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PRB update.  Structure re-enforcement for the foils introduced a couple of years ago, a new improved cockpit cover for protection and improved ergonomics.  PRB is down to do the Transat and NY-Vendee. 

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https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/19616/conrad-colman-the-vendee-globe-is-a-passion

Conrad Coleman interview. Still looking for funding but hoping to line up for the NY Vendee.

From memory he skipped the Transat last time as well then started the NY Vendee late. Could be wrong...

Hope he makes it happen. He's given himself a couple of months to get it together. 

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Isabelle Joschke on MASCF has just returned from a 3 week solo trial.

This type of training regime, with extended solo periods outside of the races, is something which has always appeared to be missing from AT's approach. AFAIK Alex rarely, if ever, uses extended solo sessions as part of his training - in fact there's been a lot of chat in the past about how he uses the rest of the team to actually sail the boat and only pops up when the helicopter comes over for the photo shoot. 

He's undoubtedly a quick sailor and has managed some solid podiums when the boat holds together but I can't help wonder if these longer solo training sessions would help with the attrition and 'long term' management his French rivals still seem to have the upper hand on??

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Well @NZK , I would think AT has more than enough solo experience as such. Testing and optimising is his priority, and that is best done with the team. And he seems to have a team as good or better than any of his competitors.

Some single or double handed racing is also important, and he is doing that alright. And at his age his family requires some attention too.

You seem to be very critical of him, that's OK, but just curious to know why. Bad experience?

 

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It wasn't meant to be too critical, it was supposed to be more of an observation on different approaches - I fully acknowledge his successes and skills but for a long time he was considered to have a bit of cowboy attitude and has always maintained a separation from the rest of the fleet with his base location and training. He does also have one of the highest attrition/incidence rates in the fleet - I was wondering if this is perhaps part of the mindset they have which appears to be looking for maximum possible boat speed achieved through continual short term testing as opposed to the more traditional approach taken by Joschke etc of using extended solo time aboard to optimise manouvres, onboard ergonomics, weather routing, sleep patterns and fatigue management (this is part assumption but also partly based on existing interviews with the Lorient based teams on how they operate). 

I think as the boats develop into the newer foiling generations there are bigger gains to be made through foil and sail plan optimisation but the balance between this and the 'time onboard' approach is what intrigues me. 

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It seems to be that one thing that AT could have done and didn't is to join the "training camp" in Port Laforet, but that would have meant relocating the team if not choosing another yard. 

But about long solo sessions, it is much more related to the planning and circumstances (breaking the boat in last TJV), which also happened with the previous one. Otherwise he for sure had some in his plans, and probably still has. 

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Isabelle Joschke  / MASCF desperately needed miles on board after the TJV start grounding mess (never heard who on board made that mark rounding call) and all the repairs that followed.  They have a lot to catch up on and confirm. No one else in IMOCA is out there doing much of anything right now.  Isabelle has also likely logged the required solo miles to validate her VG entry with that trip.  Good use of time. 

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2 hours ago, yl75 said:

It seems to be that one thing that AT could have done and didn't is to join the "training camp" in Port Laforet, but that would have meant relocating the team if not choosing another yard. 

But about long solo sessions, it is much more related to the planning and circumstances (breaking the boat in last TJV), which also happened with the previous one. Otherwise he for sure had some in his plans, and probably still has. 

Actually, the Training Center never accepted him as a member, AFAIK...

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8 hours ago, NZK said:

there's been a lot of chat in the past about how he uses the rest of the team to actually sail the boat and only pops up when the helicopter comes over for the photo shoot. 

 

Any of the hundreds of people who've sailed with AT on a Boss boat know that's some bullshit.  Regardless of which of his team are aboard, Alex is like a little monkey, constantly jumping around the boat making sure everything is functioning properly.   His energy level is astounding.

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45 minutes ago, RedFlag said:

Actually, the Training Center never accepted him as a member, AFAIK...

My understanding is that he never "applied", but I think I remember somebody saying/writing they were not opposed to it at all.

 

Edit Maybe it's not that clear, in below interview, Alex is saying that he was refused to come to the last training for the last VG, but if he had ask to do all them most probably he would have been accepted ..

https://www.ouest-france.fr/route-du-rhum/route-du-rhum-alex-thomson-les-gars-de-bretagne-sont-les-meilleurs-du-monde-6041350

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Back in the water on April 20. Long winter refit. 

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MACSF back into the shed for a refit before the two transatlantic races.

Looking like those looking to do the Transat CIC in IMOCA are mostly those needing quali miles. Kind of a shame. 

 

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16 hours ago, Chimp too said:

2 weeks since launch and still no images of the foils??

Meanwhile, nice livery.

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 Not long now until we see more of this. 

 

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An update from Charal on  VG energy consumption and sources. 

https://www.charal.fr/post-voile/chantier-charal-lenergie-question-de-compromis/

Extract... 

On this generation of boats, we have a fairly energy-consuming instrumentation system (sensors), which makes it possible to follow in real time the loads on the boat, in particular the deformation of the foils and the compression in the mast, two points to be constantly monitored.

An Imoca like Charal consumes up to 6400 Wh per day, the challenge for the technical team is to find the best possible compromise between the different sources of supply (engine powered by diesel, hydrogenerators and solar panels), depending of "two major goals" set by Pierre-François Dargnies. “First of all, the energy independence of the boat throughout the Vendée Globe , which requires having alternative solutions in the event of a breakdown or breakage. Then, the optimization of the on-board mass for the sake of performance, hence a difficult compromise to find between the weight of diesel, heavy at the start but light on arrival, and that of renewable energies, less important but constant ”. Compromise which takes into account a third key element: environmental protection, and therefore the limitation of diesel consumption. “We are all aware of this issue in the team, Charal too, we are all looking to limit our consumption of fossil energy. "

In view of the Vendée Globe 2020, the Charal Sailing Team has chosen to put more emphasis on solar energy. “On the Transat Jacques Vabre , we have done small-scale tests, we are going to switch to a higher power: the objective is to run on diesel - with a limited quantity - and on solar on the Vendée and that the hydrogenerators become the alternative, because the disadvantage of the latter is that they require the intervention of the skipper and slow down the boat ” , explains the technical director.

A partnership has been established with the company Fly Solartech which supplies customized solar panels installed during the winter construction on the roof and on the Charal bridge. "They are light, efficient and discreet, they blend well with the geometry of the bridge and the decoration of the boat," underlines Pierre-François Dargnies. Who concludes: “This is a recent but promising partnership, because we hope to go further: our goal is to have a fossil-free boat for the Route du Rhum 2022, with solar and hydrogen generators. We are also very interested in wind power, which, with the speeds that the Imoca reach today, is a solution to study, even if it is complex to implement. "

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Apologies if this has been posted already.  No foils.  Delay in build?  Nice images anyway

 

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For fellow Facebook avoiders:

 

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9 hours ago, Sailbydate said:

For fellow Facebook avoiders:

 

Same as above no?  :lol:

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4 hours ago, jb5 said:

Same as above no?  :lol:

Yeah, but cannot activate Facebook link. 

More importantly, no sign of foils, as you point out, JB.

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90 deg test. Of course without foils. 

 

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From the 11th Hour Racing Team's newsletter (February), a new edit of the return trip from Salvador, with full (6) TOR crew, by Amory Ross.

 

 

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More pictures of the 90 degree test. 

 

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Update on Charal and how they see the sail selection playing out.

https://www.charal.fr/post-voile/chantier-charal-comment-les-voiles-doivent-sadapter-au-vol/

Extract

The Vendée Globe allows eight sails including the mainsail and the compulsory storm sail which is almost never used, and "two compulsory de facto sails, the J2 (or staysail) and the J3 (or ORC) , sails for upwind and heavy weather  - Nicolas Andrieu, responsible for performance within the Charal Sailing Team and in charge of the sails program. There are therefore four sails to choose from a range, which includes the J1 (or solent), a light weather upwind sail, gennakers, small or large (including code zero), used for reaching and downwind and spinnakers, small or large, downwind.

On the Imoca Charal, a first set were manufactured by North Sails for the launch in August 2018 and have since evolved, with some new sails on the Transat Jacques Vabre, of which Jérémie Beyou said: "In more than a year, we saw a lot in terms of sail shapes and wear, which allowed us to write a big bible of what should be the sails of the Vendée Globe ” . And this testing period is not over: “In view of the complete new set of sails which we will have in mid-August for the Vendée Globe, we will still test a lot of things with North, especially on downwind sails that we will have on New York-Vendée (in June) . "

The stakes are high, especially since the behavior of the new foilers, boats specifically built around the foils changes the way of understanding the sail plan. Nicolas Andrieu explains: “At certain speeds when in flight mode, the boats need to be much less covered than before and the“ range ”, namely the range of use, of certain sails is more reduced. "

This potentially means many changes of sails for the skipper, which the Charal Sailing Team wishes to avoid. “The challenge for us is to reduce the number of maneuvers on the Vendée Globe, because the faster the boats go, the more you change ground, the more you lose ground, not to mention that it is a big energy expenditure for the skipper. So the goal is not necessarily to have the most effective sails in all conditions, but to have sails that overlap well so that Jérémie does not have to change them when we are a bit between two sails, ” explains Nicolas Andrieu. Who concludes: “Today, as everyone is groping a little on this issue of adapting the set of sails to the new behavior of the boat, there is a gain to be made which is not negligible. "

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1 hour ago, jb5 said:

 

Update on Charal and how they see the sail selection playing out.

https://www.charal.fr/post-voile/chantier-charal-comment-les-voiles-doivent-sadapter-au-vol/

Extract

The Vendée Globe allows eight sails including the mainsail and the compulsory storm sail which is almost never used, and "two compulsory de facto sails, the J2 (or staysail) and the J3 (or ORC) , sails for upwind and heavy weather  - Nicolas Andrieu, responsible for performance within the Charal Sailing Team and in charge of the sails program. There are therefore four sails to choose from a range, which includes the J1 (or solent), a light weather upwind sail, gennakers, small or large (including code zero), used for reaching and downwind and spinnakers, small or large, downwind.

On the Imoca Charal, a first set were manufactured by North Sails for the launch in August 2018 and have since evolved, with some new sails on the Transat Jacques Vabre, of which Jérémie Beyou said: "In more than a year, we saw a lot in terms of sail shapes and wear, which allowed us to write a big bible of what should be the sails of the Vendée Globe ” . And this testing period is not over: “In view of the complete new set of sails which we will have in mid-August for the Vendée Globe, we will still test a lot of things with North, especially on downwind sails that we will have on New York-Vendée (in June) . "

The stakes are high, especially since the behavior of the new foilers, boats specifically built around the foils changes the way of understanding the sail plan. Nicolas Andrieu explains: “At certain speeds when in flight mode, the boats need to be much less covered than before and the“ range ”, namely the range of use, of certain sails is more reduced. "

This potentially means many changes of sails for the skipper, which the Charal Sailing Team wishes to avoid. “The challenge for us is to reduce the number of maneuvers on the Vendée Globe, because the faster the boats go, the more you change ground, the more you lose ground, not to mention that it is a big energy expenditure for the skipper. So the goal is not necessarily to have the most effective sails in all conditions, but to have sails that overlap well so that Jérémie does not have to change them when we are a bit between two sails, ” explains Nicolas Andrieu. Who concludes: “Today, as everyone is groping a little on this issue of adapting the set of sails to the new behavior of the boat, there is a gain to be made which is not negligible. "

I'll bet they're being cut a lot flatter too, as the AW moves further forward.

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4 minutes ago, Sailbydate said:

I'll bet they're being cut a lot flatter too, as the AW moves further forward.

Yes agree. Some will be looking to skip the spinnaker as well. 

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https://voilesetvoiliers.ouest-france.fr/course-au-large/vendee-globe/vendee-globe-entretien-avec-charlie-dalin-apivia-est-un-bateau-assez-facile-891f4dfa-5e24-11ea-87a0-4b1a1193eab3

Charlie Dalin - Apivia interview

Some extracts

On the TJV doldrums

Charlie Dalin: We asked ourselves a lot of questions! We had a Multi50 in front of us too, but in the doldrums, nothing is really stalled… We suffer. In fact, Jérémie and Christopher had strong east wind and Charal continued to slide with this breeze under a gennaker: for me, it was linked to an east wave.

We had a magic sequence: I don't know if I'm going to relive this

We could see that (weak) wind was coming from the North and we were anxious to fall into it. We managed to get away with the boats that used to sail alongside us like 11 th Hour Racing… We were able to do a “pif-paf” (double jibe) at night, to play a shift like on La Solitaire du Figaro. And we could just stay in this little flow of East: we know that it closed behind us.

This summer

Charlie Dalin: The Transat CIC and the New York-Vendée, and also the Défi Azimut in September in Lorient. It's a busy year. But I will be able to learn a little more about my boat before the world tour alone. Currently Apivia is under construction in Lorient and we will launch about March 18. We worked mainly on solo ergonomics and reliability, but there was not much to repair.

New foils

Charlie Dalin We'll see ... It's a possibility. You think about it, but it costs a little money. We will not already change the foil wells. We will do a new construction this summer.

Getting passed by Charal off the Canaries in the TJV

Charlie Dalin: There is a way to gain performance under these conditions: it was only going a little knot faster! Since then, we have learned a lot in the race and the solo return transport: it will not be the same solo on the Vendée Globe!

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https://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/voile-le-grand-pari-de-manuard-pour-transformer-les-imoca-06-03-2020-12518624.php

Manuard (Tripon) interview on link.  Some excerpts below.  There is also a video on the link.

What did computer simulations say?
On the digital models, we clearly saw the beneficial effects. We carried out tests in downwind conditions or, with the sea, the boats with pointed noses, enter the nose in the water, therefore brake. Our rounded bow worked better in downwind waves because the boat bakes less, it stays above the wave, wets less, slows less. Afterwards, I don't think the Imoca will be completely dry, we plan to protect the cockpit. I never told Armel Tripon that he was going to do the Vendée Globe without being wet (laughs).

The hull evokes a whale…
The basic idea is to be more efficient downwind and to be less bothered by the waves that are caught. We hope to go faster than the others downwind. The Vendée Globe is mostly downwind and reaching very low. The boat was designed for that, for these gaits.

You enter the fairly closed circle of architects who design Imoca. Has your status changed?
I am aware of this, it is a great opportunity that Armel Tripon and the Black Pepper shipyard in Nantes have given me. I have had some feedback from the community and there are quite a few people for whom it makes sense. I have not had any negative feedback even if there are things that will not please everyone. I perceive a real interest of people who follow boat races, for architecture and design. The differences between the Verdier plans, the VPLP, the Juan Koujoumdjan are perceived by those who are interested in our sport. It brings diversity, it gives a boost to sailing.

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5 hours ago, jb5 said:

https://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/voile-le-grand-pari-de-manuard-pour-transformer-les-imoca-06-03-2020-12518624.php

Manuard (Tripon) interview on link.  Some excerpts below.  There is also a video on the link.

What did computer simulations say?
On the digital models, we clearly saw the beneficial effects. We carried out tests in downwind conditions or, with the sea, the boats with pointed noses, enter the nose in the water, therefore brake. Our rounded bow worked better in downwind waves because the boat bakes less, it stays above the wave, wets less, slows less. Afterwards, I don't think the Imoca will be completely dry, we plan to protect the cockpit. I never told Armel Tripon that he was going to do the Vendée Globe without being wet (laughs).

The hull evokes a whale…
The basic idea is to be more efficient downwind and to be less bothered by the waves that are caught. We hope to go faster than the others downwind. The Vendée Globe is mostly downwind and reaching very low. The boat was designed for that, for these gaits.

You enter the fairly closed circle of architects who design Imoca. Has your status changed?
I am aware of this, it is a great opportunity that Armel Tripon and the Black Pepper shipyard in Nantes have given me. I have had some feedback from the community and there are quite a few people for whom it makes sense. I have not had any negative feedback even if there are things that will not please everyone. I perceive a real interest of people who follow boat races, for architecture and design. The differences between the Verdier plans, the VPLP, the Juan Koujoumdjan are perceived by those who are interested in our sport. It brings diversity, it gives a boost to sailing.

Hmmmm. Manuard's, L'Occitane design will get the chance to impress, or not, on the water. 

Tripon will be up to the challenge. 

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Interesting perspective. The two smallest sails on Apivia, excluding the storm sail. 

 

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No sign of L'Occitane's foils yet? That must be frustrating, Tripon. It's sure frustrating me. ;-)

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Wicked. Fully deployed, not too dissimilar in presentation to Hugo Boss, maybe?

Are these the first IMOCA 60 foils which do not pierce the deck?

Screen Shot 2020-03-08 at 9.43.53 AM.png

Screen Shot 2020-03-08 at 9.44.00 AM.png

Screen Shot 2020-03-08 at 9.44.21 AM.png

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Oh boy. What an exciting ocean racing class this is.

Here's a parade of IMOCA60's (not a new vid) to get the blood flowing.

 

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38 minutes ago, jb5 said:

Looks maybe to have a lot of volume forward like, Apivia. Looking forward to the reveal.  

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Using Facebook is beyond words awful, but this seems to be new. Sorry if its not.

 

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17 minutes ago, Sailbydate said:

Looks maybe to have a lot of volume forward like, Apivia. Looking forward to the reveal.  

Regarding the lateness of the launch they compare it to the 2000 launch of Michel Desjoyeaux in May that year and of course he went on to win the 2000/1 VG for PRB.  Like nothing much has changed in 20 years and 4 further editions.  Good luck to them on that one.

I am looking forward to seeing it as well.

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5 hours ago, jb5 said:

Regarding the lateness of the launch they compare it to the 2000 launch of Michel Desjoyeaux in May that year and of course he went on to win the 2000/1 VG for PRB.  Like nothing much has changed in 20 years and 4 further editions.  Good luck to them on that one.

I am looking forward to seeing it as well.

Is this a sister ship to ARKEA PAPREC, JB, or a variation from JuanK? Do you know much about the design?

I think Michel Desjoyeaux was the build and campaign manager also, so you'd expect the positive spin from that camp, right?

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I like L'Occitane's approach. Rather than look to how to retract the foils, look at how to change their orientation relative to the hull so that they are clear of the water. Also keeps the inboard bearing and structure lower and reduces the openings by half. With the inboard bearing being the moveable one, keeping that structure low is significant.

I bet the others will be watching them more closely than the others that are far more of a development on the same theme.

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5 hours ago, Sailbydate said:

Is this a sister ship to ARKEA PAPREC, JB, or a variation from JuanK? Do you know much about the design?

I think Michel Desjoyeaux was the build and campaign manager also, so you'd expect the positive spin from that camp, right?

According to Desjoyeaux, they just kept the global shape of the hull (the deck aswell, I suppose). Bulkheads are announced to be different. The lamination process from Mer Agitée could also be different so the final weight will differ. For the french understanding members, I strongly advise you to listen the podcast from tip&shaft with Michel Desjoyeaux (3 hour long discussion !), it's fascinating! 

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6 hours ago, Sailbydate said:

Is this a sister ship to ARKEA PAPREC, JB, or a variation from JuanK? Do you know much about the design?

I think Michel Desjoyeaux was the build and campaign manager also, so you'd expect the positive spin from that camp, right?

Similar visible design would be my expectation.  I would hope the cockpit is a little better considered than AP's wide open spaces and difficult looking forward access.  Desjoyeaux was one of the first with the sliding roof enclosure cockpit on the first Foncia in 2008/9 (now Jean Le Cam's boat).  Wonder if they changed the forward deck camber to remove the need for drains. Biggest issues I see are gaining quick reliability within the limited available testing time.  The boats are way more complex these days of course than in 2000 and 2008.  Can this group go up against a very well versed as MER Concept in modern IMOCA prep and turn out an instant winner.  Foil shape in the water I would think will continue to converge with the other new boats.  Will find out soon I guess.  Its great to have 4 designers in play.

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https://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/voile-nicolas-troussel-ce-projet-est-genial-09-03-2020-12521549.php

Nicolas Troussel interview on the link in French - Corum IMOCA.  Some excerpts below,.

Abandoned the Route du Rhum 2018 in Class40, Corum, who then decides to launch a new Imoca project for the Vendée Globe 2020.
On November 9, 2018, I returned from Portugal after my abandonment. I work on my files and at the end of November Corum l'Épargne, tells me "ok, here we go". I go to see Juan Kouyoumdjian and there, Greg Evrard tells us "I'm ready to be project manager if you go". It reassured everyone, it was one more stone. In the process, I chat with Michel Desjoyeaux at the Salon nautique in Paris, we all see each other with Kouyoumdjian at Corum in Paris and we sign at the end of December.

Why did you choose Juan Kouyoumdjian as architect and Michel Desjoyeaux's Mer Agitée project?
Kouyoumdjian, I like the man because he is not like the others, a little like me. He has lots of ideas, is able to go on paths that others do not explore. This is my philosophy. Juan is very talented and has things to prove in the Imoca class. For the construction sites, I called several, including that of Michel Desjoyeaux necessarily. He has won the Vendée Globe twice, has the reputation of knowing how to build, of following construction sites very well, etc. And as Michel wanted to work with Kouyoumdjian… There was an alignment of planets in a short time. It was extraordinary.

In terms of timing, it's hot. You are not ahead ...
We still have a lot of work. In our specifications, we wanted to make a solid boat. We did not skimp on the safety factors. Being light is not a criterion that has been retained. The launch is scheduled for mid-March.

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300kgs. L'Occitane's foil shape solution is interesting. And closer in semicircular shape (like Hugo Boss's) than the VPLP Verdier, or Juan K foils - which tend to have flatter surfaces with sharper angles, like Charal's for example.

Screen Shot 2020-03-12 at 8.22.37 AM.png

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4 hours ago, Sailbydate said:

300kgs. L'Occitane's foil shape solution is interesting. And closer in semicircular shape (like Hugo Boss's) than the VPLP Verdier, or Juan K foils - which tend to have flatter surfaces with sharper angles, like Charal's for example.

Screen Shot 2020-03-12 at 8.22.37 AM.png

True but what will the v2s look like? All heading in a similar direction? 

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https://www.scanvoile.com/2020/03/la-transat-new-york-vendee-les-sables-2020-les-inscrits.html?m=1#.XmmHmbkpC7o

27 entries for the NY Vendee. 17 foilers. Good to see Conrad on the list. 

Fabrice Amedeo - Newrest & Art et Fenêtres
Romain Attanasio - PURE
Yannick Bestaven - Maître CoQ
Jérémie Beyou - Charal
Conrad Colman - Ethical Power
Manuel Cousin - Groupe Sétin
Clarisse Crémer - Banque Populaire IX
Charlie Dalin - APIVIA
Sam Davies - Initiatives Cœur
Benjamin Dutreux - Water Family-Oceania Hotels
Kevin Escoffier - PRB
Pip Hare - Pip Hare Ocean Racing
Boris Herrmann - Malizia II-Yacht Club de Monaco
Isabelle Joschke - MACSF
Stéphane Le Diraison - Time For Oceans
Miranda Merron - French Campaign
Erik Nigon - Towards a World Without AIDS
Giancarlo Pedote - Prysmian Group
Alan Roura - La Fabrique
Thomas Ruyant - ADVENS for Cybersecurity
Damien Seguin - APICIL Group
Kojiro Shiraishi - DMG Mori Global One
Sébastien Simon - ARKEA PAPREC
Maxime Sorel - V and B-Mayenne
Alex Thomson - Hugo Boss
Armel Tripon - L'Occitane en Provence
Nicolas Troussel - CORUM L'Épargne


Key dates for the race:
In New York:
- June 10: deadline for arrival of boats at the Brooklyn Navy Yard
- June 11: meeting of skippers at the French consulate
- June 13: exhibition regatta in the form of runs at the foot of the statue of Liberty
- June 16: departure from New York-Vendée-Les Sables d'Olonne

Aux Sables d'Olonne:
- June 25: opening of the village
- Between June 25 and 28: ETA of the boats
- June 28: Postlogue, runs in front of the large Sables d'Olonne beach and awards ceremony

Source: J Huve

 

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2 hours ago, jb5 said:

True but what will the v2s look like? All heading in a similar direction? 

Be interesting to see the convergence, if any.

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9 hours ago, jb5 said:

True but what will the v2s look like? All heading in a similar direction? 

Have they got time to build a V2? 

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1 hour ago, JL92S said:

Have they got time to build a V2? 

Wait until we see the second one of V1 before worrying about V2? 

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2 hours ago, JL92S said:

Have they got time to build a V2? 

L'Occitane ? Probably not unless they have to due to an early usage breakage or similar. which hopefully won't happen but did to Arkea Paprec.  I was talking about the v2 foils coming on HB, Arkea Paprec and Charal in particular and also likely V2's for Apivia and Advens later in the season and the potential for convergence of in the water shape, not so much hull entry/exit design. Point is anyway, until we see the final versions for the VG it's a moving playing field which is a fun and unique new variable in IMOCA.

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Let me venture a guess, compiling what I heard from my sources...

 

HB V2 : very similar geometry (if not identical) to V1.

Arkea : Similar concept as V1, but with bigger shafts !

Corum may be quite different from Arkea, not a lot more info.

Malizia is building the same foils as MACSF.

Verdier V2's might feature longer shafts, and less flexible tips.

No info on Charal.

 

Interesting times ahead !

 

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2 hours ago, RedFlag said:

Let me venture a guess, compiling what I heard from my sources...

 

HB V2 : very similar geometry (if not identical) to V1.

Arkea : Similar concept as V1, but with bigger shafts !

Corum may be quite different from Arkea, not a lot more info.

Malizia is building the same foils as MACSF.

Verdier V2's might feature longer shafts, and less flexible tips.

No info on Charal.

 

Interesting times ahead !

 

Charal are having new tunnels installed apparently so possibly a whole new geometry. Arkea Paprec have to have new control systems for the foils as well as new foils due to the rule clarification and so likely also have revised tunnels as well. Very interesting time. 

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2 hours ago, ctutmark said:

Image may contain: sky, cloud, ocean, outdoor, water and nature

Hope those foil cases and control line ports are watertight. Prolly watertight bulkheads either side, right?

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1 hour ago, Sailbydate said:

Hope those foil cases and control line ports are watertight. Prolly watertight bulkheads either side, right?

I expect the inboard end of the foil cases drain directly into the keel wet box. Since the foil boxes curve and essentially end at the hull right on centerline this would be an easy thing to plumb. 

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1 hour ago, Miffy said:

Foil frequency sounds good. 

Sounds fast. ;-)

Not much of a seaway running in that vid, but she looks like she might be comparatively dry up there on that foredeck..

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14 hours ago, ctutmark said:

Image may contain: sky, cloud, ocean, outdoor, water and nature

Looking at this photo and the video, recognising that this is flat water, I really like the orientation. Looks like a state that could be maintained with relatively little work and fatigue compared to the videos of the other I have seen. Skimming and flat has to be quicker than going bow up with the likely, frequent heavy landings. A marathon, not  sprint.

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6 hours ago, Chimp too said:

Looking at this photo and the video, recognising that this is flat water, I really like the orientation. Looks like a state that could be maintained with relatively little work and fatigue compared to the videos of the other I have seen. Skimming and flat has to be quicker than going bow up with the likely, frequent heavy landings. A marathon, not  sprint.

Some additional pics and details- https://voilesetvoiliers.ouest-france.fr/bateau/60-pieds/imoca/vendee-globe-armel-tripon-l-occitane-proche-du-multicoque-vol-bas-et-stable-a-30-noeuds-a60d018e-652f-11ea-81e0-b4367081294e?fbclid=IwAR2zgJ3DyJWJPMovZzTJiqz9Jg892BfNdUX3g8GKzwDNkwt8T9-yuGY4NBM

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https://www.scanvoile.com/2020/03/romain-attanasio-vendee-globe-itw-bateau-imoca-pure-preparation.html#.Xmuo5VfYqbg

Romain Attanasio (Pure) interview on link.  This is his 2nd VG.  He finished the race last time despite substantial rudder damage fairly early on.

They are trying to lighten the boat by 600kg mainly through reduction in creature comforts to make it more competitive.  Boat is the former Gitana Eighty of Loic Peyron (2007 Farr).  Aiming to be the first boat in the forthcoming VG to finish without foils possibly in the top 10.  See's Damien Seguin as a good measure of performance for those boats in this 'sub class' in the VG fleet.

Of the new boats he thinks the Verdier boats (Apivia and Advens) look best to sail, easier on the skipper.  He's been on Sam his wife's boat and was impressed by the impacts coming off the foils.  Like everyone else he is curious about L'Occitane.

I would say Seguin will be very hard to beat by anyone in that sub class but Romain is a class act as well.  Good to see he is also doing the NY-Vendee Transat this year.

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6 hours ago, Chimp too said:

Looking at this photo and the video, recognising that this is flat water, I really like the orientation. Looks like a state that could be maintained with relatively little work and fatigue compared to the videos of the other I have seen. Skimming and flat has to be quicker than going bow up with the likely, frequent heavy landings. A marathon, not  sprint.

for me, it reminds of figaro 3 if you look at foils. You could push more "ballast weight" to make it faster. Ideal for south ocean.

Ive always liked scow design. Now we have it at all classes (650, c40, I60). 

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https://mailchi.mp/tipandshaft.com/tip-shaft-203-coronavirus-comment-la-voile-fait-face-michel-desjoyeaux-corum-est-le-bateau-sur-lequel-je-me-suis-le-plus-investi?e=9a497c6fa7

Interview with Michel Desjoyeaux (in French). Some quotes with very rough translation below. More good stuff on the link.  

it is Nicolas Troussel's boat, not Michel Desjoyeaux's, of that there is no mistake. But it is more particularly on the fittings and ergonomics part, we were able to find solutions to make a cockpit which, I think, will be functional in navigation.

There is no longer really a roof , this is what makes this boat original. But we did not do it like that so that it was original, the objective was that it passes the criteria of gauge[in particular the 180 degree digital rectification, Editor's note] in a slightly different way from the others. That is to say, either you try to lower the center of gravity of everything and you make a boat very low on the water, but suddenly very unstable at wide angles because you have little volume in the heights, or on the contrary, you mount the volumes and suddenly, you manage to gain a lot of weight at the bottom of the keel. To complete the explanation: before the appearance of the foils, the more weight you put at the bottom of the keel, the more you had a stiff boat with the canvas, so the more you could torch the canvas and go fast. With the foils, the transverse stability of the boat is no longer mainly obtained by the keel, but by the foil, so it is no longer useful to have a heavy keel. I make it simple, but that's kind of the reasoning.

We knew from the start that it would be just in time, we are a little behind the schedule that had been imagined, but it allowed us to take advantage of the experience of the different boats that sailed. The geometry of the foils could have been decided quite late and we were able to impose criteria on the solidity of the boat, I can say that it is the sturdiest boat than Juan and we have never done.

I can't wait to see the foil V2s, especially Charal's , is he going to go to the others or will it be the opposite, knowing that so far he who still showed the best speeds with very interesting compromises? Unfortunately, we couldn't see much of Alex Thomson on the Transat Jacques Vabre when he was the only one to have curved foils. What is certain is that there are compromises to be found between a boat made for VMG and a more versatile boat, I believe that we will have the answer of the best choice after the Vendée , and not before.

 

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Thank you for that article!

A few more tidbits you did not translate. 

If Mich' Dej' were sailing the next VG, he would have chosen curved foils a la Alex Thomson, because according to him, it is easier to depower when the sailing is getting rpugh in the Southern Ocean... you can get more of the foil inside. He thinks that others will have bad surprises... unless they are do fast that they can stay ahead of the low pressure systems, with manageable seas...

Also, if the winner does not break anything major, he thinks that it can be done in 68 days...

Single handed...

On a monohull...

Asked his pronostic for a winner, he only conceded that he bets the winner will be a black boat.....

Last tidbit, with foils extended. CORUM will be 13 m wide!!! 2 more meters than the outriggers !!

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Thanks for the translations, JB and Laurent.

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9 hours ago, Chimp too said:

 Skimming and flat has to be quicker than going bow up with the likely, frequent heavy landings. A marathon, not  sprint.

Pretty much all the new foilers sail as bow down as they can IMO, the big wheelies like in all the promo videos are more the exception rather than the rule compared to the 2016 foilers and to eat extent, Charal. 

 

yysw264420.jpg.75e6a25fcc1be97b3e853cf3301bb887.jpg

IMG_3163.PNG.e5af8708bb4cf3c63e63b4361dc65b83.PNG

That seems to be the norm, rather than the wild ride that is Charal. Although don't get me wrong, occitane will probably sail the flattest and I bet you that in very heavy seas it will be the fastest. 

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3 hours ago, Laurent said:

 

Asked his pronostic for a winner, he only conceded that he bets the winner will be a black boat.....

 

Nice trick from Michel, the only black boats are Hb, Charal, and l'occitane right ?

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3 hours ago, yl75 said:

Nice trick from Michel, the only black boats are Hb, Charal, and l'occitane right ?

And who knows? Maybe CORUM???

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7 hours ago, Laurent said:

And who knows? Maybe CORUM???

Nah will most probably be greenish blue, the color of Corum logo, in fact it is :

troussel_2.png?h=920929c4&itok=VdTsYBfm

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Royal Western yc have just announced Ostar/Twostar Plymouth to Rhode island has been postponed until 2021. 

Will be interesting if Cowes Week goes ahead and if the new (Original) Lonely Rock (Fastnet) Race still runs in August. If they put that back a year it will run into the not-the-Fastnet Race to Cherbourg. Skippers will then have two courses to choose from.

 

https://rwyc.org/mailasail-ostar-twostar-postponed/

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The Vendee Globe is also at risk, I reckon. No training for the next 1-2 months at least. No race to New York in May/June, etc. Tough situation for any campaign looking to secure sponsors. Voices asking to postpone one year are going to start appearing. TOR would need to postpone, too. 

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Clipper Race now abandoned because likely that the fleet would not be allowed to sail the next leg and stop in Seattle.

Organisers say will be restarted in approximately 10 months and the 2021 race postponed until 2022. 

It will be interesting if the company can hold out until then.

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14 hours ago, JeronimoII said:

No training for the next 1-2 months at least. 

why no training?  As far as I can tell the only thing stopping boats heading off for a few weeks on the water is lack of supplies.

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24 minutes ago, SCARECROW said:

why no training?  As far as I can tell the only thing stopping boats heading off for a few weeks on the water is lack of supplies.

A french mate just told me that in France you're not allowed out of your house, and in Italy and Spain they have the army in the streets!

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https://www.letelegramme.fr/voile/voile-the-transat-cic-dalin-ou-les-ambitions-d-un-solitaire-17-03-2020-12527536.php

Its not clear exactly how old this interview with Charlie Dalin (Apivia) is, it was posted on the site today.  It is in French.

They are talking about still doing the Transat CIC and to get as many racing miles on the boat solo as possible.

I guess it wont happen, but hope it does.  The hysteria needs a reality check.

 Apivia has been "somewhat" modified for solo sailing: ...on the trip back from Brazil the main objective was above all to understand the machine solo since it was the first major navigation on board alone. I wanted to see what was suitable solo and what was not . The winter construction site, which started very early in early December, made it possible to adapt the ergonomics and work on the foils a little.
...On the return trip from Brazil, I discovered the high speeds that we do not know in Figaro. After Thomson's problems, it brings different fears. It's interesting to live them to better manage them afterwards.

 

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