Svanen

Flying Fifteen: the boat for everyone

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If you like Flying Fifteens, you will enjoy this video.

”Boats that can be handled by amateurs. Boats in which you’re not likely to lose your head, even if you do lose your hat. Boats you can sail yourself. Boats that are safe, easy and fast to sail, and that can give you all the fun of the wind and sea. One of these is the Flying Fifteen, and you can build it yourself”.

“A hull that’s like a poem: simple and beautiful”. :)

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1 hour ago, Secret Experiment said:

Dear God, it's a different planet, the past.

Good video though. 

Yeah, I feel that more and more. Must be getting on.

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We used to have an active fleet (Classic) here in Manila. And much bigger fleets in HK, Aussie, and NZ in this part of the world.  

What i I like about the class is they have made a “Classic Fleet” which has kept much older boats competitive.  If I get my history correct! Roy Windybank?,, played with tolerances and came out with a faster design.  I think they are up to Mark10 or 11 which are very impressive.  So now at the Worlds there is a Classic Fleet along with the hot rods.

Rainbow and I did the 95 Worlds in HK and we could only afford to charter a boat. It was a lot fun and we could see the speed difference in the Marks of design.  We used an older Mark8 boat if I remember and we were good up wind but struggled down wind. 

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22 minutes ago, George Hackett said:

We used to have an active fleet (Classic) here in Manila. And much bigger fleets in HK, Aussie, and NZ in this part of the world.  

What i I like about the class is they have made a “Classic Fleet” which has kept much older boats competitive.  If I get my history correct! Roy Windybank?,, played with tolerances and came out with a faster design.  I think they are up to Mark10 or 11 which are very impressive.  So now at the Worlds there is a Classic Fleet along with the hot rods.

Rainbow and I did the 95 Worlds in HK and we could only afford to charter a boat. It was a lot fun and we could see the speed difference in the Marks of design.  We used an older Mark8 boat if I remember and we were good up wind but struggled down wind. 

You were there in '95?  I was just exiting HK and missed it. I had been on a few boats as alternate crew in the lead-up. Really liked that little boat, would be much more sane for me now than the I14, but there are none around SF.  I've looked.

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1 hour ago, Raz'r said:

You were there in '95?  I was just exiting HK and missed it. I had been on a few boats as alternate crew in the lead-up. Really liked that little boat, would be much more sane for me now than the I14, but there are none around SF.  I've looked.

Here's one in Oakland that needs finishing.

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I am a passionate FF owner....have enjoyed them for years....and now that I have some time, I'm chasing the spiders out, polishing up the shiny bits and getting her ready for her first serious season in 2 years. The boats are graceful, handle beautifully and can get up and go in the waves of our bay.....best of all are the bunch of people who share the passion for this poetic little piece of sailing history. Great OD sailing.....and yes...that keel presents challenges for the newcomer! 

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I had a FF for a few years and had a ball with it.  It was the only one in Darwin so I raced against a mixed bag of trailer sailors.  Carrying a 3.5hp Tohatsu outboard mounted on the transom, we were about the same speed as a good RL24.  C1135 - I wonder where it is now?

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One day many years ago I went to Hamble crewing on a fireball. We sailed up the river and went past a Flying 11.  Apparently there was also a Flying 18 but I've never seen one.

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I loved my old 15 and am trying to persuade the older sailors around here to get into them rather than get out of sailing.

Looking a couple of decades ahead, I can see imminent death, wrinkles, heart problems, incontinence - and an excuse to sail a Flying 15 which will make up for all that if we can get a fleet together.  :-)

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Yeah...interestingly the class is seen as an old buggers boat....but the truth is that it is best sailed by a couple of athletic crew who can hang their guts out and pump all day downwind...I mix my time, (when not doing the odd serious hobart program) between FF's, the Finn (another boat with a weird keel/c'board) and etchells.....'cos each gives the satisfaction of coming to terms with the design, the fleet and conditions.....

The other thing i love about the FF is that it's accessible - cheap thrills - with a silver fleet boat available from a couple of thou (or less) and a world beater available for $20k - and yes a new Ovington landed in Oz will be $45....but you don't need that to be in the top end of the fleet...

Sweet ride in a classic yacht that delivers a thrill and top competition.....'nuff said!

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13 hours ago, fastyacht said:

I always wondered if Uffa was influenced by Ray Hunt's 110 with that keel.

Not as far as I know; but who can really say?

it’s interesting that both the International 110 and the International Flying Fifteen class associations currently promote their respective nautical chariots as “the original sportboat”. Both are fun to sail!

You might enjoy this video featuring Raymond’s son speaking about the 110 (apologies for the poor audio):

 

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5 hours ago, knobblyoldjimbo said:

One day many years ago I went to Hamble crewing on a fireball. We sailed up the river and went past a Flying 11.  Apparently there was also a Flying 18 but I've never seen one.

I’ve never heard of a Flying 11, but Uffa-designed Flying 10s certainly exist; perhaps that’s what you recall?

Below is a video about the famous Huff of Arklow, a Flying 30. Currently for sale.

 

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On 9/19/2019 at 8:50 AM, fastyacht said:

I always wondered if Uffa was influenced by Ray Hunt's 110 with that keel.

Interesting Question.  Before the F15 fleet, I grew up racing 110s.  Double Trouble was our boat and we were the only fleet outside the U.S..  

i can see the similarities in the keels and in both cases, there was room to play with designs.  I had read in ”Bridgedeck” the 110 yearbook about reshaping of the keel to give it a better foil shape which we did. Big improvement. Mind you this was back in the mid 60s to 70s.  

Back then we had Team Racing Interports with RHkYC. Both clubs had Dragons. And the F15 were used in HK and 110 in Manila.  

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23 hours ago, Couta said:

Yeah...interestingly the class is seen as an old buggers boat....but the truth is that it is best sailed by a couple of athletic crew who can hang their guts out and pump all day downwind...I mix my time, (when not doing the odd serious hobart program) between FF's, the Finn (another boat with a weird keel/c'board) and etchells.....'cos each gives the satisfaction of coming to terms with the design, the fleet and conditions.....

The other thing i love about the FF is that it's accessible - cheap thrills - with a silver fleet boat available from a couple of thou (or less) and a world beater available for $20k - and yes a new Ovington landed in Oz will be $45....but you don't need that to be in the top end of the fleet...

Sweet ride in a classic yacht that delivers a thrill and top competition.....'nuff said!

Yep, I got mine when I was in my early 30s, but now I have so many other toys that I'll have to get older to justify a new FF.

Like you say, the boat is very accessible and really has so much for everyone that it should perhaps be THE class where people from all the yacht and dinghy classes meet.

 

 

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While the Flying Fifteen is not ‘capsize-proof’ - what boat is? - it is certainly well-mannered and quite forgiving.

This video illustrates (0:11-0:14; 1:09-1:14; 1:24-1:35; 2:00-2:03; and 2:23-2:27) the ability of the keel to ‘save the day’ in circumstances where a dinghy would likely capsize.

 

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Mate, that video just makes me want to get off my arse and go out for a sail, preferable on a FF and even better, wherever that video was shot.  Many thanks!

It seems there are a few about in Melbourne where I have just moved.  Might have to check them out.

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cool little boat ain't it?

Hint: have the crew trim the main upwind if you're overpowered...  That was my one little learning in the Hong Kong fleet. 

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1 hour ago, Secret Experiment said:

Mate, that video just makes me want to get off my arse and go out for a sail, preferable on a FF and even better, wherever that video was shot.  Many thanks!

 

I'm figuring windemere. Reminds me that I've not been to the lake district in far too long. (Swallows and Amazon country :) )

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On 9/19/2019 at 3:57 PM, Recidivist said:

I had a FF for a few years and had a ball with it.  It was the only one in Darwin so I raced against a mixed bag of trailer sailors.  Carrying a 3.5hp Tohatsu outboard mounted on the transom, we were about the same speed as a good RL24.  C1135 - I wonder where it is now?

There used to be a great fleet of FF's at the Lota east Fishing and Fighting club back in the day. Back when the clubs core activity was sailing, not Yoga.

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I've got a "modern" FF.  She's now 22 years old and reasonably competitive, provided I point her in the right direction.  Yes, you can tip them upside down, that's how I know the base of the keel needs repainting:o. Cost £5,000 two years ago.

Tolerant of weight differences and rewards skillful sailing, not too much of a lump to haul about ashore and light enough to tow with an unbraked trailer.  Perfect for the sailor who's knees and hips stop him heaving his waterlogged arse about on a dinghy. Also, fulfills my need for speed, as my cruising boat can seem very ponderous.

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2 hours ago, shavdog said:

Isn't the FF similar to a Flying Scot?

Is a brick similar to a violin?

(no offence meant toward bricks--or violins.)

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On 9/19/2019 at 5:24 AM, George Hackett said:
On 9/19/2019 at 5:24 AM, George Hackett said:

We used to have an active fleet (Classic) here in Manila. And much bigger fleets in HK, Aussie, and NZ in this part of the world.  

What i I like about the class is they have made a “Classic Fleet” which has kept much older family canoeing  boats in fishing competitive.  If I get my history correct! Roy Windybank?,, played with tolerances and came out with a faster design.  I think they are up to Mark10 or 11 which are very impressive.  So now at the Worlds there is a Classic Fleet along with the hot rods.

Rainbow and I did the 95 Worlds in HK and we could only afford to charter a boat. It was a lot fun and we could see the speed difference in the Marks of design.  We used an older Mark8 boat if I remember and we were good upwind but struggled down wind. 

Amazing, It must be cool :'')

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5 hours ago, shavdog said:

Isn't the FF similar to a Flying Scot?

Now there is a somewhat interesting relationship though. Sandy Douglass was an avid American canoe sailor and champion (winning silver) before the war. He crossed tacks with Uffa Fox and Roger deQuincy at Sugar Island. He went on to also race the international 14 and build some of them to Uffa's plans. Then he designed the Thistle which is nearly a geosim of an Uffa 14 (except sleeker because it grew more in length than depth). Later he designed the Highalander, and much later the Flying Scot, in 1956 I think. Now meanwhile, Uffa took a detour during the war, designing the lifeboat that could be dropped by aircraft and then immediately after the war, in I think '46, designed the Flying 15. Note that the Thistle and the Flying 15 were designed at almost exactly the same time.

Did Sandy like the word "flying" for the same reason that Uffa did? They both liked flying over the water on the end of a hiking board.

The Flying Scot is longer on the waterline and has a ballasted centerboard but not a 400 lb keel like the Flying Fifteen. In general, the Scot is probably faster around the course in moderate conditions. The Scot is also ridiculously stable so even in snotty weather can plane (I know, 900 lbs or 700 forget which up on the water). I bet the FF is faster in 8 knots or less around the course. But the Scot is not to be trifled with. A surprisingly fast boat for all its barge-like aspects.

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21 hours ago, Secret Experiment said:

Mate, that video just makes me want to get off my arse and go out for a sail, preferable on a FF and even better, wherever that video was shot.  Many thanks!

You are most welcome. I can confirm JohnMB’s suggestion that the location was Lake Windermere 

Below is another video, also filmed at RWYC, that you might enjoy.

 

 

 

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On 9/25/2019 at 8:16 AM, Secret Experiment said:

Mate, that video just makes me want to get off my arse and go out for a sail, preferable on a FF and even better, wherever that video was shot.  Many thanks!

It seems there are a few about in Melbourne where I have just moved.  Might have to check them out.

Happy to point you in the right direction...strongest fleet is my little club..Daveys Bay Yacht Club. We have at least a dozen line up every weekend. Other clubs include RBYC, Royals, Mordialloc SC and Mornington YC with a few boats scattered around other bay clubs. 

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1 hour ago, Couta said:

Happy to point you in the right direction...strongest fleet is my little club..Daveys Bay Yacht Club. We have at least a dozen line up every weekend. Other clubs include RBYC, Royals, Mordialloc SC and Mornington YC with a few boats scattered around other bay clubs. 

The Canberra fleet seems to be sitting idle since Pillow's passing, might be some bargains to be had if you are prepared to travel

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Best threat in a long time on here! Great fun watching the build in the OP's video. A different world, indeed...

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15 hours ago, Couta said:

Happy to point you in the right direction...strongest fleet is my little club..Daveys Bay Yacht Club. We have at least a dozen line up every weekend. Other clubs include RBYC, Royals, Mordialloc SC and Mornington YC with a few boats scattered around other bay clubs. 

Ta muchly.  I think I'll have a wander around a couple on opening day or soon after and check them out.  I'm at Blackburn so all the clubs are pretty accessible (or too far away, depending on your views of Melbourne traffic!).  Cheers.

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14 hours ago, Rushman said:

The Canberra fleet seems to be sitting idle since Pillow's passing, might be some bargains to be had if you are prepared to travel

Thanks Rushman, worth knowing. Yeah, it seems most yacht clubs have at least one FF sitting around at the back of the shed.  Sort of like the abandoned Diamonds that used to block up the hardstand (another great boat from the past).

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1 hour ago, Secret Experiment said:

Thanks Rushman, worth knowing. Yeah, it seems most yacht clubs have at least one FF sitting around at the back of the shed.  Sort of like the abandoned Diamonds that used to block up the hardstand (another great boat from the past).

Canberra would have 20 sitting idle from all accounts!

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Not sure what's happened to Pillow & Reedy's ride...but it was up for sale for a while at a steal. World class set-up for ~$15k. It was an Ovington ix smoothy I think, so not new, but that's the whole thing about these boats...they keep their performance.

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I loved watching that build sequence video. Just loved it. What astounded me was how much fiddly work was involved in it, compared to building a sharpie. But they got along like pros--moved very quickly. And used a lot of nails! The gluing looked positively irresponsible, went so fast. Yet apparently successful. Imagine yourself building the same boat today. You'd be using thickened epoxy, and probably no nails--you'd have to screw every damned fastening. Would take eternity!

I do wonder if this is a quite contrived movie. They never show the critically important step of sealing the end grain on a number of parts before assembly, and no bedding for the spreader bases. It certainly makes it look like you can get it all done in a jiffy but we know better haha.

The bit about leaving the deck floating may have answered one mystery: why did my Fairie Marine 505 have a 3 mm plywood deck on 4 mm plywood webs where the deck was not attached to the webs?

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On 9/24/2019 at 8:00 PM, JohnMB said:

I'm figuring windemere. Reminds me that I've not been to the lake district in far too long. (Swallows and Amazon country :) )

:)

 

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On 9/19/2019 at 4:27 AM, Svanen said:

Boats in which you’re not likely to lose your head, even if you do lose your hat. 

Unless you are a completely incompetent moron like Curious of course. 

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On 9/20/2019 at 9:42 PM, Curious said:

 but now I have so many other toys 

Image result for sock puppets

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I have long-thought that design (Flying Fifteen) was a really neat boat - and,  to me an early sport boat - regardless of whether it was first or not.  Some days I like to ponder my own Impulse21 with half the keel weight...

 

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On 9/25/2019 at 3:17 PM, LB 15 said:

There used to be a great fleet of FF's at the Lota east Fishing and Fighting club back in the day. Back when the clubs core activity was sailing, not Yoga.

Didn't the Octopus with the big mustache have one?

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And there's a serious rumour that a top performing FF has been recently added to the fleet of a Sydney sailor who - when he isn't restoring old timber boats for the Hobart...or putting together various big boat programs....hangs out occasionally at a major Sydney marine facilities establishment....

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In the OP’s video, it’s really odd to see UK used as national identification, rather than the plain K I always thought preceded GBR.

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1 hour ago, Presuming Ed said:

In the OP’s video, it’s really odd to see UK used as national identification, rather than the plain K I always thought preceded GBR.

Maybe it's Ukrainian. 

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1 hour ago, Presuming Ed said:

In the OP’s video, it’s really odd to see UK used as national identification, rather than the plain K I always thought preceded GBR.

Ullmer Kolius?

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19 hours ago, Presuming Ed said:

In the OP’s video, it’s really odd to see UK used as national identification, rather than the plain K I always thought preceded GBR.

I'm guessing this is a local oddity of time and place.

Sail numbers 139-148 are shown as IRL on flying fifteen register, made by Gilmore. This fits with the OP video tagged at Kircubbin (Strangford lough).

Any historians out there comment on the use of the UK sail designation in County Down in 1955.

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Here is an interesting blog about home-building Flying Fifteen No. 4034 in Hawaii. Lots of photos and commentary, and a couple of short videos.

P1050544.JPG

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On 10/16/2019 at 10:07 AM, Couta said:

And there's a serious rumour that a top performing FF has been recently added to the fleet of a Sydney sailor who - when he isn't restoring old timber boats for the Hobart...or putting together various big boat programs....hangs out occasionally at a major Sydney marine facilities establishment....

He was sailing (and loving) them in the 80s, with the old Greenwich fleet.  He also hacked one up with a lovely high aspect keel and rudder, racks and 18 Footer rig.  Used to love it planing past us on Another Concubine in the CYC winter series 

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^^^ Always wanted to do a hack job and see what a real keel & big rig would do....I'll ask him about it when we next catch up!

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How I missed this???..first boat was Hunt's 110, in the 500 number series.

Always wanted to sail a 15; never a US opportunity. Hunt's rig, simple 3x8 is 24...do in garage, as some did, in very small garages. Not so with the sleek 110. Swilling, and sole sails easy in 110.

Ran afoul of the Class with trap and Hexes...amen.

Trap was necessary compliment to 110 (to me); Hexes made her easy to sail solo, very easy. But, then, no-nos.

I once thought there was a FF in Chicago but never saw it, much less sail it. Great Lakes, perfect fit. My rig was in MN's Lake Minnetonka...when lake was less crowded. How I missed this thread...?

110_5.jpg

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Couple years after Saginaw pooped on me, they legalized it...below is pic of Hex (Hexaratchet. You are correct and Harkens invention was the best "go-fast" ever, save new sail materials and carbon (foils), to me.

The tenner had a "snubber" winch on a bridgedeck for the jib. I added a 125 jib and the "snubber" was not enough. So...

Could handle sheets with one hand...sheets went to blocks astern, then to Hexes and then to Clamcleat installed in "snubber" spot. I put a single Clam just aft of each teak block, as noted. Worked slick as slimy jetsam!!! 

Never forgave Class for being so prickly! Could have asked a few questions...but a hollow "NO?" Dumbasses! BTW, that rig flew...in a chop could outgo the C-boats. Loved to go out alone in a gale...sucker was safer than a nun's rump in a snowbank.

 

Fast, I just now recalled that I must have used 4 Hexes...not sure....astern blocks might have been plain Hexes, no ratchet...or larger Harkens,

110_19.jpg

110_16SA.jpg

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Anybody know what is happening in San Francisco Bay Area with Flying Fifteens?  They had them back in the 80s but now nothing I know of except one person who was going to restore one.

Better yet are they in Southern California?  Australians, Irish, British recognize my boat here but there are none to sail with :(

Capture.PNG

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15s in SF Bay? Did not know that...thought most marinas required engines to move in harbors...but if so a wonderment.

I would prefer the less "boaty" looking 110, as the Bay is chock full of stinging critters...will have to follow. I trust the OP will comment on these views.

FWIW, I love both boats.

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6 hours ago, FFPacific said:

Anybody know what is happening in San Francisco Bay Area with Flying Fifteens?  They had them back in the 80s but now nothing I know of except one person who was going to restore one.

Better yet are they in Southern California?  Australians, Irish, British recognize my boat here but there are none to sail with :(

Capture.PNG

That boat in the background to the right is the one that burned and 34 people died on a few months ago. The VISION is the near sistership that the NTSB did a walk-through on.

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2 hours ago, BobBill said:

15s in SF Bay? Did not know that...thought most marinas required engines to move in harbors...but if so a wonderment.

I would prefer the less "boaty" looking 110, as the Bay is chock full of stinging critters...will have to follow. I trust the OP will comment on these views.

FWIW, I love both boats.

It's a dinghy. Why would a marina require a motor? Lots of dinghies in SF Bay. Stinging critters? Can't imagine more than Long Island Sound. Sometimes we have jellyfish soup.

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it's not a dinghy, it's a small keelboat, it has a heavy keel to keep  it upright..

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2 minutes ago, The Q said:

it's not a dinghy, it's a small keelboat, it has a heavy keel to keep  it upright..

Am near-certain Fastyacht (and most of us) know that...which brings up one salient point to me. I think these rigs would be more popular if the keels retracted some how like the very nice Wylie 17, make it easier and cheaper to sail...to begin with.

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9 minutes ago, BobBill said:

Am near-certain Fastyacht (and most of us) know that...which brings up one salient point to me. I think these rigs would be more popular if the keels retracted some how like the very nice Wylie 17, make it easier and cheaper to sail...to begin with.

Windward Passage was the biggest dinghy of all :-)

I sailed the small Wylie with the wishbone rig--that one did not ahave a retracting keel. Maybe it was a different one than the one you are referring to.

I liked the pathe vid on how they retracted the keel at the end of the seasn. Haha.

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Fast, I know only the "lifter"...  You liked the boat or was it a sort of a keel Flying Scot keel version...looked boring?

The one I saw was a quick-retract before ramp and required dropping sail first, which made things hairy.

What honestly attracted me was first, the keel but more so, the un-stayed carbon mast.

I still think the hull was in need of a few minor go-fasts and to remove long bench seats...not many chages.

Never really liked string puller sets. Simple is best to me.

 

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Met a new flying fifteener in the Bay Area.  Are there any fifteeners hiding out in California, Oregon?   Let us know, we can form a team and take on the world :)

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13 minutes ago, FFPacific said:

Met a new flying fifteener in the Bay Area.  Are there any fifteeners hiding out in California, Oregon?   Let us know, we can form a team and take on the world :)

Welcome! Will be a great boat for around here

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On 12/21/2019 at 12:31 AM, Svanen said:

 

That is a piece of art! 

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So classic..so beautiful...so elemental and stylish...the FF is a beautiful little keelboat that just makes you feel so good to sail it......I keep one just to feel in contact with the true spirit of sailing....

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God...never was lucky.

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16 minutes ago, Couta said:

So classic..so beautiful...so elemental and stylish...the FF is a beautiful little keelboat that just makes you feel so good to sail it......I keep one just to feel in contact with the true spirit of sailing....

+1...Aye lad, am with ya!

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One of my first boats after an Oppie.
Paid £100 for this one 'Flying Machine' with my mate when we were 14, sails were shagged, boat was one of the first GRP ones, old slow and heavy and we didn't have enough weight between us to keep it going. But it taught us a lot about sailing and we had a blast.

Its probably still out there somewhere. It
It was actually sail number 600 and something, this was just a hand me down sail.

1208650994_AltonApril03092.thumb.jpg.bf1e2b7696b536b05af964a0379d385e.jpg

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Lotta work that...good example of phrase, ""99 % of boat work is sanding.
" ... 'tis a marvel....Indeed! 

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2 hours ago, MiddayGun said:

One of my first boats after an Oppie.
Paid £100 for this one 'Flying Machine' with my mate when we were 14, sails were shagged, boat was one of the first GRP ones, old slow and heavy and we didn't have enough weight between us to keep it going. But it taught us a lot about sailing and we had a blast.

Its probably still out there somewhere. It
It was actually sail number 600 and something, this was just a hand me down sail.

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And  both you young swabs smiled a lot.

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On 3/27/2020 at 9:18 PM, FFPacific said:

Met a new flying fifteener in the Bay Area.  Are there any fifteeners hiding out in California, Oregon?   Let us know, we can form a team and take on the world :)

There are 10 known FF's between San Diego and British Columbia. Here's mine fully restored 2017/2018 from the keel to masthead. The class association for Canada is on Facebook at FFI-CAN

As I'm the only one active in Vancouver, I race PHRF at 214 (which includes a credit for the Torqeedo Ultralite 403 outboard required for PHRF.). We do ok in a mixed fleet between the FF's 20ft LOA and 30ft LOA cruiser racers on races around the cans, and some "distance " races up to 16 or 20 miles . It's a load fun particularly when the breeze is on. We got an ORC International measurement cert just to see what the polars looked like. The rig is a Selden Alto with twin carbon poles like a 5o5 system. Not bad for a boat built in 1986

 

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Such a lovely rig...have one question...I had a 110 decades back and singled it most of the time...I see one pic shows this rig being sailed by a single sailor...

I was always comforted by the fact that my rig would round up...when you singled it, what happened when a knock-down gust hit?

Just curious. Never could understand why FFs were not more popular in US...

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30 minutes ago, BobBill said:

Such a lovely rig...have one question...I had a 110 decades back and singled it most of the time...I see one pic shows this rig being sailed by a single sailor...

I was always comforted by the fact that my rig would round up...when you singled it, what happened when a knock-down gust hit?

Just curious. Never could understand why FFs were not more popular in US...

Small planing keelboats never caught on in the US. Probably for many reasons. Also the Star, being a small keelboat, was really the only small "performance" keelboat class to pay attention to.  The Tempest gained some traction but never ever even close to the star. And these are bigger than the 15. Een the 110 which was and still is a successful class, never saw numbers like the dinghies and semi-ballasted centerboarders (lighting, FS, Thistle).

Just my rambling thougths.

There have been other small keelboats of course. The Zipp. The Zephyr (a mini singlehanded interpretation of the 110) and old traditionalist stuff such as bullseye. But in the U.S small meant trailerable easily and that meant centerboarder. I suspect that if you did the numbers in England you would find substantially the same thing on a proportional basis--it's just htat England Wales Scotland and Ireland have and had a much higher per capita small sailboat action level.

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@ Fast. YT grew up in Chicago's Belmont/Montrose Harbors area. Lots of 110s in Wilmette. Stars, Luders and long knives (22 sq meter) in Belmont and around, but never a FF.

Probably why I like 110s so much, though the Luders were spendid, in a different way,

Never did get to crew on a "knife, but drooled, when these babies hit the chop from Belmont, on a sunny day. (

These swabs would sashar to the harbor entrance and just before hitting it, would harden up and go...should a taken photos.

Still wonder how the FF did as a single...though.

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There were 73 Flying Fifteens from around the world on the start line at the 2019 Worlds in Ireland. Still going strong and Ovington make a very nice carbon FF.

None of the pics above showed singled handed sailing, but I've attached some to this post that are. They can be comfortably single handed up to 15 knots TWS upwind. After that, more effort needed. Using the double pole, self launching system with a chute launching tube like a 5o5 makes hoisting, gybing and dousing simple single handed. If you're a regular single hander in heavier breezes, then get a single reef put in the main at around 12.5% of luff length. That happens to comply with OSR Cat 4 in case you race handicap and need a means of reefing for safety compliance. Fully crewed and a reef, 25 knots is comfy too. In one design racing, a reef is unnecessary and the boat handles well in 25kn. At the last worlds, there was solid breeze for all but 2 days. The pics of the worlds by Jonny Fullerton.
 

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Thenks. I see the dodger now in the one pic. Put a few FF pics in files...

Forgot to mention when I sailed the 110 alone, no spinnaker...never really like them but understand them...

Guess no spinnakers is reason I liked Snipes and C boats so much and one other one...> M16???not sure, my current outrigger....

Be well in mind and bod.

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