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So next week my college team and I are going off to Chicago to race T10's against other Midwestern colleges.

I've thumbed through the North, Doyle Boston and Sobstad tuning guides and they seem to point in similar directions as far as rig setup and trim goes, and a lot of the advice is pretty intuitive.

We were assigned an LS-10, which is the newer boat with the coachroof and some layout changes on deck and inside.

1. Are there any special tuning considerations for the LS-10 that wouldn't be true for the T-10?

2. Any preseason prep (Fairing, Longboarding, Sanding/Antifoul, New Sails) would have to already have been done by the owner, is there anything we can do to increase performance before leaving the dock?

3. For the main trimmer, how much of the trim is done with the traveler versus the sheet? The guides talk about keeping the aft third of the top batten parallel to the boom and the telltale stalling about 50% of the time, and that it's more crucial to induce twist coming out of tacks to promote flow adhesion on the keel-obviously keeping a dialogue with the driver, is that just slowly pulling the car to windward as the boat flattens out or is there some sheet play? Downwind, is it just playing out mainsheet until the sail hits the spreaders or is there more finesse?

4. Weight placement downwind-I assume that the goal is to keep weight out of the cockpit unless it's nuking, does the T-10 do better with a little windward or a little leeward heel? Better to soak or to try and keep boatspeed up? It's a pretty tiny kite...

5. Any tips to get a crew that has never sailed big boats together before; and most of whom have only sailed Opti/420/Laser/FJ or some very "Cruisy" PHRF boats up to speed quickly?

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1. Are there any special tuning considerations for the LS-10 that wouldn't be true for the T-10?

The LS10's are identical as far as a tuning and rig set up.  The  LS's are very stiff so if there is breeze you should have no issues putting on the turns.  Most of them launch from the companionway hatch which is a longer way for the kite to travel so just keep an eye on it when prefeeding/setting.  

 

2. Any preseason prep (Fairing, Longboarding, Sanding/Antifoul, New Sails) would have to already have been done by the owner, is there anything we can do to increase performance before leaving the dock?

Double check that they remember to clean the bottom, rudders will show the growth first.  Make sure the rig is centered and tuned.  Also make sure there is enough throw on the backstay in big breeze, you'll need it

3. For the main trimmer, how much of the trim is done with the traveler versus the sheet? The guides talk about keeping the aft third of the top batten parallel to the boom and the telltale stalling about 50% of the time, and that it's more crucial to induce twist coming out of tacks to promote flow adhesion on the keel-obviously keeping a dialogue with the driver, is that just slowly pulling the car to windward as the boat flattens out or is there some sheet play? Downwind, is it just playing out mainsheet until the sail hits the spreaders or is there more finesse?

 

In light to moderate upwind bring the traveller up so the boom is centerline or slightly above in flat water and decent breeze.  The mainsails have long top batten so light sheet tension makes a big difference light to moderate, use the fine tune to play the top.  Out of the tacks ease the sheet slightly (a few inches) and let the traveller fall to around the edge of the leeward bench.  Pull the car up slowly as the jib comes in and the boat speeds up then bring the sheet in.  The final sheet pull will induce more heel and bring the bow up.  Your speed build on you jib is generally just inside of touching the lifelines.

Downwind in sub 8 you will play the main a lot because you will reach.  between 8-11 the boat mode changes to a deep run and the main goes all the way out, boom at or need the shrouds.  Vang eased so the top is just open, almost 90 degrees to the boat centerline.

 

4. Weight placement downwind-I assume that the goal is to keep weight out of the cockpit unless it's nuking, does the T-10 do better with a little windward or a little leeward heel? Better to soak or to try and keep boatspeed up? It's a pretty tiny kite...

Weight forward until nuking, yes.  The boat likes leeward heel up to about 10 then dead flat.  A touch of weather heel in the breeze helps keep the bow down, but it doesn't need much.  Bow up for speed generally until you hit the mid teens then send the sucker at the mark, it doesn't go much faster than hull speed.

 

5. Any tips to get a crew that has never sailed big boats together before; and most of whom have only sailed Opti/420/Laser/FJ or some very "Cruisy" PHRF boats up to speed quickly?

In light air give the boat a ton of time to accelerate, not a lot of sail area for the weight.  Steer with your weight because the rudder is huge and a big brake.

In breeze sail the boat flatter than you think (10-15 degrees, almost a nuetral helm) and bow down to get as much flow over the keel as possible.  Play the backstay a ton.  I generally either put the backstay on before the puff if you can or drop the traveler when it hits, backstay on, traveler back up.  If you cant get the boat flat before you get overbend wrinkles in the main, add turns.  I don't know what they will do for GLIOR but class rules allow for turns to be put on mid race.

Trim the jib in until the leech telltale at the top batten stalls and then ease it until it is just flying.  This is your max trim.  If its light or lumpy ease an inch.  If its both ease two.  If you can't find the groove you can ease more

If you PM me an email I can send over a few regattas worth of notes and my tuning guide

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37 minutes ago, onepointfivethumbs said:

So next week my college team and I are going off to Chicago to race T10's against other Midwestern colleges.

I've thumbed through the North, Doyle Boston and Sobstad tuning guides and they seem to point in similar directions as far as rig setup and trim goes, and a lot of the advice is pretty intuitive.

We were assigned an LS-10, which is the newer boat with the coachroof and some layout changes on deck and inside.

1. Are there any special tuning considerations for the LS-10 that wouldn't be true for the T-10?

2. Any preseason prep (Fairing, Longboarding, Sanding/Antifoul, New Sails) would have to already have been done by the owner, is there anything we can do to increase performance before leaving the dock?

3. For the main trimmer, how much of the trim is done with the traveler versus the sheet? The guides talk about keeping the aft third of the top batten parallel to the boom and the telltale stalling about 50% of the time, and that it's more crucial to induce twist coming out of tacks to promote flow adhesion on the keel-obviously keeping a dialogue with the driver, is that just slowly pulling the car to windward as the boat flattens out or is there some sheet play? Downwind, is it just playing out mainsheet until the sail hits the spreaders or is there more finesse?

4. Weight placement downwind-I assume that the goal is to keep weight out of the cockpit unless it's nuking, does the T-10 do better with a little windward or a little leeward heel? Better to soak or to try and keep boatspeed up? It's a pretty tiny kite...

5. Any tips to get a crew that has never sailed big boats together before; and most of whom have only sailed Opti/420/Laser/FJ or some very "Cruisy" PHRF boats up to speed quickly?

Are you allowed to make any standing rigging changes (aside from backstay?)?

Can you get at least one practice session on a big boat this week? Any big boat? Even a J/24? That will make a huge difference. 

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To make the most of short practice time, I’d say in addition to practicing tacks (maintain/regain boatspeed and point asap) and jibes (get used to the sequence of things), also do some downwind sailing with the spinnaker up, no pole. That will give the crew both a feel for being in control dead down (and 10-20 degrees either side) but also the idea “ok I can take two tenths of a second and figure out what needs to happen and do that,” rather than just “pull harder.”

 

A couple of small tips to help get used to the bigger boat: 

jib trimmer. Position your head more or less above the main winch and look up at the luff of the jib past the spreader. 1-3 inches off the spreader for power/footing, at the spreader or an inch inside for pointing, and 2-3 inches inside the spreader for pinching. 

 

Spinnaker trim and guy: before a jibe, especially if you’re planning to come to more or less the same point of sail on the other jibe, take a look at where the crews of the spinnaker are relative to each other. This will give you a sense of how much line you’re going to have to ease out on the old guy and take in on the old sheet to accomplish the jibe. Add 2-4 feet if the boat has tweakers (not sure what percentage of the tens are sailing with tweakers these days).  

 

Those things will help give you a sense of how big the moves need to be on the bigger boat. And in the case of the jib, they give the trimmer and skipper a vocabulary to talk about where the jib is and where it needs to be. 

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Sounds like good advice you've gotten already.  Back in the day when we would jump into a new boat and race the next day, our standard practice was to figure out how we wanted to tack, then sail upwind and do 50 tacks.  Full Speed, down speed, ending in a tacking duel pace.  Then set the chute, figure out our footwork, and do 50 jibes.  Again, ending in a poleless jibing duel, working on good roll jibes and roll tacks as we get a better feel for the boat.  It's trying, but will give you confidence in the basics so you can focus on getting your head out of the boat.

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I can only advise as to your 5th question. I was a member of a reasonably successful college keelboat team made up of dinghy sailors. The most important part of transitioning from dinghies to keelboats is to assign everyone their position (ask the class experts what positions make sense on your boat) and train everyone to do their job and ONLY their job. That includes the driver. We won by putting our best tactician on mainsheet and putting a very focused driver on helm to keep the boat moving at top speed.

The rest of the transition is not hard. Tack and jibe less often than you’re used to (be more patient with shifts and use your compass), and come out of your tacks low and smoothly trim in and head up as you build speed.

Starts are going to be a bit different. You can’t luff, accelerate, and go. You’ll need plenty of runway and a good lane. Work on your time-on-distance awareness.

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Great advice and a big 2nd on doing your job and staying there - Still good to have a floater who can jump in if something goes wrong. Unless it's changed the halyards are at the base of the mast so no jumping, something to keep in mind getting jib and spin up and down.  Fun boats and flush deck makes crew work a lot easier.

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Most T-10s will have halyards that you can jump. You can and should adjust the shrouds when breeze picks up or lays down, even during races.

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From a foredeck perspective, the fact that you're coming from small boats is an advantage. You already know the value of taking the kite down to port all the time.

You'll want to decide if you'll douse down the forward hatch or the companion way. See how they're set up. Ask someone who crews on that particular boat.

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On 9/15/2019 at 11:28 AM, Sisu3360 said:

Starts are going to be a bit different. You can’t luff, accelerate, and go. You’ll need plenty of runway and a good lane. Work on your time-on-distance awareness.

Huuuuuuge advice here.  Compared to what you guys do, this is gonna be the biggest thing.  If it's the first time the driver had been in a big boat, Practice Vanderbilt starts and don't worry so much about favored side,(in a regatta like that they should have pretty good rc, so it's gonna be square anyway.) Worry about clear air and getting off the line with room to come down a bit for speed.  The boats are tanks compared to what you are used to so again, patience.  literally practice coming down 5 or so degrees every tack and coming up slowly as speed increases.  Your dingy start of sitting on the line and luffing aint gonna work..  Hence the Vanderbilt thing.  Come in on a screaming reach and you will take out the guys that are fighting for perfect placement on the line.  Oh, and don't pinch..  If the guy below is taking you up you will not be able to hang there, so get out quickly.  Don't try and pinch unless you really really have to, live to fight another day, and with any luck, your tack will be better and you will get them on the next tack.  

 

Have fun..... 

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1 hour ago, herdingbats said:

Soo... how'd it go? 

It was fun, ended up 7/16. We had some good races and some not-so-good races, but we were probably in the top-3 as far as straight-line boatspeed and preparation. Definitely going to try and go next year, preferably with a team that's practiced together more than once.

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