lots of puzzlement over these foils. Hopefully, they'll get revealed shortly.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
57 minutes ago, jb5 said:

Since it seems that foil shape has a great impact on which conditions the boat excels in and with most of the new boats and maybe 1-2 older ones getting new foils over the winter I'm wondering if some teams will forego complete foil retraction for gains in other conditions that can be expected to be more common on the race route.

It's the hoary old question of foil lift Vs drag, JB. Lots to ponder.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking forward to seeing this boat going closer to its potential.  Thanks for posting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Talks about saving weight through paint choices and reducing usage. Possible depiction of the foils? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Measurement time... 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/3/2020 at 7:07 PM, Sailbydate said:

Lots of puzzlement over these foils. Hopefully, they'll get revealed shortly.

Quite interesting indeed. Still hard to figure out how flying low, fully retractable and foil offset/trimaran like goes together. Especially that current Imoca's foiling low tend to have the foils near the hull and the one having big offset tend to flight high with bow up.

Wonder if we couldn't see some foils looking like AC75's. No pivot point, but if the arm is curved close to the hull, it doesn't take much to take the foil completely out of the water (except a lot of grinding). Does it mean they also have to go anhedral to have some righting moment from the foils and keep the hull from flying high? How else could they control the attitude and avoid going bow up as the hull seem designed to be sailed flat like Apivia?

In a sense they did well not to reveal the foils during boat launch, it builds some anticipation and allows us to come with bunch of hypotheses only to be proven wrong when they finally show and release them...

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://www.scanvoile.com/2020/02/thomas-ruyant-vendee-globe-advens-imoca-preparation-2020-.html#.XjwHM8PYqow
Thomas Ruyant prepares the Vendée Globe

unnamed.jpg


Credit: P.Bouras / TR Racing

Revised ergonomics 
"We voluntarily launched a boat with poorly developed interior ergonomics," explains Thomas Ruyant. We are now able to deeply review the layout of the boat's living space, which will revolve around a seat completely molded to me. As we know, these new generation sailboats are terribly demanding, and it is important to have inside a living space dedicated to real physical recovery. This seat will be oriented "back to the road". Such orientation will also greatly facilitate access to the cockpit. This seat will serve all inboard functions, food preparation, rest position, and access to weather and computer tools. "
V.2 foils under study
“We have made some structural reinforcements. The idea is to leave nothing to chance. Says Thomas Ruyant.

 “ Our design office is working on the creation of the V2 version of our foils. We will compete in The Transat CIC with our current foils. The idea is then to have an optional set of foils at the end of the summer. "

"The Transat CIC will be an important test. We are free to decide whether or not to compete in the New York-Vendée. A “study” and crew work trip would also be a smart option just before the Vendée Globe. To be decided in good time. "

By the editor
Source: TB Press

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

PIERRE_BOURAS_pbo_6411.thumb.jpg.511f61d9c046aca77904d464c541e149.jpg

Could it be possible that the foils might look like something like this? Sort of like Advens and Apivia but more .

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, jb5 said:

This seat will be oriented "back to the road". Such orientation will also greatly facilitate access to the cockpit. This seat will serve all inboard functions, food preparation, rest position, and access to weather and computer tools. "

Is anyone else imagining a little pod like space?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, samc99us said:

Those boards wouldn't be fully retractable. Try again.

I think that by "fully retractable", Tripon meant that they get entirely out of the water, not that they retract all the way into the boat. I pretty much agree with raptorsailor's idea of what they will look like.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, JonRowe said:

Is anyone else imagining a little pod like space?

Video arcade games, JB?

c1beb09f960493a926a459d81a46d93e-mp4.jpg

Zero-Gravity-Coding-Pod-Luxury-Video-Game-Cockpit-Racing-Cockpit.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Sailbydate said:

Video arcade games, JB?

c1beb09f960493a926a459d81a46d93e-mp4.jpg

Zero-Gravity-Coding-Pod-Luxury-Video-Game-Cockpit-Racing-Cockpit.jpg

Yeah would be cool. 

Backwards facing would be better for impact shock protection I guess and since these boats have a lot of that it could make sense. Assumes he relies on cameras for forward visibility as well like HB and Charal to some extent. 

Thing that also interested me was his opposite approach to the forthcoming races and v2 foil implementation. Maybe he's just late with his new foil order and so has to wait. Most teams seem to be going with get the foils in early to work out the settings and test them out with the two transatlantic crossings even if going to the US is a delivery trip. Skipping the Transat should allow maybe a couple of extra weeks testing. 

The approach here will have pretty much only solo testing v2 foil before the VG.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^Agree. Alex Thomson tested his, Hugo Boss V2 foils before the last VG go-around and snapped one clean through (no impact, just a build failure). He went back to the V1's and, as we know, subsequently smashed one of those off in the race (can't recall if that was through impact or not). 

So, a risky strategy maybe to set out in the race with untried and tested foils. But if they're late delivery, what can you do?

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Found some more regarding L'occitane foils, it looks like the philosophy has changed during the design process.

Early representation had the foils much lower on the hull.

G7TXDpBcgJZ5DERDnbQ_BkJhrll5QYP-7Q-fjNhB

Even on more recent graphics (from http://www.manegeculturel.com/imoca-loccitane-en-provence-un-nouveau-chapitre-pour-armel-tripon/), it still looks like they are entering the hull at the bottom, but not clear to see on such low res and black on black.

image.thumb.png.1416df42b12c672a5dbe08a946686e55.png

Could they have gone for foils like Beneteau Figaro 3? But more extreme with much longer arms, that should fit the description about offset, trimaran-like, could fly low. About retractable, they could add some curvature at the end of the arm and push it out to actually lift the foil to take minimum space outside the hull (push to lift instead of pull to lift), and not bad for RM either (they might need some serious beam in the arm depending on its length).

figaro3_11.jpg?itok=HOadHQ2o

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lakrass, I think that you will find that the early promotional renderings will look nothing like what they are thinking. The Figaro 3 approach is not semi foiling and would be a dog from the start in IMOCA world.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, jb5 said:

https://gcaptain.com/ocean-infinity-launches-unmanned-vessel-company/

More shit floating around at sea.   Remote controlled.  How long till something hits one.

Hopefully the autopilot is programmed so that if it sees /.*SOLO.*/ in an AIS it just turns around and goes in the other direction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been pouring through the build pics and found some that may give further hints on the boards

This is looking at the access port in the port case generally looking aft, can see the egg shaped bulkhead opening and the companionway in the background. The case appears to substantially curve down 78537124_2544063488976446_7353374904315543552_o.jpg.a820d541c81edaf5f61f4b6e0c9679ed.jpg

Here is another with bulkheads in place before the deck went on, on the starboard side there is a steel bar sticking out of the foil exit. The hull ends of the foil cases can be seen but then they either disappear (curving down) or are not in place. The bulkhead forward of the case location also has a similar egg shaped opening which leans towards the cases curving down and ending on the hull bottom. The cases would drain into the keel wet box. 79370256_2561338147248980_5613025388285394944_o.jpg.e167a4da42b01566462fc31a62bd88e6.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://mailchi.mp/tipandshaft.com/tip-shaft-198-sbastien-simon-sur-le-vende-globe-je-naurai-pas-rougir-face-la-concurrence-figaro-tout-sur-la-saison-2020?e=9a497c6fa7

Arkea Paprec - Sabastien Simon interview..  Its in French.

They are not giving away the reasons for the foil failures other than there was more than one.  They don't want to give others any competitive advantage.  Good on them.

They have new VMG (downwind) focused foils in build with new, more basic control systems.  They are building two sets so they have spares.  Obviously very well funded.

Sees the usual characters as competition .  "..the most dangerous is Jérémie Beyou . He had the timing that was right by putting his boat in the water a year before, he is the big opponent. After, we know the strike force of Alex Thomson , we know what he is capable of, he has a magnificent boat."


No Transat CIC - "I signed up at the beginning, but we finally wanted a more typical Vendée Globe program , which is not the case The Transat which is very north with a lot of up close. We really want to work on it, so we will first go as a crew to the Canaries, then I will go solo to New York, which will allow me to sail downwind in the trade winds and a difficult sea, fairly high and tight, but also to validate my qualification for the Vendée Globe. Then, I will do the New York-Vendée which is also a downwind route."
 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/7/2020 at 5:08 PM, ctutmark said:

Been pouring through the build pics and found some that may give further hints on the boards [...]

Very interesting ! May I ask where you found those pictures ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, RedFlag said:

Very interesting ! May I ask where you found those pictures ?

Never mind... Pauger's facebook !

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, RedFlag said:

Never mind... Pauger's facebook !

Correct, from the Pauger Carbon FB page. They have a LOT of pics from the build posted there

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites