Gabe_nyc

Any thoughts on 1987 Aloha 30?

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Ouyang built good boats.

Ron Holland designed good boats.

But that old, specifics of that boat are everything.

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I owned a 1980 Aloha 27.  Enjoyed it greatly.  Build quality was medium, some things were great, some drove me nuts (interior woodwork fastened with plain steel screws???).   Pretty solid boat.  Usual issues of potential wet core.

There is a good website for owners, you could ask questions there.   www.alohaowners.com

 

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I'm on my fourth year with A30 #7 (built in 1987) and we're pretty pleased with the boat.  It had been well maintained for 20+ years by the original owner, then virtually ignored (but lived aboard) by the second owner for the next 6 years.  We've worked to catch up on the years of lost maintenance, and focused upgrades on improving sailing capabilities for shorthanded racing.  We recently retired and relocated to eastern Lake Ontario, so are pivoting our use to more short-term cruising.

In general, Aloha Boats have a pretty good reputation on the Great Lakes, but my own experience is that integrity varied greatly from boat to boat, and I'd suggest any Aloha's specific build quality depended on how Aloha's order book looked at the time...  I've seen significant variation in how details and basics were assembled from one boat to another...

The Ouyang family sourced their keelboat designs from various reputable architects:  Ted Brewer, Bob Perry, Mark Ellis, and Ron Holland.  The 30's an oddball in Aloha's offerings since it's the only design that leans sharply towards performance rather than cruising comfort.  It's clear that Aloha didn't have much experience dealing with scantlings for lighter boats, since the 30's way heavier than it's design intended - I've never seen one that floats on it's line properly.  I've contacted Ron Holland a few times to find out more about the design, but never heard back, and suspect that Aloha screwed around with his original design.  The cockpit coamings in particular are uncomfortable and awkward and I can't believe Ron would've designed them that way...

THE GOOD:

  • A good pedigree Ron Holland design:  the boat sails pretty well, not as quick as MORC designs of the same vintage, but better than most 30' PHRF racer/cruiser types.
  • The frac rig is easy to handle, simple to switch gears and keep balanced so great for shorthanding.  We've modified our rig with running backstays and a jumper strut to support the crappy Isomat rig and use oversized spinnakers.
  • The stick-built interior (no fiberglass liners) looks nice, is strong structurally, and is easier to work around than moulded pans.
  • The interior layout is very open and nice for two.  The cabin windows are massive so it's very light below, more like a powerboat salon than a sailboat.
  • The open transom to a small swim platform is a nice feature.
  • The original owner converted from wheel to tiller steering which we love.  The wheel installation is pushed to the back of the cockpit, takes up a ton of space in the small cockpit, and the split backstays are constantly in the way of the helmsman's head.

THE BAD:

  • Boat is HEAVY - design displacement is 6800 lbs but the actual weight is close to ~8000 lbs.  It is frustratingly difficult to keep the waterline and transom clean when they're immersed half the time.
  • Cockpit coamings are uncomfortable whether under sail or at rest.
  • The interior layout is miniaturized (a problem common to several Aloha designs).  It looks great on paper but everything is small.  My wife and I are both short to so problems for us but it would be tight for a family.
  • Isomat spar is iffy.
  • Inspect chainplate terminations carefully - I've seen a few different techniques used.
  • More than a few A30s have had problems with the hull floor behind the keel i.e. failure of laminate following groundings which push the back of the keel up into the hull.
  • The few A30s I've seen all have different thru hull locations and styles.
  • The Isomat rig on at least one A30 was undersized (used the A27 profile which is way too small).  I've heard of two mast failures on A30s.
  • The Westerbeke W13A's a great motor but parts are not inexpensive.

 

We love our boat but recognize it's not perfect.  With a careful survey and ongoing maintenance, the boat could be a great choice.

 

Cheers!

 

 

20180902 16 LongReach.JPG

20180813 KF LSYC.jpg

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26 minutes ago, CriticalPath said:

The original owner converted from wheel to tiller steering which we love. 

Thank you for your very comprehensive answer.

What was needed for the conversion other than removing the binnacle, relocating the engine controls and installing a long S-shaped tiller on the bracket supplied w the stubby emergency tiller?

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12 minutes ago, Gabe_nyc said:

Thank you for your very comprehensive answer.

What was needed for the conversion other than removing the binnacle, relocating the engine controls and installing a long S-shaped tiller on the bracket supplied w the stubby emergency tiller?

I'm gonna guess that's all that was required, assuming the bracket for the emergency tiller is robust enough to handle the task fulltime.  Here's a few photos of the tiller and bracket that came with the boat when we bought it, and a few more of the carbon replacement I had made.

20180207 KFTiller 01.jpg

20180207 KFTiller 02.jpg

20180207 KFTiller 03.jpg

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IMG_0515.jpg

IMG_0517.jpg

IMG_0519.jpg

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We just bought a 1986 Aloha 32 a few months ago.  Haven't really had the chance to get to know her yet but I am impressed with the build quality.  Ours was babied pretty much of her life (as best as we can tell) and that played a big part in the purchase. 

Since the purchase I've been over her a few times, opened her up and so far have seen nothing that indicates careless construction.  Ours has a solid glass hull below the waterline but a few years before we bought her the then owner did a peel and barrier coat.  Don't know if that was fiberglass problems or just a loving owner.

About the only issue I've had is sailing upwind.  But I think that's the genoa.  Other than that, I feel like we got a lot of boat for the money.  Friends we've had out are usually shocked we paid so little.  I think the low price is because Aloha is not a household name.

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33 minutes ago, Gabe_nyc said:

Wow! 

Beautiful work!

Thanks, my buddy does very nice carbon work - good enough to have been recruited by assorted America's Cup teams for the past several campaigns.  In his spare time when he's back in the frozen tundra, he cobbles together pretty carbon bits for good friends.

I only wish the rest of the boat met the same standards!

Cheers!

 

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A lot of builders (aloha being one) offered a chance at production to option upgrade on fittings and bits. We have 3 Aloha in our harbor , 2 - 28's and a 30, most surprising are the two 28's side by side its almost like 2 different builders made them , but one was the basic and the other was optioned up nicely. 

@criticalpath, i see your located in the BOQ, we passed through last week and stopped at the Trenton marina, WOW. Municipal operations like Cobourg and especially Oakville need to go have a look at how it should be done. 

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4 hours ago, crankcall said:

A lot of builders (aloha being one) offered a chance at production to option upgrade on fittings and bits. We have 3 Aloha in our harbor , 2 - 28's and a 30, most surprising are the two 28's side by side its almost like 2 different builders made them , but one was the basic and the other was optioned up nicely. 

@criticalpath, i see your located in the BOQ, we passed through last week and stopped at the Trenton marina, WOW. Municipal operations like Cobourg and especially Oakville need to go have a look at how it should be done. 

Hiya crank,

Aloha’s 28/ 8.5 was in production for about 15 years so went through some pretty significant equipment changes over that time even though the basic design remained unchanged.  The newer 8.5s look and are equipped much differently than the original 28s.

We moved outta TO for (hopefully!) the last time earlier this year, settling in to a slower pace and less responsibility in Quinte.  Trent Port is a great facility - their pods are the best bathroom facilities on the lake in quantity, quality, and service.  Beauty facility, and has become an important stopover for US$ spending powerboat loopers as they travel through Canada.

Cheers!

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