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Vendee Globe 2020

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https://isabellejoschke.com/cap-horn-aerien-vendee-globe/

Cape Horn: "In two days I'll be there. It's going to be trashy!"
Isabelle Joschke

I set the alarm clock to be on time for the radio session! It's been a long night, behind me you can see that the day is starting to dawn, it's the right time to go to sleep. Yesterday I lost my aerial, the last one that was working broke down. The boat turned around on its own when it was 30 knots and the sea was impossible so it was hot to get it back. Since then, I don't have an aerial anymore so I don't have any instrument that indicates the wind. I don't have any more information for the moment. And as I'm sailing downwind, it's very complicated, so I always have to keep an eye on the boat's speed and course so that it doesn't go off track. I spent the night on this and now the conditions are a little more stable.

I'm still downwind VMG but I've taken a reef in the mainsail so that allows me to keep my rear. Last night I was under full mainsail and as it's gusty with the south-westerly wind, it's a lot less tolerant. Now that it's more tolerant, I've taken a reef and I'm going to be able to go to sleep.

I spend all my time monitoring the boat's progress, speed, course, trim, to feel if she is on the right course, if she is accelerating too much, in that case you have to trim down a little. When I sleep, I sleep with my left hand in a ski glove to keep warm and my right hand on the remote control with my thumb on the pilot button to adjust the trajectory as soon as I feel the boat is going.

It's a really uncomfortable situation because I know that I still have a big month of sailing ahead of me, I still have a big third of the course to complete, and it's not going to be the same tempo, the same comfort at all. It's going to be harder to go fast, I'll often need to lift my foot, the boat will be slower so it will be frustrating. I think I'm going to be very solicited by the boat's movement. On the other hand, Cape Horn is coming and that makes me very happy. I admit that I can't wait to get out of the South Seas. It's a hell of a piece, it's starting to get long, I'm suffering from the cold and despite the beauty of the scenery, I really need to change the climate, to set a course north. In two days I'm there, it's going to be trashy!

The passage is going to be hard because it's only a tail wind, so without an airplane it's going to be complicated. But it's true that I'm looking forward to moving on to another sequence. And there's something else too, it's that Cape Horn was one of my big objectives for this Vendée Globe. There were the South Seas, finishing the race of course and rounding Cape Horn. That would be a great satisfaction.

For this airplane I am afraid that there is no solution to repair, because I have the impression that there is a broken part. Afterwards, for the main aerial that has been broken for a few weeks, sometimes it can come back, it can be a miracle! I could put an awning on the transom of my boat when the winds are better. But unfortunately that's not really going to change the situation. It's a spare that doesn't work very well.

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

> Go Isabelle! <

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7 hours ago, GER 100 said:

At least Boris is in the zero emission thing, It's one of the key marketing stories he sells  - remember the Greta Transat

Maybe Greta will spill the beans in the pub (Sweden; no lockdown/ masks, etc?) when she celebrates her 18th birthday this evening :lol:

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10 minutes ago, stief said:

Maybe Greta will spill the beans in the pub (Sweden; no lockdown/ masks, etc?) when she celebrates her 18th birthday this evening :lol:

I (vaguely) remember my own Now-I-can-drink-legally night out.  Gotta say, I have a hard time picturing Greta Thunburg having the same kind of night.

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Armel Tripon update, he is taking it little more easily until cape horn, to not break anything, and plans to go on the attack in the Atlantic.

 

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From Sam. Vid in the FB link

Quote

FINALLY in the PACIFIC ! Tonight, an ocean separates Sam Davies from the 1st of the Yannick Bestaven race just passed Cape Horn. But Sam keeps her spirits up, she's doing better, her ribs are less painful. She approaches the world's biggest ocean with a smile ENCOURAGE HER

 

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Everyone seems so fed up with the southern oceans... lol... as Jean Le Cam said in Vendee Live FR they had execrable southern oceans this year... everyone is in a hurry to pass the horn and looking forward to the atlantic.

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On 1/2/2021 at 11:26 AM, Snowden said:

I’m not sure who JörgRiechers is but his comments don’t make a lot of sense. Ellen MacArthur seemed pretty unhappy a lot of the time but is plenty tough enough for me.

Whatever he thinks of Boris, only one of them got a boat on the start line and is consistently challenging for the top 5. 

Reminded me of this passage from Godforsaken Sea. Tough race in so many ways.

Quote

Getting a sponsor to foot the bill for a Vendée Globe is a matter of somehow grabbing a piece of the pie when there aren’t nearly enough pieces for everyone. As in any scramble by obsessed people for a share of scarce resources, the fight is bitter. Many of the aspiring newcomers, trying to break into the charmed circle of monied professionals, hustle the sponsors of the established sailors. And sponsors aren’t necessarily faithful either—perhaps they’ll be able to get a louder bang for the franc with some other sailor. If they feel they’re justified, as profit-seeking businesses, in handing out the money, then business considerations will dictate how, and to whom, the money is handed out. All this is a long way from the casual amateurism of Blondie Hasler’s transatlantic innovation or the Golden Globe.

Roufs was a successful enough jungle fighter to get a sponsor and enter the race. But it was a tough fight. He made the mistake of spending too much time on the building of Groupe LG2 and not enough time preparing for races. He didn’t do well in the 1995 and 1996 Figaros. Groupe LG began to have doubts. Had it chosen the right skipper? It equivocated. There were lots of up-and-comers clamoring to replace the established sailors. The pressure on Roufs intensified. For months, he wasn’t sure whether he would be able to sail the new boat in the Vendée Globe.

One of his good friends watched him under the gun. “Lots of people would have said, ‘Screw it, here’s your boat, keep it. I don’t want to hear any more about it.’” But Roufs had the qualities to win out: he was mentally tough and focused, confident he could keep the helm and win the Vendée Globe, too, in the end.

(hard not to think about the darker side, physical, mental and political, of the RTW races, especially when the boats are now passing over the dreams and bones of Roufs, Fisher and far too many more)

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Yes Stief, a long way to go for those at the back, whether still in the race or not, I hope they get better weather. I'm feeling for Sebastien Destremeau... he's still far off Tasmania (his destination right?) and the boat seems to be all over the place, looks like hell.

I don't know how he does it but Ari Huusela is always so cool, I love how he's doing his VG, usually he always finds a sunny spot for his videos, but in the recent onboard videos things seem to be harder, maybe he's fed up with the southern oceans too but he still has a long way to go to get out. I hope he manages to finish the VG, he's not THAT slow, he should cross the line within the 163 day deadline.

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On 1/2/2021 at 9:04 AM, Varan said:

Pip "waiting for the big banana skin to trip me up" waits no longer, but her resourcefulness saves the day.

Pip loses masthead windspeed

Sadly, her fix isn't enough for now

Quote

Right now it is Medallia conditions I think about 26-28 knots of wind, and I should be flying, doing 18-20 knots of boat speed but I am not and it is killing me. As it is getting dark and I am tired and I know the wind is going to build quickly I have decided to reduce sail early and to sit this opportunity out, maybe by the morning I can get the wand working again, but even if not I can rest through the dark hours tonight and will be fit and ready to react quickly for sail changes tomorrow. I just can't afford to set the boat up to go fast and then fall asleep and wake up in 35 knots of wind. So we are going slowly but safely. I have never sailed Medallia like this. It feels so wrong, it's not relaxing at all and I am miserable at the thought of all of those miles that I am losing against everyone on the course. I know this is the right decision for this moment but it hurts like hell.

https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/21441/pip-hare-trying-to-think-calm-thoughts

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1 hour ago, stief said:

Maybe Greta will spill the beans in the pub (Sweden; no lockdown/ masks, etc?) when she celebrates her 18th birthday this evening :lol:

Thanks, stief, for the heads-up.

Happy Birthday, Greta!

I think embedding this tweet is worth every single byte of this thread.

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1 hour ago, stief said:

Haha. Sheesh troll, don't forget the links to source. And did you see earlier posts, like Herman and Scarecrow's about La Nina? 

Thanks for the links. My knowledge about La Nina and such is updated. The Bouwike video is pretty useful. It made sense why the leading group encountered typical SO winds before passing Cape Horn as the picture of La Nina shows winds going up along the west side of America. Clarisse & Armel couldnt shorten the gap a while then. 
 

The picture of Ruyant comes from his FB page. The text not particlarly telling. https://www.facebook.com/thomasruyantnavigateur/posts/2068351893304221?__cft__[0]=AZWNPjveZ0dU0HhKWqB57Z7FclAx70Vm1ZI4UAyHlZkW207fBLhcILEBROTMR1AhGJ_w3Mno5N__n2W0qSE3Yd7FZBgGQ-G-pdS_htbHb7yLrs5mLlMHQ9xshgAaxQiW0dgSs-meQ5btffzZ6-zM_X9m&amp;__tn__=%2CO%2CP-R

Why I think Ruyant might catch, see the screenshot. Other sailors will catch as well. The early wind patch slowed Charlie as well. Charlie thought of sailing eastwards and the prognosis changed. The rest of the group pushes the pedal in a straighter route compared to Charlies. The pic is based on Wednesday evening.

Untitled-1.jpg

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A fun article on the life of the sailors that end up at the back of the fleet in past Vendee Globes:

https://www.francetvinfo.fr/sports/voile/vendee-globe/mon-sponsor-m-a-demande-de-finir-dernier-les-galeriens-du-vendee-globe-racontent-leur-grande-traversee_4174941.html

"My sponsor asked me to finish last": the galleymen of the Vendée Globe tell about their great crossing

They knew from the start that they would not break the race record and that they would see the podium contenders from afar. They tell of their extended world tour, which they ended up completing.

“A Vendée Globe, can be won or can be finished. ” The phrase comes from the skipper Fabrice Amedeo, and sums up the two races in the race which have taken place since November 8 and the start of Les Sables d'Olonne (Vendée). From the start, many competitors know that they are not here to win, and that speculation about the race record, which falls with each edition , does not concern them. "I had 5% of Armel Le Cléac'h's budget " , underlines Conrad Colman, a New Zealand sailor based in Brittany. Like many of the less well off in the fleet, he had to fight to the end to make ends meet. "I was exhausted before the start of the race. "

Very often, the unheralded of the peloton were only able to get their boat a few weeks before the start. Far too short to break it in and know every nook and cranny. Take Karen Leibovici. When the La Rochelle sailor got the green light from her sponsor, three months before departure, she was lying on a hospital bed after a fairly serious car accident. "The doctors gave me the choice: either I lay for six months without moving in a corset, or I took the risk of having an operation. Fortunately, I had a good surgeon." Of course, rehabilitation takes precedence over the preparation of the boat."I was lucky to have an older generation model, less physical. We made choices: my sails were all strapped to the pontoon so that I didn't have to carry them."

"A hundred years of solitude", or barely less

An old generation boat, in nautical jargon, it is an old cuckoo clock with spartan comfort that has several Vendée Globe to its credit. "I had a tiny chart table and to get to it I had to step over the engine."  Heeling, it is less practical. Still, even if they have no chance, carelessness has no place on board. "We remain competitors at heart , insists Tanguy de Lamotte, 10th in the race in 2012-2013. It is not because I had an old boat that I stepped in it a few minutes before the start, like a tourist."

The first part of the race is the field of all possibilities. Then… "At first, I fought to keep in touch with others , remembers Austrian sailor Norbert Sedlacek. Afterwards, I fought to finish the race." At the back, we stick together by VHF or through radio. "I remember we helped each other a lot , says Benoît Parnaudeau, 10th in the 2004-2005 edition. Karen [Leibovici] still suffered from back pain. We exchanged sailing tips so that she would avoid squalls. The idea was that everyone could finish. "  On board an Imoca, a typical day is“Three or four hours to check the weather, walk around the boat to detect damage, eat, sleep… We never have a lot of time. These boats are very demanding,” he says.

So even for those who finish a month after the winner, every minute counts. “I had taken a bottle of rum,” says Anne Liardet, also involved in this 2004 edition. Her recipe for a few moments of happiness? One hundred years of solitude , by Gabriel Garcia Marquez -  "I have read it dozens of times"  -, a little music, an improvised deckchair on the bridge, and a glass of ti'punch. Rare moments. "The bottle was barely halfway through when I arrived," smiles the sailor. 

To support the morale of the troops, there is food. Just like the weather, it's a matter of strategy, especially when you're going to eat freeze-dried for four months. The ideal is the gourmet comforter, which you never get tired of. Norbert Sedlacek had thus loaded 40 kg of Chinese noodles, a third of his food stock. "I love it , admits the Austrian sailor.  It keeps you warm, it replenishes calories, we can accommodate them with dried fish, dried fruits, spices ..." Such enthusiasm would almost make you want some. Well organized, Norbert Sedlacek had even established a meal plan, to vary the pleasures. Finally, the accompaniment of noodles. An idea that should have inspired Benoît Parnaudeau: "I made the mistake of saving the worst stuff for last."

Sailor (dreaming) of fresh water

This inveterate smoker had also taken "ten days of cigarettes" to try to wean himself on the boat. His friends had hidden a few packages in his cabin,  "lest the craving for a smoke made him abandon the race . " It was not enough. He  had to wean himself for six weeks. It was not the lack of nicotine that made him doubt, but the loneliness. "I was off Salvador de Bahia, and I said to myself: 'I'll stop the engine, join the friends over there and we'll go back to Les Sables.'" A desire for human contact immediately showered by Anne Liardet, companion in misfortune, on the radio. "I told him to stop his bullshit!" Later, in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, Benoît Parnaudeau thought again: "I looked at my position in relation to the land. I was far from everything, from the other competitors, from the first inhabited land. One point. in the midst of the vastness. And there I was, 'Well, you focus on what you have to do.' It's very easy to let go. On the ocean, you get very emotional, things get blown. " 

After the holidays, it's time to go up the Atlantic. After the roaring forties and the howling fiftieths , the enemy is still water, but in another form. Do you remember the chaotic conditions of Karen Leibovici's departure, barely out of the hospital? In the precipitation of her start, she did not check her water reserves. And it is under the heat of the equator that her desalinator decided to give up. "I was putting it in manual mode, pumping, but it took so much energy that I was getting dehydrated more than I was getting drinking water." In these cases, we forget the weather forecast, the ideal trajectory, and we head towards the first cloud that passes."From the first drop, I lowered the mainsail to use it as a tank. And then I poured everything into cans." 

An isolated case ? Not really. A bacteria slipped into Raphaël Dinelli's desalinator while he was tinkering with his boat in the Falklands during the trip up the Atlantic in 2009. "My water started to taste like toilets. I must have forgotten to change the filter on the cartridge. I tried to flavor my water as much as possible. I drank tea, coffee, I put lemon in it, but it lasted three weeks. " Near the equator, it is 4 to 6 liters of water that the skippers need daily. "I couldn't take it anymore. I ended up getting permission to open the 30 to 60 liters which are sealed, in case of emergency. I greedily downed 3 to 4 liters of water from at once. And I was good for 24 hours of spasms. " Overdosing on fresh water in the middle of the ocean is possible.

Dirty laundry as a lifeline

The best way not to give up is to set a goal. One wants to beat the time of the previous skipper to have circled the world on his boat, others are competing against legends, such as Titouan Lamazou , winner of the first Vendée Globe in 109 days, a time that would have earned him the 15th place in the 2016 edition. "I compared myself to the boats of the 2000 edition , explains Tanguy de Lamotte, who competed in 2012 on a fourteen year old boat. I was in Ellen MacArthur 's time. [second in 94 days] as the finish approaches. I was just forecasting my arrival date when my hull creaked. You should never do that, it is bad luck. " 

A slit 20 centimeters wide and a few millimeters high, splinters of carbon everywhere, the water seeping in briskly… The fin (a very sharp 200 kg piece of carbon intended to stabilize the boat) stuck in the hull. "I took whatever was in my hands… my dirty laundry." A little personal hygiene aside: Vendée Globe sailors take clothes on board, but not a pair of socks and briefs for every day either.  "Thirty" for Tanguy de Lamotte. And as the times laundry days are scarce, "it's more important to have dry clothes than clean clothes". Anyway, damp laundry is doomed to mold in a plastic bag. It is therefore with the contents of this bag that the sealing operation begins. "My fleeces, my briefs, my socks… with a certain result."

Three nights of anguish pumping and seeing the automatic pumps burn out one after the other, days of diving to delicately clear the fin free , days and days of stagnation and, in a final burst, a hulkish attempt to forcibly remove a stuck piece, which pays off. "In twenty minutes, it was over", breathes "TanGyver" .  But the lost days will never be made up for, and so will Ellen MacArthur's time. If François Gabart or Armel Le Cléac'h had experienced such damage,  "we would not have known until after the arrival, during their press conference" , confirm all the sailors questioned. While at the back of the standings, transparency is essential.

The big technical bug is the lot of some of our last in the fleet, and that also explains their ranking. Raphaël Dinelli's solar panels, which nearly set his hull on fire, Conrad Colman's mast, which snaps, forcing him to finish the race with his boom as a rig. Boom that had to be glued, improvising an XXL oven on the deck of the boat. "Four days of construction in the middle of the Atlantic, with the survival blanket to seal the oven, the personal heater pads as fuel, to allow for the epoxy to glue the pieces together" , says the New Zealander, who found himself running out of food because of this twist of fate."I licked the crumbs from the cereal bar wrappers, I ate the energy biscuits from the liferaft, I rationed myself to 300 calories when it took ten times more…"  It is 10 kg lighter that he crossed the finishing line.

Fluctuat nec mergitur, even after arrival

The arrival in sight is the moment when the sponsors remember you fondly. "Mine asked me to finish last, to have more advertising impact , explains Norbert Sedlacek, who was struggling at that time with Raphaël Dinelli to avoid the donkey hat. I answered 'yes', but I did nothing! " Anyway, after three months at sea, the last place becomes very relative: "We were 20 at the start, I'm 10th at the finish, that's how I see it" , insists Benoît Parnaudeau. And the public in Les Sables d'Olonne welcomes each new arrival in large numbers, with smoke and clamors. "I did not take time to enjoy the passage in the channel enough ,sighs Karen Leibovici, last of the 2004 edition. But as there was not a breath of wind, I had struggled for hours to cross the line ".

For Tanguy de Lamotte, the arrival was almost more cruel. The sailor arrived on a Sunday evening when the tide went down at breakneck speed " [The guests of his sponsor] partied for two days without me. And in any case they were leaving the next morning ... It was a quarter of an hour close for me to be told to wait offshore for high tide to enter the channel. The boat even scraped the sand before reaching the dock. " Once docked, it's time to celebrate the event. Well almost. "Benoît Parnaudeau and some friends got on board, found the bottle of rum, whistled it in two seconds without offering me any of it, because I was looking for water to give to my children " , smiles Anne Liardet.

And then it's the time for the festivities… well, in a way of speaking: "I still see myself going to vomit in the toilet, with exploded eyes. At sea, we eat a little all the time, my stomach which was not dilated was absolutely not ready for the' starter-main-dessert 'concept " , recounts Raphaël Dinelli, who does not have many good memories of returning ashore. “In addition, as we are surrounded by iodized air for months, the body's immune defenses weaken. And when we come back, in February-March, it is the season of the flu and gastro. As soon as the body relaxes a little, we end with 40 fever. " No need to draw you a picture: for the galleymen of the Vendée Globe, the challenge goes on a little longer than expected.

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26 minutes ago, troll99 said:

Why I think Ruyant might catch, see the screenshot. Other sailors will catch as well. The early wind patch slowed Charlie and Yannick as well. Charlie thought of sailing eastwards and the prognosis changed. The rest of the group pushes the pedal in a straighter route compared to Charlies. 

That straight route north has indeed paid off in the past. I'd never bet against a boat cutting the corner, not after being glued to the tracker for days watching this leg of the VOR (time stamped, but the whole hour worthwhile IMHO)

All the reports I've read and watched today see the route closed, but whatever the reason, I'd not be surprised to see any of the top 12 crossing the Doldrums in the lead. Who'd have ever predicted Seguin and Dutreux ahead of JLC at this point!?

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Pip speaks about the troubles. Some assistance, but the 50 knot gust has helped her masttop indicator

 

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Conrad Humphreys uploaded this clip, as mentioned in the Live earlier. He understands the struggles Pip (and the others) are having.

Quote

Three days before Cape Horn, I was caught by a storm that knocked Hellomoto down twice and destroyed the liferaft hatch, allowing 2 tonnes of water into the aft rudder compartment. During the storm, I lost my wind instruments from the top of the mast. Luckily, I discovered and plugged the leak before the water level rose above my autopilots. The storm passed and allowed me to draw breath as I went around Cape Horn.

 

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3 hours ago, troll99 said:

Good chance for Thomas to catch Charlie? Ninja technique is required. :ph34r::ph34r:

Image may contain: one or more people and closeup, text that says 'Linked out une ideed entourage Ovens CYBERSECURITY SwissLife CGIF CGIF ESAS Linkect Thomas Ruyant LinkedOut #VG2020'

The weight of white paint in the interior sure seems worth it to me. Living in a black bat cave for 70+ days could definitely darken one's mood. 

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More gybes to the east in play for the leaders to get around the building High pressure zone.

Vendee20.JPG

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44 minutes ago, Hitchhiker said:

More gybes to the east in play for the leaders to get around the building High pressure zone.

Thanks Hitch. So once again, Yannick is streaking to get ahead of another HP blocker. I've lost count--seems like this next one is number 7 or 8 that again tries to block him. Pretty impressive how well he has beaten the odds, and if this one has his number, hat's off to how often he's managed to win out.

Burton, too, has managed to get ahead despite his foul at the AEZ.  He may jump to 5th soon.  Impressive.

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55 minutes ago, Varan said:

The weight of white paint in the interior sure seems worth it to me. Living in a black bat cave for 70+ days could definitely darken one's mood. 

Black is for douchebags, white for old farts, like me.

But if you are a cool kid from Paris...

vlcsnap-2021-01-03-19h07m45s962.jpg

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Relief 

dd.jpg.7d8dd96ed4bb9f36c55f8bad65b5a380.jpg

Bestaven: "In my life as a sailor, that was the biggest storm I have ever seen. Mad seas, such as I have never seen so big, and gusts of 60 knots. It's a huge relief now because it's been so hard."

Dalin: "I celebrated by putting up more sail (laughs)".

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5 hours ago, ant1 said:

Armel Tripon update, he is taking it little more easily until cape horn, to not break anything, and plans to go on the attack in the Atlantic.

 

His slowliness makes me realise how tough a Vendée is mentally and physically, i think he clearly had enough the past few days, not going at the speed he should be going.

Clarisse is very impressive in the way she's holding this pressure.

Winners or almost winners :) are on a different planet mentally Bestaven, Dalin, Le Cleach, and Thomson, they are some kind of beasts :)

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So, to my eye it looks like Apivia gybed at the point that the routing suggested.  MCoQ kept going north.  He can certainly afford to cover Apivia. But, not sure I would want to be inside of Apivia with the upcoming HP.  Maybe he waits until Apivia is line astern? 

Vendee20.JPG

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1 hour ago, yl75 said:

Seguin is truly amazing.

   +1 on that

   the word "amazing" is often misused these days ;      but in his case, it is the accurate word.

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Thomas and Damian passed Cape Horn

Thomas probably in daylight before dawn but no foto or video coverage as of 2021-01-04 10:00 UTC. Damien passed during the dark hours, so no Cape Horn footage either.

Cape Horn times

1 - Maître CoQ IV on 01/02/2021 at 13:42 UTC after 55d 00h 22min of racing
2 - Apivia on 03/01/2021 at 04:39 UTC after 55d 15h 19min 14h 56min behind the leader
3 - LinkedOut 04/01/2021 at 00:40 UTC after 56d 11h 20min 1d 10h 57min behind the leader; 20h 00min behind Apivia
4 - Groupe APICIL on 01/04/2021 at 02:40 UTC after 56d 13h 20min 1d 12h 58min behind the leader; 02h 00min behind LinkedOut

Meanwhile we might see a split in the casing pack: Benjamin, Louis and Jean are sailing a more easterly course while Boris and Maxime are still heading to the Horn. 180 to 250 to go. Isabell dropped to 11 after problems with her keel ram (and without wind instruments). Pretty tough for her.

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2 hours ago, yl75 said:

Seguin is truly amazing.

He wasn't even allowed to go sail solo on an IMOCA a couple of years ago !!!

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Keel hydraulic problem for Isabelle

Her team report today that she has had successive problems since the turn of the year, the worst coming yesterday Sunday when her keel ram gradually let go around 1300hrs UTC.

“I lost my aerial 48 hours ago. The autopilot can longer steer in wind mode. That was already an additional difficulty for me in terms of performance. Then in the night from Saturday to Sunday, I tore my gennaker. Since then I have been short of power. With all these problems, I hadn't slept enough and I was exhausted. So I went to rest and after half an hour I heard the creaking of the keel which was gradually releasing. I knew something was going wrong. I called my team to discuss solutions. We looked for hydraulic leaks, I got out the toolbox. When we wanted to do a test and when I activated the actuator motor, I heard a rather loud metallic noise. At this point I noticed that the cylinder rod had come loose from the keel head. Even so I am still OK because I have a keel locking system in the middle. Now we can say that the boat is completely out of danger,” says Isabelle Joschke.

We saw pictures and quickly realized that this was not fixable. It was absolutely necessary to prevent the keel from moving around. On MACSF, we have a cylinder which allows the keel to be blocked in the vertical position in the axis of the boat. This means that Isabelle will not be able to move it from here on," explains Alain Gautier, the team manager of the MACSF project.

 
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Isabelle Joschke has a broken keel ram. She had to secure the keel in the middle (there is an emergency system that allows to do that) and will have to finish the race like this unfortunately.

 

https://voilesetvoiliers.ouest-france.fr/course-au-large/vendee-globe/vendee-globe-avarie-de-quille-importante-sur-le-bateau-d-isabelle-joschke-inconsolable-73ac55a0-4e72-11eb-9cee-06d8888ea845?fbclid=IwAR1TIp-6Q7SEl3EWluz9tDhoUls1YNdP_G2AnIxsgYOs8OXE5wbv-wLBDe4

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A bit gutted. Was looking forward to maybe seeing Isabelle in the finale.

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Yesterday everyone was astonished by the easter course Yannick took.
Look at him now.
175896083_Vendee4-1-2021.PNG.a5fda73308558fdf70400daf45ef1a08.PNG
It has a reason he is leading; he's very good in this game.
182,7 nM lead on Charlie Dalin,
Captivating.

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On 1/1/2021 at 5:29 AM, huey 2 said:

I would like to vote for both because they do things that us normals dont think ,they will win or do or compete,   we see incredible efforts when we look,....

Damien Seguin, man of the week

The man of the week is undeniably Damien Seguin who finds himself third after having managed to get out of this group of pursuers. Coming out of the high pressure, he managed to position himself better and regain a better angle, we see that he pushed harder than the others, especially during a frenzied reaching edge. Result: while he was in the middle of the peloton a week ago, he is now 130 miles ahead , that's really impressive, hat!

Screen Shot 2021-01-01 at 5.24.13 am.png

   Damien has amazed , since first coming across him in the Paralympics...but he has always know that he is determined to do things outside the comfort zone of most of our lives....

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1 hour ago, PHIRKIN said:

A bit gutted. Was looking forward to maybe seeing Isabelle in the finale.

Isabelle is gutted too...

Courage Isabelle ! Its going to be a pain to get to the finish with these wounds, not being able to push the boat, but you're racing exceptionally well anyway, a million bravos ! We'll see what the Atlantic has in store...

 

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Damien Seguin celebrates his cape horn passage with us... cheers !

 

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1 hour ago, Bebmoumoute said:

He wasn't even allowed to go sail solo on an IMOCA a couple of years ago !!!

He was also forbidden to race in the solitaire du figaro in 2005 :

http://www.courseaularge.com/depeche/damien-seguin-interdit-de-figaro

Btw, didn't know he is from Guadeloupe :

https://www.la-croix.com/Sport/Damien-Seguin-navigue-dune-main-vers-Guadeloupe-2018-11-05-1200980836

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10 minutes ago, Snowden said:

Who is the previous one-armed sailor the race director referred to that caused two incidents?

A quick search doesn't give any result, but you can look up the sories of:

  • Denis Hugues, who competed in the mini-transat several times despite being paraplegic;
  • José Gonçalves - same thing;
  • Fabrice Payen, who competed in the 2018 RdR with one leg.

https://www.ouest-france.fr/sport/voile/mini-transat/les-histoires-les-plus-folles-de-la-mini-transat-episode-2-5291129

https://www.franceinter.fr/emissions/le-zoom-de-la-redaction/le-zoom-de-la-redaction-01-novembre-2018

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1 minute ago, Bebmoumoute said:

A quick search doesn't give any result, but you can look up the sories of:

  • Denis Hugues, who competed in the mini-transat several times despite being paraplegic;
  • José Gonçalves - same thing;
  • Fabrice Payen, who competed in the 2018 RdR with one leg.

cheers!

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1 minute ago, Snowden said:

cheers!

And in the UK, Hannah Stodel is trying to find sponsors to compete in the VG. She is racing a Class 40.

She has a very similar disability than Damien, hopefully his story can help her in the future.

https://www.hannahstodelracing.com/

https://www.facebook.com/HannahStodelRacing

 

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About Damien, in below interview discussing putting foils or not, he is saying something like "I think I wouldn't compete in the top 5 with foils on this boat anyway, so I prefered to replace the electronics and do all the other changes", in fact he replaced the existing daggerboards with the ones from Quéguiner (now MACSF, Isabelle's boat), and now he is fourth at the Horn !! :

https://www.tipandshaft.com/imoca/damien-seguin-je-nai-pas-peur-de-rever-grand/

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He worked on his boat and it prepared it with Jean Le Cam too... I posted another article about their work together on their boats a couple of weeks ago. Seems like their collaboration has been fruitful... for both :)

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Is Thomas actually going for a split split, leaving the Falklands to starboard or is he following Charlie to the east?

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Bestavens routing stopped working again. But looks like many boats will keep up. @stief where can one find measuring tool there? 

Untitled-1.jpg

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13 minutes ago, GER 100 said:

Is Thomas actually going for a split split, leaving the Falklands to starboard or is he following Charlie to the east?

Windy routing suggests Thomas taking the former Charlie route ie. westwards. Passing Falkland on the west side as well. 

Otherwise, he LOSES time doing like that if it was for eastwards.

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7 hours ago, Hitchhiker said:

So, to my eye it looks like Apivia gybed at the point that the routing suggested.  MCoQ kept going north.  He can certainly afford to cover Apivia. But, not sure I would want to be inside of Apivia with the upcoming HP.  Maybe he waits until Apivia is line astern? 

 

where do you find polars? Maybe it was discussed before. Id like try Opencpn or Squid 8.5 with 16 days forecast.

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52 minutes ago, troll99 said:

where can one find measuring tool there? 

It's flaky, often disabling the squid routing. On the iPad, a 'long click' pulls up the distance and planning option. On the Mac, a control-click, or using Windy's 3-bar menu (the same one that can load the Windy plugin). Sometimes I have to try several times, reloading the plugin, finding a place to control-click that doesn't pull up other options. And yes, can confirm squid not working for Yannick this morning, too.

Interesting, squid sees a north route for Ruyant, which also takes advantage of ocean currents. Here's a pic of Dalin and Ruyant's options:603868043_ScreenShot2021-01-04at7_38_16AM.thumb.png.8a3a82b11fb0a95aa4bbe18b02486bb9.png

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3 hours ago, Schakel said:

Yesterday everyone was astonished by the easter course Yannick took.
Look at him now.
175896083_Vendee4-1-2021.PNG.a5fda73308558fdf70400daf45ef1a08.PNG
It has a reason he is leading; he's very good in this game.
182,7 nM lead on Charlie Dalin,
Captivating.

He shure has blown me away,100+ miles lost 100 miles gained and got your competition looking at your stern all in a day's sailing.That is balls of steel. 

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On 1/2/2021 at 8:43 AM, DVV said:

Love the leeboard vessel in the background!

Me too. That is a Dutch former fishing ship turned pleasure, could be a hoogaars-type. Bow is more pointier than a schouw-type. The photo of Pip as a child could have been taken in The Netherlands, as a hoogaars is not really North Sea-worthy. More used on the coast or inland.

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28 minutes ago, The Tug said:

He shure has blown me away,100+ miles lost 100 miles gained and got your competition looking at your stern all in a day's sailing.That is balls of steel. 

100 % agreed. there is another interesting gamble between Yannick and Thomas Ruyant who is taking the route west of the Falklands.
These are the projected weather forecast by windy.
1632359769_Vendee5-1-20211100forecast.PNG.5ba7adcce167a9ff5ae98033501a2d8f.PNG

Vendee 5 -1 -2021 1100 forecast
76519466_Vendee6-1-20211100forecast.PNG.9039d13b79d54d3b76ba8fda2e019539.PNG

Vendee 6 -1 -2021 1100 forecast
And don't ask me why windy is freezing the position of Yannick while promoting Charlie Dalin.

4 minutes ago, Herman said:

Me too. That is a Dutch former fishing ship turned pleasure, could be a hoogaars-type. Bow is more pointier than a schouw-type. The photo of Pip as a child could have been taken in The Netherlands, as a hoogaars is not really North Sea-worthy. More used on the coast or inland.

True. Can you run your navigational software on the next 2 days Herman?
Is Linked Out right or Yanick?


 

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Thomas Rouillard back in the Atlantic!

WhatsApp Image 2021-01-04 at 09.12.59.jp

The LinkedOut skipper cut the longitude of Cape Horn (67 ° 17 '21' 'West) last night at 1:40 am French time, in 3rd position in the Vendée Globe, crossing around thirty miles south of the famous rock . His race time since the start of Les Sables d'Olonne is 56 days, 11 hours and 20 minutes.

 

All to the dazzle and pride of this accomplishment, Thomas finds this South Atlantic that he left on December 1st. So in second position, he has hardly ever left the provisional podium, except for a brief interlude. To say that leaving the South Seas is a relief would be an understatement. If the road remains long and strewn with pitfalls, it is for all loners, true survivors of the Indian and the Pacific, a return to the known sea, synonymous with greater serenity of mind. More than ever, make way for sport. However significant they may be, the differences in ocean racing are never final until the finish line is crossed. Thomas, hardly spoiled by fate from the start, believes in his star and is counting on the 6,800 miles of road still to be covered to bring him the pleasure of sailing of which he has been deprived for too long in the ruthless southern seas. The complexity of the weather phenomena still to be negotiated encourages the Dunkirk skipper to play his luck. "I want to be a bit of a maverick ”he admits….

 

It was a beaming, happy and proud Thomas Rouillard who woke up this morning in time to enter Le Maire Strait, this 16 nautical mile (29.6 km) wide arm of the sea that separates the island from the States of the eastern tip of Argentine Tierra del Fuego, the Miter Peninsula. Almost without any transition, the wind which still swept LinkedOut yesterday at over 30 knots has dropped to around fifteen units. The sun rose, the sea leveled off and it was escorted by myriads of birds including sumptuous and nonchalant albatrosses that Thomas left this "parallel world of the Great South" (dixit Thomas) to find a familiar reality Atlantic:

 

I have the incredible feeling of coming back to reality. I had forgotten what a flat sea was! I live again! It's crazy, the transition is so brutal. A few hours ago I still saw it! 'had rough seas, gusts of 45 knots, in cold and humidity. It still "quails" but the sun is out. I see Patagonia and the boat glides painlessly. I am tired, but I am completely re-energized by this feeling of making my way home now. The South Seas have not been very nice. The moments of pleasure and contemplation were rare. I did not find the long, beautiful swell that I had seen four years ago. There were a few quick phases but they didn't last. We have very (too) often been in the difficulty of unfavorable weather systems, on a sea too disorderly to really slide. The South has not been conducive to high speed. It's a little frustration. There were some magical moments, but little fun. The regatta, the challenge of surviving these seas leaves me with a real sense of satisfaction though. Third at the Horn, my first Horn. It's huge, even if the pursuers push hard behind! Yes! I am Cape Hornier!"

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27 minutes ago, troll99 said:

Thomas Rouillard back in the Atlantic!

 

When did LinkedOut change skipper? ^_^

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Now that the top 10 Boats are beginning to climb up the Atlantic it might be interesting to find out which boats of the top 10 have endured damage to their instruments, sails or appandages to a degree that it will impact their performance or hurt them on a specific point of sail.

 Damian had issues with his Gennaker earlier in the race. If the sail is lost, he would really miss it in the coming weeks. Could he fix it?

Anything else beyond the obvious (Apivia and LinkedOut port foil issues, Isabell)?

Edit: My bad - the the Gennaker issue video is from the RDR. Grr. But I still think / IIRC he had issues with his Gennaker, but no source.

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17 minutes ago, Terrorvision said:

When did LinkedOut change skipper? ^_^

Since Dec 2 and later. Machine translators love to mess with Ruyant, Rouillant, and Rettant. IIRC, Laurent had a good explanation. 

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55 minutes ago, troll99 said:

Thomas Rouillard back in the Atlantic!

 

 Yes! I am Cape Hornier!"

 

As long as we're having fun with auto-translate, I have to wonder: Hornier than what?  He's been in a cold shower for the last several weeks.  :lol:

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4 minutes ago, Corryvreckan said:

As long as we're having fun with auto-translate, I have to wonder: Hornier than what?  He's been in a cold shower for the last several weeks.  :lol:

Something is rusty. 

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Weather update

Now the Christmas tree has gone, I found 2 hours for a new routing. Updated the no-go zones. The big picture is in pic #1 with ECMWF and a scattered handful of HP-zones. Wind is mostly west of Cape Horn. Or below Gough Island. The HP is driving Bestaven more east looking for wind. The blue line I drew is the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) which they have to pass.

I put a new virtual waypoint on the map at the equator at 0 N 28 W. This wp is close to the Brazilian St. Paul and St. Peter Archipel, 100 nm to the SE of these islands. The wp is also on the rhumbline between Cape Horn and the finish at Les Sables d'Olonne. Which is the black dashed line. A virtual wp more closer to the fleet at 30 S 40 W seems less valid, see the routings for four boats. Two weeks sailing to the equator. See pic # 2 for the routing table. Bestaven projected a good comfortable sailing trip, the other less so (bumpy of difficult). Dalin projected 9 hrs behind Bestaven, and Ruyant 5 hrs behind him again. So the pressure stays on the current leader.

The routings for Bestaven, Dalin, Ruyant and Le Cam are in pics # 3 to 6. Bestaven has the most easterly route projected, compared to the other boats. Forcing him possibly against the AEZ at 50 S. Also interesting is that Dalin and Ruyant are projected to cross their paths at Januay 7th. And stay relative close to each other. See pic # 7 the arrows for the top-3 boats. If forecast holds up, etcetera.

 

 

 

ECMWF 040121.jpg

routing table 040121.png

Bestaven 040221.png

JLC 040121.png

Ruyant 040121.jpg

Dalin 040121.png

 

detailed routing top-3.jpg

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Well, Andi's projections are working (pic is timelinked to the Live)520585587_ScreenShot2021-01-04at9_38_29AM.png.988c6802629e404a6a471b17f9361d5d.png

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5 minutes ago, Herman said:

Also interesting is that Dalin and Ruyant are projected to cross their paths at Januay 7th. And stay relative close to each other. See pic # 7 the arrows for the top-3 boats. If forecast holds up, etcetera. 

Amazing, Thanks, But it's just like chess, you never can foresee what the next move of the opponent will be.

5 minutes ago, stief said:

Well, Andi's projections are working (pic is timelinked to the Live)520585587_ScreenShot2021-01-04at9_38_29AM.png.988c6802629e404a6a471b17f9361d5d.png

According to Andi ( and  Stief) Yannick made the right decision again.
We will know for sure tomorrow and the day after that.
To keep track Charlie distance to leader is 195,1 nM
Thomas 329 nM
Great.

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  "The moments of pleasure and contemplation were rare. I did not find the long, beautiful swell that I had seen four years ago."

Well done Thomas, so good to see after the last time.

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Vendée Globe. The rise of the two Atlantics will be "full of pitfalls" according to Christian Dumard

The two Vendée Globe leaders, Yannick Bestaven (Maître Coq) and Charlie Dalin (Apivia), crossed Cape Horn on Saturday then Sunday. But the ascent of the two Atlantics promises to be "full of pitfalls" according to Christian Dumard, the official weather analyst for the race. Suddenly, he does not expect a first arrival in Sables-d'Olonne "before January 28 or 29". Or a world tour in more or less 80 days for the winner ...

And now ? When we ask this question to Christian Dumard, the Weather Manager of this 9 th Vendée Globe , appointed router of the biggest international offshore racing teams, readily replies that there is life after Cape Horn and that “for the competitors , this may be long and complicated, this ascent of the two Atlantic. Let us not forget that they are going up from 57 ° South latitude. It will be long and it risks being strewn with pitfalls ” .

A high pressure system north of the Falklands could block many

“For starters, the wind will ease for the first to pick up. An anticyclone will probably set up around next Wednesday north of the Falklands. There is a risk of blocking a lot between the ice zone to the south, at least the island of South Georgia, and Mar-del-Plata, in Brazil. It will depend on their position to try to get around this high pressure. the solution is not obvious, for the moment ” .

MjAyMTAxZTEwYzMzMGUxMTE0MzM3NWYxZjA5Mzg0NmUyYWYzMzc?width=630&focuspoint=50%2C50&cropresize=1&client_id=bpeditorial&sign=dd7e0e4db22ff20945093018a60f87a48a5f97c5d93093363e7aafb51d9e74b6

Since the start of the race on November 8, Christian Dumard has provided daily weather analyzes for the PC Course and the skippers at sea. | JEAN-LOUIS CARLI

“And there will be a corridor of depressions that will form in Brazil to descend south-east towards Bonne Espérance. Eventually, they should be able to push back the high pressure but as they are not very hollow a priori, this may take time. The skippers will therefore have to deal with this corridor as best they can ”.

I don't really expect an arrival before the 28th or 29th

“For them, it will then be a matter of getting around the Saint Helena high by managing the switch well which will allow them to catch the trade winds above. It should be from the South-East to the latitude of Salvador de Bahia but rather from the North-East to that of Rio-de-Janeiro. Not very strong trade winds. 10-20 knots rather, with peaks at 25 knots but we should not count on more wind ”.

MjAyMTAxNzhjM2IzZjdiMmFkNGYxODMzNzc1YmYyYzY3YjA0NWU?width=630&focuspoint=50%2C50&cropresize=1&client_id=bpeditorial&sign=b897267f1229c50e3f15859a91e7d29fd29b52fd2e4c2135ebadf51080ba4fa6

Christian Dumard does not a priori expect a first arrival in Les Sables-d'Olonne before January 28 or 29 ”| OLIVIER BLANCHET

“Then the doldrums will come, in 13 or 14 days, no doubt for the first ones. Fortunately, it is not very marked in January. It is a little more south at this time and by taking it from the west, we attack it from the favorable side. Then we will have to manage the Azores high pressure. It's hard to know now exactly how it will be, then there will be the Bay of Biscay and there, the history of the Vendée Globe proves that anything can happen there in January. I don't like risky predictions but I don't really expect an arrival before January 28 or 29. January 2021, of course! ".

If he says so, then!

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Vendée Globe. At Cape Horn, Damien Seguin "cried all the tears" of his body

It's crazy what happens to Damien Seguin! The first disabled sports skipper (born without a left hand) to participate in the Vendée Globe, this night he achieved the double feat of passing the legendary Cape Horn, but also of passing it in fourth position, just two hours after the third Thomas Rouillard! Read what he wrote for the big occasion and watch this video he shot, right after being overwhelmed with emotion. Respect!

 

Nobody, strictly nobody expected Damien Seguin at such a party. Fourth at Cape Horn! At 3:40 am French time this Monday, January 4, 2021, Damien Seguin screamed in the night… and broke down in tears. It was at the time of passing Cape Horn… his first Cape Horn! A big rush of adrenaline savored alone in the middle of the ocean after 56 days 13 hours and 20 minutes at sea.

 

Overthrown by emotion: Cape Horner and 4 th in the Vendée Globe!

Aboard his APICIL Group , Damien was overwhelmed by emotion, he could not believe he finally passed this long-awaited milestone, the last of the three great caps of this Vendée Globe after Bonne-Espérance (South Africa) and Leeuwin (Australia), a little that of deliverance for all sailors racing on this round the world trip. Because it took courage and self-sacrifice to get there, south of Tierra del Fuego. The long tour of Antarctica was demanding and did not spare the men engaged in this mad race.

For Damien, it was not the mere fact of becoming Cape Hornier that generated so much emotion, but also the place he currently occupies in the event. Fourth! The skipper of Groupe APICIL is making a dream come true, the one he had been touching on for a few days: to leave the South Seas in the Top 5 of this Vendée Globe. He parried the Horn during the night, one day 12 hours and 58 minutes after Yannick Bestaven, leader and only two hours after Thomas Rettant, third!

A feat for the first disabled skipper to participate in the Vendée Globe and a fabulous reward for anyone who sails on an older generation boat equipped with straight daggerboards.

 

Even in his dreams ...

Damien experienced the intense emotions of the Paralympic Games. Twice, he resonated the Marseillaise in 2004 in Athens and in 2016 in Rio. He also knew how to master his head and his body by winning five times at the 2.4 world championships, his flagship Paralympic discipline. By entering this Vendée Globe, Damien came to take up a new challenge, to satisfy his thirst for competition and to carry a strong message around inclusion. He chose to go around the world and gave everything to prepare for it but even in his best dreams, he could not imagine the race he is currently doing. This passage of the Horn will now be remembered as a huge moment in his career as a sailor, just like his victories in the world championship or the two gold medals and the silver medal he wore around his neck.

The words of Damien Seguin when passing Cape Horn:

“Well here we are, friends! My first Cape Horn! Something crazy ! First Cape Horn, fourth in the Vendée Globe. I barely come back, I cried all the tears in my body just now thinking about it. There was so much effort to get there, it's so hard! The weather is not nice, it's cold, but I got there, it's great. There is still a long way to go, but it's been a long way already! It's cool. There remains the ascent of the South Atlantic, the North Atlantic and I will meet you in a few weeks at Les Sables-d'Olonne if all goes well ” . (press service source)

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50 minutes ago, stief said:

Well, Andi's projections are working (pic is timelinked to the Live)520585587_ScreenShot2021-01-04at9_38_29AM.png.988c6802629e404a6a471b17f9361d5d.png

Sure it is the Windy Plugin? Does not look quite the same. For example, the routing forecasts are dashed, not bold lines. Now and then the routing forecasts do not show up or are missing for a single boat. Probably a lot of manual intervention necessary to keep it up'n running. Kudos to Kevin S. for the hard work. It really brings the race alive for us mere mortals.

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21 minutes ago, GER 100 said:

Bad news from Boris. After having a hard time fixing charging issues, he now reports a damaged main sail. He is know sailing with the J3 only in 30 to 35 knots. Fingers crossed he will be able to repair it.

 Damn. Looks like the bit that he patched a few days ago. WhatsApp-Image-2021-01-04-at-15_50_40.thumb.jpeg.c1d38458c4b9e24efbee22f027d4b2fb.jpeg

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2 minutes ago, troll99 said:

@Bebmoumoute Check out https://voilesetvoiliers.ouest-france.fr/

i add link next time. 

Or . ..  just use the "paste as plain text option" and snip the content. That way it's easy to trim out extra pics, ads, captions, emoticons, etc.  The link then works for those who want the full formatted experience ;) 

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6 minutes ago, stief said:

Or . ..  just use the "paste as plain text option" and snip the content. That way it's easy to trim out extra pics, ads, captions, emoticons, etc.  The link then works for those who want the full formatted experience ;) 

I did tweak text and it looks great on 32" 1440p monitor and 16 cores PC :D

Plain text is harder to read as to listen to someone with a robot voice. 

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21 minutes ago, GER 100 said:

Sure it is the Windy Plugin? Does not look quite the same. 

It's not (though sometime past he was using it). Back in November IIRC, he was only allowed to project three days for one or two boats at a time. I think it's the same router Christian Dumard uses in his presentations.

Whatever the engine, useful to benchmark against the Hitch and Herman versions shown here and by other routers like Conrad Humphreys, Yann Richomme, Will Harris and others.

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11 minutes ago, troll99 said:

I did tweak text and it looks great on 32" 1440p monitor and 16 cores PC :D

Wish you and Huey2  would use the plaintext option, not that my opinion is worth anything IMHO. :D 

I need to get an external monitor for my little MacBookPro so I can view Herman's posts better, since I can't view them elsewhere (well, sometimes his tweets help).

Whatever. Anyone here is free to post what and when they want, just as anyone is free to ignore or go away.  

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1 minute ago, stief said:

Wish you and Huey2  would use the plaintext option, not that my opinion is worth anything IMHO. :D 

I need to get off my little 13" MacBook so I can view Herman's posts better, since I can't view them elsewhere (well, sometimes his tweets help).

Whatever. Anyone here is free to post what and when they want, just as anyone is free to ignore or go away.  

Exactly, I bought 32" screen recently for my work. It triples efficiency even for daily surfing.

I dont imagine go back to 12" laptop I did use previously in many years. I don't really understand the people using a 7" screen with 2000p screen. :lol:

I remember your plain text once and I didn't bothered to read it. But itd be good if everyone adds a link to that. So I can use autotranslate wherever I want. 

To each his own. :P

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1 hour ago, Corryvreckan said:

 

As long as we're having fun with auto-translate, I have to wonder: Hornier than what?  He's been in a cold shower for the last several weeks.  :lol:

Maybe his fantasies include being superman... "Yes! I am Cape Hornier!"

In any case, pretty super in my opinion. 

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Jean Le Cam has tweeted a Puzzle to shorten the waiting time for us...

It is not until late this Monday evening that Jean will cross the longitude of Cape Horn. He has crossed it several times very close and in daylight. Here is a nugget to wait... In your opinion, this picture was taken when and on which boat ?

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Silly, but somewhat fun vid from Pip's friends and team.

 

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2 minutes ago, GER 100 said:

Jean le Cam has tweeted a Puzzle to shorten the waiting time for us...It is not until late this Monday evening that Jean will cross the longitude of Cape Horn. He has crossed it several times very close and in daylight. Here is a nugget to wait... In your opinion, this picture was taken when and on which boat ?

https://youtu.be/bJ5gR9kcVM8?t=206

vid published Dec 31, 2016. Boat  Finistère Mer Vent 

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Just now, troll99 said:

JLC passes Cape Horn 7th time?

I think so . . . he mentioned it somewhere yesterday. Please don't ask me to find the link :P 

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