Lex Teredo

What's Your Go-To Cocktail and How Do You Make It?

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Stand and deliver, Anarchists!

What's your go-to cocktail, and how do you make it?  Not beer, not booze-in-soda, not straight whisky.  I need to add a new drink to my lineup. 

My current hockey team lineup of cocktails features a medium dry martini with olives and less floral gin, a proper fresh made whisky sour, the Negroni / Boulevardier, the Sidecar, and the Old Fashioned, an underrated and sophisticated flavor that hits it out of the park if you use the right whisky and Luxardo cherries, and both orange and Angostura bitters.  

But my fave is the daquiri.  Not the treacly bullshit frozen Sno Cone of a cold headache-inducing Slushee that low end chain restaurants popularized, but the honest-to-God, reputable, probably-has-been-in-a-church-once-in-its-life foster stepbrother of grog. 

3 ounces white rum

1.5 ounces fresh squeezed lime juice

1 ounce (plus a couple drops) of simple syrup, store bought is okay it's better homemade Demerara sugar syrup.

Pour ingredients onto ice in a cocktail shaker, shake vigorously for about 5 seconds, serve promptly in a martini glass.  If guests are coming over you can fancy the glass up with sugar on the rim, and a slice of lime and or orange for garnish. 

 

What do you got?

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Big fan of Sensations: Super refreshing - Discovered once when I said bartenders choice, Gin/Citrus at a nice cocktail bar in town. I was blown away.

* 6 to 8 mint leaves
* 1/2 ounce maraschino liqueur
* 1 1/2 ounces gin
* 2/3 ounce fresh lime juice

In a mixing glass, muddle the mint with a few ice cubes and the maraschino liqueur until the mint is broken into very small pieces. Add more ice, the gin, and lime juice, and shake until cold. Strain into a sugar-rimmed cocktail glass.

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our go to for special evening at home with friends...

2 oz of your best bourbon, 2/3 oz sweet vermouth. 1 drop angostura citrus bitters (i mean it, one drop only!!!), 1 dark cherry

 

be liberal with the bourbon, be precise with the vermouth and bitters. place in order bourbon, vermouth, bitters in 1/4 ice filled cocktail mixer and stir gently. strain and garnish with dark cherry. ours are served in a crystal lowball glass for that added "adult" feeling lol

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Dark and Stormy

A bunch of Golings dark rum over ice and fill the rest with ginger beer

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9 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

Dark and Stormy

A bunch of Golings dark rum over ice and fill the rest with ginger beer

And not a lot of ice.

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19 minutes ago, Sail4beer said:

Dark and Stormy

Substitute Crabbies for the ginger beer.

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The cocktails I make at home in rough order: Old Fashioned, Rum & Tonic, Margarita, Dark ‘n’ Stormy, Bloody Mary. Others rarely, occasionally.

My recipe preferences:

  • You must include fresh orange peel making an Old Fashioned, makes a HUGE difference. Orange bitters isn’t a substitute IME, I do that too. Express the orange peel oils over the drink and then rub the peel all over the inside of the glass before tossing it in. I also use Luxardos, but the orange peel is more important IMO.
  • Everything from scratch, no mixes - especially for Margaritas!
  • Dark ‘n’ Stormy must be Gosling’s rum and Gosling’s Ginger Beer.
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scotch.........neat

rum.............neat

beer............cold

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1 hour ago, Sail4beer said:

Dark and Stormy

A bunch of Golings dark rum over ice and fill the rest with ginger beer

You make yours upside down. 

The rum goes on the top on a D&S.

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We did a cruise to Antarctica on a fancy ship, Seabourn - and no, we are not rich. We sold our Bristol 45.5 after our circumnavigation and bought a smaller, cheaper boat. The difference went on the cruise. Anyway, in the fancy restaurant on the ship (and not elsewhere) they had something called an Old Cuban which was truly wonderful but complicated and not something to be made at home.

1 12 oz
Rum
 
Freshly Squeezed Lime Juice
1 oz
Simple syrup (sugar and water)
6 whole
Whole mint leaves
2 dashes
2 oz
Champagne
 
Also a big fan of dark and storms from multiple visits to Bermuda. Great fun to move around the island and try different D&Ss and different Bermuda fish chowders.

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Ceasar - for you Americans that's a Bloody Mary made with Clamato juice. Lots of Worcestershire sauce and a pickled bean for garnish. Salt & pepper on the rim of the glass.

Made by handing money to the bartender.

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Best Mai Tai recipe from the head bartender at the Royal Hawaiian in Waikiki during a Clipper Cup in the early 80's.

4 ice cubes in a tall glass
1 oz white or gold rum
½ oz orgeat (almond syrup)
½ oz Curacoa
1 oz orange juice
2 oz pineapple juice
Add 2 mint leaves, a lime wedge and a cocktail cherry
Stir
Float 1½ oz M e y e r s rum on top

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16 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Ceasar - for you Americans that's a Bloody Mary made with Clamato juice. Lots of Worcestershire sauce and a pickled bean for garnish. Salt & pepper on the rim of the glass.

Made by handing money to the bartender.

+1

The Ceasar is the Gold Standard for hangover drinks.  Requires actual celery salt rimmer, though.

 

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Captain's Punch -

Shot of Myers

Shot of Nassau royale

1/4 glass of OJ

1/4 glass of either pineapple or grapefruit juice

Ice

My former Presbyterian minister (a former Naval Aviator and a cruising sailor, before he was a minister) would make a pitcher of this for the crew.   It tasted so good and smooth, but man, it would sneak up on you!

I guess he was making up for the non-alcoholic sacraments grape juice...

- Stumbling

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Here is my Mai Tai graphic which I want to use on a boat I designed and is under construction. I'll look for the recipe later.

mai_tai_close_up.thumb.jpg.24723dcea61e54a276a5c33e37da469a.jpg

 

Here is the official recipe for the boats cocktail.

image.thumb.png.73cd949221d9fcd9c3f4bd4bb928be1d.png

 

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The Daiquiri is the drink of Kings, of JFK and Papa Hemingway, and will always be one of my faves.  The Sazerac Cocktail is also a fave, particularly with oysters on the half-shell (Old Overholt Rye whiskey; Peychaud's bitters; simple syrup; and Herbsaint to rinse the glass).  Add to that a rum based Manhattan (El Dorado 3yo rum; Antica Carpana vermouth; a dash of orange and angoustora bitters; garnish with a proper Luxardo Marascha cherry).  There you go.

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My go-to lately has been a St. Laurent Negroni.

I took a pretty traditional Negroni recipe and upgraded the ingredients, then played with the ratios til I got something I really like.

1.5oz. St. Laurent whiskey barrel-aged gin, 1.5oz Aperol, 1oz. Noilly Prat sweet vermouth.

Shake and strain over a big-ass ice cube, and if you feel fancy toast a chunk of orange peel over a butane torch and then squeeze some orange peel oil over the cocktail through the flame - oil should combust - then garnish with toasted orange peel wedge. 

The St. Laurent gin is much woodier than traditional juniper gins. With Aperol and burnt orange an interesting bitter dark chocolate note comes out of the cocktail I find Aperol works better than Campari with the burnt orange. I use Noilly Prat cause I find it compliments this particular gin a little better than Martini & Rossi, Carpano etc. The resulting drink has more depth and complexity, and less sweetness and bright citrus and botanical notes than a traditional Negroni.

 

 

 

image.png.c7b6adbbcc88b0a042cde38fd077dd90.pngimage.png.dd0277c7bcc25d6cec3fb75b10b613cc.pngimage.png.6afe6ad88f3221ede7d58f28076bc388.png 

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Painkiller, name of my boat. 4 parts pineapple, 1 part orange juice 1 part cream of coconut and as much Pussers Rum as you want. Grate some fresh nutmeg over the top. I'm sure anyone who has gone to the Annapolis boat show knows the recipe.

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Add angostura bitters to ginger-ale for non-alcohollic. Also add bitters to your dark-stormy and make sure you mix with a well oiled rigging knife. 

Lime, rum, honey and hot water when it's cold out and I'm too lazy to make a hot buttered rum. 

 

 

Quote

My go-to lately has been a St. Laurent Negroni.

That sound interesting. Monkey 47 also makes an interesting Negroni. 

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Just now, Elegua said:

That sound interesting. Monkey 47 also makes an interesting Negroni. 

I'm generally a fan of whiskey based cocktails. The whiskey barrel-aged gin puts a slant on this that suits my palate.

 

 

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Oh, and try bending the orange peel into a lit match - the oils burn and infuse the drink. 

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Not really a go-to, but one that the wife and her friends liked was something I created off-the-cuff, but managed to write it down.

 I pre-made some Tazo Wild Sweet Orange tea and chilled it - use double the tea bags and let it steep.

1. Muddle a handful of mint leaves in a shaker with 3oz. of Four Roses Bourbon (just the normal one)

2. Add some ice to the shaker and 4 oz. of the wild sweet orange tea and about 1/2 oz simple syrup.

3. Add 1/2 oz. of Rothman & Winter Creme de Violette

4. Add about a teaspoon of egg white.

Shake til it seems frothy and strain into glasses (I like margarita glasses for it)

Top with Prosecco and garnish with a mint sprig. - makes 3 glasses worth

These end up being sort of a ruby color with lavender foam. Sorta floral, sorta herbal, the tea gives it a bit of sharpness. Not sure what to call them but I had to make several rounds of them at every bbq this summer.

 

image.png.904f3af16c113d8a1f4fc8ee784fe95a.pngimage.png.d8f85cc1650024ffc4dac128a53d800a.pngimage.png.535804d3633d56a41648044d65d19b5b.png  

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2 hours ago, Bristol-Cruiser said:

We did a cruise to Antarctica on a fancy ship, Seabourn - and no, we are not rich. We sold our Bristol 45.5 after our circumnavigation...

image.jpeg.cb00f10d4c3fd0e7625993c36d245825.jpeg

 

3 hours ago, MidPack said:

You must include fresh orange peel making an Old Fashioned, makes a HUGE difference. Orange bitters isn’t a substitute IME, I do that too. Express the orange peel oils over the drink and then rub the peel all over the inside of the glass before tossing it in.

^^^This, and use same technique for Manhattans. On the rocks but with just a bit of ice.

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10 minutes ago, Elegua said:

Oh, and try bending the orange peel into a lit match - the oils burn and infuse the drink. 

Yeah I do that... that's what I meant by squeezing the orange peel through the flame.

 

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12 minutes ago, ajbram said:

Yeah I do that... that's what I meant by squeezing the orange peel through the flame.

 

Sorry - didn't read that closely. 

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1 hour ago, Tack nazi said:

Painkiller, name of my boat. 4 parts pineapple, 1 part orange juice 1 part cream of coconut and as much Pussers Rum as you want. Grate some fresh nutmeg over the top. I'm sure anyone who has gone to the Annapolis boat show knows the recipe.

We were introduced on St Croix on our honeymoon 20+ yrs ago.  Heaven in a glass.  ;)  Dark and stupid runs a close 2nd.  Whiskey and I do not get along(besides the scotch kind... ) :)

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The Soixante Quinze

Ingredients:

Fresh Lemons

2 oz gin

1/2 oz of simple syrup

Champagne

 

Peel long slice of lemon skin and put aside.

Squeeze approx 1 oz of lemon juice, add 2 ozs of gin + 1/2 oz of syrup and  ice to shaker.  Shake and then strain into champagne flute just over half full and then fill rest of glass with chilled Bollinger champagne (Any Grande Annee vintage will do and in a pinch a good dry non-vintage like Veuve also works).

Put peel in glass.

Serve.

 

The French "75" named after the 75 mm French artillery used to such good effect in the first world war. The cocktail has a similar effect. Taught to David Murray Scott by Lt Col Murray Duncan Scott (Royal Artillery 1914-1918 and Royal Corp of Signals 1939- 1942).  and taught to Mambo Kings by David Murray Scott.  Col Murray Scott was flying as a spotter with a french pilot Capt Verpiere.  After an unfortunately successful piece of German anti-aircraft fire, they recouped  in London and made the acquaintance of a Belgium bartender  at the Royal Automobile Club (RAC) called Robert Vermiere.  Vermiere introduced Scott and Verpiere to the mix which they quickly adopted as their cocktail of choice and it has been in the family repertoire ever since.  

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17 minutes ago, shaggy said:

We were introduced on St Croix on our honeymoon 20+ yrs ago.  Heaven in a glass.  ;)  Dark and stupid runs a close 2nd.  Whiskey and I do not get along(besides the scotch kind... ) :)

Whisky from Scotland does not have an "e".

B)

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17 minutes ago, Mambo Kings said:

The Soixante Quinze

Ingredients:

Fresh Lemons

2 oz gin

1/2 oz of simple syrup

Champagne

 

Peel long slice of lemon skin and put aside.

Squeeze approx 1 oz of lemon juice, add 2 ozs of gin + 1/2 oz of syrup and  ice to shaker.  Shake and then strain into champagne flute just over half full and then fill rest of glass with chilled Bollinger champagne (Any Grande Annee vintage will do and in a pinch a good dry non-vintage like Veuve also works).

Put peel in glass.

Serve.

 

The French "75" named after the 75 mm French artillery used to such good effect in the first world war. The cocktail has a similar effect. Taught to David Murray Scott by Lt Col Murray Duncan Scott (Royal Artillery 1914-1918 and Royal Corp of Signals 1939- 1942).  and taught to Mambo Kings by David Murray Scott.  Col Murray Scott was flying as a spotter with a french pilot Capt Verpiere.  After an unfortunately successful piece of German anti-aircraft fire, they recouped  in London and made the acquaintance of a Belgium bartender  at the Royal Automobile Club (RAC) called Robert Vermiere.  Vermiere introduced Scott and Verpiere to the mix which they quickly adopted as their cocktail of choice and it has been in the family repertoire ever since.  

Have also had a twist on this with just a dash of Creme de Violette for color and aroma, but barely enough to taste. Makes it very similar to an Aviation with the omission of maraschino liqueur. 

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31 minutes ago, Mambo Kings said:

The Soixante Quinze

Ingredients:

Fresh Lemons

2 oz gin

1/2 oz of simple syrup

Champagne

 

Peel long slice of lemon skin and put aside.

Squeeze approx 1 oz of lemon juice, add 2 ozs of gin + 1/2 oz of syrup and  ice to shaker.  Shake and then strain into champagne flute just over half full and then fill rest of glass with chilled Bollinger champagne (Any Grande Annee vintage will do and in a pinch a good dry non-vintage like Veuve also works).

Put peel in glass.

Serve.

 

The French "75" named after the 75 mm French artillery used to such good effect in the first world war. The cocktail has a similar effect. Taught to David Murray Scott by Lt Col Murray Duncan Scott (Royal Artillery 1914-1918 and Royal Corp of Signals 1939- 1942).  and taught to Mambo Kings by David Murray Scott.  Col Murray Scott was flying as a spotter with a french pilot Capt Verpiere.  After an unfortunately successful piece of German anti-aircraft fire, they recouped  in London and made the acquaintance of a Belgium bartender  at the Royal Automobile Club (RAC) called Robert Vermiere.  Vermiere introduced Scott and Verpiere to the mix which they quickly adopted as their cocktail of choice and it has been in the family repertoire ever since.  

That's a good drink, but very different from the original which was gin, calvados, absinthe, lemon juice and grenadine. Plus de puissance. 

 

 

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For me rum (lately its been El Dorado 25yr) or tequila (Centenario) - both neat

But for my wife, i make these.

 

Smoked Old Fashion

  •  2 oz Whiskey (usually Knob Creek)
  • 5-6 dashes of Angostura bitters
  • Orange twist.
  • 1/2 oz Demerara Syrup
  • put fire to plank of hickory, Applewood, Mesquite, cherrywood..  Put overturnd glass over the fire.  Mix ingredients in shaker, then pick up glass, add one LARGE icecube (i have special molds for them), pour in glass.

Original Margarita

  • 1 oz Cointreau
  • 2 oz blanco tequila
  • 1 oz fresh lime juice
  • Combine all ingredients in a shaker and add ice.  Shake and strain into salt-rimmed (optional) glass, add lime wedge or slice for garnish

 

 

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Thomassini from “Islands in the Stream”, one of my favorite books. A splash of bitters in a gin and tonic. And always float a little straight booze on the top of any drink. Make that first sip special. 

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1 hour ago, Mambo Kings said:

The Soixante Quinze

Excellent cocktail, and quite devastating as you say.

Would you believe I was taught a version that one by a French army Major in Nice who was racing with us on Coriolan.  I think it even had brandy and absinthe in it.  Happy (but hazy) memories.  He also showed me how to do an effective 'sabrage' on a bottle of champagne without amputating your left thumb.

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6 hours ago, aA said:

our go to for special evening at home with friends...

2 oz of your best bourbon, 2/3 oz sweet vermouth. 1 drop angostura citrus bitters (i mean it, one drop only!!!), 1 dark cherry

 

be liberal with the bourbon, be precise with the vermouth and bitters. place in order bourbon, vermouth, bitters in 1/4 ice filled cocktail mixer and stir gently. strain and garnish with dark cherry. ours are served in a crystal lowball glass for that added "adult" feeling lol

Since I seldom keep enough cherries, oranges, etc on hand for proper Manhattans and Old Fashioneds, I've defaulted to this.

2 oz Bourbon or Rye  (I'm liking the Rye a bit more these days)

1 oz Averna Amaro Sicilliano

1 Dash (8 drops) Spiced Cherry Bitters

Stirred gently in cocktail mixer, then served sans ice.

I refer to it as a Black Manhattan but it's really a personal evolution of such...never was much of a cocktail guy until I developed an allergy to sulfites/nitrites or something in most beers and wines....   (one adapts)

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2 hours ago, Kenny Dumas said:

Thomassini from “Islands in the Stream”, one of my favorite books. A splash of bitters in a gin and tonic. And always float a little straight booze on the top of any drink. Make that first sip special. 

indeed, that is how my father liked his G & T.

His mother (Murray Scott's wife) who spent the war in Bermuda and then moved to the USA , liked her strong gin martini.  Pour gin into an iced glass. Open a Vermouth bottle and wave it close to the glass so that the Vermouth fumes could infuse the gin , then close the vermouth bottle and drink the gin.   Even at 8 years old, I was moderately impressed!

 

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3 hours ago, P_Wop said:

Excellent cocktail, and quite devastating as you say.

Would you believe I was taught a version that one by a French army Major in Nice who was racing with us on Coriolan.  I think it even had brandy and absinthe in it.  Happy (but hazy) memories.  He also showed me how to do an effective 'sabrage' on a bottle of champagne without amputating your left thumb.

Quite devastating.  The artillery and the cocktail. 

482978017_French75.jpg.d0c71145495e20ea332c16b4e73c905b.jpg

I think the version you and Elegua are referring to was the original version. It got anglicized with gin vs Brandy/calvados. Great champagne and good gin didnt need the absinthe.......but I have Vermiere's book somewhere and I would like to try and make the original.

I also have Murray Scott's book...."Five Lives"....its a rattling good read.

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All of these sound too complicated to make while sailing.

My personal favorite:

1 part rum

2 parts - whatever fruit juice you have on hand. Mixing juices is acceptable, as is a splash of soda water. 

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Cooler weather: Martini.

Gin of choice...kept in the freezer. I can't afford to drink Bombay Sapphire anymore unless it's on sale or duty free.
Shaker and glasses, also in the freezer.
Vermouth
Olives (or cocktail onions for a Gibson)

Put ice in the shaker. Open vermouth bottle. Grasp bottle firmly in hand while glaring at the shaker and muttering obscenities. Add gin to taste. Shake until you remove a layer of skin from your fingertips (which only takes a few seconds), then pull the glass out of the freezer and pour in the gin. Give it a shake to get those little flecks of ice crystals in the top.

---

Hot weather: Mudslides.

Recipe here: http://sailevenstar.com/in-case-anyone-asks/

I'm too lazy to type it again.

Kahlua, Vodka, Irish cream and ice.

3:3:2 booze ratio. Blend the crap out of it.

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Grey Goose vodka (or Costco's version of imported French Vodka)  We traveled in Spain and Portugal with one of the founders of Costco and he said that their version was from Grey Goose.  Nice!

Martini glass (stored in the freezer)

6 frozen organic blueberries (for the antioxidant properties)

Lemon slice (Scurvy is a constant threat), and rubbed inside the lip of the glass

A few ice cubes (or with vodka poured from a shaker)

Grey Goose Vodka, or Koskenkorva Finnish Vodka (I'm mostly Finnish and have raced on a Baltic 39 for 41 years)

Repeat as necessary.

 

 

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12 hours ago, Rasputin22 said:

Here is my Mai Tai graphic which I want to use on a boat I designed and is under construction. I'll look for the recipe later.

mai_tai_close_up.thumb.jpg.24723dcea61e54a276a5c33e37da469a.jpg

 

Here is the official recipe for the boats cocktail.

image.thumb.png.73cd949221d9fcd9c3f4bd4bb928be1d.png

 

Will the boat's name be the "Crazy Ginger?"

- Stumbling

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I like a classic G&T, a nice double shot of good gin (none of that Bombay Sapphire crap though), squeeze of lime, poured over ice and topped with tonic.

Margarita, make enough for 2 each, few manage more than 2.  1 part fresh squeezed lime juice, 2 parts orange liqueur (I prefer Cointreau but any triple-sec type will do), 4 parts tequila (if it's not good enough to drink neat, it's not good enough for a margarita). Mix over ice. Serve, watch the giggling.

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Rum punchOJ, pineapple juice, lemon juice, almond sirup, spiced rum. 

Rum punch two: Replace almond sirup with grenadine. 

Real Negroni: Gin, Campari, Martini rosso. 1:1:1. Nothing else. 

Negroni sprizz: fill Real Negroni up with dry Spumante, a small dash of orange juice, and a sprizz of sparkling water. One is perfect before dinner. Two will knock the socks off your feet. Three will blow a humpback whale out of the water. 

Kir royal: Creme de cassis, dry Champagne.

 

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The boat drink is negroni.  Something about channelling Orson Welles and being able to say "green grace, where we serve no wine ... at all", while handing up that perfect dark red bomb makes me very happy.  We use gin that has licorice / anise, aperol as noted, and the antico formula for vermouth.  On occasion, spritzed with a cremant into a form of americano, we can pretend that we are true heavyweights.  I have to say, though, that the gin fizz is also a favourite, making our own lemon peel infusion to capture that perfect aromatic sweetness of lemon oil.  Never use citrus juice - that's pucker nasty...

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Sangria.....sort of and yes not a true cocktail but a summer favorite drink

peels and juice of 2 oranges, 1  lemon, 1 lime

fresh peach slices

1 bottle red wine, 1 bottle chilled cava or prosecco

Combine in pitcher minus prosecco and chill, add prosecco just before serving over ice. Be sure to fish out any remaining peach slices when done. Can add fresh berries as well.

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I just remembered another favorite for summertime. Especially with jerk chicken or simple BBQ fare. 

This is the infamous Rasta Punch. I learned the recipe from Wes, who several years ago was the bartender of note at Hemingway's Cafe in Providenciales, Turks and Caicos Islands. He is purported to be the creator of this, but I'm sure similar versions have been made elsewhere. His Rasta Punch is just particularly good.

The genuine article is made with Bambarra Rum, which is sadly unavailable outside out Turks. I have approximated it as closely as possible with things that are readily available elsewhere.

The base mix is 1:1:1 pineapple juice, mango juice, and gold rum (I like Havana Club Anejo for this). 

Here you have options - you can either layer the drink or pour other ingredients down the side of the glass after pouring the base mix over ice, but the end result is similar. 

Pour 1oz of grenadine down one side of the glass

Pour 1.5 oz blue Curacao down the other side of the glass

Float 1.5oz of black rum on top - Demerara rums have the closest flavor profile to Bambarra Black. I like Blackwell or Old Sam for this, but you can get away with M eyers's or Gosling's in a pinch.

If you pour or layer correctly, it looks like a rasta flag when you present it. Stir it up and it's a weird purple/brown, but tastes amazing. These are very very dangerous!

 

 

20227989_10154984313829353_1908450869_o.jpg

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11 hours ago, stumblingthunder said:

Will the boat's name be the "Crazy Ginger?"

- Stumbling

I like that name! How about 'Fire in the Hold'...

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A Cocount Mojito, basically it's derivative of traditional Mojito best consumed on down wind legs.  In Fact it's good for homeward bound legs, sunset....and just about anytime after 5:00.  I especially like them just after I go through woods hole.

1-2 oz simple syrup (based on how sweet you want it)

2 oz Rum (pick your rum)

2 oz cocunut run (Cruzan preferably)

5 minced mint leaves

1/4 Lime squeezed

4-5 oz Schweppes tonic water.

 

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2 minutes ago, jdubes said:

A Cocount Mojito, basically it's derivative of traditional Mojito best consumed on down wind legs.  In Fact it's good for homeward bound legs, sunset....and just about anytime after 5:00.  I especially like them just after I go through woods hole.

1-2 oz simple syrup (based on how sweet you want it)

2 oz Rum (pick your rum)

2 oz cocunut run (Cruzan preferably)

5 minced mint leaves

1/4 Lime squeezed

4-5 oz Schweppes tonic water.

 

I make these with 3oz. 10-Cane or Papa's Pilar Blonde rum, muddled lime and mint, sparkling water and 1.5 oz coconut creme. 

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14 minutes ago, Rasputin22 said:

I like that name! How about 'Fire in the Hold'...

Or "Ginger Snap!"

- Stumbling

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6 minutes ago, stumblingthunder said:

Or "Ginger Snap!"

- Stumbling

Snapping Ginger by the looks of that girl!

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Most any rum from Barbados, in a glass with 1-2 small ice cubes.

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23 hours ago, Israel Hands said:

image.jpeg.cb00f10d4c3fd0e7625993c36d245825.jpeg

 

^^^This, and use same technique for Manhattans. On the rocks but with just a bit of ice.

For Manhattans and old fashioneds try Bulleit Rye instead of bourbon... 

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No one has mentioned the Side Car: 1.5 oz Cognac (or Bourbon), 3/4 oz Grand Marnier, and 3/4 oz lemon juice, orange peel twist and sugar the rim

Served up in a Martini glass

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2 hours ago, ajbram said:

I just remembered another favorite for summertime. Especially with jerk chicken or simple BBQ fare. 

This is the infamous Rasta Punch. I learned the recipe from Wes, who several years ago was the bartender of note at Hemingway's Cafe in Providenciales, Turks and Caicos Islands. He is purported to be the creator of this, but I'm sure similar versions have been made elsewhere. His Rasta Punch is just particularly good.

The genuine article is made with Bambarra Rum, which is sadly unavailable outside out Turks. I have approximated it as closely as possible with things that are readily available elsewhere.

The base mix is 1:1:1 pineapple juice, mango juice, and gold rum (I like Havana Club Anejo for this). 

Here you have options - you can either layer the drink or pour other ingredients down the side of the glass after pouring the base mix over ice, but the end result is similar. 

Pour 1oz of grenadine down one side of the glass

Pour 1.5 oz blue Curacao down the other side of the glass

Float 1.5oz of black rum on top - Demerara rums have the closest flavor profile to Bambarra Black. I like Blackwell or Old Sam for this, but you can get away with M eyers's or Gosling's in a pinch.

If you pour or layer correctly, it looks like a rasta flag when you present it. Stir it up and it's a weird purple/brown, but tastes amazing. These are very very dangerous!

 

 

20227989_10154984313829353_1908450869_o.jpg

Reminds me of something that I was served years ago in Christiansted, St. Croix, that they called "The Hugo."  (It was a couple of years after Hugo.)  It was alternating layers of frozen fruit juices from a slushie machine and white and dark ************ rum, in a taaalll glass.  I had never taken an actual vacation before, and had trouble figuring out what one is supposed to do on one.  (After morning diving.)  Turns out, it's sitting on the beach, sipping "Hugos."  Hence my inability to remember the exact recipe. 

This year... too many carafes of Sangria and Seabreezes during the hot weather.  *looks at waistline*  *shakes head*  *goes bicycling instead*

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2 minutes ago, toddster said:

Hmm... the site is censoring rum selections now?

Noticed that... hence the weird spelling of M eyers's in my previous post.

Toddster - which brand did it censor in yours?

 

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The same, although there is only one "e"  

Maybe I mis-typed it?  Myers

 

Oops! But there are two "s"s.  If that doesn't make sense, drink more Myers's

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So Scot wants us to properly spell our rum brands. I can appreciate that.

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And a most satisfying Paris bar aperitif on a hot day, the Mauresque.

1 oz Pastis and 1 oz Orgeat in a tall chilled glass.  Ice-cold water on the side.  Dilute to taste. 

It used to be Absinthe rather than Pastis, but that's hard to find now.

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YellowBird (from the Abacos)

1 ounce Light Rum(Bacardi), 1 ounce Gold Rum(Appletons), 1 ounce Dark Rum(your choice), 1/2 ounce Apricot Brandy, 1/2 ounce Galiano.  Equal parts orange and pineapple juice. 1 freshly squoooooz lime.  Pour in a blender over ice and blend until ice is reduced in half.  Pour into glasses and serve to your friends and see who gets happiest soonest.

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18 hours ago, gn4478 said:

No one has mentioned the Side Car: 1.5 oz Cognac (or Bourbon), 3/4 oz Grand Marnier, and 3/4 oz lemon juice, orange peel twist and sugar the rim

Served up in a Martini glass

 

AHEM. 

 

On ‎9‎/‎10‎/‎2019 at 8:42 AM, Lex Teredo said:

What's your go-to cocktail, and how do you make it?  Not beer, not booze-in-soda, not straight whisky.  I need to add a new drink to my lineup. 

My current hockey team lineup of cocktails features a medium dry martini with olives and less floral gin, a proper fresh made whisky sour, the Negroni / Boulevardier, the Sidecar, and the Old Fashioned, an underrated and sophisticated flavor that hits it out of the park if you use the right whisky and Luxardo cherries, and both orange and Angostura bitters.  

 

But thanks for the recipe. 

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4 hours ago, Lex Teredo said:

 

AHEM. 

 

 

But thanks for the recipe. 

Calvados sidecar - yum!

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5 hours ago, Lex Teredo said:

 

AHEM. 

 

 

But thanks for the recipe. 

I stand corrected, or drink corrected...

 

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Funny... lots of dogballs booze in Ohio

 

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Pan Galactic Gargle Blaster, (obviously),

1 part Everclear (or any other strong grain alcohol such as Bourbon, Moonshine, or Vodka)

1 part Bitter Lemon 

1 part Bombay Sapphire Gin 

1 part Yukon Jack Perma-Frost Schnapps 

Enough blue food coloring to make the mixture a very light sky blue

Also:

Sugar cubes

Cinnamon extract

Angostura Bitters

Olives

Mix the first five ingredients and chill (usually for 24 hours). Then, take a sugar cube and let it absorb 1 milliliter of cinnamon extract and 1 drop of yellow food coloring (optional). Place three ice cubes in a glass and pour the chilled liquid mixture over these. Drop in the sugar cube and stir to dissolve, or just let it sit (if food coloring is used, often the sugar cube is just left to sit, to create a layering effect with the color). Sprinkle the Angostura Bitters in the drink, and add an olive. Drink, but very carefully.

Alternatively, one can let the sugar cube absorb 1 milliliter of Angostura Bitters, and sprinkle ground cinnamon on the top of the drink, thus omitting the cinnamon extract.

Make a large amount of the mixture ahead of time and chill for a day, rather than constantly mix more of it. Also,  save it for a special occasion, such as Towel Day, due to the work put into making the drink.

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I like the Hemingway daiquiri, 2 ounce rum, 1/2 ounce maraschino cherry liqueur, 1/2 ounce lime and grapefruit juice

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At the RBYC in Bermuda, they serve something called a "Loudmouth".   I dont know what goes into it (rum obviously) but it works as advertised.  The noise level goes up many decibels.

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19 hours ago, Mambo Kings said:

At the RBYC in Bermuda, they serve something called a "Loudmouth".   I dont know what goes into it (rum obviously) but it works as advertised.  The noise level goes up many decibels.

Speaking of RBYC I'm surprised no one has brought up the Rum Swizzle.  Not sure what's in it other than rum but I am sure that it gets the job done after a Bermuda race!

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On 9/10/2019 at 8:47 AM, cyclone said:

Substitute Crabbies for the ginger beer.

Substitute Myers for goslings

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Hotel Citroen, on Ping Island. They had a bartender there, Kino, made the best rum cannonball I've ever tasted.

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On 9/12/2019 at 1:55 AM, P_Wop said:

And a most satisfying Paris bar aperitif on a hot day, the Mauresque.

1 oz Pastis and 1 oz Orgeat in a tall chilled glass.  Ice-cold water on the side.  Dilute to taste. 

It used to be Absinthe rather than Pastis, but that's hard to find now.

I thought that Absinthe was on its way back, having been rehabilitated from the "Green Fairies" days?

- Stumbling

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54 minutes ago, stumblingthunder said:

I thought that Absinthe was on its way back, having been rehabilitated from the "Green Fairies" days?

- Stumbling

My in-laws used to issue each other around the family a tot before jumping in the car to drive home. You know, for confidence on the roads? Yea gods! There was also a LOT of home brew absinthe in France after it was outlawed. Mon dieu!!

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11 minutes ago, HFC Hunter said:

My in-laws used to issue each other around the family a tot before jumping in the car to drive home. You know, for confidence on the roads? Yea gods! There was also a LOT of home brew absinthe in France after it was outlawed. Mon dieu!!

I guess it is true, Absinthe makes the heart grow wilder!

- Stumbling

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General thoughts so far:

- Bombay Blue is a brand construct with a pricing exercise. Support your local gin distiller or Tanquer’s 10

- Angostura bitters is very high alcohol. You only use a drop, but don’t think it’s virgin if you’re mates with wagoneers.

- Dark & Stormies have lime. Without it you’re drinking rum and “pop.” (Which can be fine, but it ain’t a Stormy)

- Clamato tastes like poorly timed cunnilingis. You canucks are bad people ;)

- A simple G&T steps forward with a dusting of cinnamon (Spanish trick) 

- Not a cocktail, but airline coffee can become drinkable by asking for a Baileys to drop into it (though you may lose your man-card asking for the Baileys)

- Cocktails needing an explanation to the barman or your mates are up there with Mt Gay hats

- Rum & Ting... beware of the disruptive effect of grapefruit on the coverage of the pill ;)

 

 

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9 minutes ago, stumblingthunder said:

I guess it is true, Absinthe makes the heart grow wilder!

- Stumbling

Especially when it’s been soaking cherries in a jar in someone’s garage for 30 years. French becomes easier though

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Well, we be in de islands mon...rum and (fresh) coconut watah cures what ails ya. If ya fancy ya ken squeeze a lime in dere too, wit some ice in a tahl glass. First tasted a Dark and Stormy at some little dive in St. George, Bermuda, after a strenuous passage from CT. Ate Wahoo chunks and drank D&S's until I could just barely stagger back to the boat. Good times! Nowadays we find using a 50/50 blend of Cruzan dark and backstrap rum instead of Goslings makes them easier to guzzle. I like to double up on the lime too. Nothing like getting blasted on "Ti Punch" (see below), watching the sun go down in Martinique. The Frenchies really take their alcohol seriously - see Wikipedia discourse on "Champagne." Rum agricole is made from sugar cane, industrial is from molasses (which most rum is made from these days). My favorite rum is Clemant, coincidently from Martinique. And you can freely purchase seriously ass kicking Absinthe in lotsa places down here. Cheers!

Ingredients

Serving: 1

  • 2 ounces rhum agricole, light or dark
  • 1 barspoon cane syrup
  • 1 wedge lime

Garnish: lime peel coin

Directions
  1. In a rocks glass, add a splash of cane syrup and a squeeze of lime.
  2. Add rhum agricole and a few ice cubes.
  3. Stir gently and garnish with a lime coin.

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6 hours ago, sugarbird said:

Well, we be in de islands mon...rum and (fresh) coconut watah cures what ails ya. If ya fancy ya ken squeeze a lime in dere too, wit some ice in a tahl glass. First tasted a Dark and Stormy at some little dive in St. George, Bermuda, after a strenuous passage from CT. Ate Wahoo chunks and drank D&S's until I could just barely stagger back to the boat. Good times! Nowadays we find using a 50/50 blend of Cruzan dark and backstrap rum instead of Goslings makes them easier to guzzle. I like to double up on the lime too. Nothing like getting blasted on "Ti Punch" (see below), watching the sun go down in Martinique. The Frenchies really take their alcohol seriously - see Wikipedia discourse on "Champagne." Rum agricole is made from sugar cane, industrial is from molasses (which most rum is made from these days). My favorite rum is Clemant, coincidently from Martinique. And you can freely purchase seriously ass kicking Absinthe in lotsa places down here. Cheers!

Ingredients

Serving: 1

  • 2 ounces rhum agricole, light or dark
  • 1 barspoon cane syrup
  • 1 wedge lime

Garnish: lime peel coin

Directions
  1. In a rocks glass, add a splash of cane syrup and a squeeze of lime.
  2. Add rhum agricole and a few ice cubes.
  3. Stir gently and garnish with a lime coin.

Well-timed post sir. I am enjoying some Minnesotan rhum agricole as we speak. This just neat, well chilled.

 

image.thumb.png.ca263b448f7b3e14390833311542caea.png

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While in Sydney, Australia for the 1996 Sydney / Hobart, we were made aware of Bundaberg Rum, and quickly learned that there was a flight in every bottle.  

We taught them at the Sydney Yacht Club that you could make pitchers of rum (Mount Gay) and tonic for $2 per shot.  They lost money. . . amateurs.

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You guys are pros. I tend to go for the more low brow slushie cocktail, at home with a good electric machine or on the boat with the carbon fibre gas powered unit. 

Daiquiri with fresh bananas

mojito, maybe with coconut rum, if it's passion fruit season, I'll scoop a few in

a Favourite is a can of pineapple, a can of red bull, and midori and vodka ( amount depends on crowd) top with ice and blitz

rum and coke slushies can be made with soda stream syrup, some lime, rum and ice. 

The best thing about the blender is adding actual fruit, chuck in an actual piece of lime or lemon.  

Low brow but fun  

 

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Something light & fresh and without any rum for those hot summer afternoons: traditional German “bowle”. 

Put fruit like strawberries or peaches (peeled pieces) in a large glass bowl. Pour one bottle of semi-dry white wine over it. Put it in the fridge for a couple of hours so the fruit can soak up the alcohol and the wine can soak up the fruit flavour. Before serving, pour another bottle of dry sparkling wine in it, mix very gently. Traditionally served in flat glass cups with little dessert-forks. Ladies will get an extra large portion of fruit, of course. :rolleyes:

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15 hours ago, sugarbird said:

Well, we be in de islands mon...rum and (fresh) coconut watah cures what ails ya. If ya fancy ya ken squeeze a lime in dere too, wit some ice in a tahl glass. First tasted a Dark and Stormy at some little dive in St. George, Bermuda, after a strenuous passage from CT. Ate Wahoo chunks and drank D&S's until I could just barely stagger back to the boat. Good times! Nowadays we find using a 50/50 blend of Cruzan dark and backstrap rum instead of Goslings makes them easier to guzzle. I like to double up on the lime too. Nothing like getting blasted on "Ti Punch" (see below), watching the sun go down in Martinique. The Frenchies really take their alcohol seriously - see Wikipedia discourse on "Champagne." Rum agricole is made from sugar cane, industrial is from molasses (which most rum is made from these days). My favorite rum is Clemant, coincidently from Martinique. And you can freely purchase seriously ass kicking Absinthe in lotsa places down here. Cheers!

Ingredients

Serving: 1

  • 2 ounces rhum agricole, light or dark
  • 1 barspoon cane syrup
  • 1 wedge lime

Garnish: lime peel coin

Directions
  1. In a rocks glass, add a splash of cane syrup and a squeeze of lime.
  2. Add rhum agricole and a few ice cubes.
  3. Stir gently and garnish with a lime coin.

Martinique rhum agricoles have an AOC appellation  - so the real deal and much under appreciated. 

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