Bob Perry

Eight Bells Mark Lindsay

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Sorry to read this morning of the death of Mark Lindsay. Mark worked for Dick Carter at the time I was there. He was a lot of fun, high energy. He had a unique drafting style involving a lot of free hand lines. It was very effective.

Magazine articles of Carter designs would say "from the drawing board of Dick Carter" despite the fact that Dick did no drawing at all.. Mark cut one of these quotes out of the magazine and taped it to the edge of his drawing board. It read, "The drawing board of Dick Carter". Dick must have seen it but said nothing.

 

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GREAT back story!  Thanks for that.  RIP, Fair Winds and Following Seas Mark.

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Mark had an interesting career. He cut a wide swath through life and was well regarded for his skill and his attitude.

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Guerdon:

No kidding. I was very fortunate. I remember one day Dick came into the tower and said, "I can just feel the horsepower in here."

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Mark Lindsay from 505s and Marblehead back in the '70s?  Sorry to hear it.  He was a loyal Marblehead Frostbiter too, made beautiful custom centerboards for our Interclubs.  Great technical sailor, but really intutitve also and a very nice guy to boot.

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When Mark went on to building bigger boats what was the name of his Boatyard? Was it Boston Boatworks?

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I was only in the same room with him once.  This was back in '96 or '97 in KW during Race Week.  We were attending the same, uh, dance recital.  He seemed to really enjoy himself as did his wife who was at his side.  

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12 minutes ago, Cal20sailor said:

I was only in the same room with him once.  This was back in '96 or '97 in KW during Race Week.  We were attending the same, uh, dance recital.  He seemed to really enjoy himself as did his wife who was at his side.  

 

"Dance recital", that's a new name for a "Gentlemens Club"!  Did you have a wad of singles beside you? LOL

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1 hour ago, guerdon said:

Bob, you worked with some good people.

From the MJM article by Mark, " soon afterward we hired another young aspiring designer, Bob Perry who had a few years previously given up a career as a rock musician."

RIP Mark.

Image result for international 505 sailboat

 

     As a Flying Dutchman sailor from that late 60's early 70's I can attest that our fleets sense of smug superiority (as the highest level of performance sailing dinghy) was severely challenged by Mark and his new breed of International 505's! They always looked like they were on ball bearings at speed to me...

 

Good example here

Image result for international 505 sailboat

 

Only boat I ever saw that had more strings to pull that a FD.

 

Image result for international 505 sailboat

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Here's a little piece I wrote for my Facebook Fan Club:

Mortality sucks:

I woke up early this morning to the news my old friend and co worker at the Carter office aka "the tower" had died. Mark Lindsay was my age.

Let me tell you about Mark. Mark was 6'6" with shoulder length sandy colored hair and a huge smile. Mark worked with Chuck Paine on the top floor of the tower. I worked with Yves Marie Tanton two floors down. While Chuck, Yves Marie and I tried to work to an office drafting style Mark had a unique drawing style. He would free hand many of the less important lines. This gave his drawings a vitality that was hard to duplicate.

When Carter designs were published inevitably the blurb was say, "from the drawing board of Dick Carter. This was funny, in a way because Dick did no drawing at all while I was there. Mark cut out the words from one article "the drawing board of Dick Carter" and taped the quote to the edge of his drawing board. Yves Marie, Chuck and I though this was very funny. Dick never commented on it but must have seen it.

The tower was perched on the rocks above Boston Harbor at the tip of Nahant. It was an old submarine watch tower. Each floor was 12' by 12" and the upper three levels were connected by ladders. I think at some point each of us took "the fast way" down landing sprawled on the floor of the lower level. Dick was master of this maneuver while holding his cup of coffee. On hot days we would go down to the tiny beach below the tower, I think it was called 13 Steps Beach, strip to our undies and go swimming.One hot day, Dick was in Europe, we swam and then went back to work. I went up to Mark's floor for some reason and there he was working away wearing only a towel. Sparkman and Stevens it was not.

During my two week "audition" at the tower Mark was the only one who invited me to his home for dinner. That was a welcome break from my usual dinner of peanut butter sandwiches. Mark's house was bustling with sailor stuff. Mark and his wife Sally were very active 505 dinghy racers. Mark's kitchen was half food prep and half boat workshop where Mark had various dinghy parts he was working on. I think dinner was pasta in an epoxy sauce.

Mark was far more interested in building than he was in designing and he went on to become a successful builder of large racing boats in Boston.

I remember the morning when Dick came into the tower and said, "I can feel the horsepower in here."

Glad I got to know you Mark. I was fortunate.

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Mark was a local legend having grown up on Cape Ann and cutting my teeth racing in Manchester, Marblehead and Gloucester.   When I was 13 or 14 Dennis Connor, was racing Etchells in Marblehead for the summer and he was slated to meet us kids at Pleon for a talk during race week.  He was of course my idol when I was a kid, so I was pretty pumped, but he was a no show.  He strolled through later launching his boat, and ignored all of us adoring kids.  That day I f’ed up my I14 daggerboard and Dennis got in a collision with another boat (DC was DSQ) and lost a set of chain plates and his rig in process.   Mark was the guy to go to for any kind of decent racing repair, so I headed down there right after hauling my boat.  DC got to Mark’s place just after and was trying to push his job to the front of the queue... Mark was having none of it, and I took great satisfaction watching my board get repaired as DC and his guys waited and fumed.  

Through the years I raced against Mark a lot.  He was a lot of fun to do battle against during the Courageous R19 frostbit series, and he was always racing The 8m Pleone during classic events. Sorry to hear this.  

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Never met him, but had one of his 5-ohs for a couple of seasons.  He was a true artist.

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The world has lost a good man.

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He had many talents, what a life well-lived.  

I still have a really cool trophy he fashioned from scratch for a Frostbite "Evacuation Day 1977" regatta we had the day we had to move all the Interclubs from the Boston Yacht Club to the Marblehead Transportation Company , by pushing or pulling them along Front Street on their dollies a few blocks.   I didn't "win the day" often in that competition, but I did that day.  It's a leaded glass on wood backing depiction of a Penguin with the hobo's swag bag on a stick over his shoulder,  pulling an Interclub on wheels to the new joint. 

I am not taking it to Antiques Roadshow!  At least not to sell...

Thanks, Mark.

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In the 80's my boat partner and I bought a Farr designed one tonner in Annapolis and trucked it up to Marblehead.  We sent it to Mark's shop in Gloucester for a new paint job and some work on the foils.  Used to love checking on the progress at the shop.  Where everybody else was sensibly wearing resparaters and overalls, Mark was happily running around covered in epoxy and fiberglas dust, oblivious to the massive amount of solvents in the air.  He laughed and told us he was immune to the stuff. 

As related in the stories above, he was one of the good guys.

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5 minutes ago, dave-j said:

In the 80's my boat partner and I bought a Farr designed one tonner in Annapolis and trucked it up to Marblehead.  We sent it to Mark's shop in Gloucester for a new paint job and some work on the foils.  Used to love checking on the progress at the shop.  Where everybody else was sensibly wearing resparaters and overalls, Mark was happily running around covered in epoxy and fiberglas dust, oblivious to the massive amount of solvents in the air.  He laughed and told us he was immune to the stuff. 

As related in the stories above, he was one of the good guys.

Yeah, I saw that sort of false bravado a lot in my days in the boatyards and shops. How did that work out for those fellows as fine as they might have been?

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RIP Mark, met him and raced against him a few times. Great guy. 

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I am very proud to say at one time I owned a Mark Lindsay Flying Dutchman (USA 301 still sailing). Man it was incredible..... RIP

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6 hours ago, Cal20sailor said:

I was only in the same room with him once.  This was back in '96 or '97 in KW during Race Week.  We were attending the same, uh, dance recital.  He seemed to really enjoy himself as did his wife who was at his side.  

Those places were easy to take the wife to in the late 1990’s. Good, clean fun!

Sail on, Mark

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When he was still in Gloucester/Cape Ann,  I had a Lindsay rudder made for my boat.  It was a thing of beauty. It was a damn shame to hang it on the back of my boat, it would have looked good, hanging on the wall in my study.   Anyway, chalk it up as another winner for Mark because we won the R19 North American Champs with it.  I wish I had kept that rudder as a memento when I sold the boat.

I met Mark a few times since then....a brilliant engineer and designer who liked to build things.....but visiting that workshop in Cape Ann was special.  Im also appreciative of the good things he did for Courageous.    

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Will be missed.   Hard not to know someone around Boston with a Lindsay FD or 505 in those days.   Honor to have one built.   

Kick out of the mention of his conversations/work with Joe Duplin.  Both were Speed Doctors Supreme and always worth a listen if you were lucky enough to meet them around the dock.

Sail on ML.

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Found this advert in the August 1985 issue of Seahorse Magazine.

IMG_0750.JPG

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Spent many a good day in a Lindsay 505.  Also spent many a day refinishing the foredeck on one.

Farr 39ML was a hell of a boat I spent lot's of time on too.

 

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1 hour ago, fivestar said:

Found this advert in the August 1985 issue of Seahorse Magazine.

IMG_0750.JPG

Worked on that mold, bumpy. He was a terrific guy, always nice to me well past my sell by date.

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I was thinking of selling the ML, but that idea just went out with the trash.  Very good man, that Mark.

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I have great memories of competing against Mark in the 505 class back in the day. There was some fear at that time that his boats were so obviously superior that they threatened the viability of the class. He advanced the state of the art.

Sail on Mark.

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Sparkman and Stevens it was not.

To any qualified naval architect, it's Sparkman and Stephens. To the illustrious illustrator - just some other detail with which he can't be bothered.

 

 

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10 hours ago, Dog said:

I have great memories of competing against Mark in the 505 class back in the day. There was some fear at that time that his boats were so obviously superior that they threatened the viability of the class. He advanced the state of the art.

Sail on Mark.

Yeah, Marks 505's did have the kind of threat to the class that Marstrom's Tornado Olympic cats did for that class. 

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Is it why early rock rocked and sailing "back in the day" had more characters and personality? I hate feeling this way but perhaps that's the secret sauce that ,being lacking, is leading to sailings demise. There are bright talented people around today but they just don't seem as colorful and engaging. Maybe it's because I don't drink as much as I used to.

Probably why I so enjoyed this website in it's early days. It captured some of the character of days past.

Enuf. Look forward, be positive and grateful for Mark's spirit, energy and intellect and ART.

 

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On 9/10/2019 at 10:52 AM, Bob Perry said:

I think dinner was pasta in an epoxy sauce.

 

Best laugh of the day. Sorry for the loss of an old friend Bob. 

I sailed on a Carter 33 half tonner back  in the day. It needed a lot of wind to be competitive, but Corpus Christi usually provided plenty. A very well designed rule beater, but a thing of beauty as well. Those must have been fun times.

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