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Vendee Globe 2020

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Happy Birthday Clarisse!

c.jpg.a4d408232f4c63fe9c4c401440db76c0.jpg

Clarisse Cremer the young skipper of Banque Populaire X celebrated her 31st birthday today near Point Nemo - in the middle of nowhere. She admitted having to negotiate with herself over and over again: "I try to be fast all the time, keeping myself safe. It's all a story of compromise between performance and keeping the emotions in check. I'm getting to know myself. It's a real lesson in life. "

In 12th she is trying to avoid being passed by Armel Tripon, whose black and yellow Sam Maniard foiler continues to gain on her. (From SW)

... and she doing a damn fine job of avoiding being passed! She is awesome. Happy birthday. 

 

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2 hours ago, JL92S said:

No need to risk breaking the boat or himself this far into the race. He knows he’s fast and probably saving himself for the battleground that will be the Atlantic!

He doesnt want destroy her birthday. Wait until tomorrow. 

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4 hours ago, triumph72 said:

Boris was worried he was going too fast presses a button and the boat slows down; I assume that's some autopilot setting adjusting the heading and sail trim? 

I'm just a dinghy sailor so it's beyond me, If I go too fast I fall in.

 

4 hours ago, JonRowe said:

Pretty certain thats the B&G autopilot remote control, and he'd be adjusting a setting most likely desired wind angle bearing away a touch. You don't use heading mode that often on autopilot on boats like these (he commented on it as an unusual thing when in the light stuff that he did to keep the boat going straight) and all sail trim is manual.

I believe he said in a previous video a while back, that he has a mode for the AP which is not based on heading, TWA or AWA, but target boat speed. If too slow, the AP heads up, if too fast the autopilot bears away.

Is that correct? Has somebody seen/used this mode before?

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1 hour ago, Varan said:

Happy Birthday Clarisse!

c.jpg.a4d408232f4c63fe9c4c401440db76c0.jpg

Clarisse Cremer the young skipper of Banque Populaire X celebrated her 31st birthday today near Point Nemo - in the middle of nowhere. She admitted having to negotiate with herself over and over again: "I try to be fast all the time, keeping myself safe. It's all a story of compromise between performance and keeping the emotions in check. I'm getting to know myself. It's a real lesson in life. "

In 12th she is trying to avoid being passed by Armel Tripon, whose black and yellow Sam Maniard foiler continues to gain on her. (From SW)

... and she doing a damn fine job of avoiding being passed! She is awesome. Happy birthday. 

 

I don’t remember what I was doing on my 31st birthday but it wasn’t that. 
 

Congrats Clarisse on a young life well lived - can’t wait to see what’s next!

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Boris vid...Absolutely mind boggling to imagine trusting and tweaking the auto pilot to keep the situation in hand...no words.

And Boris seems not even thinking about a change of underpants.

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Yesterday Maxime Sorel wrote a nice account of his ongoing epic adventures in the southern oceans...

Intro: [ Imagine yourself after 25 days of isolation in a carbon box. You have already started your inner journey and have had a lot of questions about yourself. You even seem to have already obtained answers ... You then enter an unknown universe. What people call “The Deep South” or “The Dark Kingdom” ... Wow, it's bloodcurdling right? Sailors who have been there, and they are not that many, speak of it as something unique, cold, gray, hard, but seem to have fallen in love with it.]

https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=&sl=fr&tl=en&u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.vendeeglobe.org%2Ffr%2Factualites%2F21380%2Fle-grand-sud

 

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13 hours ago, SCARECROW said:

La Niña driven southern ocean weather patterns are the issue.  Freight train of trade winds doesn’t exist in the usual places.

According to the KNMI, our Dutch weather bureau;

"In a La Niña, the sea water temperatures in the eastern Pacific Ocean near the equator are lower than average. Stronger easterly winds bring more cold water from the deep ocean to the surface. We often hear reports about El Niño; La Niña is the counterpart. In an El Niño, the seawater in the Pacific Ocean heats up."

Source (in Dutch); https://www.knmi.nl/over-het-knmi/nieuws/bovengemiddelde-warm-2020-verwacht-ondanks-la-nina

According NOAA;  

"Another key signal to how well La Niña is doing lies in the wind. ENSO events disrupt the Walker Circulation, the normal atmospheric wind pattern that blows across the tropics.

La Niñas tend to rev up the existing Walker Circulation. The trade winds, which blow east to west across the Pacific Ocean, blow a little harder, while winds higher up in the atmosphere blow to the east a little bit harder. During November, that is exactly what happened. "

Source https://www.climate.gov/news-features/blogs/enso/december-2020-la-niña-update-walking-la-niña-winter-wonderland

So both indicate that the trades should be blowing harder. KNMI states that notwithstanding the lower average sea temperatures which indicate La Niña is active, the average temperature measured in The Netherlands is one of the highest ever measured due to climate change. I just remembered that I had to buy 4 ventilators this summer as we hit a smoldering heat wave which is very uncommon for our country. Sleeping at night was otherwise impossible.

So we have El Niña combined with climate change impacting the weather.

 

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7 hours ago, Laurent said:

I believe he said in a previous video a while back, that he has a mode for the AP which is not based on heading, TWA or AWA, but target boat speed. If too slow, the AP heads up, if too fast the autopilot bears away.

Is that correct? Has somebody seen/used this mode before?

That rings a bell, well remembered! I'd forgotten, my NKE certainly doesn't have that mode and no way I would trust it, sounds like a recipe for "kite flogs, boat speed drops, boat rounds up!" but Boris's autopilot would be more (probably 10x as) sophisticated than mine :lol::lol:

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Stronger winds but they happen at different latitudes.  In Australia we’re taught that the “roaring 40s” circulate just under Australia in summer and move north in winter bringing rain and and cooler weather.

with La Niña similar occurs the winds stay north which means southern Australian has a cooler wetter summer (thank god after last year) but the “trade winds” have some big hard obstacles in the way or you have to go a long way south to get a consistent westerly just like we are seeing in this race.

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The kids at Jean Gillet school in Plemy singing "yes we cam"

https://www.facebook.com/LeCam.jean.29/videos/3610467222375872/

The chorus goes something like this:

Yes we cam! Yes I cam!
We all support Jean Le Cam
He's a real sailor at heart
for the fun and for the win
Come on Jean, king Jean
and his impressive record
You cross the ocean
always carried by the wind

Looks like there's a new dictionary entry

Cam verb
past : camed , present singular & plural : cam
Definition of cam
auxiliry verb
1 :to be able to do, make, or accomplish something awesome - not to be confused with can which doesn't indicate awesomeness
Example: Can Jean Le Cam do well in this Vendee Globe ? Yes he cam !

Go Jean ! YES WE CAM !

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Different gravy I know but if we’re power reaching and a squall hits I’ll hit the +/- 10 button to take it down 10° until it passes. I don’t adjust the sails, only the course and it calms everything down. Boris could have just been doing the same. A setting to limit peak boat speed will be hard to achieve as surfing off the waves is not the easiest thing to control 

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anything else is a recipe for a ton of grinding and you’ll slide 10 degrees to leeward because of excessive heel anyway

having said that Boris does talk about a target BSP mode in one video, suspect that is for vmg running not reaching?

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Weather update

So Dalin and Ruyant took both a more northerly route away from the AEZ that Bestaven is still hugging. All as projected yesterday. Seguin who has been hugging the AEZ too sailed into the third ranking last night. That was not in the books.

Bestaven looks good with a DTL on 2nd Dalin of 126 NM this morning and 300+ NM on 3rd Seguin and 380+ NM on Ruyant. But that LP I wrote about in the past 2 days could change this in the coming two days when I fast forward the windy plugin. These projections indicate that Dalin could Pacman away his DTL quickly. And possibly overtake Bestaven at Saturday 2nd of January. Let's have a look in detail.

The overall situation is in pics 1 to 3. The fleet is in between two LPs. Light winds in between them impacting a large part of the top-10 boats. Ruyant was doing 2 kts.. But not the two most easterly boats. Blasting away at 20+ kts. AFAIK I could make out two fronts, one far to the north and the one that passed, going east, yesterday. 

Set the polars for Herrmann to 103% as his 2015 boat got a nice overhaul in 2020. Set max swell to 5 meters for all boats in order to circumvent a very bad sea state building up west of the Chilean coast. Weather routing table in pic 4. The projections by windy and Kevin's plugin do not align with mine for Bestaven and Dalin. The ETA for Dalin as 2nd behind Bestaven at Cape Horn is a couple of hours later. A projected DTL of +/- 130 NM, the same as now. The difference could be in the polars used, as we both route with GFS wind and WW3 waves.

Rounding CH will be very though though for the first two boats, as winds up to the 40s are expected, wind gusts up to the 50s, when the LP has moved southwest below Cape Horn. Bestaven projected to round CH around Saturday 2nd, around lunchtime (12 UTC). I expect no selfies with CH in the background with these expected conditions. But a triple reefed main, and a quick exit into the southern Atlantic ocean. Which provides better weather, as South America acts a shelter / high shore. And the SACZ and St Helena HP await them.

Finally, the boats behind the first two will have completely different weather, see pic 6 for JLC's routing with very moderate winds. So that DTL-gap will grow behind Bestaven and Dalin into an abyss worthy of a Lord of the Rings film. The projected DTL is almost to double (from +/- 450 nm to 800 nm) for The King. That will be hard to claw back imho in the relative foiler-friendly South Atlantic conditions.

I wish you all reading this a good 2021 with lots of anti-corona vaccinations. They start in 2 weeks time here in The Netherlands on a small scale, but that could be for me in the summer or even later. Nasty times but following the VG keeps me happy.

 

EUMETSAT 311220.jpg

ECMWF wind MSLP 311220.jpg

temperature ECMWF 311220.jpg

routing table 311220.png

Routing Bestaven and Dalin 311220.png

routing JLC 311220.png

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11 hours ago, Essex said:

Must admit my first thought was "What Would Alex Do" :)

He would be pressing the button to go to 40 knots :)

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1 hour ago, Herman said:

Weather update

So Dalin and Ruyant took both a more northerly route away from the AEZ that Bestaven is still hugging. All as projected yesterday. Seguin who has been hugging the AEZ too sailed into the third ranking last night. That was not in the books.

Bestaven looks good with a DTL on 2nd Dalin of 126 NM this morning and 300+ NM on 3rd Seguin and 380+ NM on Ruyant. But that LP I wrote about in the past 2 days could change this in the coming two days when I fast forward the windy plugin. These projections indicate that Dalin could Pacman away his DTL quickly. And possibly overtake Bestaven at Saturday 2nd of January. Let's have a look in detail.

The overall situation is in pics 1 to 3. The fleet is in between two LPs. Light winds in between them impacting a large part of the top-10 boats. Ruyant was doing 2 kts.. But not the two most easterly boats. Blasting away at 20+ kts. AFAIK I could make out two fronts, one far to the north and the one that passed, going east, yesterday. 

Set the polars for Herrmann to 103% as his 2015 boat got a nice overhaul in 2020. Set max swell to 5 meters for all boats in order to circumvent a very bad sea state building up west of the Chilean coast. Weather routing table in pic 4. The projections by windy and Kevin's plugin do not align with mine for Bestaven and Dalin. The ETA for Dalin as 2nd behind Bestaven at Cape Horn is a couple of hours later. A projected DTL of +/- 130 NM, the same as now. The difference could be in the polars used, as we both route with GFS wind and WW3 waves.

Rounding CH will be very though though for the first two boats, as winds up to the 40s are expected, wind gusts up to the 50s, when the LP has moved southwest below Cape Horn. Bestaven projected to round CH around Saturday 2nd, around lunchtime (12 UTC). I expect no selfies with CH in the background with these expected conditions. But a triple reefed main, and a quick exit into the southern Atlantic ocean. Which provides better weather, as South America acts a shelter / high shore. And the SACZ and St Helena HP await them.

Finally, the boats behind the first two will have completely different weather, see pic 6 for JLC's routing with very moderate winds. So that DTL-gap will grow behind Bestaven and Dalin into an abyss worthy of a Lord of the Rings film. The projected DTL is almost to double (from +/- 450 nm to 800 nm) for The King. That will be hard to claw back imho in the relative foiler-friendly South Atlantic conditions.

I wish you all reading this a good 2021 with lots of anti-corona vaccinations. They start in 2 weeks time here in The Netherlands on a small scale, but that could be for me in the summer or even later. Nasty times but following the VG keeps me happy.

 

EUMETSAT 311220.jpg

ECMWF wind MSLP 311220.jpg

temperature ECMWF 311220.jpg

routing table 311220.png

Routing Bestaven and Dalin 311220.png

routing JLC 311220.png

Happy New year as well Hermann and everybody, and thx so much for your routings.

Riguarding vaccin, we are very unorganized in France, i hope going back sailing in the Caribbean soon or i will just escape to Las Palmas di Gran Canarias.

 

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11 hours ago, Essex said:

Must admit my first thought was "What Would Alex Do" :)

Take the damaged boat to a city with an airport and fly home?

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4 hours ago, Herman said:

According to the KNMI, our Dutch weather bureau;

"In a La Niña, the sea water temperatures in the eastern Pacific Ocean near the equator are lower than average. Stronger easterly winds bring more cold water from the deep ocean to the surface. We often hear reports about El Niño; La Niña is the counterpart. In an El Niño, the seawater in the Pacific Ocean heats up."

Source (in Dutch); https://www.knmi.nl/over-het-knmi/nieuws/bovengemiddelde-warm-2020-verwacht-ondanks-la-nina

According NOAA;  

"Another key signal to how well La Niña is doing lies in the wind. ENSO events disrupt the Walker Circulation, the normal atmospheric wind pattern that blows across the tropics.

La Niñas tend to rev up the existing Walker Circulation. The trade winds, which blow east to west across the Pacific Ocean, blow a little harder, while winds higher up in the atmosphere blow to the east a little bit harder. During November, that is exactly what happened. "

Source https://www.climate.gov/news-features/blogs/enso/december-2020-la-niña-update-walking-la-niña-winter-wonderland

So both indicate that the trades should be blowing harder. KNMI states that notwithstanding the lower average sea temperatures which indicate La Niña is active, the average temperature measured in The Netherlands is one of the highest ever measured due to climate change. I just remembered that I had to buy 4 ventilators this summer as we hit a smoldering heat wave which is very uncommon for our country. Sleeping at night was otherwise impossible.

So we have El Niña combined with climate change impacting the weather.

 

in other words, stronger trade winds keep pushing LP below ice limits?

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12 hours ago, Laurent said:

 

I believe he said in a previous video a while back, that he has a mode for the AP which is not based on heading, TWA or AWA, but target boat speed. If too slow, the AP heads up, if too fast the autopilot bears away.

Is that correct? Has somebody seen/used this mode before?

For all the autopilot question:  The new autopilots such as Bravo madentec have all sorts of new modes.  You can choose to pilot by heel angle or boat speed target as well as the normal modes.  They also have certain abilities to machine lean the characteristics of your boat.  

Boris could have been using any one of these or just simple beard away to cool the boat down.

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Post Horn options from Yann Richomme at T&S

Quote

AFTER THE HORN, LEFT OR STRAIGHT?

Each week during the Vendée Globe, the double winner of the Solitaire du Figaro, winner of the Route du Rhum 2018 in Class40, delivers his tactical and strategic analysis of the race , exclusively for Tip & Shaft.

I spoke to you during my last column of the week about all the dangers, with the possibility of seeing big gaps according to the trajectories of each other in the Pacific. Finally, the situation I was describing to you has totally changed : the high pressure system that was supposed to split the head of the fleet in two did not have the expected influence, which means that it is still as compact as ever. The observation that we can make is that the reliability of the weather files - the different models were however all in agreement - does not exceed three days.in these areas. And it's not just a question of 5-10 knots of wind difference, we are not at all in the same weather system as the one planned! This makes the exercise all the more difficult when you are at sea after more than 45 days of racing!

Yannick remains the boss

Despite this weather uncertainty, the leader Yannick Bestaven remains the boss, we can underline his good overall management when it was not easy, he must have maneuvered quite a bit and is doing well. He had a small speed deficit for a while compared to Charlie (Dalin), which caused him to lose around forty miles, but that's normal, we must remember that his boat is going slower than Apivia . And we can see that since this morning, he has been going the fastest, averaging over 21 knots over the last eight hours.

Charlie also did very well , he did not get caught by the high pressure as one might fear for him. He played with fire, but he played very well staying just in front of the high pressure, he managed to get out of it cleanly and show what the potential of a 2020 foiler was in the Deep South, in making a day of almost 500 miles , averaging almost 21 knots. He climbed north - about 200 miles off Yannick who is along the ice zone - to benefit from a more favorable angle, but a priori, he will have to readjust on a south-eastern route, that will depend on the options chosen at the Horn which I tell you about below. Thomas (Roaring)had more trouble and was caught by the group of pursuers, from which he is very out of step, in a north position. 

Damien Seguin, man of the week

The man of the week is undeniably Damien Seguin who finds himself third after having managed to get out of this group of pursuers. Coming out of the high pressure, he managed to position himself better and regain a better angle, we see that he pushed harder than the others, especially during a frenzied reaching edge. Result: while he was in the middle of the peloton a week ago, he is now 130 miles ahead , that's really impressive, hat!

The other big beneficiary of the week is Armel Tripon who continues his climb, I see him passing Cape Horn 400 miles behind this group of pursuers, it seems that the conditions will be favorable for his 4x4.

Master Rooster Routing

About ten boats in 48 hours at Cape Horn

Between now and the Horn, there is still a big storm to manage for the two leaders with 45 knots of wind, gusts to 60, and 7 meters of sea. Even if it should mostly pass in front of them, they will surely have to slow down a bit to avoid risk nothing.

The routings still give a passage of Cape Horn on January 2 in the afternoon for Yannick , in the early hours of January 3 for Charlie, while the group of pursuers led for the moment by Damien should wind him during the day from the 4th, followed by Maxime Sorel on the morning of the 5th, Armel Tripon during the day of the 5th, Clarisse Crémer between the 5th and 6th, Romain Attanasio on the 6th during the day. Basically, that's ten boats in 48 hours at Cape Horn, 14 in 4 days, that's quite impressive!

At the strategic level, two options emerge after Cape Horn for the two leaders : either cut close to the pebble and pass near the Falklands, which is the “traditional” route (the one closest to the orthodromy), or continue towards the east along the very southern ice zone (see sketch above). 

Master Rooster Routing 2

Anticipate the trade winds

In my opinion, they have an  interest in going very offshore for two reasons: first to avoid too muscular conditions at the Horn (45-60 knots of crosswind in 7-8 meters of waves) and then to create a shift towards the east in view of the continuation , because the final objective in the South Atlantic is to seek the easterly trade winds north of the Saint Helena high (see sketch above). The advantage of the direct route is that you are quickly protected from the sea by the coast.

For me, the two leaders have a real opportunity to put more distance to their pursuers by riding the back of this storm of the Horn. The others should all wrap it pretty close. How not to be tempted to come and see it up close after having traveled so much without seeing the land, especially since for many of them, it is their first passage over the Horn!

As for the rest, I see Apivia dominating the debates a priori , its potential is greater in all points of view than that of Master CoQ , it remains to be seen whether, with its low hold problems on the port foil, it will be disabled or not. We must not forget to leave “South Seas” mode to engage in a more “regatta” mode. The need to preserve the boat will not be at all the same as in the southern seas, so some people will perhaps pull more on the machine in this start of the ascent.

 

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@Coconuts.is  and @Haji Some questions

IIRC, you were/are in touch with boat preps, and hope you might have some background why there aren't more zero emissions efforts this time? Figured more boats would have gone for a zero emissions Vendee Globe, like Conrad Colman last time.

What happened to the 'Oceanvolt' motors or equivalent?  Seemed like a good idea all sailors would like to see develop. Had thought Conrad's agreement with the Race Authorities had worked out a solution to the drive shaft seal issue.

Halyard locks and Corum's mast. Less prep time for the riggers as a major factor this edition?

Thanks for any insights you feel free to offer.

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15 hours ago, Essex said:

Must admit my first thought was "What Would Alex Do" :)

haha. Good one. As a 'woulda' answer, he'd be in the Atlantic and be happily doing Q&A's from the comfort of the cave, while happily trimming the main. 

 

Of course, the gurus would be complaining how the fleet is stretched out over too many miles.

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Sadly they all seem to sail pretty conservatively, the likes of François Gabart, Armel Le cleach, Alex Thomson and Michel Desjoyeaux are really missed on this edition.

 

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Had to laugh at Andi's "last day of being European" contrast of Boris and the other Boris

 

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JLC slowed down with reduced sail, in line with much of the routing advice. Figure he's letting the others bash themselves against the Horn, and planning to take advantage up the Atlantic. 

Set up for a rookie fumble. ;) 

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5 minutes ago, stief said:

JLC slowed down with reduced sail, in line with much of the routing advice. Figure he's letting the others bash themselves against the Horn, and planning to take advantage up the Atlantic. 

Set up for a rookie fumble. ;) 

So that is why! I was wondering what happened all day long! 

So let them trash their boat King Jean..

 

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On 12/30/2020 at 3:26 AM, Herman said:

Polars for foilers 2020 added I see :)

[aside] A bit more info re the Windy polars from Great Circle"

"we have a generic imoca polar of each generation .. and that of VR circulates ... for routing on windy, we play with the percentage of application of a polar ... also depending on what we see for 53d" https://twitter.com/GreatCircleBe/status/1344667891921203202?s=20

(and best wishes for the new year)

 

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I would like to vote for both because they do things that us normals dont think ,they will win or do or compete,   we see incredible efforts when we look,....

Damien Seguin, man of the week

The man of the week is undeniably Damien Seguin who finds himself third after having managed to get out of this group of pursuers. Coming out of the high pressure, he managed to position himself better and regain a better angle, we see that he pushed harder than the others, especially during a frenzied reaching edge. Result: while he was in the middle of the peloton a week ago, he is now 130 miles ahead , that's really impressive, hat!

Screen Shot 2021-01-01 at 5.24.13 am.png

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3 hours ago, Coconuts.is said:

For all the autopilot question:  The new autopilots such as Bravo madentec have all sorts of new modes.  You can choose to pilot by heel angle or boat speed target as well as the normal modes.  They also have certain abilities to machine lean the characteristics of your boat.  

Boris could have been using any one of these or just simple beard away to cool the boat down.

Thanks for the insight. In the short video from Boris that started that side discussion, you are most likely right that he is "just" changing the heading setting to 5 or 10° more down wind to "cool it off a bit" when he reaches boat speed of 33-34 knots... :blink:

The other options "heel angle, boat speed,...) you describe must be useful only for specific point of sail/wind speed, I guess.

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Charlie taking advantage of his starboard foil on port tack, and his thoughts about the Horn:

Quote

"The Horn is not nothing, it is the most feared of the three capes and the most dangerous," warns Charlie, who is about to cross his first cape Horn, firmly installed in second position 133 miles behind the leader, Yannick Bestaven. "To pass it means a lot in the life of a sailor, it makes you take a hell of a rank, it's a myth, becoming a cap-hornier in the coming days is not just nonsense, it means something strong." Even if the passage into the New Year tonight has its share of meaning, Charlie will celebrate the dreaded Chilean Cape more. "Thirty centilitres of champagne are waiting for me in one of my bags and I hope to be able to taste them even if the announced conditions seem rather muscular with winds of 40 knots. I will take the necessary measures to manage the approach: laughter and change of sails are planned but normally no maneuvers, no gybees. If it does it like that, it's magical! Not having a starboard to do is necessarily beneficial for me."

The weather puzzle of the day: slow down or not?

The approach to the dreaded Cape Horn and its passage poses an unusual problem for the skippers of the race leader. Will they have to temper their pace to benefit from a milder sea and a weaker wind?" At the moment, I have not planned to moderate my speed but I constantly monitor the evolution of the weather and it is true that if 45 knots are announced at the passage of the Horn, I may consider adjusting my speed and trajectory to be less shaken. Caught in a vice between the weak wind located behind the front and the strong gusts expected in front of him, the skipper of the mutual may have to adapt his speed to spare his mount while keeping this north trajectory that allows him not to have any additional maneuvers to do. This ninth Vendée Globe is definitely an exceptional and unpredictable vintage, it would be both surprising but wise to note a slowdown, this time voluntary, of the two breakaways in anticipation of a tobacco shot deemed too dangerous for their IMOCAs. Only Eole's whims will be the justices of the peace before entering the Atlantic and the red carpet that leads to Les Sables d'Olonne.

Safari trans snipped from https://www.apivia.fr/voile/actualites-voile/apivia-un-cap-horn-epice-pour-commencer-lannee/

aside. "Eole's" = Aeolus, judgement of the wind god, I assume, but no idea about "tobacco shot" :P

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Ah--found an interview with Yannick about his thoughts approaching the Horn:

Quote

Yannick, you are advancing at an average of more than 21 knots this morning, what are the sensations aboard Maître CoQ IV? 

It spins, it vibrates, we are still shaken, but that's the daily lot as soon as we average over 20 knots. I am still in a small front that I had come to look for, I have 20-25 knots, with slaps at 30, I am 115-120 degrees to the wind, that's fine, because we are moving fast, but briskly the exit ! Fortunately, the sea is still manageable, it is starting to rise, but it is not the messy sea as I have known it in the Indian that made me fly around the boat. There, we have to hang on, but it's still bearable.

What conclusions do you draw from the week that was announced to be decisive in terms of strategy? 

The results are quite positive for me. I had a pretty good line, I managed to widen the gap again on those behind, including on Apivia, even if we can see that Charlie (Dalin) is pushing well at the moment. For the others, I took the break with Thomas (Ruyant, LinkedOut) and the group that is with him, and given the conditions, I think that I will continue to widen the gap in the next few hours, it's more good.

How do you see the approach to Cape Horn? 

For me, it will now be a large tack on the port tack up to Cape Horn, the objective is to take advantage of being still in this front to do miles, the wind will gradually shift north-west, which will take me back north. I still plan to cross the Horn on January 2nd if all goes well, it will depend a little on the speed at which I will be able to move forward with the sea and the strong wind forecast.

You are discovering the Great South for the first time, what will you remember? 

Mental pressure! These are still places where there is a lot of stress, especially with these boats, there are few cool moments. I have nevertheless experienced a few, but the routine of the Great South is to be far from everything in a strong wind, as at the moment, it is engaged, as navigation. We will have to ask the weather statisticians, but I have the impression that this year, we did not have very usual conditions, we took a long time to cross the Indian then the Pacific, it is time let it stop!

How will your New Year's Eve be going? 

It's going to be an evening like any other, I'm a little disconnected from all this at sea, even if I will have a thought for my loved ones. So that won't change much for me, my goal will be to continue to do miles to get closer to the goal, well wedged in the watch seat or in my bunk. 

Do you already have an eye on the rest and the start of the Atlantic climb? 

I watch from a distance, it will be complicated, these are often areas with not much wind and upwind. The diagram is still not very clear today and I am mainly focused on the last 1000 miles up to Cape Horn.
Source: C Muller

using site's trans from https://www.scanvoile.com/2020/12/vendee-globe-le-cap-horn-samedi-pour-le-leader-bestaven.html

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There is an article on the French side of the website that does not appear on the English side, about Romain Attanasio. He lost the hook for the 2nd reef on his main; so he is either on third reef (undercanvassed right now) or first reef (over canvassed right now...) and apparantly, he has not been able to raise full main for quite a while. Maybe not such a problem for the time being, but not so good once back in the Atlantic...

"I had 2 reefs in the mainsail this morning and suddenly, the whole sail fell on deck. So I think that something broke; I can no longer hook the second reef, so I switched the third reef. Taking only one reef in the current conditions, it is not enough. But with 3 reefs, I only have a mini-mainsail... When I carry the J2, it is too much in the squalls, so I go back to the J3, which is not enough in the lulls... So I am spending my time switching between headsails. It is a bit of a headache, because I could not raise a full main already; so it leaves me with only 2 settings.

Yesterday, I decided to sail conservatively all the way to Cape Horn. I am afraid to make mistakes. But since the group upfront is going to get stuck behind a low wind speed bubble, I think this is also the opportunity to come back in the game. For them, it is not the ideal scenario, but for us, it is the possibility to get back to them by Cape Horn. On the other hand, I am going to get there in 50 knots of wind... so it is not going to be easy to manage those hairy conditions...

I am trying to be rather positive in my messages. But I still say so when something is going wrong. When we were across the Aguilehas Cape, and that we were worried of hiting something, I was relating that fear as well. I am trying to relate reality with a pinch of humor, especially in the tough times. I would rather laugh at it, than cry... It is an escape technique when the going really gets tough. Loïck Peyron used to say "I have the luxury to chose my pains, so I cannot complain." I think a lot about that, reminding myself that I chose to be here.

At sea, you can go anywhere, we are on our boat, without any constrains; without a curfew, without a mask, etc. But we still live in a 5 cubic meter space... You cannot "go out", we are away from "normal life", go to the bakery, have a good breakfast, see your friends. On the other hand, this deprivation of normal life, we chose it, and we have other advantages which allow us to live something very strong. When I am asked why I do this race, I answer that it is to live those very strong moments, that you cannot find on land, and that we miss once it is over."

 

 

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22 minutes ago, stief said:

Charlie taking advantage of his starboard foil on port tack, and his thoughts about the Horn:

Safari trans snipped from https://www.apivia.fr/voile/actualites-voile/apivia-un-cap-horn-epice-pour-commencer-lannee/

aside. "Eole's" = Aeolus, judgement of the wind god, I assume, but no idea about "tobacco shot" :P

Ahhh, the beauty of automatic translation...

 

In French: un coup de tabac.

"Coup" means shot (like in "un coup de feu": a fire shot) or hit (like in "un coup de poing", a fist hit)

Word for word translation, indeed, is a tobacco shot... or maybe more appropriately a tobacco hit... but what it means is: a nasty sudden storm... You made me look so I found out the origin.

It actually has NOTHING to do with tobacco.

The verb "tabasser" in familiar French mean to assault someone with a fury of fist hits. So "passer à tabac" should actually be written "passer à tabas" and mean that you have been hit hard during a fight.

The two words collided and "tabac" (which means tobacco) got associated with "tabasser" which means hit someone hard...

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Thanks Laurent--always appreciate your sailor and linguist's take on the idioms. Sorting through machine trans is almost as entertaining as figuring out which weather model and guru is the least wrong :P

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Pip's New Year's message--hoping she can hold on being in the top 1/2 for a few more hours.

She really has been the best pleasant surprise this edition. Am still trying to find out more about her past history as a sailing journalist, because she's almost as good as Conrad at communicating about ocean racing.  And, maybe more future VG entrants will try her Three Peaks efforts to prep for the VG, too.

 

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And snipped news from JLC's wife in V&V

image.png.75dbb5f6183fb0df0e571c6f64c83585.png

Quote

Vendée Globe. Jean Le Cam is not going to New Year's Eve on the 31st. Anne, his wife, says that "he doesn't care"

Jean Le Cam (Yes We Cam!) should spend New Year's Eve in 7th position in the Vendée Globe, 511 miles behind the leader, Yannick Bestaven (Master CoQ). One of the heroes already in this race after his rescue from Kevin Escoffier and his excellent ranking despite his straight drifts, does not intend to take out the cotillons. "I know him by heart: he doesn't care! said his wife, Anne. When he runs, he thinks about his race. And then the cotillons, not for us! ".

It's a fact, moreover: among the 27 competitors still competing in this Vendée Globe, Jean Le Cam is one of the few not to have sent videos from inside his Yes We Cam to the race PC! all tangled with multicolored garlands. No plush toys either, nor even open gifts with great pomp.

He's always been like that, Jean. When he runs, he doesn't do anything else

"Jean wearing a red Santa Claus hat? You're laughing or what! is having fun with Anne Le Cam, his wife, hiding the vision of her husband making the antics with a white pompom with a great generous laugh as the next day the New Year's Eve party is announced. I know him by heart, Jean. Even for the New Year, he won't make the fuss behind his small computer camera."

"And then he's always been like that, Jean. When he runs, he doesn't do anything else. He will spend hours adjusting his boat, hours looking for good routings. If he has hours left, he will try to rest. Because right now, it's not the party for them."

Anne Le Cam: "We must leave them in their bubble! "

"We both talked about Christmas the other day on the phone. He didn't do anything special because, as usual, he says that Christmas alone on a boat is creepy. It may be the old school but they are a lot like him, his friends, who no longer try to look for a parade. He says it's creepy and that the faster it passes, the better."

But Anne Le Cam refuses to make any judgment on those who, for Christmas, sent videos of garlands, plush toys and other trinkets to the ground. "Abolished trinket of sound inanity", as Stéphane Mallarmé wrote in his -Sound in X-.

He, too, does not conceive well of living happiness in his corner

"The other skippers do what they want," she adds. Many of them probably had children or grandchildren on the ground. To make them smile. We, our children, are grown up now and we do not yet have small children."

"It didn't surprise me but the other day, with Jean, around Christmas, we talked about the elderly people who were going to spend this evening alone. It's true that usually, with him, for Christmas, we try to go for a while with residents in EPHADs, near us. To go knock on the door of lonely people we know a little. He makes a lot of solo boats, Jean., but on land, he too, does not conceive well of living happiness in his corner. "

"And anyway, our friends, we see them whenever we want. The day before or the next day rather than the holidays - mandatory-. We have a simple relationship with the holidays. Not to mention, he told me the other day, that there, the emotions, he had his charge, Jean. It is saturated. The other day, he also told me that this Vendée Globe is the worst he has known for the conditions. Not the wind, but especially the waves. Crossed, dismantled. A completely broken sea. So he hangs on, he did his best. No need to go and annoy him right now with Santa Claus hats! ".

By Nicolas FICHOT. Published on 12/31/2020 at 7:04 pm

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1 hour ago, stief said:

Thanks Laurent--always appreciate your sailor and linguist's take on the idioms. Sorting through machine trans is almost as entertaining as figuring out which weather model and guru is the least wrong :P

Thanks stief! Another one which made me... laugh, from the autotranslatioin you got: Charlie Dalin speaking about the forthcoming adjustments. " I will take the necessary measures to manage the approach: laughter and change of sails are planned but normally no maneuvers, no gybees."

A reef in English, is, in French "un ris". Prendre un ris = take a reef.

But the verb to laugh in English is: "rire" in French. At Present tense, it writes:

Je ris

Tu ris

Il rit

Nous rions

Vous riez

Ils rient

So the sentence " ris et changement de voiles sont prévus" should be translated to "reefs and change of sails are planned", rather than "laughter and change of sails are planned..."

 

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55 minutes ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

It's tomorrow. Now he didn't want to spoil her réveillon, isn't it?  :lol::lol::lol:

He is nicer than I expected :lol::lol: However, I was surprised a bit.. maybe fatigue has come, after all. 

I admit Clarisse looks more alert, refreshed than most sailors. She recovers quite well. She has 250nm next to the boat of Pedote.  Man, the group looks more compact except for the three leaders. Damien got stuck a bit. 14nm in 4 hours, meanwhile Ruyant 80nm. 

Untitled-1.jpg

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24 minutes ago, troll99 said:

He is nicer than I expected :lol::lol: However, I was surprised a bit.. maybe fatigue has come, after all. 

I admit Clarisse looks more alert, refreshed than most sailors. She recovers quite well. She has 250nm next to the boat of Pedote.  Man, the group looks more compact except for the three leaders. Damien got stuck a bit. 14nm in 4 hours, meanwhile Ruyant 80nm. 

Untitled-1.jpg

Clarisse is pulling away a bit lately from Armel, and about 18 hours behind the peleton now.   Not giving up without a fight obviously.  Youth has the distinct advantage of endurance. 

Then again, the only one even more chipper that Clarisse is Pip Hare.   So there goes that theory.  

Pip pointed out something pretty astute:  She feels quite competitive in light air and in breeze where she is very happy with her set up, but can't hold the foilers in moderate air.  So she pushes hard in the conditions where she has the advantage.   Does make you wonder if the next generation of foilers is going to have fully retractable foils to reduce parasitic light air drag and not have the "Too Fast!" issues at the top end when waves are the limiting factor.  

 

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Happy New Year, six hours early, to all you anarchists who keep this thread interesting, and of course all 33 sailors who have the guts to tackle this amazing race.

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4 hours ago, stief said:

Pip's New Year's message--hoping she can hold on being in the top 1/2 for a few more hours.

She really has been the best pleasant surprise this edition. Am still trying to find out more about her past history as a sailing journalist, because she's almost as good as Conrad at communicating about ocean racing.  And, maybe more future VG entrants will try her Three Peaks efforts to prep for the VG, too.

 

Absolutely fantastic !

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Brutal boats...

"I have been surfing at 30 knots," said Dalin today, sporting a black eye after slamming his head into the companionway when his IMOCA ploughed into a wave and slowed suddenly (SW).

Clarisse is hold off, and gaining on, Armel. Moving like a scalded cat :ph34r:.

Further back, Jérémie continues to tick off impressive miles.

20201231_172431.thumb.jpg.9977fdc6cd4692a192a20563bced44f2.jpg

Oh, and before I forget, I wish y'all the best new year.

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11 hours ago, stief said:

@Coconuts.is  and @Haji Some questions

IIRC, you were/are in touch with boat preps, and hope you might have some background why there aren't more zero emissions efforts this time? Figured more boats would have gone for a zero emissions Vendee Globe, like Conrad Colman last time.

What happened to the 'Oceanvolt' motors or equivalent?  Seemed like a good idea all sailors would like to see develop. Had thought Conrad's agreement with the Race Authorities had worked out a solution to the drive shaft seal issue.

Halyard locks and Corum's mast. Less prep time for the riggers as a major factor this edition?

Thanks for any insights you feel free to offer.

It's hard to go without fuel without performance sacrifices.  Hydrogenerator charging (whether with a Watt & Sea hydro or an electric propulsion unit like an Oceanvolt) is a always a bit of drag.  The energy density of fossil fuel is difficult to match.  But redundancy is key, so having a lot of solar panels and the hydros, in addition to high power alternators on the engine is the smart way to go.

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What a day for New Years

 

Screen Shot 2020-12-31 at 10.55.36 PM.png

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1 hour ago, Haji said:

It's hard to go without fuel without performance sacrifices.  Hydrogenerator charging (whether with a Watt & Sea hydro or an electric propulsion unit like an Oceanvolt) is a always a bit of drag.  The energy density of fossil fuel is difficult to match.  But redundancy is key, so having a lot of solar panels and the hydros, in addition to high power alternators on the engine is the smart way to go.

I’m pretty sure the new Hugo Boss is hydrocarbon free, save for the cooking fuel. ATR would not have sacrificed performance for the environment. I could be wrong on this, but the quantity of solar panels on the deck suggests it was certainly considered!

The limit with hydrocarbons is they aren’t replenishable, and the energy density of a battery that is fully rechargeable times 70+ days starts to make a pretty compelling argument for ditching the fuel+engine. Further, Conrad proved that all electric can work going around the world. The only downside is if you have to motor for a long time in a rescue scenario etc.

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9 hours ago, stief said:

Pip's New Year's message--hoping she can hold on being in the top 1/2 for a few more hours.

She really has been the best pleasant surprise this edition. Am still trying to find out more about her past history as a sailing journalist, because she's almost as good as Conrad at communicating about ocean racing.  And, maybe more future VG entrants will try her Three Peaks efforts to prep for the VG, too.

 

i follow her on instagram, delightful, speaks english, super entertaining

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3 hours ago, F18 Sailor said:

I’m pretty sure the new Hugo Boss is hydrocarbon free, save for the cooking fuel. ATR would not have sacrificed performance for the environment. I could be wrong on this, but the quantity of solar panels on the deck suggests it was certainly considered!

The limit with hydrocarbons is they aren’t replenishable, and the energy density of a battery that is fully rechargeable times 70+ days starts to make a pretty compelling argument for ditching the fuel+engine. Further, Conrad proved that all electric can work going around the world. The only downside is if you have to motor for a long time in a rescue scenario etc.

Hugo Boss had a Fischer Panda generator on board.  

 

The batteries were charged via solar or generator (diesel).

 

The batteries supplied power for the electric motor.

 

The entire system was lighter then a typical diesel motor.  Weight could be distributed more favorably. 

 

I couldn't find the original article I read, but this one has similar details.

https://www.boatsnews.com/story/35439/why-did-hugo-boss-choose-an-electric-engine-for-the-2020-vendee-globe

 

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Impressed by Isabelle!

She gained quite some miles from yesterday!

1.jpg

Schermata 2021-01-01 alle 09.39.09.png

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1 hour ago, tDot said:

Hugo Boss had a Fischer Panda generator on board.  

The batteries were charged via solar or generator (diesel).

The batteries supplied power for the electric motor.

The entire system was lighter then a typical diesel motor.  Weight could be distributed more favorably. 

I couldn't find the original article I read, but this one has similar details.

https://www.boatsnews.com/story/35439/why-did-hugo-boss-choose-an-electric-engine-for-the-2020-vendee-globe

Yeah Alex made a big deal of the electric engine when the boat first launched, not to go zero emission obviously, but to prove the electric engine could be an advantage (which is important for convincing other people to switch, and is a good stepping stone for eliminating diesel technology). 

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There are a lot of Pleasure Creafts in this area! Much more than I thought..

Schermata 2021-01-01 alle 12.28.32.png

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Damn, why Armel is sailing like a pussy? should have had overtaken Clarisse long ago and got closer to the others, if they all wait for the Atlantic to race again it's going to be tough.

Must definitly have a technical problem...

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Pip moves up to 15th!

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Windy weather-routing sends Yannick and Charlie straight trough the storm at the Horn. Gusts of 60 knots and big waves. I don't see any measures from them to avoid this boat breaking conditions. To avoid it, it's quite some extra miles to the south. Are they playing bluff-poker? 

Schermafbeelding_2021-01-01_om_15_32_47.png

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On 12/31/2020 at 2:43 PM, troll99 said:

in other words, stronger trade winds keep pushing LP below ice limits?

You honor your nickname :lol:

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On 12/31/2020 at 2:01 PM, cortosam said:

Happy New year as well Hermann and everybody, and thx so much for your routings.

Riguarding vaccin, we are very unorganized in France, i hope going back sailing in the Caribbean soon or i will just escape to Las Palmas di Gran Canarias.

 

Sounds like a very good plan to me 

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7 minutes ago, Herman said:

You honor your nickname :lol:

why not explain? I didn't bother to read those texts.

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56 minutes ago, KlaasWiersma said:

Windy weather-routing sends Yannick and Charlie straight trough the storm at the Horn. Gusts of 60 knots and big waves. I don't see any measures from them to avoid this boat breaking conditions. To avoid it, it's quite some extra miles to the south. Are they playing bluff-poker? 

 

My guess is that they'll slow down and bear off SW in the worst of it.  Maybe with the deepest reef and storm jib they can roughly match the speed of the waves and take some of the punch out of them.  At least they didn't have to spend New Year's in the Aleutians - that storm sounded nuts :blink:.

Amazing that Yannick and Charlie have increased their lead over the peleton* by 400 nm since Christmas.  I had to check back to make sure I was remembering it properly.

 

* edit to add:  and over Tripon :lol:

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Weather update

As predicted, the gap is widening between the first two boats and the rest. The LP is splitting the fleet. "Okay, Houston, we've had a problem here" as the actual quote was on Apollo 13. The weather models ECMWF and GFS agree where the centre of the LP zone is. See pics 1 and 2. But looking at the latest EUMETSAT visible clouds, I think both models are a bit off for the centre of that LP. See pic 3. It is more to the east than currently projected. So routing is a bit useless imho, as it is garbage in, garbage out.

But I did have look at the windy plugin and rolled forward a bit, and noted that Bestaven and Dalin are projected to sail close around Cape Horn. I think I don't buy it, as the projected sea state will turn sour too below CH. As in 8 meters high according to WW3 model. See pic 4. Or 7+ meters in the ECMWF WAM model in pic 5. Closer to the AEZ the projected sea state is a bit better; 6 to 6.5 meters. It could be Theta-like conditions close to CH for wind, expected gusts and waves. If the models are valid. Not something to sail in, unless no other option is possible. Staying closer to the AEZ makes sense in this case with the current weather projections.

GFS 010121.jpg

ECMWF 010121.jpg

EUMETSAT vis clouds 010121.jpg

Seastate WW3 Saturday 1300 CET.jpg

Seastate ECMWF WAM Saturday 1300.jpg

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1 hour ago, KlaasWiersma said:

Windy weather-routing sends Yannick and Charlie straight trough the storm at the Horn. Gusts of 60 knots and big waves. I don't see any measures from them to avoid this boat breaking conditions. To avoid it, it's quite some extra miles to the south. Are they playing bluff-poker? 

Schermafbeelding_2021-01-01_om_15_32_47.png

Hi Klaas, see my post above for my humble opinion that they will probably not get close to CH with current projected weather conditions. No selfies with CH background to be expected as I typed yesterday or so.

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Oh, it is nice to get Windy results by using Squid routing. The analysis is made on 10th Jan Sunday.

The distance the two leaders would make is quite large. I find it odd that Damien would lag behind and Ruyant - a bit ahead. Well because of foilers and non-foilers profiles. The gap between Tripon & Clarisse and the front group would increase. 

3rd and 4th - Boris and Isabelle. 

Untitled-1.jpg

Untitled-1_1.jpg

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I've had the feeling for the last day or so that perhaps Tripon is sailing at a casual pace intentionally, to let the heavy stuff pass in front, so that he can round Cape Horn close without getting into boat-breaking conditions.  If those who get pounded by it slow down to deal with it, and/or take damage, he and those with him could suddenly look quite good off Isla Deceit, heading up to leave the Falklands to Starboard, while those ahead have been pushed to the ice limit further East.

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Going for the horn at speed with Isabelle Joschke...

Edit: Oops, just posted above :)

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16 minutes ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

 

Stunning Isabelle.

Suffering for some fucking media and us, posters :lol:

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11 minutes ago, troll99 said:

Suffering for some fucking media and us, posters :lol:

My thoughts, exactly! :D

That's 5°C/41°F air and 6°C water, and she famously suffers terribly with the cold.

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Is it me or she is missing her port hydrogenerator?

As said above, impressive video, and getting all soaked in cold water for the pictures to be made!

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Nice find on YouTube: Boris' 2nd Cape Horn passage in the Barcelona World Race 10/11 together with Ryan Breymaier onboard Neutrogena. The video starts with them being overtaken by Thomas Coville during one of his solo Jules Verne attempts.

 

 

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Subtitles work anyway.

 

Good for Ruyant to be able to finish The South almost at the moment.

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Good to see the thread alive and well this year. Thanks to all the routing posts, and vid surveys, there was time to follow up on some leads: 

Re rounding the Horn in miserable conditions, this account was memorable from the 3rd 2014/15 Barcelona World Race (the one where JLC and Stamm won). They certainly trusted their AP. 

Quote

Renault Captur skippers reveal how they sailed through a 70-knot storm after rounding Cape Horn: “These are the most stressful conditions I have seen in 25 years,” comments Sébastien Audigane

NEWS MAR 11, 2015 17:42

On Day 70 of the Barcelona World Race, Jörg Riechers and Sébastien Audigane revealed that they encountered 70-knot gusts after rounding Cape Horn yesterday.
Speaking in video conference today the Renault Captur skippers spoke of their relief at surviving what Audigane, who has now rounded the Horn four times, called “The most stressful conditions I have seen in 25 years.”
For German co-skipper Riechers, his first rounding of the landmark transpired to be the most severe Cape Horn crossing in the Barcelona World Race’s history. Riechers commented today, “We survived it. It was not easy.”
“Rounding Cape Horn was pretty easy. We had 35-40kts of wind. And just after the Cape, we thought OK, it is going to be easy. No stress. But one mile after Cape Horn came the first gust, 70kts of wind, so the boat was lying flat with the third reef in the main and the J3. So from there we were a b it scared, we bore away and rolled up the J3, and continued with the triple reefed mainsail. And still we surfed at 24 to 25kts. The seas were very white and very steep. In the end it was pretty scary. So for my first rounding of Cape Horn it was a big one.
“You are not super, super scared. But you ask yourself the questions. With a triple reefed main and with the boat on the edge of control, with the rudder problem, you can only steer with the autopilot, you just stay inside. You ask yourself what is going to happen if the autopilot freaks out and makes a mistake? Then you have a real, real big problem.”

The waiting game
Sébastien Audigane explained how the pair prepared for the storm and, once in its midst, rode it out together at the chart table in their survival suits:
“Two and a half days ago we contemplated turning round to avoid it. It was the perfect storm with a very low depression in the centre. Looking closely we judged we could pass it. But I confess that during the storm we looked at each other and said “This is a bullsh*t idea”. Once you are in it there is little you can do to manage the situation. The boat did well under three reefs. The only worry was our dear autopilot might give up on us.
“After the Horn, when we hit 70 knots and the wind was consistently at 60, we sat it out, watching what was going on outside from time to time as we waited at the chart table, ready to adjust the autopilot if needed. These are the most stressful conditions I have seen in 25 years.
“We don't try to get ourselves into these situations. We had prepared the boat as best we could. We stacked the boat as best we could, we had our survival suits on and were ready psychologically.”
The boat was monitored constantly through the extreme conditions by the Race Direction team of the Barcelona World Race, liaising closely with the Chilean Navy and MRCC.

The Race team didn't have to tell the boats to stop, as Dee mentioned was the case in the 2008 VG:

 

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Is Sebastien Destremau on Merci going to put in somewhere in AU for repairs?

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3 minutes ago, Autonomous said:

Is Sebastien Destremau on Merci going to put in somewhere in AU for repairs?

The last messages were for him to plan to stop and anchor in Esperance Bay is South West Australia to try to repair the many things that are broken on his boat... Knowing that his family is in Australia, there will be a big emotional pull to stop it right there, I think...

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Strange little snip about Ari's New Year, with gtrans trying to deal with a Finnish article

Quote

THE year of SOLO SAILOR Ari Huusela was changed with hourly dolphins in the Arctic Ocean below Australia.

[found the YT vid and subbed it here]

The dolphins followed Huusela's boat on the high seas for a good time. The distance to Adelaide, Australia’s fifth largest city, was about a thousand miles.

“The year changed calmly at night. I got very rested, even though the night was intermittent, when the year in Finland only changed later and I was in video contact with loved ones, ”Huusela said.

At the turn of the year, Huusela was seven and a half hours ahead of Finland.

Huusela's Stark boat is moving at a good pace without any technical problems. Huusela's goal is to sail 300 nautical miles, about 555 kilometers a day.

"There I am satisfied."

On Friday, the speed of the boat was 14–15 knots, 26–28 kilometers per hour.

THE NEW routing is taking the Finnish skipper further south than ever during the Vendée Globe. However, he does not want to go very down.

At the edge of the iceberg zone marked by the organizers, the wind speed can rise to 40 knots, more than 20 meters per second.

In the new year, the race organization had been allowed to let the competitors deeper into the edge of the ice area.

“The ice had melted before. Personally, I don’t really go to winds of more than 30 knots. Must secure access to the finish line. Competition is secondary to me in itself. There is just enough momentum and mood here. ”

Huusela also has a large property at sea. He could not afford to take out 70,000 euros in insurance.

The weather had cooled down, and Huusela had put on a down for the first time.

“Today I was still out all day. At times the sun glanced, otherwise there was a flat layer of clouds. I ate lunch outside and drank day coffee. ”

Huusela has also read. Currently working under Gavin Pretor-Pinney’s Cloud Bongar Guide [probably this one] where fables and stories, visual arts and literature overlap with exact knowledge.

"It's a good review for the sailor and the pilot."

Huusela's wishes for the new year were that Korona would finally be won and life could return to normal.

“The year was weird. It was one celebration for me to get into this race. The year 2021 can be one celebration when Korona gets right from that. ”

[snip]

Huusela always reaches Alexia Barrier, who is still sailing, and has problems with the boat's mast. The difference is about 370 kilometers. The Frenchman is one of the seven female skippers in the race.

Making the stern grip Sébastien Destremau the other hand, has remained Huusela already more than 2 000 kilometers. A French and Australian dual-citizen boat crawled at a speed of 3-4 knots on Friday.

Explains a bit more about his choice to very relaxed and happy with his VG. I can respect that.

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For us race trivia nerds, thanks to this chart from Benoît @skol33 who points out Pip's "boat from 2000 which is participating in its third #VendeeGlobe" Cool to note Isabelle's boat is on its 7th consecutive VG.

image.thumb.png.8a201b6976efa7b27f0a3a99692f6feb.png

Pip was probably getting into keelboats at about the same time her current boat was being planned, judging by this pic from the VG app. Still grinning.

image.thumb.png.f2cf62e60ec14c602264a4f00d532d03.png

 

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40 minutes ago, Laurent said:

The last messages were for him to plan to stop and anchor in Esperance Bay is South West Australia to try to repair the many things that are broken on his boat... Knowing that his family is in Australia, there will be a big emotional pull to stop it right there, I think...

Thanks for the report.

He was walking a tightrope just to get in the race and that rope is fraying badly. Cape Horn will test any hasty repairs or further weaknesses.

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3 minutes ago, stief said:

For us race trivia nerds, thanks to this chart from Benoît @skol33 who points out Pip's "boat from 2000 which is participating in its third #VendeeGlobe" Cool to note Isabelle's boat is on its 7th consecutive VG.

image.thumb.png.8a201b6976efa7b27f0a3a99692f6feb.png

 

 

 

Isabelle's boat is "only" doing its 4th consecutive Vendée. RDR = Route du Rhum in Benoit's table.

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