Israel Hands

Lusting on Yachtworld

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1 minute ago, Bull City said:

Seriously, I love the looks of that boat. Are you thinking about it?

I wasn't really, but the boat looks SO pretty and seems to be sitting getting no offers and sounds like a 6 figure restoration was done. Of course there probably is a reason for that, but I may drive over and look. Of course you have the drawback of the room of a modern 30 something foot boat with the slip fees of a 44, but I do love that wood - probably. I can't tell if the boat has been totally flooded or the camera and shadows are making weird patterns :unsure:

The last two "wow look at how nice that boat is" listings I found turned into the broker saying "Those photos are a decade old, the boat is trashed, don't waste your time" :rolleyes:

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2 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Would it be wrong to go buy this boat? They are taking offers and I may finally get my guest off my mooring soon.

The reason to buy a boat is because you want the boat. "Because it's cheap" is not a reason to buy a boat.  

It was a dated design when it was built. It was not designed to be a daysailer, but as a boat to take a small crew a long way.  The gear is probably heavy and awkward compared to a new boat. 

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33 minutes ago, kent_island_sailor said:

I wasn't really, but the boat looks SO pretty and seems to be sitting getting no offers and sounds like a 6 figure restoration was done. Of course there probably is a reason for that, but I may drive over and look.

They are well regarded boats.  Classic Tripp.  Like a big Invicta or a small Columbia 50. 
 

I recall Cruising Loser knowing someone who massively regretted selling theirs. 

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Those Mercer's have a cult following.

I've never seen even a beater for that price.

 

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35 minutes ago, SloopJonB said:

Those Mercer's have a cult following.

I've never seen even a beater for that price.

 

Either this is the new normal like boat shopping in 1930 or see the dead body smell theory.

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1 hour ago, kent_island_sailor said:

 the dead body smell theory.

I thought that was just Corvettes.

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5 hours ago, kinardly said:

Stylish, very definitely. But I object to the loose use of the term "performance catamaran". To me it looks like a very expensive, very heavy floatabago. Can you even have a performance cat without dagger boards?

It has carbon dagger boards operated by an Antal line driver. I guess they are easy to miss on the deck profile as the cassette is located outboard of the rail. An added bonus of the outboard cassette arrangement is the boards/cassettes don’t take up as much room in the interior. This cat is in a completely different weight class as your average ‘floatabago’, coming in at about the same as the Gunboat of comparable length yet with a narrower(yet still cruiserish) cabin house profile.  They call the teak, ‘lightweight’ teak, whatever that means, but I’m pretty sure it’s razor thin. The teak and perhaps the stainless counters are cruisy concessions but other than that the furniture is all cored...so the boat is a lot lighter than it looks.

Add to that, the bridge deck clearance, the rotating carbon rig and the synthetic standing rigging, the sail inventory, the custom rudder replacements, and this boat has no problem being characterized as a performance cat.

 

 

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3 hours ago, fufkin said:

It has carbon dagger boards operated by an Antal line driver. I guess they are easy to miss on the deck profile as the cassette is located outboard of the rail. An added bonus of the outboard cassette arrangement is the boards/cassettes don’t take up as much room in the interior. This cat is in a completely different weight class as your average ‘floatabago’, coming in at about the same as the Gunboat of comparable length yet with a narrower(yet still cruiserish) cabin house profile.  They call the teak, ‘lightweight’ teak, whatever that means, but I’m pretty sure it’s razor thin. The teak and perhaps the stainless counters are cruisy concessions but other than that the furniture is all cored...so the boat is a lot lighter than it looks.

Add to that, the bridge deck clearance, the rotating carbon rig and the synthetic standing rigging, the sail inventory, the custom rudder replacements, and this boat has no problem being characterized as a performance cat.

 

 

if you are't in sales...you should be! :D

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19 hours ago, fufkin said:

It has carbon dagger boards operated by an Antal line driver. I guess they are easy to miss on the deck profile as the cassette is located outboard of the rail. An added bonus of the outboard cassette arrangement is the boards/cassettes don’t take up as much room in the interior. This cat is in a completely different weight class as your average ‘floatabago’, coming in at about the same as the Gunboat of comparable length yet with a narrower(yet still cruiserish) cabin house profile.  They call the teak, ‘lightweight’ teak, whatever that means, but I’m pretty sure it’s razor thin. The teak and perhaps the stainless counters are cruisy concessions but other than that the furniture is all cored...so the boat is a lot lighter than it looks.

Add to that, the bridge deck clearance, the rotating carbon rig and the synthetic standing rigging, the sail inventory, the custom rudder replacements, and this boat has no problem being characterized as a performance cat.

 

 

OK, I'll take one.

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19 hours ago, fufkin said:

It has carbon dagger boards operated by an Antal line driver. I guess they are easy to miss on the deck profile as the cassette is located outboard of the rail. An added bonus of the outboard cassette arrangement is the boards/cassettes don’t take up as much room in the interior. This cat is in a completely different weight class as your average ‘floatabago’, coming in at about the same as the Gunboat of comparable length yet with a narrower(yet still cruiserish) cabin house profile.  They call the teak, ‘lightweight’ teak, whatever that means, but I’m pretty sure it’s razor thin. The teak and perhaps the stainless counters are cruisy concessions but other than that the furniture is all cored...so the boat is a lot lighter than it looks.

Add to that, the bridge deck clearance, the rotating carbon rig and the synthetic standing rigging, the sail inventory, the custom rudder replacements, and this boat has no problem being characterized as a performance cat.

 

 

The dink set up is pretty nice too.

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/2011/alibi-54-3641922/

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On 5/14/2020 at 7:15 PM, kent_island_sailor said:

OMG you are right! No wonder no one will buy that boat!

 

death.jpg

How did he get out of the boat? He's supposed to be inside, waiting, for all time if needs be. Shit, we're in trouble now.

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11 hours ago, Black Sox said:

How did he get out of the boat? He's supposed to be inside, waiting, for all time if needs be. Shit, we're in trouble now.

The world's gone mad. And now The Reaper's running the pit.

Should give the lads down the hall, arguing if a racing boat needs a mainsheet traveler or not some sense of proportion. Keep the bowman focused anyway.

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On 5/14/2020 at 2:26 PM, SloopJonB said:

When we were chartering a mono in the BVI the company had some cats like that. The French dockmaster had sailed his own mono across the Atlantic and when we asked him about the cats he whispered "motorhomes" with a Gallic shrug. :D

We just chartered a cat in the VI's:  a Leopard 50.  I don't know much about cats, but I thought that Leopards had a rep as fast cats that cruised nicely, and I assumed we'd be zipping around at about 9 or 10 knots, easy.  But the skipper informed me that they didn't sail at more than 7 or 8 knots at best.  He was right.  I thought I would be disappointed that we weren't sailing much faster than my Catalina 28 does on a good day, but I wasn't.  A chef and captain catering to our every whim while maintaining an open bar really took the edge off of whatever disappointment there was.

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To me, speed is only part of the story. I’ll admit I’m not really a cruising sailor. Most of my sailing Is day trips with a couple of overnighters and maybe a week in Catalina, so My wife and I are heavily focused on the sensory elements of sailing and there is where we have been disappointed with cats. When you sit up so high above the water on top of those hulls you lose much of that sensation that makes sailing so special. Now, trimarans are much better in this regard but I understand they have their own motion issues with running before a quartering swell and finding a place to berth one big enough to cruise a family in Southern California is a real drawback.

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On 5/14/2020 at 2:04 PM, kinardly said:

Stylish, very definitely. But I object to the loose use of the term "performance catamaran". To me it looks like a very expensive, very heavy floatabago. Can you even have a performance cat without dagger boards?

@kinardly - you did not watch the video, did you? or you weren't paying attention. so, can you please elaborate on what is this?

image.thumb.png.3c96970432c72eb38ec063b3cf9021ea.png

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7 hours ago, Hukilau said:

We just chartered a cat in the VI's:  a Leopard 50.  I don't know much about cats, but I thought that Leopards had a rep as fast cats that cruised nicely, and I assumed we'd be zipping around at about 9 or 10 knots, easy.  But the skipper informed me that they didn't sail at more than 7 or 8 knots at best.  He was right.  I thought I would be disappointed that we weren't sailing much faster than my Catalina 28 does on a good day, but I wasn't.  A chef and captain catering to our every whim while maintaining an open bar really took the edge off of whatever disappointment there was.

Damn that's slow. The Privilege 39 I chartered would have done a horizon job on it and that cat is far from a racer. Did they have some cut down charter-proof sails or 100 pounds of barnacles ?

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14 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

Damn that's slow. The Privilege 39 I chartered would have done a horizon job on it and that cat is far from a racer. Did they have some cut down charter-proof sails or 100 pounds of barnacles ?

No, we had a professional skipper and clean hulls; sails (and the whole boat for that matter) were less than a year old.  I think it's just a big, heavy cruising cat.  My guess is that if they pushed the boat, they could hit double digits.  But this was a luxurious boat that was way loaded down. 

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3 minutes ago, Hukilau said:

No, we had a professional skipper and clean hulls; sails (and the whole boat for that matter) were less than a year old.  I think it's just a big, heavy cruising cat.  My guess is that if they pushed the boat, they could hit double digits.  But this was a luxurious boat that was way loaded down. 

Even so - that is damned slow. The Privilege 39 was not new and neither were the sails. We were commonly in the 9-11 knot range and did go faster on occasion.

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1 hour ago, bmiller said:

Wylie was mentioned in another thread, so I went lusting. I'm just a weeee bit short of the ask price.

https://au.yachtworld.com/boats/1996/custom-60-world-cruiser-racer-3569206/

Great looking boat!  Good designer, builder and price...   Hmm, just a few too many miles away--drat!

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9 minutes ago, Veeger said:

Great looking boat!  Good designer, builder and price...   Hmm, just a few too many miles away--drat!

You could buddy-boat back with BJ...

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Those are great boats. My guess is an estate situation and the widow just wants it gone.

I've known 2 owners of those. One guy had one, sold it, still regretted it 20 years later. Rock solid with serious hardwood interior. 

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On 5/17/2020 at 9:14 AM, bmiller said:

Wylie was mentioned in another thread, so I went lusting. I'm just a weeee bit short of the ask price.

https://au.yachtworld.com/boats/1996/custom-60-world-cruiser-racer-3569206/

Certainly lustworthy. I like the partially covered cockpit. You can be in the sun or out.

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So much to like but I'm not a fan of the hogged shear. I suppose I could get used to it after a couple of 200 nm days in the trades, though.

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And too much COTB.

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On 5/16/2020 at 8:39 AM, Hukilau said:

I don't know much about cats, but I thought that Leopards had a rep as fast cats that cruised nicely, and I assumed we'd be zipping around at about 9 or 10 knots, easy

Uh no. Their rep is fat cruising boat. Hull form is designed to swallow a lot of payload without sinking (big waterplane area)

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Leopard 48 BVI Roadtown moorings. 11 souls on board(3 young children, 3 couples, me and a mate to help me out). Plus luggage and provisions. Only time I noticed was one passage... to keep my eye on the leeward bow on the Anegada back to Foxies 'open water' route, weather and waves were such that I had to make adjustments accordingly. Good payload carrier but still...you can't overload any cat too much...and I felt it was getting close...

That said, yes it did well with the payload and was a great boat for the application. No speed demon, but it did the job quite well for a BVI charter. Better than the comparable length mono that I'd chartered previousy...

liking the Wylie 60 entry

 

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12 hours ago, Zonker said:

Uh no. Their rep is fat cruising boat. Hull form is designed to swallow a lot of payload without sinking (big waterplane area)

Well, then mission accomplished.  We had a lot of payload and did not sink.  And I was correct:  I don't know much about cats.

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What's your verdict on this Condor 37?

sparkman-stephens-condor-37-308771201910

37 kGBP pre-Covid seems like a good price for a S&S design?

 

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"Please note: these pictures are over two years old and do not fully represent her current condition."

Uh oh...

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Looks like a variation of the Tartan 37 design.

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1 hour ago, Elegua said:

"Please note: these pictures are over two years old and do not fully represent her current condition."

Uh oh...

RUN AWAY!

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Then if seriously interested ask the lazy broker to go and take some current pictures. When the listing says needs TLC (and it's been for sale for 2 years plus) it may not be a 'run away' but it should be certainly 'approach with caution'

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1 hour ago, kent_island_sailor said:

RUN AWAY!

Yeah, well, you know even if you have broker at 10%, it's a lot of work and trouble to ask to have current pictures on a listing. Just sayin' man.

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11 hours ago, Matagi said:

What's your verdict on this Condor 37?

sparkman-stephens-condor-37-308771201910

37 kGBP pre-Covid seems like a good price for a S&S design?

 

Cockpit is a complete joke.

Kiddy seats and a bridge deck .

503EADC4-FDFA-43DD-B2B4-4CEC655300C3.jpeg.dd33177b46fcb62aeacac17d73de323b.jpeg6F78DCCD-08D0-49D1-9C88-5F21438BBA0F.jpeg.5c0254dcf07fd0c6ee57f35b951722cf.jpeg

 

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So bridgedeck + offset hatch = megadeathtrap? 

Sorry, I find especially the cockpit very well designed. It's nothing for many,, but so is the whole boat  

The cockpit is small so that it won't flood the boat, the bridgedeck gives space below and is an excellent place to stretch across: This is much more comfortable and you are up on your feet much quicker if you need to be. Winches are very well placed (at least in the upper picture) and will not hurt your back.

But I agree, the boat has been on the hard for four years I guess. I found a Youtube-converted Apolloduck ad, dating back four years. A shame, really.

And it will probably drive you mad dead downwind with the IOR shape. Nonetheless, I think a boat has to excel more to windward then downwind anyway. So, I like it very much. 

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17 hours ago, Matagi said:

What's your verdict on this Condor 37?

sparkman-stephens-condor-37-308771201910

37 kGBP pre-Covid seems like a good price for a S&S design?

 

So this was on my list of go to see boats until I asked a guy who lives at  Brighton marina about it. It's a huge pile of nope, was put up for sale in 2012 at $stupid by the guy who did the original refit and has been sitting there ever since.

This Condor 37 I did go and see was in pretty good nick, including the deck & exterior wood. though nowhere comparable with the out of date interior pictures above that look like the groucho club. This one has been converted to a cutter, with only 2 primary winches and jammers like a pipe organ, I am way too much of idiot to handle that currently so ended up with a simpler, slower boat. 

Listing for the other Condor here: 


image.png.660510554d761873d94be7f65db60010.png

image.png.1a987cf00243a7c7c27391139d6acdeb.pnghttp://www.harbouryachts.co.uk/boat.php?stock_id=SEKP 1572&boat=Condor-37

And yeah, I believe they are the Tartan 37 hull but laid up in the UK and usually owner fitted. Only a few built.
 

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Thanks for the suggestion. It's slightly Tardis-like: It's more beautiful on the inside...

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18 hours ago, Matagi said:

What's your verdict on this Condor 37?

sparkman-stephens-condor-37-308771201910

37 kGBP pre-Covid seems like a good price for a S&S design?

 

My opinion?  Nice looking boat,  but only 2 tiny Dorades, placed too far aft, for effective ventilation. One of the Dorades on a boat like this should be dedicated to the head compartment. If the cabin ports opened, it would be a new boat below. I LOVE the saloon table, with fiddles and piano hinges. That's an expensive piece of furniture. At least it has a midcabin hatch, just forward of the coaming. I didn't see that at first and thought "oh, no". 

The traveler in the cockpit is great for racing, but breaks up the cockpit when cruising. Because of the bridgedeck, the cockpit seats aren't long enough to stretch out on., but the bridgedeck is great if the bride lies athwartship. Add a dodger, that's where my wife would be, pillows behind her neck, reading blissfully while I drive her upwind in slop. The only negative would be the large amount of water coming through the coaming where the lines pass through if going upwind in a chop. 

Without a well designed dodger, this is a guys only boat, like most mid-40 foot range Swans. With the dodger, it will be a little gymnastic get started down the companionway. 

It's not a pin stern like the worst behaving IOR boats. One of the things that made those twitchy downwind was the bow-down trim for measurement that was meant to reduce stability. If you're going to cruise the boat, that's a pretty easy fix. 

Looks like a spirited sailing boat. I like the design. 

 

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Well, would you look at that. A second traveler just forward of the companionway so you can go to midboom sheeting when cruising. Clever.

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Seems to go along nicely. Looks good too. This example, like many Dutch boats, is spotless. It also has proper stowage for gas and safety gear.  Still, a good cockpit to sleep in is a highly underrated quality to me.  Ventilation says cold region boat. 

7208356_20190907050617200_1_XLARGE.jpg?t

 

Proper anchor locker, too

7208356_20190907050618868_1_XLARGE.jpg?t

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To me that first picture made me think Tartan 37, and sailboat data notes that they both use the same S&S hull design. 

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21 hours ago, Matagi said:

So bridgedeck + offset hatch = megadeathtrap? 

Sorry, I find especially the cockpit very well designed. It's nothing for many,, but so is the whole boat  

The cockpit is small so that it won't flood the boat, the bridgedeck gives space below and is an excellent place to stretch across: This is much more comfortable and you are up on your feet much quicker if you need to be. Winches are very well placed (at least in the upper picture) and will not hurt your back.

But I agree, the boat has been on the hard for four years I guess. I found a Youtube-converted Apolloduck ad, dating back four years. A shame, really.

And it will probably drive you mad dead downwind with the IOR shape. Nonetheless, I think a boat has to excel more to windward then downwind anyway. So, I like it very much. 

Crikey Matagi either you are a leprechaun or a friendless contortionist or possibly both:P

The cockpit in a cruiser is your living room full length lie down squabs with deep sea lockers and seating for the more = merrier.

download.jpeg.6cc6ff4d56a4387ac215402c94e0f510.jpeg

 

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I sent an email re the Mercer 44 asking if the interior woodwork is all water damaged or just has weird shadows. I'll let you all know what I find out.

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Betadur, she looks like a nice little cruiser.

One thing I note is the Genoa tracks seem a little far inboard and there does not appear to be anyplace to run an outboard lead to open up the leech of the Genoa- the leech in the photo looks to be acting like a brake.
No place to rig a barber-hauler either.

Both can make a huge difference to the off the breeze performance.

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On 5/21/2020 at 11:13 AM, kent_island_sailor said:

I sent an email re the Mercer 44 asking if the interior woodwork is all water damaged or just has weird shadows. I'll let you all know what I find out.

The boat has been sitting and is a mess. The price accurately reflects the condition of the boat now :(

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On 4/23/2020 at 10:02 AM, ChrisJD said:

My dad sailed the 1989 Marion-Bermuda race on his boat, a 1970s Ted Hood design (already linked further up in the thread) that's currently for sale.  My grandmother and aunt cooked two 25-pound turkeys with all the fixings, veal, pasta and God knows what else; a crew of six sailed with food for over a month.  I remember as a kid seeing the boat in Bermuda and I'd never seen so much food in one place in my life.  They didn't even bother restocking in Bermuda for the return trip.

7360517_20200214101502453_1_XLARGE[1].jpg

I've always wondered what she was when I moor near her in Marion. 

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3 hours ago, Navig8tor said:

Betadur, she looks like a nice little cruiser.

One thing I note is the Genoa tracks seem a little far inboard and there does not appear to be anyplace to run an outboard lead to open up the leech of the Genoa- the leech in the photo looks to be acting like a brake.
No place to rig a barber-hauler either.

Both can make a huge difference to the off the breeze performance.

Slotted toe rail, innit? Snatch block, or a running low-friction ring and Bob is yer blast-reaching uncle. 

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4 hours ago, kent_island_sailor said:

The boat has been sitting and is a mess. The price accurately reflects the condition of the boat now :(

Sorry to hear that. Disappointment for you; tragic for a nice boat.

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51 minutes ago, Diarmuid said:

Slotted toe rail, innit? Snatch block, or a running low-friction ring and Bob is yer blast-reaching uncle. 

Yep you are right, when I looked I did not pick up on the slots it looked like a solid toe rail, my bad. 

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4 hours ago, Bull City said:

Sorry to hear that. Disappointment for you; tragic for a nice boat.

This is the second or third boat I have found around here that looks great in the photos and has been rotting away uncared for ever since. If I was a kid I would start a business going around the marina looking after brokerage boats. In the case of the Mercer every $20 in attention would have saved $200 or maybe $2000 in damage. Kind of like parking a Ferrari outside with a For Sale sign and leaving the top down for a year :rolleyes: Hey, a tree is growing in my car, why can't I get $100,000 for it :unsure:

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1 hour ago, kent_island_sailor said:

This is the second or third boat I have found around here that looks great in the photos and has been rotting away uncared for ever since. If I was a kid I would start a business going around the marina looking after brokerage boats. In the case of the Mercer every $20 in attention would have saved $200 or maybe $2000 in damage. Kind of like parking a Ferrari outside with a For Sale sign and leaving the top down for a year :rolleyes: Hey, a tree is growing in my car, why can't I get $100,000 for it :unsure:

Somebody deserves a good beating.

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On 5/28/2020 at 6:47 PM, kent_island_sailor said:

This is the second or third boat I have found around here that looks great in the photos and has been rotting away uncared for ever since. If I was a kid I would start a business going around the marina looking after brokerage boats. In the case of the Mercer every $20 in attention would have saved $200 or maybe $2000 in damage. Kind of like parking a Ferrari outside with a For Sale sign and leaving the top down for a year :rolleyes: Hey, a tree is growing in my car, why can't I get $100,000 for it :unsure:

Its not just boats, its property as well.  Whether dolled up for the photo, using angles or camera lenses to distort the reality or just plain neglect after the place was put up for sale, its not what was pictured.  

We have been looking for land or a decent home near our son.  It is shocking how good may of the homes look in the photo.  Once one sees the place, one wonders who many dump truck loads will be required to haul off the trash (scattered around the property). A fellow really has to study the photos to see the actual condition of the home.

Worse is descriptions that are not descriptions of the property being sold.  Nothing like checking out a really nice bit of acreage, with a third party broker, only to have some run out in thier pickup to tell you that you are trespassing on thier land.  (Actually happened.). Yep, sure enough, after we explained the situation, everything deescalated and the owner of the land where we were standing showed us the actual property for sale. The land for sale was not the nice open land advertised, but a cutover woodlot.  

Our broker has the courtesy to require we see, in person, any property we might want to purchase.  Good to see honesty for a change.  

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old age + low hours = run away

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On 4/21/2020 at 10:52 AM, Mid said:

Untitled.thumb.jpg.5ae3a346a799dbd2ae53221f9e0ce90f.jpg

claustrophobic ...

I wouldn't mind!

It looks like the forward 3rd of the boat is a sail locker!

At sea she must be quite nice as the sailing quarters are well separate from the cooking/navigating/living area.

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All those cane doors create the claustrophobia - some open shelving would reduce it a lot.

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2 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

All those cane doors create the claustrophobia - some open shelving would reduce it a lot.

It looks like some weird experiment where the professors are hiding behind those doors shocking the people at the table.

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12 hours ago, SloopJonB said:

All those cane doors create the claustrophobia - some open shelving would reduce it a lot.

You'd think that those cane lockers wouldn't last one bout of heavy weather - flailing elbows and stuff flying around.....

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On 5/31/2020 at 6:00 AM, Trovão said:

old age + low hours = run away

Unless its a ferrari.  :D

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Looks pretty near all original - a barn find.

Big project but worth saving at that price.

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On 11/24/2020 at 4:41 AM, steelmadesteamer said:

47'  alu 2003 blt 3-cabins circa 800 hrs on her engine intended for RTW and ready to sail @ USD 170k.

Trip to Black Sea required to see her. 

 

The Black Sea.

I’ll go only if there’s mast clearance under the E97 highway so I can get up to that weird northern part of the Black Sea no one ever talks about, and then go up river and nip into Rostov-on-Don, to visit Russia.  Just to say I did it.

Ok, I think this is the start of cabin fever... :-)  Spring fever Wanderlust is next... :-)

2C28B21C-9514-497A-9F97-33B7AAB9543F.jpeg

FEA16A1D-7231-4FDE-9D9B-FBCC1464E582.png

69ED255E-470A-44B2-A573-6F3FE2439F0B.jpeg

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On 11/26/2020 at 3:44 PM, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

I’ll go only if there’s mast clearance under the E97 highway so I can get up to that weird northern part of the Black Sea no one ever talks about, and then go up river and nip into Rostov-on-Don, to visit Russia. 

2C28B21C-9514-497A-9F97-33B7AAB9543F.jpeg

 

 

33 meters air draft is what allowed to sail under this bridge. 

Will it be sufficient for You !? :huh:

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3 hours ago, steelmadesteamer said:

33 meters air draft is what allowed to sail under this bridge. 

Will it be sufficient for You !? :huh:

Good to know I can bring the big boat.  :-)  (But watch out for the railway ferries that cross the Kercz strait there. According to “Sailing through Russia: from the Arctic to the Black Sea”, the Sea of Azov is quite busy with commercial traffic.)

https://www.yachtingworld.com/voyages/sailing-through-russia-arctic-black-sea-128427


 

91740CB4-5B51-4AA4-A717-7E41914B1EC1.jpeg

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That Nordic is a great looking boat, if a bit dark down below.  I’m sure Bob Perry will tell me I’m wrong about this, but I view it as kind of a first draft of what ended up being the Saga 43, which is absolutely one of my “If I ever get serious about crossing oceans” boats.

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1997/saga-saga-43-3717014/

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On 11/26/2020 at 2:44 PM, Jud - s/v Sputnik said:

The Black Sea.

I’ll go only if there’s mast clearance under the E97 highway so I can get up to that weird northern part of the Black Sea no one ever talks about, and then go up river and nip into Rostov-on-Don, to visit Russia.  Just to say I did it.

Ok, I think this is the start of cabin fever... :-)  Spring fever Wanderlust is next... :-)

2C28B21C-9514-497A-9F97-33B7AAB9543F.jpeg

FEA16A1D-7231-4FDE-9D9B-FBCC1464E582.png

69ED255E-470A-44B2-A573-6F3FE2439F0B.jpeg

That's the Bridge Putin built after annexing Crimea I think! I would be worried to be accused of spying....

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28 minutes ago, Panoramix said:

That's the Bridge Putin built after annexing Crimea I think! I would be worried to be accused of spying....

Wow!  I had no idea that was done - but wouldn’t surprise me. It links Crimea directly with the Russian heartland.

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On 9/30/2020 at 3:40 PM, valcour said:

Re-igniting the Mercer 44 topic, This popped up recently:

https://www.yachtworld.com/boats/1969/cape-cod-mercer-44-3719868/

I saw this:

image.png.3d15e5206a1ce588e92dfd17343dc387.png

And it'd scare me away. My Centaur had two of these up on the v-berth, and while a noble idea before the invention of low draw LEDs, they were leaking like a sieve. There's a huge gap to be filled with goop 'tween the prism and the mount, and the mounting bolts were corroded away. I could see myself chasing leaks forever, so I took them both out and fiberglassed over the holes (new core, too).

Done properly (overdrilled and backfilled with epoxy), I suppose they might be alright, but how many owners did so, and introduced wet core later on? Besides, while it does let in a bit of natural sunlight... I'm most likely going to want light when it's dark, and will need to run LED lighting anyway.

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Does the term Philistine have any significance for you? ;)

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5 hours ago, The Lucky One said:

I saw this:

image.png.3d15e5206a1ce588e92dfd17343dc387.png

And it'd scare me away. My Centaur had two of these up on the v-berth, and while a noble idea before the invention of low draw LEDs, they were leaking like a sieve. There's a huge gap to be filled with goop 'tween the prism and the mount, and the mounting bolts were corroded away. I could see myself chasing leaks forever, so I took them both out and fiberglassed over the holes (new core, too).

Done properly (overdrilled and backfilled with epoxy), I suppose they might be alright, but how many owners did so, and introduced wet core later on? Besides, while it does let in a bit of natural sunlight... I'm most likely going to want light when it's dark, and will need to run LED lighting anyway.

I'd like to install a couple of those, or something similar, up forward where I hope to improve accommodations. The V-berth area has so far as I can tell never been used for anything but a sail locker, it's very dark and low, and I don't want to have to turn on lights in the daytime. I'm pretty sure I can install them without leaks, and I don't have any core to worry about. :)

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Core or no core, I try to avoid putting large holes in my deck for philosophical reasons. Warm white 2700K LED strip lighting that's mounted to reflect off a nearby surface to provide indirect illumination is cheap, effective, attractive, and relatively efficient. For less than $20 you could do a temporary installation to see how it looks before taking a saw to your boat.

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Doesn't help that they involve these big honkin' chunks of pointy glass overhead, with (on mine) eight equally pointy and likely sharper bits of bolts. I've a bald head. Those pointy bits are like mythical sirens, demanding my blood sacrifice on a regular basis. Sure, I can cover those bolts easily enough... but there's still this design feature leaving the presence of a heavy glass edge, just waiting for the opportunity to present itself...

@Oceanconcepts: I've got a couple sitting on my dining room table now, partially cleaned up. I ought to throw them up on eBay and let you have at 'em. Can't imagine they're going to go for much more than the cost of shipping them.

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9 hours ago, Oceanconcepts said:

I'd like to install a couple of those, or something similar, up forward where I hope to improve accommodations. The V-berth area has so far as I can tell never been used for anything but a sail locker, it's very dark and low, and I don't want to have to turn on lights in the daytime. I'm pretty sure I can install them without leaks, and I don't have any core to worry about. :)

Solatube!

flat-panel-dome.png

(Joking, but in bitterness as I just spent part of Saturday scraping old sealant off  curbed glass skylights on our house. After 17 years, original sealants fatigued and they have begun to leak -- as skylights do. Wish I knew about 3M 5200 in those days. :( Also wish I'd installed tube lights instead of skylights.)

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6 hours ago, IStream said:

Core or no core, I try to avoid putting large holes in my deck for philosophical reasons. Warm white 2700K LED strip lighting that's mounted to reflect off a nearby surface to provide indirect illumination is cheap, effective, attractive, and relatively efficient. For less than $20 you could do a temporary installation to see how it looks before taking a saw to your boat.

Sounds like a voice of wisdom. I will want LED's up there in any case, so probably best to do that before taking any more drastic measures. 

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4 hours ago, Diarmuid said:

Solatube!

flat-panel-dome.png

(Joking, but in bitterness as I just spent part of Saturday scraping old sealant off  curbed glass skylights on our house. After 17 years, original sealants fatigued and they have begun to leak -- as skylights do. Wish I knew about 3M 5200 in those days. :( Also wish I'd installed tube lights instead of skylights.)

I have the one on the left installed in the laundry room. Works fantastic.  Far superior to earlier models.

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1 hour ago, Oceanconcepts said:

Sounds like a voice of wisdom. I will want LED's up there in any case, so probably best to do that before taking any more drastic measures. 

The devil is really in the details with the installation of the strip lighting. If you can see the LED emitters directly from wherever you normally sit or lie down, you'll have an unpleasant, glary mess. If instead you can point them towards a diffusing surface, either away from your eyes or upwards, they can create a beautiful ambient light. 

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On 11/29/2020 at 8:48 PM, The Lucky One said:

I saw this:

image.png.3d15e5206a1ce588e92dfd17343dc387.png

And it'd scare me away. My Centaur had two of these up on the v-berth, and while a noble idea before the invention of low draw LEDs, they were leaking like a sieve. There's a huge gap to be filled with goop 'tween the prism and the mount, and the mounting bolts were corroded away. I could see myself chasing leaks forever, so I took them both out and fiberglassed over the holes (new core, too).

Done properly (overdrilled and backfilled with epoxy), I suppose they might be alright, but how many owners did so, and introduced wet core later on? Besides, while it does let in a bit of natural sunlight... I'm most likely going to want light when it's dark, and will need to run LED lighting anyway.

An alternative, if you have them, is to use dorade boxes. I built a couple with Lexan tops to admit sunlight. The light thru the down pipe is impressive and natural in the dark head and passageway on my boat.

I used a clear deck plate in a forward dorade box over the anchor locker(which is open to the vee berth) to do the same (plus give access to the deck wash nozzle). 

1105177088_Standpipedecklight(1of1).thumb.jpg.b6251f9e3d03426b5f13bd3a6347ce36.jpg

 

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