Raptorsailor

Climbing Anarchy

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It's fun, it's safe until you fall. Discuss.

Personally I solo climb, free climb but never both at the same time, I like living and I'm not Alex Honnold. I climb mainly in the Maurienne valley as it's one of my favourite places on Earth. Once a year I do a proper Alpine climb, this year it was L'Albaron at 3637m. It was fun and easy, next year one of the Ciamarella's awaits... or the Mont Rose, I'm not sure.

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Just returned from Yosemite and watching some climbers on El Cap. Fuck that. I puckered sitting down in the meadow watching.

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I used the stairs. Vernal Falls.

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God created helicopters so we wouldn't have to do that shit.

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My 20’s were pretty much spent on rock. Sadly I didn’t find sailing until I turned 30. I still miss it and try to get to a indoor wall once or twice a year. 

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Don't all free-solo climbers eventually die free-solo climbing?

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I don't climb but I enjoy reading about it. Especially climbs on 8,000 meter peaks.  This year so far, I've been following the exploits of  Nepalese climber, Nirmal Purja .

Climber, and former Nirmal Purja is attempting to climb all 14 8,000 meter peaks in 7-months. He didn't make that time frame, but so fart he has climbed 11 out of the 14 8,0000 meter peaks this year!

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In his 16 years of serving for the UK Military force, Nims contributed 10 years to the secretive world of the UK’s special forces. Nims is the only Nepalese citizen who has worked for special boat service (The Special Boat Service (SBS) is the special forces unit of the United Kingdom’s Royal Navy).

https://explorersweb.com/2019/08/27/exclusive-interview-nirmal-purja


By the end of August, Nirmal Purja summited 11 of the 8000’ers in a mere 94 days. He has also helped in four rescues during this time, including the extraction of Wui Kin Chin from high on Annapurna.

The former special forces soldier has just two peaks left on his lofty tick list: Manaslu and Shishapangma.

https://explorersweb.com/2019/09/23/breaking-purja-summits-cho-oyu


In case you were wondering, Nirmal Purja is Reinhold Messner approved...

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15 hours ago, Guitar said:

Just returned from Yosemite and watching some climbers on El Cap. Fuck that. I puckered sitting down in the meadow watching.

I'd love to go to Yosemite one day and climb El Cap. Lucky to go there. 

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Yeah no interest in free soloing here either. I climb my local choss pile and the gunks mostly.

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3 hours ago, Ease the sheet. said:

I was skinny, and a climber. Once.

 I remember. Gerald Ford was President then.

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Mountains and the oceans captured my imagination as a boy, I remember going through the Rockies on the California Zephyr as a 5 year old and asking my mom if we lived here would you let me climb them, she said yes , of course it was a safe answer. I love heights and climbing trees. However sailing and the oceans were where I lived so that was the adventurous path before me and I lived that to the fullest   

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Caught these monsters in camp climbing rocks. Both my wife and I remembered doing this as kids so I went down to have them poise for me and then shared it with their parents in camp. 

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On 9/24/2019 at 9:54 PM, blunderfull said:

Honnold calls slower climbers “hikers.”

Freak.

He's got a point, I hate slow climbers. Also, if you're going hiking you really do not need a north face puffer jacket, fancy ski/walking pole, massive boots, even bigger backpack etc... Trainers with suitable tread, shorts, t-shirt and a light hoodie in a small backpack +snacks and water bottle is more than enough. Even for rock scrambling in all but the most extreme routes.

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So I should have said something to the woman pushing a double side-by-side stroller down the Mist Trail? 

 

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6 hours ago, Guitar said:

Caught these monsters in camp climbing rocks. Both my wife and I remembered doing this as kids so I went down to have them poise for me and then shared it with their parents in camp. 

20190909_181209.jpg

Recently had a family (inlaws) day at a park with multiple rocky outcrops. This was exactly what the kids did absent parents and grandparents.

I took the kids for an explore, leaving the rest of the parents behind. They had a great time, no sooking, no arguing, just fun. And they loved it.

If I had of heard a "no, get down" one more time, there was going to be an unexplained mass grave.

That explore did the young kids and this old kid, a world of good.

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8 hours ago, Guitar said:

So I should have said something to the woman pushing a double side-by-side stroller down the Mist Trail? 

 

I mean, you could, but it's always funny to watch them figure out their mistakes.

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I used to free climb, nothing too high, but I had to make some ill-advised jumps to stay on the face of the rock and/or building. Injuries?

Lessee ... I've been riding skateboards, snakeboards and snowboards pretty much my entire life. Even yesterday, I took my son to the skatepark and I fell hard three times (as I often do) and I don't use pads or a helmet because I don't use pads or a helmet unless I'm on a motorcycle. As I type this, my bones are bruised and sore, I have a raspberry the size of a silver dollar on the side of my knee and one the size of a half dollar on my elbow. The repeated pounding of my body hitting the street or the cement at the skatepark since I started riding at 8 years old has left my knees and shins and elbows battle scarred, and yet they always heal, eventually.

But rock climbing? I've broken an elbow (unset, because I had no health insurance back then and I was broke), I've broken my foot and my.pinkie finger, both of those unset due to inability to pay. I still climb indoors sometimes, I've never hurt myself climbing indoors, because indoor climbing never means losing your grip to rotten rock, or bird shit, or losing your footing on a jump from grippy rock onto slippery rock.

I've climbed a few fourteeners in Colorado, and Ben Nevis in Scotland, alpine climbing in the summer, off the mountain before 2 pm, that's safe and beautiful, never hurt myself doing alpine climbs.

But rock climbing ... three broken bones in maybe two years of very sporadic outdoor rock climbing, versus no broken bones ever in over forty years of riding boards in skateparks, snow, and in traffic. That climbing stuff is fun, but the men and women who do it are often nuts and make board sports seem rational and safe.

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Learnt to climb in Switzerland where 'every' climb* has a sparkling line of shinny stainless bolts. Only thing I used to do was count the number of quick-draws before starting a route. Brought that new energy to BC where the climbs are mostly trad. Way different. 

The thing that I realized attracted me to the sport was the absolute requirement for focus. Cant think about anything except whats in front of you. Then when you do get to re-engage the world, you can choose what to let in, rather than sparring with shit thats already bouncing around inside your skull. I hear that same refrain from others when they talk about what they do to 'escape'.  

I miss the itchy finger tips. I think the miss's misses the six pack :)

*that I did

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For those interested...

Nirmal Purja completes eight-thousander's in six months and six days!

Note: I was off a bit in my previous post as I calculated from January, not April when Nims started his project.

From abenteuer-berg.de
https://abenteuer-berg.de/en/nirmal-purja-completes-eight-thousanders-in-six-months

Nims did it. “Mission achieved”, Nirmal, called “Nims” Purja announced today, after his “Project Possible” team had reached the 8,027-meter-high summit of Shishapangma in Tibet. The 36-year-old former soldier of the British Gurkha Regiment has thus successfully completed his plan to climb all 14 eight-thousanders in seven months. It was even faster than planned. Only six months and six days passed between his first eight-thousander success on Annapurna on 23 April and that on Shishapangma. For comparison: The fastest eight-thousander collector to date, the South Korean Kim Chang-ho, needed seven years, ten months and six days.

Chinese-Tibetan authorities granted special permit

Much later than planned, Nims travelled to Pakistan and scaled the country’s five eight-thousanders within three weeks. And also the third phase in fall was difficult at the beginning. Above all, the two eight-thousanders Cho Oyu and Shishapangma located in Tibet caused him trouble: The Chinese-Tibetan authorities demanded that all expeditions had to have left Cho Oyu by 1 October, and Shishapangma was completely closed. Apparently they did not want foreign spectators if there were unrest in Tibet during the festival week for the foundation of the communist state 70 years ago.


Nims was also involved in four rescue operations during this period

Purja will appear several times in the next Guinness Book of Records. Not only as the fastest 8000er collector. Within only 48.5 hours he stood on the summits of Mount Everest, Lhotse and Makalu. On Dhaulagiri, he and his comrades succeeded in achieving the only summit success of the spring season despite adverse weather conditions. And also on K2 he broke the summit spell after many expedition teams had already left. Two days later he scaled Broad Peak. In addition, Nims and his changing teams were involved in four eight-thousander rescue operations.

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Alpine and Rock climbing are 2 really different sports. The only guy I can think of who excelled at both was Alex Lowe, and see where that got him.

I have a bouldering wall in my home, was working out on it last night. I was still doing 5.12+ in my mid 50's. That took some serious training.

Among peak baggers, the guy who impresses me is my old buddy Dave Hahn. 15 summits of Everest, and AFAIK, the 2 highest altitude rescues ever.  He once told me that most prospective clients ask the wrong question - "what's your success rate at getting people up?", instead of "what's the highest I can get and you can still save my bacon?"  A truly great and humble guy.

I never did his kind of climbing, sounds like a miserable slog to me. I was a rock climber, spent a lot of wintertime at Hueco Tanks getting strong. Climbed with a lot of once famous guys who are now old or dead. I just looked it up, Fred Nicole is 49, Bernd Zangerl 41 (he was a kid when we met). 

 

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Seems someone didn't like hearing about Nirmal Purja's accomplishment...

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Ex guide/friend told me alpine climbing is like distance sailing: It's a test of how long you can sustain being physically and mentally uncomfortable while still being 100% on your game.

I'd rather cross an ocean!

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On 10/30/2019 at 6:40 AM, Cruisin Loser said:

Alpine and Rock climbing are 2 really different sports. The only guy I can think of who excelled at both was Alex Lowe, and see where that got him.

I have a bouldering wall in my home, was working out on it last night. I was still doing 5.12+ in my mid 50's. That took some serious training.

Among peak baggers, the guy who impresses me is my old buddy Dave Hahn. 15 summits of Everest, and AFAIK, the 2 highest altitude rescues ever.  He once told me that most prospective clients ask the wrong question - "what's your success rate at getting people up?", instead of "what's the highest I can get and you can still save my bacon?"  A truly great and humble guy.

I never did his kind of climbing, sounds like a miserable slog to me. I was a rock climber, spent a lot of wintertime at Hueco Tanks getting strong. Climbed with a lot of once famous guys who are now old or dead. I just looked it up, Fred Nicole is 49, Bernd Zangerl 41 (he was a kid when we met). 

 

Getting to the top is generally the easier part.

 

Have seen multiple climbers wondering how to get off the top after the ascent.

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I used to climb the "Gunks".... But I stopped.

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9 minutes ago, Ease the sheet. said:

Getting to the top is generally the easier part.

 

Have seen multiple climbers wondering how to get off the top after the ascent.

Getting down is the easy part. Surviving it is another story.

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8 hours ago, Merrill Levi said:

Speed climb world record

 

what's the point? Giant holds makes it look like climbing a ladder...

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Indoor is training, not climbing. Top rope is training, not climbing. Rock climbing is leading on real rock.

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Hard no!

I'd repel down maybe.

 

Btw I thought this thread way going to be about that anarchy number by my screen name.

 

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On 9/24/2019 at 6:57 PM, QBF said:

I don't climb but I enjoy reading about it.

I'm an arm chair climber as well. Loved reading about the ascents of the big peaks.

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On 9/23/2019 at 11:27 PM, Liquid said:

Don't all free-solo climbers eventually die free-solo climbing?

"Free-solo" is a weird Americanism. Around here we just say "solo". Every rock-climber I've known did some soloing, mostly well below their lead grade. No they don't all die, in fact mostly they don't. 

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31 minutes ago, dogwatch said:

"Free-solo" is a weird Americanism. Around here we just say "solo". Every rock-climber I've known did some soloing, mostly well below their lead grade. No they don't all die, in fact mostly they don't. 

My understanding is that with "Solo" the climber can use a rope, pitons, etc. for self-belay, but for "Free Solo" the person climbs without use of a rope or any other self-belay items.

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1 hour ago, QBF said:

My understanding is that with "Solo" the climber can use a rope, pitons, etc. for self-belay

The technical term for that is "Johnny No-Mates".

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