EarthBM

Hughes/Perry 63 tri

Recommended Posts

no idea, but I can't imagine how terrifying a 90' dismasting would be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

#$@&%*! - Rosinante suffered a dismasting shortly after her rig was taken off and redesigned. Her boom and all equipment above and below deck remain.  Her prior mast, top rigging and sails were cut-away at sea.  Her owner says he has no time for renewing her rig and his cruising plans are indefinitely postponed.  Do you have time to re-rig this fabulous all carbon fiber trimaran?  She is offered at a fire sale price!

image.png.5042868691f109e2b2016716b8b1e713.png

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Strange that this keeps coming up. Use the search function and I think you will find a thread or five. My info and recall is dated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Rasputin22 said:

About twice as terrifying as a 45' dismasting usually is...

In terms of kinetic energy it’s x16 times

58 minutes ago, Wess said:

Strange that this keeps coming up. Use the search function and I think you will find a thread or five. My info and recall is dated.

I actually did search. Other than some confusion whether Faamu Sami or Rosinante was Pipeline 2 or 3, nada

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, EarthBM said:

In terms of kinetic energy it’s x16 times

I actually did search. Other than some confusion whether Faamu Sami or Rosinante was Pipeline 2 or 3, nada

 

Yeah, but you have about X8 times as much space to run to avoid the falling mast!

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any opinions/intel on the boat though? A proper carbon stick with sails is a $200k fix... worth even looking at it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Was sold recently to go from Hawaii to Europe i thought freshly repainted and in one piece, ie with rig & sails. Don't know what changes to the rig were made? Have to agree with Rasputin 22 on that one. Also agree with Earth BM on cost of new carbon mast & sails.! Tri in Hawaii. Logistics? Love the Tri but?? Anyone have any more info? Cheers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

200k for a rig & sails. I would have thought x4/5 that price. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know where the confusion re Pipeline / Faamu Sami came about other than its also a Kurt Hudges boat but much smaller (if ~45 can be considered small) than this boat.  Rosinante popped up some considerable some time ago in our searching so our info is dated and I could easily be recalling things incorrectly but the general take was a boat that was quite elegant but that came with an associated and rather significant weight penalty.  Maybe somewhat dated design (not sure I agree that but consider Pipeline's rework).  Rotating rig (back then not sure now) which we also would have preferred to avoid (funny in retrospect since we now have one... which I would still prefer to avoid).  More of a cruiser than a racer or performance cruiser and sort of stuck between segments. Not the kind of boat (size, complexity, etc...)  to take on if you were trying to run a program to a budget  due to high operating costs but lacking the performance and luxury that somebody (does not describe the wife and I) with an unlimited budget would take on.  I would be quite interested to know why the rig came down if considering the boat.  Again, I could be recalling this incorrectly, but think it was Bob Perry that did the beams on Rosinante which is otherwise a Kurt Hudges designed boat (I think?).  Not sure why or how Bob's involvement came about and may be a something or a nothing.  Bob is on SA and other social media and quite approachable so anyone serious could reach him for certain.

She is a looker.  Don't think the Hawaii logistics would be unworkable assuming the hull structure and mechanical is all sound. Sounds like @soma has his RTW boat but curious his thoughts on this as it might have been up his alley.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Call Pete McGonagle from Swiftsure. I'd looked into her before I pulled the trigger on my boat. Pete knew a lot of the backstory. It was listed at $900k(?!?) at the time. What was the listing price before? $500? $600? Assuming it sold for $500k, then $350k isn't really a "fire sale". A new rig and sails, with running and standing rigging, furlers, locks, mast electronics, shipped and stepped, will be a lot more than $200k. Use that to beat them up. It does es look like a good boat. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So is it a “white elephant” - a boat where the costs of maintenance, refit, insurance, berthing, etc mean that the market clearing price might as well be negative? Like some old Americas Cup boats, Hydroptere, old commercial jets?

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey @EarthBM- Don't rely on me for that decision if she is of interest to you.  My involvement with the boat was brief and some time ago.  She may make sense for you... just was quickly apparent she wasn't right for us. 

Maybe also look into whatever happened to the old (original) rig/sails/etc... and if that is serviceable and available.  Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Wess said:

Hey @EarthBM- Don't rely on me for that decision if she is of interest to you.  My involvement with the boat was brief and some time ago.  She may make sense for you... just was quickly apparent she wasn't right for us. 

Maybe also look into whatever happened to the old (original) rig/sails/etc... and if that is serviceable and available.  Good luck.

Rig was cut away and deep-sixed after dismasting apparently.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Rig was cut away and deep-sixed after dismasting apparently.

I was reading that (the rig cut away and deep sixed after dismasting) as being a new and redesigned rig.... ie the second rig on the boat. My suggestion if I understand the situation correctly was to try to locate the original (first) rig that the boat had sailed with from its initial launch. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Wess said:

I was reading that (the rig cut away and deep sixed after dismasting) as being a new and redesigned rig.... ie the second rig on the boat. My suggestion if I understand the situation correctly was to try to locate the original (first) rig that the boat had sailed with from its initial launch. 

Here is what I was reading Wess and thought it indicated that the original (Prior) mast was lost (cut away at sea) shortly after the redesign of the rig.  I have a skipper friend that sent me a photo of a Hughes tri in Hawaii that had a weird mast hounds replacement recently that may be the very one. I'll see if I can dig that photo up and post. 

#$@&%*! - Rosinante suffered a dismasting shortly after her rig was taken off and redesigned. Her boom and all equipment above and below deck remain.  Her prior mast, top rigging and sails were cut-away at sea.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Wess, 

     I think this might be the smoking gun for the dismasting!

https://www.instagram.com/p/BpAytQLH63_/?utm_source=ig_web_button_share_sheet

I am purely guessing here Rasp.  Judging from the looks and date of that... that is the original rig (or attachment arrangement)??  If so even if it existed I would not want that rig with that attachment arrangement.  I ain't no engineer but my gosh that looks absurdly inadequate from my desk chair. 

They talk about a redesigned rig.  I pray that (pic/video) wasn't the redesign and if so pray tell who did the redesign.  If there was a subsequent redesigned rig - or maybe just redesigned attachment points on the same wing mast -  and that is what failed... wow.  I don't know how anything could be more sketchy than that photo/video. 

Either way... did I mention I HATE rotating rigs. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is what the rigging company had to say about the original rig configuration and the owners 'improvements' which apparently didn't work out so well for him...  I agree about that pivoting hounds mess I posted above looking pretty gnarly but it apparently served for 18 years and the 'new and improved' rig didn't last 8 months! 

image.png.446609b0720978ad39d0706bdb780664.png

As Bob Perry's grand daughter says, 

ForeGirl.thumb.png.b4e94ecb26f4ab93dad759d52915bce0.png

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

Here is what the rigging company had to say about the original rig configuration and the owners 'improvements' which apparently didn't work out so well for him...  I agree about that pivoting hounds mess I posted above looking pretty gnarly but it apparently served for 18 years and the 'new and improved' rig didn't last 8 months! 

image.png.446609b0720978ad39d0706bdb780664.png

As Bob Perry's grand daughter says, 

ForeGirl.thumb.png.b4e94ecb26f4ab93dad759d52915bce0.png

O.M.G.

So I think what you are saying is what we have is a redesign of the attachment arrangement (shown on the first pic/video) and spreader by Rigging Hawaii and that is what quickly failed.  I can't imagine how anything could be worse than the original but O.M.G.

I know what rigging company in Hawaii I would never ever use.

I can't imagine that BP had anything to do with that original rig attachment arrangement. At least not how it looked and was described.  But then again I ain't no engineer and like you said it seems to have worked for some considerable time. But damn I get the shivers looking at the size of it compared to the line.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

    I'm not sure just how much Bob had to do with the Hughes project at al other that the interiorl. He told me a bit about it and I'll leave it to him say anymore here. I did read a bit of back and forth between Bob and Kurt about the beams but if I remember correctly the owner had a brother who was an engineer and had done the beam design. Bob is pretty good about getting well qualified engineers for such critical areas and I think he had Jim Antrim do the beam calcs on the catamaran that Bob designed. That original hinged hound is very much like the one that was used on the old ROYALE cat, the creme del la creme of the French oceanracing multihull fleet back in the mid 80's. I was part of a Worrell 1000 project in which we built a very nice carbon spar for a SUPERCAT 20 in Ft Lauderdale. The French airforce trained carbon guy was pretty sharp until he had an aluminum pivoting hounds built that was obviously inspired by the one on ROYALE. It lasted about 6 hours of sailing before coming apart on the first leg of the race which pretty much doomed our effort.

   I can't find the photos that I thought I had for the 're-designed' hounds on the Hughes 63 but here is another Waikiki daysail tourist cat hound replacement for the 'Jesus Shackle' on the rotating mainmast. I'm not impressed with the thinking behind this one either. The mods for the 63 in question may have been more of the owners brothers efforts but surely the rigging company would have some say in the mods. Spreader rake changes as mentioned in the Pikstagram post may have more to do with the dismasting than the hounds but I'm trying to find out more. 

     

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I realise RM, staying angles... probably pretty much everything... are completely different, but could a Multi50, or a reduced ORMA rig be pressed into service? There'd have to be a few of those kicking about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Exactly my thoughts. This project only makes sense if a suitable used mast can be procured first.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

 That original hinged hound is very much like the one that was used on the old ROYALE cat, the creme del la creme of the French oceanracing multihull fleet back in the mid 80's.

     

I clearly do not understand the engineering if that the creme!  With the ball and socket in the middle of the mast base and the hing at the front of the wing, the forces don't seem aligned and the hing would be torqued I would think.  Add to that in line spreaders that would allow inversion.... but I am an uneducated hick and like you said if its original, it sure lasted a long time. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ROYALE was considered by many as a benchmark at the time but not for the pivoting hounds. A contemporary tri APRICOT had a really advanced rotating rig by comparison. Looking at Kurt's original drawings of his 63 shows double diamonds so perhaps the rig with the single inline spreaders and the 'barndoor' hounds was not built as designed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So is it crazy to think that the rig on LeHydroptere could fit the bill here?  She is still on the ball at Keehi.  Not sure if she got clear in the auction.  I just saw her today and thought might bring the 63 back to life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like Hydroptere is in the midst of refit. Doubt that rig would suit the Hughes 63. Keep us posted on progress on either boat!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

how about you get a two blocks, run a triple stack of the biggest available parasails through them to the cabin top winches, and go sail somewhere cheap to install a mast...?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

18 hours ago, Loose Cannon said:

how about you get a two blocks, run a triple stack of the biggest available parasails through them to the cabin top winches, and go sail somewhere cheap to install a mast...?

Seem'd to work for this F24... 

kiteF24.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Where would you think that a re-rig of that 63' tri would be cheap? New Zealand and Southern Spars? Maybe could get a decent Chinese carbon spar but either place would be a lot further than I would want to take my chances of sailing there under some jury rigged kites/parasails. 

     A guy got back to the Carolinas after dismasting his tri in the Caribbean a few years ago, let me try and find that story.

     There was a nice Hall carbon rig that came out of a Gunboat 60/62 (Elvis?) a few years ago when it got turbo'ed. I got the whole inventory and the price was great for what was included but it was a non-rotating rig. The whole rig had gone through a thorough electro testing of some sort and it had a clean bill of health.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd buy from Offshore in Michigan. They'll beat the price of Southern/Hall and Lorima and the price of shipping will save you another big chunk. Plus tariffs...

im in pretty regular contact with Steve King (who owns Offshore). If you want an intro let me know. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We just saw that boat in Hawaii in July, mast intact - saw her go out for a day sail.  Was that a new mast, or did they just lose the mast since then?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A copy of the rig on Paradox would be close depending on weight and RM comparisons. And it's been bulletproof as far as I know. Love to see Rosinante get another life world cruising as she was intended. Cheers all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know of a non-rotating carbon Hall spar off a GB55 currently available for sale in good shape at a sensible price.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If the  rig stood all those years with that Heath-Robinson hound arrangement it had to either be docked or only used in light air, infrequently - did this boat see any extended use?

I wonder how the spar failed, sweeping the spreaders aft would have helped contain the inversion problem, maybe allowing for a more spirited sail to find the next weak link.

Putting three, separate, articulated attachments can make sense on a rotating spar mostly to reduce localized flex on the treacherous stainless cables.

Stainless steel standing rigging and rotating spars are a poor combination and that hound would have been conceived to at least give the 1x 19 stainless wire a chance.

Why do you HATE rotating rigs  Wess - personal experience?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, boardhead said:

If the  rig stood all those years with that Heath-Robinson hound arrangement it had to either be docked or only used in light air, infrequently - did this boat see any extended use?

I wonder how the spar failed, sweeping the spreaders aft would have helped contain the inversion problem, maybe allowing for a more spirited sail to find the next weak link.

Putting three, separate, articulated attachments can make sense on a rotating spar mostly to reduce localized flex on the treacherous stainless cables.

Stainless steel standing rigging and rotating spars are a poor combination and that hound would have been conceived to at least give the 1x 19 stainless wire a chance.

Why do you HATE rotating rigs  Wess - personal experience?

 

I don't have a bad experience with them Board.  I am just a hick and like simple.  And all my rigs up the most recent - on all boats big and small, mono and multi - were fixed rigs.  Now every time I gybe the tri and the rotating rig flops over I look up to see if its falling down.  Truth be told I am sure its all over engineered and Corsair and Farrier have done rotating rigs for decades... I'm just too stupid to believe.  Just seems like a lot of ways for a rig to fail for little gain.  But I may get educated and change my view as I sail it more.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Understood, Wess.

The rig on the Corsair is alloy, rotating, stainless wire supported?

Don’t assume that they did a lot and it’s OK. Lot’s of rigs have fallen down and I never liked what I saw, stock.

The 39 out in the Pacific is awful and has to be addressed before the owner can continue his circumnavigation.

We can talk privately if you like, running in and out right now so may not catch any response promptly.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, boardhead said:

Understood, Wess.

The rig on the Corsair is alloy, rotating, stainless wire supported?

Don’t assume that they did a lot and it’s OK. Lot’s of rigs have fallen down and I never liked what I saw, stock.

The 39 out in the Pacific is awful and has to be addressed before the owner can continue his circumnavigation.

We can talk privately if you like, running in and out right now so may not catch any response promptly.

 

Yes.  Its all good.  Got a team here I trust.  We had a lighting strike which prompted refit #2 (within a year of purchase).  Rig is down and making some minor tweaks and improvements.  We absolutely love the boat.  Could have had it totaled and would have made money but we wanted her saved.  We are about a week or two from relaunch though for sure there will be a punch list of fixes after that.  But Fall cruising looks realistic. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
20 hours ago, Wess said:

I don't have a bad experience with them Board.  I am just a hick and like simple.  And all my rigs up the most recent - on all boats big and small, mono and multi - were fixed rigs.  Now every time I gybe the tri and the rotating rig flops over I look up to see if its falling down.  Truth be told I am sure its all over engineered and Corsair and Farrier have done rotating rigs for decades... I'm just too stupid to believe.  Just seems like a lot of ways for a rig to fail for little gain.  But I may get educated and change my view as I sail it more.

Wait what?!

I've dropped 3 rigs in my life, all non-rotating...

I have sailed more with rotating rigs than not...

My experience is that because they are rotating they tend to be much simpler and have less points to fail. 3 consistent stay points, with a simple ball and cup for mast base.

Triple spreader sport boat mast came down when a mast base failed, more fittings more failure points...

Adjustable fore-stay boat mast came down when the fore-stay tension-er failed...

Fixed rig boat with adjustable back-stay tore the fore-stay fitting out of the bow...

I would also go as far as to say that rotating rigs are also over-engineered due to their variability, however a fixed rig boat is resigned to run at the bare minimums.

And the gain in performance is not little, it is massive, I don't mean double the speed, but it's a serious performance boost.

I argue with myself all the time about the possibility of using a rotating rig on a mono, if you could use an proportionately smaller rig due to the power upgrade from efficiency that you could have similar weights aloft and still have it supported by the narrower stay base and end up with a faster boat... IE- Less drag upwind and more power downwind for similar weight co-coefficients.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@darth reapius-

I am not keen to continue this tangent to an otherwise interesting boat thread so I will keep my response brief.  I agree that often rotating rigs have fewer connections to fail. And I am being semi-serious when I say that I view each tack and gybe as an opportunity for failure with the rotating rig where I don't with a fixed rig.  Its just kinda shocking on a large boat to experience the loads in the rig as it rotates.  Adds a whole new element to gybing in heavy air.  Anyway I am not a fan or convert to rotating rigs yet though I do now own one LOL.  As we are no longer racing and this boat is strictly for cruising I don't care about every last 1/10th of a knots of SOG.  So yea, I know fixed rigs and are comfortable with them - where I am not with rotating rigs - and so have a preference.  Is what it is. 

On the performance side I feel much more qualified to speak.  While we don't care about every last knot of boat speed the wife and I are extremely passionate and spend a lot of time on rudder balance, rig and sail tune and trim to have a boat that is lively, responsive, and a true joy to just sail.  In moving up we didn't want to lose that. Even at 45 feet we wanted to be able to close our eyes while driving with the tiller extension on the float and honestly not be able to tell if we were on our Laser, our old F27F, or our new big tri. This is a huge deal for us and we worked had to get the new boat to that point and did.  Now add in the rig to that... both by the numbers and by feel there is little difference to locking the rig centerline vs letting it rotate (or even forcing over rotation).  Maybe a 1/10 or two but not noticeably different in terms of helm feel.  Now on the other hand I will admit we once had locked and forgot to rotate the rig after tacking and THAT was noticeable both in terms of feel and boat speed.  Lastly we raced our F27F (fixed rig) against F28s (rotating) often and beat them. Anyone who knows the boats would agree the F28 is in theory faster but we were often ahead of them over the line.  I ain't no rock star... my point though is simply that a rotating rig does not transform the boat and at the end of the day the loose nut at the end of the tiller will have more of an impact on performance than other things like a rotating rig or not all other things being equal.  IMHO.  YMMV.

 

Hey @sassthathoopie - can you PM me where is the rig you speak of located?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I took a close look at her sistership, called Atlantis, about 10 years ago in Margarita, off the coast of Venezuela. At the time I remember thinking she was a truly awesome bit of kit for adventure cruising for a couple. Interestingly, Atlantis came up on auction in the French West Indies recently.... minus her rig! I don’t know if she had the same dodgy looking barn door standing rigging attachment, but whatever she had it too failed. I’m still very interested in the boat, and would love to find a used rig that would work. An old ORMA or GB stick might be just the thing. I’ve started chasing down some leads but no luck so far...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Incidentally, my only (non dinghy) dismasting occurred with a fixed rig, on a 95 foot Farr sloop. V1 pulled right out of the turnbuckle after the cold head sheared off. It all came down quite gently, almost in slow motion, though that may have just been my impression compared to the total chaos afterwards!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,  I'm totally new to this site but not to multihulls although I can honestly say that I have not set foot on one for 2 decades.  Unfortunately now at almost 80, I am finally having my midlife crisis.  The last and only time I was aboard Rosinante was just after it's first sail.  It was the most amazing tri that I had ever seen.  Jeff Strange had spared no expense.  The Seattle multihull club met at his house for his birthday as I recall and got a tour.  80k open ocean miles later it has never left my mind. 

So here it is for sale and there is a slim possibility that it is within reach.  I had my daughter, who lives in Hawai'i Kai, go see it.  We did a video chat where she walked around touring the entire boat for me while I watched and asked questions.  In the following I'll give you what I saw.

On deck photos from the boat ad are straight forward, very little damage.  Down below is a mess.  It would appear that the delivery crew motored it back to O'ahu and walked off.  Most of the vinyl headliner is sagging or has fallen down, not sure why.  A lot of drawers and cabinet doors are sticking.  It's as if the entire inside was subjected to extremely high humidity.  The mast winches were salvaged and are inside.  A  ginormus (that's really big) spinnaker is in the main passageway forward.  Looks good but not in it's bag?? Blocks access to the fwd area.  A great deal of minor items to fix and repair inside.  the dagger board winch is under a lid as part of the table.  It''s a trailer boat winch and is getting totally rusted.  The carbon boom was saved as was 20+ ' of mast.  The goose neck can be salvaged and perhaps a few halyard exit sheaves, etc.  Quotes for rigging start at the top at 300+ yankee dollars and go down to 50k for an aluminum non tapered spar, non rotating, double diamond spreader.  None of these prices include shipping to Hawai'i. Moorage might also be a problem as the marina really wants the dock back.  At the moment, $1300 a month.

That's a short version.  It's a great opportunity for the right person,  that being a person who can do almost all the work themselves, has a pile of thousand dollar bill laying around and has a love of really, really big (63'X44') trimarans. 

1: Photo of Antigone launched '71, lost to Hugo '89 St Croix  2:Sugar Blues, one off '91-2000 in Mo'orea 3:Te Lapa F-25A 2000-'03 4: Pat's Cat 15m Schionning  1yr SP tour Not mine, I was only the Capt

 

Tevake with Antigone Honolulu.jpg

ANCHOR.JPG

P1010374.JPG

049-Anchored BOI.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Were Antigone and Sugar Blues your boats Harry? I remember reading cruising stories about them both mega years ago in the American Multihulls mag!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice to know someone remembers all that Pulitzer prize writing.  Yes, Antigone was a 46' Piver and Sugar Blues was a 40' one off by Derick Jones from Canada.  Switched boats because of this.

hugo23.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Big challenge, given the description, is finding somewhere economical to do the work. Many old spars getting recycled so fewer jury rigs available here now. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/29/2019 at 2:45 PM, Defy said:

 

Seem'd to work for this F24... 

kiteF24.jpg

I see a remake of Waterworld.....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Potential dumb question (I know very little about multis), but with all the big cat conversions to power only, ala Rainmaker, could that be a play here?  Bigger engine in main hull, or twin pods in the amas?

Maybe there’s no benefit, due to less interior space on the tri vs cat, and also more hulls in the water. 
 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Harry. So looks like a slow death similar to the other Hughes 63 Atlantis. Sad. Looks like reality found empirical limits to cruising trimaran size.

Stopped by Mighty Merloe today... still in great shape, kind of ready to sail unlike Tritium/Lending Club. But couldn’t fight off the feeling that it won’t really see much sailing any longer... sad. 
 

14FC6DEC-ABF1-4976-93E1-156CE8C10FB5.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, EarthBM said:

Thanks Harry. So looks like a slow death similar to the other Hughes 63 Atlantis. Sad. Looks like reality found empirical limits to cruising trimaran size.

I don't think the boat is the problem here.  You either have to ship a mast to Hawaii or motor 2500 miles upwind.  Boat will sell once the price reflects this reality.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This tri had issues before she even hit the water. Looked at it years ago but made the mistake of talking to Kurt and got an ear full of bad juju.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, oldsurfer said:

This tri had issues before she even hit the water. Looked at it years ago but made the mistake of talking to Kurt and got an ear full of bad juju.

 

 

Bob Perry posted somewhere that this is boat is almost all his work.  He's super active on Facebook and I think there was a thread about this boat at one point.

Lots of people around here know more than I do but Hawaii seems like a terrible place to sell a boat, especially now.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are very few good places in Hawaii to keep a boat.  Even fewer to keep a 60'x45' boat like Rosinante.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, EarthBM said:

Thanks Harry. So looks like a slow death similar to the other Hughes 63 Atlantis. Sad. Looks like reality found empirical limits to cruising trimaran size.

Stopped by Mighty Merloe today... still in great shape, kind of ready to sail unlike Tritium/Lending Club. But couldn’t fight off the feeling that it won’t really see much sailing any longer... sad. 
 

14FC6DEC-ABF1-4976-93E1-156CE8C10FB5.jpeg

Any reason why? Mighty Merloe is competitive with the MOD70’s and has a dedicated owner with the $ to keep her in top-notch racing shape. I’d hate to see that program end!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mr. Motors, can I call you Eastern?  Do you think you could find that Perry thread you mentioned?  I'm curious what problems or issues were being discussed.  Many thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, F18 Sailor said:

Any reason why? Mighty Merloe is competitive with the MOD70’s and has a dedicated owner with the $ to keep her in top-notch racing shape. I’d hate to see that program end!

Yes, but the owner isn't getting any younger and, afaik, he's already well north of 80 y.o.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Trovão said:

Yes, but the owner isn't getting any younger and, afaik, he's already well north of 80 y.o.

Yep. And there is a dearth of new sponsors willing to spend $$$$$ on older multis, since there is little racing. (In contrast, SD Bay regularly has 70+ monos racing several times a month.)

So without continuity of training/racing the skills and experience to race these large tris will just fade away. Sad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, EarthBM said:

Yep. And there is a dearth of new sponsors willing to spend $$$$$ on older multis, since there is little racing. (In contrast, SD Bay regularly has 70+ monos racing several times a month.)

So without continuity of training/racing the skills and experience to race these large tris will just fade away. Sad.

True.:(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now