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A Cat World Champions 2019

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Congratulations to Mischa Heemskerk and Andrew Landenberger on their World Championship victories in the Open and Classic divisions sailed in Weymouth.  Great racing all round and a completed series!  Well done guys!!

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Riveting worlds competition, pity Brewin was hurt as his and Mischa's high level racing was a key interest. Landy was a well deserved winner and his son is a talent to keep an eye on ..  

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May I ask, as a fellow Aussie and admirer of Steve, what was the injury, and is he ok?

cheers

 

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Deep cut just above the ankle. Stitches and drugs fixed that. He is good and helped load the container yesterday. 

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55 minutes ago, random said:

tell me more about the drugs and does he have any leftovers?

I’m told they were good and I doubt it. 

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Good to hear nothing lasting. 

Cheers

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Amazing week in the sun, sailing outstanding boats, in fabulous waters, with great facilities, perfect race management and safety cover, with the finest, nicest, fastest sailors on the planet.  If you were thinking about going, but didn't, you missed something great.

I was in the classic fleet, or non foilers, it was interesting to see the range of designs, sails, masts, foils, and sailors represented.  The turnout was a little disappointing, with French and American sailors almost absent, but the top 5 still represented the cream of the class, the gears these guys have in a breeze are almost unbelievable.  It was a very gentlemanly class to race with, very little shouting on the water or argy bargy, as pure a boat speed race as you could wish for, almost no protests.

There were some Foilers converted to C boards, some purpose built classics, some C board generation, and some straight board boats.  Most of the boats had T foil rudders, some converted lifting rudders, and some modern foiling rudders.  I would say that there is no clear advantage either way, with the boats dragging bigger foil packages struggling in less than 10 knots, but excelling in over 15, I would say platform and foil wise, just bring what you have.  Many conversions or re-conversions seemed to frustrate their owners, with alignment issues etc, if I were getting into the class I would get a barn find vanilla boat, Flyer 2 or newer, still running its original foil package, than a heavy ex foiler, on its third daggerboard configuration, or a boat with a history of inventive or accident prone owners.

On the Aero side, the classic boomed sails were at a disadvantage across all conditions, any boomless deck sweeper sails had already fitted booms, it seems boomed deck sweepers were a no brainer.  In the lighter winds, having a high gooseneck position was good for low drag, as the boom is lined up with airflow, but in more wind, boom mount as low as possible seemed to be an advantage for overall sail shape, as the outhaul becomes automatic with downhaul, and the foot of the sail seems to flatten better.  All generations of mast were represented, with both manufacturers sharing the fleet, and all the different sailmakers represented, there seemed no magic bullet.  Going to a sailmaker you know, who will sell you a sail that will work with your mast, and your weight / height, and getting them to show you how to make it work, seems more important than simply getting the latest / greatest.  Sails made for foiling may not be the most suitable for classic.

The Aussies were simply class when the wind got up, especially downwind, in a league of their own.  Landy had a mode upwind in 16 knots that was untouchable, high and fast, like his own personal lift. Andy Landenberger was a downwind demon all week, he could make trapping downwind in 8 knots pay, it was like he was sailing a 49er through gybes and round marks, amazing skills.  And big Alberto, in his Marstrom barge, he could make that boat dance.  So many happy memories.

 If you are going to St Petersburg, in a classic, practice trapping downwind, in more than about 10 knots, until you can't get it wrong.  Time spent on the water will pay you back 10x compared to time in the workshop.  Eat plenty of salad, you can make heavier or lighter work on these boats, but 85kg (185Lb?) seems about right across the wind band, the 95kg+ guys were just miserable the first couple of lighter days, the 75kg- folk just couldn't put the pedal down upwind the last 3. Get fit enough to last 6 days on the water.  Fit a second ratchet block, thicker control lines, have a second set of gloves ready and broken in, for when you wear out the first, etc, etc.

Buy an A Class, and unless you are Clark Kent, buy a Classic.  No other cat can compare.  Others may be better for picnics, or for taking friends blasting off beaches, but for racing, nothing else comes remotely close, it makes hiking dinghy racing feel as exciting as playing with bath toys, and F18's feel like yachts.

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23 hours ago, maxstaylock said:

 if I were getting into the class I would get a barn find vanilla boat, Flyer 2 or newer, still running its original foil package,

Psst I may know of an Auscat platform that may be about to go on Apollo Duck.

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Great summary of the week for the Classic fleet maxstaylock. 

I too sailed in the fleet and enjoyed the close hard fought racing. Although the fleet was smaller it was a step up in quality from the last Worlds in Hervey Bay. The beauty of the Classic fleet is that you can bring along older designs at the moment and still be competitive. It’s still a development boat so improvements can be made as has always been the case. It has been a masterstroke by the A Class to create this discipline to keep many of us sailing competively and for those who don’t have the time to pursue foiling. 

The modified Classic rules introduced by the Technical Committee before this event have worked beautifully. Measurement of the new dimensions proved easy and the no foiling parameter was adhered to by all sailors. I watched the people who were ex foilers closely because they are the ones who could potentially get a Classic foiling albeit crudely, and there was not a hint of transgressing the rule. It was a credit to the sailors and I’m confident it is a viable rule going forward which needs no modification at this point.

there is a good fleet of classics already in North America so Florida next year will be great. They always put on a good event particularly the social side.

So start organising your containers people and see you in St Pete  

 

 

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On 9/2/2019 at 4:00 AM, maxstaylock said:

Buy an A Class, and unless you are Clark Kent, buy a Classic.  No other cat can compare.  Others may be better for picnics, or for taking friends blasting off beaches, but for racing, nothing else comes remotely close, it makes hiking dinghy racing feel as exciting as playing with bath toys, and F18's feel like yachts.

The sport of yachting is about your position relative to the other competitors, the maximum speed of a class is interesting and attractive but not required.

If speed was as important as you are claiming, there would only be A Class boats on the water, but there isn't.  I would sail bathtubs if that was the dominant class where I lived, and have fun trying to win.

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So I just got home. It all went a bit downhill for me when on day 3, I damaged my shoulder, continued sailing for the rest of the day and paid the price on day 4 when I really couldn't sail and it didn't improve. i believe the injury was caused by a change in my trapeze gear for the regatta that increased the distance from hook to handle, plus a change in handle type. Although I had used it a couple of years ago, I think the extra stretch combined with me having bulked up by 4-5kgs for the regatta simply put too much load on the shoulder. As they say in the movies "shit happens"!

My feel with the foiler fleet is that the Exploders with Brewin Sails were probably the fastest in all but the lightest winds, but Mischa out sailed everybody and found something extra in the light stuff, probably due to losing 5-8kgs. Mischa was particularly good downwind. Dave Shaw sailed great for his second place. He felt once the breeze was in he had a speed advantage but that Mischa made up for that and some more by his overall boathandling, whether it was turning corners or keeping flying longer downwind without the small touchdowns most get which seem minor when there is nobody around but which loses you boat lengths against somebody who doesn't do it. In the interests of fairness, I should disclose a bias as I sail with Stevie all the time, but I think I am being fair.

I think that the level of the fleet has picked up as well, probably due to a mix of more sailing and better set up as information gets out about what and how. Settings are very hard to generalise because 5-7kgs difference in weight results in needing different settings. Then there are differences in personal sailing styles. And while being super competitive on the water, the A's remain one of the friendliest fleets around.

Final shout out goes to the venue and in particular, the race team. The PRO had a great reputation and you can see why - best I have ever raced under. The centre itself had a great vibe, with lots going on from introduction to watersports kids programs to 7-8 world class Moths training to the GBR youth squad training for their transition into 470's.

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23 hours ago, random said:

The sport of yachting is about your position relative to the other competitors, the maximum speed of a class is interesting and attractive but not required.

If speed was as important as you are claiming, there would only be A Class boats on the water, but there isn't.  I would sail bathtubs if that was the dominant class where I lived, and have fun trying to win.

Happy you are happy to sail slowly.  I have spent more than half my hours on earth going slowly in boats, I find it very good for the soul.  But for when I can choose the boat, the waters, and the company, fast just creates better sensations and memories, for me, to each his own.  

One thing I notice with fast fleets, usually the guys who come last come in with just as big a grin as the guys who come first.  Just the thrill of making it to the start line in a functional boat,, then surviving the day, is a win in itself, keeps you young at heart.  Not saying it's a good or a bad thing, just saying.  

Bathtub classes can seem to attract the shouty, aggressive, sea lawyer types, which kills my buzz.  Development classes attract enthusiasts, the race track as much a testing ground, as an arena, the back stories seem to have more depth.  It's not about the speed, it's about the sensation, the atmosphere, the spectacle and circus, if you can find this easily, and cheaply, and close to home, I envy you.

But please, Mr Random, you are on multihull anarchy, reading about the A Cat Worlds, you are curious about A Cats, contact literally any local A Cat sailor, they will get you a ride, then you can decide first hand if the feeling of going upwind at 15 knots, and downwind at powerboat speeds, hanging from a piece of 2.5mm string from a boat that weighs less than you, is less or more fun than the difference between 4th and 7th in a bathtub race.  Winning a club race in a Laser gives me a smile that lasts till the first half decent problem of a Monday morning, getting to sail at the A Cat Worlds, still smiling 5 days later, might get a month out of it yet.  You owe it to yourself to try.

 

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2 minutes ago, maxstaylock said:

But please, Mr Random, you are on multihull anarchy, reading about the A Cat Worlds, you are curious about A Cats, contact literally any local A Cat sailor, they will get you a ride, then you can decide first hand if the feeling of going upwind at 15 knots, and downwind at powerboat speeds, hanging from a piece of 2.5mm string from a boat that weighs less than you, is less or more fun than the difference between 4th and 7th in a bathtub race.  Winning a club race in a Laser gives me a smile that lasts till the first half decent problem of a Monday morning, getting to sail at the A Cat Worlds, still smiling 5 days later, might get a month out of it yet.  You owe it to yourself to try.

I have probably sailed multi-hulls longer than you have, from beach cats to Ocean Racers.  Hung from a trap wire for years of competition up to National level in two different classes.  Then I owned a monohull that needed a crew of 5,  to get some competition when cat numbers dropped off.

After all that, the things that shit me off more than anything are;

  1. Multihull or monohull sailors who bag the other form relentlessly, one-eyed annoying people.
  2. Class sailors who claim that their class is superior for reason they are very willing to bore me with

Real sailors appreciate the finer points of each class and understand that everyone will not start sailing on an A, nor are there competitive fleets near them, nor can they afford +$30K to get a new one.

And a free tip from 'Mr Random'.   Get some humility and your sailing will improve.

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1 minute ago, random said:

I have probably sailed multi-hulls longer than you have, from beach cats to Ocean Racers.  Hung from a trap wire for years of competition up to National level in two different classes.  Then I owned a monohull that needed a crew of 5,  to get some competition when cat numbers dropped off.

After all that, the things that shit me off more than anything are;

  1. Multihull or monohull sailors who bag the other form relentlessly, one-eyed annoying people.
  2. Class sailors who claim that their class is superior for reason they are very willing to bore me with

Real sailors appreciate the finer points of each class and understand that everyone will not start sailing on an A, nor are there competitive fleets near them, nor can they afford +$30K to get a new one.

And a free tip from 'Mr Random'.   Get some humility and your sailing will improve.

All good points, I was unaware of your experience.  So for you the cat scene is dead in your region, and choose to discourage others from sailing them?  I am sorry, I would race rafts locally, if it was the only game in town.  We are blessed in Europe with so many classes to choose from, supporting your class to encourage new participants to join is not seen as distasteful here, just part of the usual friendly class rivalry, survival of the fittest and all.  A rising tide floats all boats.  Etc.

My total outlay for this event, about $2k, including logistics and training, and upgrades, but excluding loss of earnings.  Expensive sure.  But not outside the realms of reality for a working man, the +$30K number is alien to most in the fleet, certainly for all of the classics, the cheapest of which was worth around $1500, and still wasn't last. 

I've only sailed cats for 25 years, still feel like a novice, but always keen to learn.  

All good classes are tribal, please forgive a little tub thumping from a fan boy, in the A Class Cat Worlds thread, no less, in this case largely to big up St Petersburg next year, hope the Americans can get 50+ classics on the water.  A Cats are not for everyone, it's true, but at risk of sounding like an enthusiast, Classics are surprisingly easy to sail, and offer a route into performance sailing for the less fit and agile, and wealthy, I am not knocking any other type of racing, just getting out in a boat and encouraging others to do the same, should be the main goal.

Thanks for the tip, might I offer one in return, with as much humility as my depraved soul can muster: If you have no interest in A Class Cat's, there are a large selection of other subjects in different forums?  Some of which may "shit you off" less, unless you are indeed suffering from a blockage, and need relief?

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15 minutes ago, maxstaylock said:

Thanks for the tip, might I offer one in return, with as much humility as my depraved soul can muster: If you have no interest in A Class Cat's, there are a large selection of other subjects in different forums?  Some of which may "shit you off" less, unless you are indeed suffering from a blockage, and need relief?

Hahhahaaa  the Australian term for what you just did ... you're a dickhead.

I came here because I am interested in the A Class and all other classes in all forms of sailing, only to find you and your smart arse attitude.

It appears that you are trying to promote the class, while all you have succeeded in doing is the complete opposite. Congratulations mate, well fucking done.

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From a guy that races Lasers and Cats and DN iceboats,and  just getting my feet wet in the A Cat Scene,I am totally on board with Maxstaylocks comments and observations.

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5 minutes ago, Canhobie said:

From a guy that races Lasers and Cats and DN iceboats,and  just getting my feet wet in the A Cat Scene,I am totally on board with Maxstaylocks comments and observations.

Al-Pacino-LaughSmoking.gif

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In defence of the Laser Class and the Hobie 16 there is quite a bit of satisfaction gained from knowing you are all competing on equal equipment.So you know it is the " Man not the Machine"

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Canhobie,

  I'd ignore most of this banter and bring your Flyer down to Florida for the Worlds or if you can the Nationals this year. I think we are looking at 30+ classics this year, so I have no trouble envisioning an easy 40+ boat U.S fleet of classics for the St. Pete Worlds...getting to 50-60 boats should be very possible if the Europeans show up in force!

You have a point regarding equipment, but I think as long as you have a good DS sail cut for you and your mast you'll be in the hunt for sure...a local kid with limited racing experience beat me in 2 out of 4 races last weekend on his A2...this was in sub-foiling conditions but I could see that happening in St. Pete and a lot of foilers wishing they were on Classics!

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+1 samc. 

And you don’t even need to worry about the DS sail. For a lot of people the classic sail is just as fast around the course. They are often faster downwind. The DS is definitely faster upwind but unless they’ve been designed specifically for the classic they tend to be slower downhill. A straight foiling DS will only work for. Very light sailor. 

Expect a good fleet of AUS Classics for Florida to defend our five in the top ten this year!

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WnW, +1 on that front. A lot of work has been done by Sail Technologies in Florida on a classic DS sail, and Landy's is clearly going well. The old squaretops are still good sails and if you can hold one down in the upper wind range they are very quick off the wind.

 

 

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Wished i'd been in Weymouth (excuses; interesting jobsituation, no mast, to many holes in boat), seems like wonderfull racing (to many jellyfish, though). Pretty dominant wins on both courses, congratulations. And pity for you Simon, next time itlll be better. And thanks for the reporting to all.

Sam, is marginal flying-conditions to be expected at the worlds in St. Pete? 

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I think the St Pete Worlds is going to be a Classic type of event. Based on historical data, Oct avg is 6.6mph.

We will find out first hand next month when the 2019 NA's is going to be held at the same time period that the 2020 Worlds is scheduled.

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deck sweeper

its sort of funny that it took that long to copy the bottom part of the windsurf sail; the square top was embraced fairly quickly.

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58 minutes ago, lamorak said:

I think the St Pete Worlds is going to be a Classic type of event. Based on historical data, Oct avg is 6.6mph.

We will find out first hand next month when the 2019 NA's is going to be held at the same time period that the 2020 Worlds is scheduled.

I live in clearwater (just up the road from st pete)

Oct is unpredictable as per wind. Often oct is a continuation of summer - hot and humid with very light air and only a seabreeze 

sometimes it is cold (florida cold that is) and blustery 

It is really hit or miss and this year's event can be a complete 180 compared to any other year

 

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1 hour ago, david r said:

deck sweeper

its sort of funny that it took that long to copy the bottom part of the windsurf sail; the square top was embraced fairly quickly.

I should have known DS = deck sweeper. I guess I've got too many acronyms cluttering up my brain.

I don't think the cats are copying the windsurfers though. Here's a photo of the C-Cat Aquarius IV in 1974, and I'll bet there are much older examples.

Aquarius4_1974.thumb.jpg.8d4f3858789bbc8037720913b14dcca9.jpg

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2 hours ago, MN3 said:

I live in clearwater (just up the road from st pete)

Oct is unpredictable as per wind. Often oct is a continuation of summer - hot and humid with very light air and only a seabreeze 

sometimes it is cold (florida cold that is) and blustery 

It is really hit or miss and this year's event can be a complete 180 compared to any other year

 

This, and the 6.6mph average are what I'm preparing for. I hope that doesn't detour the foilers from coming, odds are good we will have 2 or 3 excellent days of foiling during the regatta, i.e I'm not running out and buying a classic just because the forecast is for lighter conditions!

Our last race there, back in February (at the St. Pete Worlds site) we had one race that was blowing 18, 2 or 3 in the 12-15 range and the rest generally below 12 that, at least for me, made foiling a real struggle at times. I know the top guys can foil in 6-7kts and make it pay so there should be plenty of foiling going on and the water is flat!

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On 9/6/2019 at 3:58 AM, Doug Halsey said:

I should have known DS = deck sweeper. I guess I've got too many acronyms cluttering up my brain.

I don't think the cats are copying the windsurfers though. Here's a photo of the C-Cat Aquarius IV in 1974, and I'll bet there are much older examples.

Aquarius4_1974.thumb.jpg.8d4f3858789bbc8037720913b14dcca9.jpg

And don’t forget the sealed tramps :P

3F159DBF-F366-485B-B220-E7D42C5FD8B9.jpeg

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