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Vendee Globe 2020

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6 minutes ago, Jean-Baptiste said:

Mlle is no longer used. And yes I suspect BP is quite happy.

Switching from one winner to the 11th position,they were probably looking for a different kindda of communication...and if you consider they had Bidegorry before Le Cleach

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8 minutes ago, Jean-Baptiste said:

Mlle is no longer used. And yes I suspect BP is quite happy.

Ah, yes.  Oooops!  Not since 2012.   I must have been getting side-long glances (Check out the American geezer!) last time I was there.  Is the Mme abbreviation universal now?  Or is there another term?

I think the English neologism "Ms." was a brilliant bit of etymology

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4 minutes ago, cortosam said:

Switching from one winner to the 11th position,they were probably looking for a different kindda of communication...and if you consider they had Bidegorry before Le Cleach

L'Cleach didn't win his first time out, did he?  My understanding is that he is prepping for another record run and they handed this "budget" ride over to Mme Cremer as a look to the future.

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Just now, Left Shift said:

L'Cleach didn't win his first time out, did he?  My understanding is that he is prepping for another record run and they handed this "budget" ride over to Mme Cremer as a look to the future.

Which future ? I doubt she will ever win the Vendée or La route du Rhum.

But they wanted to have a woman sailor and they are not so many.

Le Cleach finished second at his first vendee Globe.

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Just now, cortosam said:

Which future ? I doubt she will ever win the Vendée or La route du Rhum.

But they wanted to have a woman sailor and they are not so many.

Le Cleach finished second at his first vendee Globe.

The future in which the marketing folks realize that women purchase petroleum products?  That one?

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14 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

The future in which the marketing folks realize that women purchase petroleum products?  That one?

No, not that one.  The one where they use financial services.  B)

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13 minutes ago, Corryvreckan said:

No, not that one.  The one where they use financial services.  B)

Well, probably not the future of women in Saudi Arabia :)

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6 minutes ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

All I care is that today, finally, we, heterosexual non-gay manly man, can buy beauty products, and cheer for L'Occitane in a Vendee-Globe. :P

Ah ah ah, millenial are kindda of metrosexuals.

 

Would be curious to see the story behind Tripon signing L'occitane as a sponsor .

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31 minutes ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

All I care is that today, finally, we, heterosexual non-gay manly man, can buy beauty products, and cheer for L'Occitane in a Vendee-Globe. :P

Just like the *resident of the United States of America!   As long as it comes in orange.

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42 minutes ago, Corryvreckan said:

No, not that one.  The one where they use financial services.  B)

Ooops,  again!  That's two today.  You are so right!  That was an unforced error.  I even had an account with them at one time!

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I'm totally sold on Armel's demo of the hand lotion... seems to work wonders

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Intermission?  And now a message  from one of our sailors: flat water at last

 

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A bit old, but here's a bit about Ruyant's north strategy mangled by gtrans from the man's  sailor's press gang on FB

Quote

the Northerner, confronted like his little playmates by a new high pressure challenge that came to block the road in the North of the Falklands, wanted to be a player , bettor, especially not follower. It extended its long port tack to the north in the western archipelago of the British Archipelago, while Bestaven's hounding pack extended its route east. Downwind on a slow and extended route for these, versus upwind to the shortest route for LinkedOut. It is the more or less rapid eastward movement of the high pressure areas that will determine which Thomas or the peloton will pull the chestnuts out of the fire. Unless there is always a very possible status quo, and a regrouping within 48 hours of the contenders for the runners-up, Yannick Bestaven, always in a tempo blessed by the Gods, continuing far ahead of his fault.

In less than an hour we'll find out how he did against Charlie on Apivia. (no Marinetraffic peeking)

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from Kevin Escoffier  about the current post Cape situation [aposcaplytic?]

Quote

"We know that it is often in the Atlantic ascent that significant differences can be made or made again. We have had the example historically on many occasions. What is new this year is the number of boats. While usually there are two or three of them fighting, there are about ten of them to stand in 800 miles. We see that it is optional with Ruyant who left west of the Falkland Islands while Bestaven and Dalin are in the east. It's really very interesting to follow! What I also notice is Benjamin Dutreux's race, which I think we don't talk enough about. He is one of the sailors who had the least means, with a very late project and there we see that he is doing a magnificent race! I obviously look very closely at Jean's race too! There are people with projects that were supposedly a bit of a Ligue 2 and that make a very beautiful Vendée Globe and it's great to see that! "

safari trans snipped from https://sport.prb.fr/en-mer/actus/254-maintenant-il-faut-aller-de-l-avant

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Looks like Thomas has gained on Charlie. No some 80 miles behind but going at 16 Knots to Charlie's 6 knots so he could close that gap even more. Typical compression happening so there's every reason to think that Yannick and then Charlie will find some pressure before Thomas? I wonder how the damage to Charlie and Thomas's boats compare? Yannick will prove to be hard to pass the way he is sailing IMO.

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2 hours ago, cortosam said:

Which future ? I doubt she will ever win the Vendée or La route du Rhum.

But they wanted to have a woman sailor and they are not so many.

Le Cleach finished second at his first vendee Globe.

So bitter.

Did you lose at love?

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24 minutes ago, terrafirma said:

Looks like Thomas has gained on Charlie. No some 80 miles behind but going at 16 Knots to Charlie's 6 knots so he could close that gap even more. Typical compression happening so there's every reason to think that Yannick and then Charlie will find some pressure before Thomas? I wonder how the damage to Charlie and Thomas's boats compare? Yannick will prove to be hard to pass the way he is sailing IMO.

Agree that Yannick has done VERY well--I think this is the 7 or 8th hole he's managed to escape since he was sailing against Alex. 

Burton (darker yellow) and Damien (red line below) are the ones who have really been pushing--looks like Burton also reduced his DTL by 100+ nm (awaiting the new version 1.3.3. windy plugin to refresh)

Charlie (yellow) is the one suffering right now looking at the Hub's stats. Everyone else gained in the DTL dept, so he has to hope the HP gets out of his way and squeezes the pack behind.

  1527382128_ScreenShot2021-01-05at10_36_34PM.png.75e823bb98cbfc0cdb32e0a2fc60b447.png1062836545_ScreenShot2021-01-05at10_36_50PM.png.2a64a0e4adfb5a80139e814165ce20e2.png

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Clarisse is as good a bet for a future Vg win as any skipper in this edition. If you look objectively at the women skippers who started this race and how they all are performing and consider the relative budgets and potential performance of the boats, also their responses to unforeseeable problems, plus the opportunities they have had to gaiin experience, all are performing, on average, better than the men, maybe with the exception of Yannick.

A sensible betting man would have Clarisse at short odds.

6 hours ago, cortosam said:

Which future ? I doubt she will ever win the Vendée

 

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6 hours ago, cortosam said:

Would be curious to see the story behind Tripon signing L'occitane as a sponsor .

 

6 hours ago, ant1 said:

I'm totally sold on Armel's demo of the hand lotion... seems to work wonders

 

Having good looking hands was I key asset I guess. 

JLC should try with L'Oreal.. :)

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On 1/3/2021 at 9:24 AM, GER 100 said:

Charlie passed 04:39 UTC, 01:39 (-03:00) local time. No photos so.

However, I prepared a selfie weather forecast for the remaining fleet - may they adjust their routings accordingly ;-)

  • Sunrise:  04:54
  • Sunset: 22:18
  • Dawn: 23:18

 

Back to the important things. Cape Horn selfies. Clarisse passed way off-shore, so no footage of the magic cape either. Now our next chance for proper Cape Horn Foto und Video footage is on Armel, who passed close and right after sunrise.. Pics or it didn't happen ;)

 

image.png.1382d6a3bd4e8ed41498900fdc7f0d33.png

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56 minutes ago, staysail said:

Clarisse is as good a bet for a future Vg win as any skipper in this edition. If you look objectively at the women skippers who started this race and how they all are performing and consider the relative budgets and potential performance of the boats, also their responses to unforeseeable problems, plus the opportunities they have had to gaiin experience, all are performing, on average, better than the men, maybe with the exception of Yannick.

A sensible betting man would have Clarisse at short odds.

 

Yes Clarisse has done exceptionally well. I hope she is an inspiration to other female skippers. But don't forget Isabelle she is 10th overall an exceptional effort. Samantha Davies is also in that mix she was doing very well before her damage. 3 great female competitors. Before the start there wasn't much talk about Yannick I think he has blindsided many of us. Take into consideration he stopped to assist in the recovery of Kevin and has some 15 hours (Not sure on the amount) up his sleeve. Hindsight is a lovely thing but when you compare the solidarity of some of the older gen boats they slipped under the radar for that very reason. 

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1 minute ago, GER 100 said:

Here we go

 

 

How happy is Armel WOW he is always smiling. If he can complete the race it will be a sensational effort by him.

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1 hour ago, staysail said:

Clarisse is as good a bet for a future Vg win as any skipper in this edition. If you look objectively at the women skippers who started this race and how they all are performing and consider the relative budgets and potential performance of the boats, also their responses to unforeseeable problems, plus the opportunities they have had to gaiin experience, all are performing, on average, better than the men, maybe with the exception of Yannick.

A sensible betting man would have Clarisse at short odds.

 

Well, not really.

Take Benjamin Dutreux, Maxime Sorel, both have very small budget for examples, small teams behind, and yet they are outperforming them.

Anyway, i love Isabelle Joschke, who is even more compétitive or Pip Hare, who came as a big surprise.

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Weather update

The big picture is with ECMWF in pic #1. The HP zone should be moving slowly due east in the coming days. ECMWF and GFS more or less align for the coming days. No synoptic maps available yet. I could not make out any fronts in the South Atlantic in the coming days though. The SACZ has gone of for lunch too in the coming days. On Thursday two LP zones are projected to come in from South America, moving SE. That could get interesting. 

Weather routing table to the virtual waypoint / equator is in pic #2. Part of the route is done by the climate plugin. Dalin seems to have better papers to stay close to Bestaven than Ruyant, according to projections. Which do not account for the missing foil of Ruyant, so performance for him is overestimated anyway. The seven boats I routed all show upwind percentages of 24-38 %. And highest for Bestaven. That is not so good for foiling, as polars are best for reaching. So that is good news for the non-foilers. 

All routings are pushed more to the east for the seven boats, see pic 3. East of Ilha de Trindade in the current projections. And far away of the shortest route (black dashed line). If projections change, I would expect a more western route along the rhumbline. Although the boats have to go east anyway. But how far? When looking at the next hurdle which could drive boats west closer to Brazil, the ITCZ, boats should arrive around the 18th. That is not in scope yet for the more detailed forecast models yet. This will take 4 days or so to see if a quick passage like when Boss was steaming south unhindered could be the case, or that there is a possibility that boats could get parked-up.

Routing from the windy plugin seems valid up to Thursday afternoon. Up till the part that Bestaven should sail SE with a small or negative VMG towards the HP zone, which I don't buy. See pic # 4.

 

ECMWF 060121.jpg

routing table 060121.png

routing 060121.jpg

Bestaven Thursday windy plugin.jpg

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1 hour ago, terrafirma said:

Yes Clarisse has done exceptionally well. I hope she is an inspiration to other female skippers. But don't forget Isabelle she is 10th overall an exceptional effort. Samantha Davies is also in that mix she was doing very well before her damage. 3 great female competitors. Before the start there wasn't much talk about Yannick I think he has blindsided many of us. Take into consideration he stopped to assist in the recovery of Kevin and has some 15 hours (Not sure on the amount) up his sleeve. Hindsight is a lovely thing but when you compare the solidarity of some of the older gen boats they slipped under the radar for that very reason. 

Yes and Pip has been a revelation coming from nowhere and Alexia and Miranda all doing solidly considering the boats they are sailing and with presumably very low budget projects. Sam has been unlucky but at least is still sailing (unlike some men) and has proved herself at least equal to Yannick in previous Imoca races. I think only once before in as long as I have been following has a woman had a "new generation boat" in the VG and that was Ellen who didn't do too bad.

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Some news from Armel, seems everything began for him at Les Glénans Paimpol

https://www.ouest-france.fr/vendee-globe/vendee-globe-a-bord-avec-armel-tripon-ce-cap-horn-il-est-pour-toi-mon-pote-7109166

"The sea is grey, almost green, it runs under the hull and on the deck, the sea is everywhere, it's so close that I find myself looking if it hasn't entered the boat!

 

The sea is big and dirty, it comes apart in bundles, has no clothes, nothing is tidy, it's an incredible noise, a huge shipyard and I try to make my way through, pushed by a strong north-west wind.

 

L'Occitane in Provence is hurtling down steep slopes, being mistreated from all sides. The sea is merciless and doesn't go into detail, so I adapt, reduce the canvas when it grows too much, send it back when it softens!

 

The Hard Cape is in my sights, only a few hours, a few hundred miles before I pass the Horn! It's completely crazy to be there anyway! A dream of more than 20 years, shared between three friends, on the quays of Paimpol.

 

 

" The sea in intravenous "

We were 20 years old and over and the sea was mocking us, we who were constantly sailing between England and North Brittany! We dreamed of the Deep South, Patagonia, the ice and Cape Horn. Fed to Damien, Van God and other Slocum, we were looking for the boat of our dreams, with pockets full of holes!

 

Our dreams fell silent, temporarily at least, everyone made their own way. Manu left for the mountains, Nako "Mam Goz", as he liked to be called, who looked after his kid during all my first years of ocean racing, went to the stars!

 

And here I am today, 25 years later, the dream has remained alive, I have nurtured it, I have protected it, I have made it grow and I am here! So today this Cape Horn is for you, my friend!

 

All these miles and oceans, all these stars, and all these moments when I miss you ! Our 20 years are far away, but here today, at 57° South, in the rubble and the fight, I know that you are looking after me! I am thinking of Béa, your sons Anton and Noé who, since Ploubaz, and the cove of Beg Nod, are perhaps watching a strange black and yellow boat pass by somewhere at the end of the world, where our dreams started, where our dreams went away! »

 

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2 hours ago, Herman said:

Routing from the windy plugin seems valid up to Thursday afternoon. Up till the part that Bestaven should sail SE with a small or negative VMG towards the HP zone, which I don't buy. See pic # 4.

Bestaven Thursday windy plugin.jpg

The Windy plugin is still showing similar routing, which just doesn't seem to make sense.
Perhaps an issue with an intermediate waypoint - e.g an arbitrary location which made sense when routing from the Horn, but not now they are getting closer?

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Nice video from Pip here: 

Confirms her ambition/plan is to come back in 4 years with a more competitive boat (or bone as the subtitles would have it).

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11 hours ago, Left Shift said:

Ah, yes.  Oooops!  Not since 2012.   I must have been getting side-long glances (Check out the American geezer!) last time I was there.  Is the Mme abbreviation universal now?  Or is there another term?

I think the English neologism "Ms." was a brilliant bit of etymology

Mme considered proper but likely the French state is carrying out a long term billion euro study of the issue.

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Is it some kind of deflector to stop the windward foil dragging in the water? Or a jury-rigged repair?

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Maybe it is local weather conditions, but Clarisse's last position seems a bit contrary.  She and Armel are less than 50 nm apart yet he's sailing what would be a logical course east whilst she's heading almost due north in approximately the same wind conditions   9 kts in 9 kts of breeze from @ 13 degrees is a bit odd and maybe it's like Yannik's "Hey it looks like I'm doing something crazy when it turns out I'm really smart" moment a few days ago.

Still, that is a strange moment in time for this race.

It seriously looks like Pip has actually gained more distance on the two foiler's chasing her and this with no wind indicators other than her senses guiding her.  Seems like she gets no break till after the Horn and I am really looking forward to that video but also how she'll route up the Atlantic to the finish.  There is no doubt I will love to watch her in 2024 and maybe do even better with a newer boat/campaign.

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Just now, Snowden said:

Is it some kind of deflector to stop the windward foil dragging in the water? Or a jury-rigged repair?

This is the side where the foil bottom wedge was damaged, so most likely something to do with that.

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A thing to know about ocean racing, is that there is no segregation or distinction between male, female, or whatever, and it has always been the case. No official classification takes into account sex. From minis to imocas to unlimited multihulls, there are only... sailors.

The rest... makes for fun and animated discussions, but it really doesn't matter. No woman has won the Vendee Globe yet, but its more a matter of less women participating and fate than sailing performance. Ellen Mac Arthur (what a sailor... one of my favorites... I have many) would have won if not for her equipment failure close to the finish... its ocean racing.

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deepl translation of an interview Boris gave to journalist in a Zoom Session, right after completing his repairs.

Source:  https://www.yacht.de/regatta/vendee_globe/boris-herrmann-es-kann-noch-alles-passieren/a127053.html

This is what Boris Herrmann says about ...

... his sleep pattern in the last 24 hours:

"About two or three hours."

... The origin of the damage to the mainsail:

"We had quite strong wind. Then I tied in the third reef, and the sail came against the shroud and tore at the leech, to about 15 centimeters. This means that any load can cause the sail to tear completely. If that had happened, I wouldn't have had enough material to repair it the way the Japanese guy (Kojiro Shiraishi) did. I already used too much material and glue. In that respect, that would have been the end of the race. So that was immediately the highest level of alarm. Fortunately, it wasn't such a large-scale repair, but a structural one that had to be done properly and was also complicated.

When you reef the sail so far, the triangle on the shroud is so wide that the mainsail head can slip in there. The problem is actually new because we used to have a much wider flared top in the main. But we made the head smaller when the headboard tore the rail out of the mast in the Vendée Arctique race. The new foilers don't need as much area in the top anyway, because they just create drag at the high speeds. The sail also twists better when it is narrower at the top; that was North Sails' philosophy.

All well and good, but including a third reef in 40 to 50 knots of wind has been a desaster as a result. If I had just stayed bluntly downwind or completely luffed while reefing in the first place, it probably wouldn't have happened, but hindsight is always wiser. Of course, I have reefed hundreds of times, at 40 knots into the third reef, and always managed it, even in the Indian Ocean. Why this has now become my undoing, I don't know. I have the suspicion that my wind instruments indicate too little, that it had therefore more wind. But the sail is also built a bit too light, I realize."

... Repairing the mainsail tear:

"That took a really long time. Started while still in the storm, up on deck. The boat surfed down a wave every now and then, just under J3 (the small jib). Really rough conditions, up to 45 knots wind. Glued cloth on there and then let it cure, quite a long time for the sika to set. Has now dried a good twelve hours. Takes much longer because of the cold. Still have to put the tools away now."

"Has become warmer, the wind has decreased. It's the way you want it to be after Cape Horn: you're heading for blue skies, and calm seas - bliss!"

... his prospects in the Atlantic:

"I haven't even taken stock of how much I've lost. But it may not even matter. The important thing now is to sail well and see what happens. I should still be able to get a few places, hopefully (laughs). Anything can happen. People can drop out; others have problems, too.

I'm still grateful for every day that I'm still at sea. You only realize that when you're confronted with damage that can knock you out of the race. Two days ago the problem with the generator, now the big - that's when you're reminded to be a little thankful, too, if it continues at all."

... His fifth Cape Horn rounding:

"That was the most difficult Cape Horn, least as you'd want it to be. I actually saw the horn all the other times. This time there was a storm, it was gray, I fell behind in the race - it was the least enjoyable experience."

... The feeling of having the hardest part behind you:

"That's totally overshadowed by the damage to the mainsail. If I hadn't been able to fix that, it would have been the end of the race for me. I don't have that much provisions with me. That's why I haven't even realized yet that I've sailed around Cape Horn. I've been in crisis mode for 24 hours now, working at full throttle, sleeping only as much as necessary.

I'm going to clean up here, sleep a bit, look at the map and then really realize that I'm around Cape Horn. I think that's a big relief. I feel free of pressure at the moment. I think that's just the happiness of having the mainsail working again."

... The cancelled celebration at the Cape:

"If you can't see the Cape, then it's not very interesting to pour whiskey overboard or drink. So I didn't celebrate the Cape. I can celebrate other things, after all: if I catch up a place maybe, or (pass) the equator or something."


... his sporting ambition:

"The Vendée Globe is not just a race - it's also an adventure. And you just notice that in challenges like yesterday and today, the big, the storm. Getting to the finish is not a given. In a race where everyone arrives safely, there's only the sporting aspect. But here, arriving is already such a great achievement!

And that is still at the top of my priority list. I still want to get out what I can, I want to sail as well as I can. And I've also been training more in these Atlantic conditions, so I know the boat better, and I hope to be able to use the potential better and hopefully make up a few more places."

... Tactics for the coming days:

"At least in the beginning, the routings all point in the same direction, and so does the fleet. So west of the Falkland Islands hasn't been an option for a couple of days. At the moment, there's no big binary decision to be made."

... The relief of being in the Atlantic:

"The Atlantic is just a completely different house number. Such a weather situation with breaking waves, cross seas, 50 knots of wind - hopefully we won't have that again until the finish. I hope we won't have to use a third reef. Maybe that's wishful thinking, but if things go well, we'll sail in moderate conditions all the way home, maybe avoid a low in the North Atlantic.

Of course we'll still have reaching and downwind conditions; it'll be tough again in the next ten days. But it's the course to the north, it's getting warmer, it's mentally a completely different stage. Most importantly, you're back in civilization. In a week we'll be back near shipping lanes. If something happens in the Southern Ocean, it's always game over. In the Atlantic, you can still count on rescue."

... Yannick Bestaven's leadership:

"Yannick is a super sailor, and his boat is similar to ours, but doesn't have the new, bigger foils yet. In that respect, I didn't have him on my list at all before the Vendée Globe. That's really a surprise. Of course, it was much easier with the small foils in the Southern Ocean. He could just push a lot more.

I also imagine: If I had sailed with our boat, in the old configuration, I could have sailed with less doubt. And I got into a bit of a spiral. We also had so many of the conditions unfavorable for us, surprisingly. Yannick is just showing a very strong side now that we didn't know from him before."

... his desire for sailing, for even more lonely miles:

So right now I'm experiencing a high because the mainsail is working again and because, after everything was in question, it's going on. That's what the Vendée Globe is for me: always overcoming the greatest challenges and the most difficult obstacles. And it's not a fun activity - but there's something about it somewhere.

I don't even ask myself the question (whether he would rather get off if he could). I want to sail home, of course, not take a plane from Ushuaia. If I were told: You'll get ninth place if you quit now, then I'd say: nope, I'll get a better place, and besides, I'd rather keep sailing.

But: It's so damn long. And the last few days have been so damn hard, unbelievable! So I might have answered differently.

... his incentive to shoot videos even in difficult situations

"I do feel loneliness sometimes, and talking to you guys does me good. It also helps to process these things. Talking to someone, even if it's only the camera... A lot of stress and pressure and inner distress accumulates. And to get rid of that, it helps to talk to the camera.

That's totally a matter of type. For me, the camera is like a friend to whom I tell something. If you see it as a duty and try to always look good, to be strong, then at some point I would also put that aside. I just have a fundamentally different attitude. I don't think about how I'm perceived. I just go for it and don't filter.

Holly (Cova, Boris' team manager) didn't want to show a video; I felt so bad the day before yesterday. That's when she said: That's not good if you come across as negative (laughs). Otherwise, I talk freely from the soul down, and that just helps me."

... the chance to now fully exploit the potential of the new foils:

"It would be a great satisfaction because we have totally put a lot of work and money into the foils and the conversion and further development of the ship. So far, I don't feel I've lived up to that potential. But if it stayed that way, it would be okay.
The whole year of the rebuild has been totally exciting in itself, and we have developed the ship in the right direction. And even if the (hoped-for) result didn't come out of it, I wouldn't regret it. I have already thought about that. Now we just have to see what else is possible. The conditions have to be right. If there's not enough wind, it won't foil, or if the course is too high on the wind. I just have to have a bit of luck.
For example, Damien Seguin on "Groupe Apicil" - when we sail our training sessions in Brittany, we only see a boat like that for the first two hours after the start and then never again. It's totally crazy how older ships have been able to achieve really great performance in the Southern Ocean. In the Atlantic we were ahead of them, we were much faster there, so I also hope that normality will now return on the way back."

... The possibility that this was not his last Vendée:

"I don't know what the future holds. We'll have to talk about it after the finish."

... the question of how much of the success is the boat and how much is the sailor:

"Hard to say. There's also an interaction. If you have confidence in your boat or if it's simpler, then you can push it harder and get into a flow, you can call up your potential better. But when you realize that it's hard to use your boat the way you want to, like I did throughout Southern Ocean, I also lose a little bit of that confidence and routine and confidence. That's where the bumpy sailing came in, where I lost miles every now and then. It's not all bad and black either. But since Christmas I actually wanted to hold my position, but then I fell behind very clearly compared to Damien, which amazes me the most. It's an absolute interplay between man and machine. I would say 50/50."

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5 hours ago, staysail said:

Clarisse is as good a bet for a future Vg win as any skipper in this edition. If you look objectively at the women skippers who started this race and how they all are performing and consider the relative budgets and potential performance of the boats, also their responses to unforeseeable problems, plus the opportunities they have had to gaiin experience, all are performing, on average, better than the men, maybe with the exception of Yannick.

A sensible betting man would have Clarisse at short odds.

 

If AT retires, I sure would like to see Hugo Boss pick up Clarisse.

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3 minutes ago, ant1 said:

A thing to know about ocean racing, is that there is no segregation or distinction between male, female, or whatever, and it has always been the case. No official classification takes into account sex. From minis to imocas to unlimited multihulls, there are only... sailors.

The rest... makes for fun and animated discussions, but it really doesn't matter. No woman has won the Vendee Globe yet, but its more a matter of less women participating and fate the sailing performance. Ellen Mac Arthur (what a sailor... one of my favorites... I have many) would have won if not for her equipment failure close to the finish.

Not quite true regrettably. The Volvo Ocean Race introduced positive discrimination in its last edition. Something which I think demeans women given how they can evidently compete equally with men in ocean racing as proved by VG performances.

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4 minutes ago, Varan said:

If AT retires, I sure would like to see Hugo Boss pick up Clarisse.

BOSS Hugo Boss 2016 Fall/Winter Campaign | Fashion Gone Rogue

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4 minutes ago, Varan said:

If AT retires, I sure would like to see Hugo Boss pick up Clarisse.

I think a new boat from BP would be far better for Clarisse and for the sport, and might encourage a few other sponsors to ante up new boats for other capable girls.

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More about Ruyant's routing

Western option

"After rounding Cape Horn, there were two possible route choices. The more direct route to the north with a tighter angle, or a VMG route with a few gybes to get closer to the high. I didn't like the look of the Easterly route given my position. The two route choices are the more or less the same, I am a bit of a gambler from time to time and I am in hunting, chasing mode. Opportunities and different choices, I don't think there will be too many later one. In the end, it is a fairly low-risk route that allowed me to do something different to try to get back on terms, even if I don't have much hope of getting back to Yannick. I can come back on Charlie. I am trying to do my route and get closer to the first two.

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Benjamin Dutreux is having a phenomenal race, he's super discrete, but flawless race so far... chapeau !

Still 4 non foilers in the top 10...

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2 minutes ago, ant1 said:

Benjamin Dutreux is having a phenomenal race, he's super discrete, but flawless race so far... chapeau !

Still 4 non foilers in the top 10...

Almost exactly equal to their relative abundance among the entrants (14/33, I think)

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5 hours ago, GER 100 said:

Here we go

Pure happiness... priceless. Go Armel !

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50 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

 From Yvan Bourgnon FB page : https://www.facebook.com/ybourgnon

136621058_226768265568028_1154493255135534547_o.jpg

I think the two ropes are here to support the weight of the foil. This probably suggest that the damaged part is the lower bottom wedge, which supports the weight of the foil and the possible reverse loads.

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1 hour ago, Bebmoumoute said:

 From Yvan Bourgnon FB page : https://www.facebook.com/ybourgnon

136621058_226768265568028_1154493255135534547_o.jpg

From Yvan Bourgnon Facebook (French to English Translation)

11th chronicle of the Vendée Globe. ⛵️
Human stronger than money?
This edition of the Vendée Globe 2020 will come out of all known executives, be it weather, predictions and surely in its conclusion.
Initially there were 8 new boats with budgets often surpassing € 10 m over 3-4 years and as a goal posted for sponsors: a podium or win the Vendée Globe for maximum visibility and relationship Press the press. The racing hazards have severely decided otherwise!
Those who gave up:
- Corum: Destroying off the Cape Verde Islands.
- Hugo Boss: Front internal structure of the cracked boat in different places + collision causing a break in the saffron system.
- Arkea-Paprec: Major damage to a foil and cracked bulkhead following a collision with an OFNI.
Those who have continued the race with a certain disability in time and / or material:
- Charal: Major avarie on the structure that holds the mast bastaque + collision with an OFNI causing a broken saffron system off Cape Finisterre.
- DMG Mori: 5 days up to Cape Verde to repair on deck, its heavily damaged mainsail.
- Linked Out: In the Indian Ocean, collision with an OFNI causing major cracks on his port foil that he had to amputate from a part, degrading the full potential of his boat.
- Apivia: In the Indian Ocean, the lower hold of the port foil that unfriends the hull, the repair time makes it lose its forecast system.
And finally, at the passage of Cape Horn, the only new boat that can claim to have suffered no major damage is L ' Occitane. Apart from his hook problem off Cape Finisterre, having a time forced him to head to Coru nea, losing any chance of returning to the fleet's head to finally change his mind and start his race again but then with several hundred Miles late!! For a coin of a few thousand euros, what can it be like to be at the outposts...
So it's clear that from mid-race, the whole fleet of new boats ended up with a real handicap, never before seen to my knowledge on a Vendée Globe!!
And the record of all this, is that the old generation 2015/2016 boats (Bestaven, Burton) and sometimes even generation 2007/2008 boats are at the forefront (to quote those of Jean Le Cam, Damien Seguin, Benjamin Dutreux, Maxime Sorel, Isabelle Joschke). Who knew that in Cape Horn we'd have 5 boats aged 12 in the first 11! This is just amazing!
We should also highlight the very beautiful trajectory of , who on a 20-year-old boat, Bernard Stamm's former ′′ Superbigou ′′ and on a congruent budget, plays in the middle of the fleet. Just like engaged in the oldest Imoca ′′ Penguin ′′ that Catherine Chabaud was leading in... 1997! We could almost talk about a circular economy, so many of these two ships will have made world towers.
It should be noted that unlike other sports, there is always a strong shame in the offshore race to reveal its own operating budgets but we all see that these old boats have financial resources in light-years of those of the boats New Some talk about budget differences ranging from 1 to 20, sporting goals are not the same but they all participate in the same history page. The hardness and beauty of Vendée Globe means that even without THE budget, some will benefit from the blows of their competitors, it is possible for them to glean an unexpected place at the outset. I don't know many other motorsports or this scenario is possible.
The only bad news I get in all of this is the current struggle of convincing sponsors to put a lot of money into financing a project on a new boat. You will answer me that budget racing is an inseparable part of sport in general, but this component could eventually become detrimental to the Imoca class like what happened for the Orma.
My personal conviction is that the late launch of new boats (less than 2 years from the departure of the Vendée Globe) is a real handicap for the success of a project especially by aiming only the one shot for the Sponsors. With the rise in the Atlantic also the time when the negotiations are happening, one could imagine, and I hope, that the sponsors will now bet on 2 successive editions with the same boat / skipper couple to succeed!
And a little fun fact about the unsaid breakers on board.
You can see in this image of Charlie Dalin's Apivia caught by English aviation as he passes near the Falklands, that his port foil is kept in the freeboard by ends! (Red Arrows). Surely to relieve pressure and movements on the foil low hold... if there's still a hold in place.
Let's assume that its direct competitors will be notified by their respective technical teams because it will be the efficiency of this foil in the Alizées to climb the Atlantic mostly on starboard?
The impression that this gives me is that in starboard between Yannick Bestaven who has a little foil, Thomas Ruyant who is missing a piece of it and Charlie Dalin who can't force it too much, we have to have equivalent performances.
On the other hand in crosswind and port, Thomas and Charlie are clearly performing better than Yannick but these are conditions they won't often meet by the time of arrival.
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And meantime we have a non-foiling boat into 3rd place.! Damien Seguin congratulations for the moment.! 

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3 minutes ago, terrafirma said:
The impression that this gives me is that in starboard between Yannick Bestaven who has a little foil, Thomas Ruyant who is missing a piece of it and Charlie Dalin who can't force it too much, we have to have equivalent performances.
On the other hand in crosswind and port, Thomas and Charlie are clearly performing better than Yannick but these are conditions they won't often meet by the time of arrival.

Yep, it are straps, so presumably fixed in movement and will hurt Dalin.
Thanks for original poster of this...

What a race....

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2 minutes ago, LeoV said:

Yep, it are straps, so presumably fixed in movement and will hurt Dalin.
Thanks for original poster of this...

What a race....

The two straps/ropes don't prevent the foil from deflecting upwards when it generates lift.

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Movement of foil in and out, up and down is another movement.

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Damien took 3rd! Impressive. Isabell climbed to 9th. Despite alle her issues, still sending it. Wow. Boris and Maxim where both loosing miles due to the wind shadow of the Falklands. Why did they go there? Isn't ist quite obvious situation to avoid? But, who am i... Otherwise the chasing pack ist posting high speeds with  Louis Burton and Jean Le Cam beeing the fastest boats in the fleet.

Also, there is a new weather outlook with Will Harris is online. He predicts quiet a compression coming up in a few days.

 

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cap-horn-2bato-1210x423.jpg

It is done ! L'Occitane en Provence passed the legendary Cape Horn this morning of Wednesday January 6, 2021 at 9:01 am French time, after 58 days and 18 hours at sea. The emotion is intense for Armel Tripon, whom the wind has pushed very close to the Cape . Among the thirteen first in the Vendée Globe, he is the one who saw the famous “pebble” the closest! Head full of images for a lifetime and a real deliverance after these last days and nights of rough seas and stress in the Pacific. Now he will gradually leave the howling Fiftieth, feel the temperatures rise rapidly, the sea calm down. He's going back to Les Sables d'Olonne!

Armel Tripon has passed Cape Horn! Look at his images, feel his immense emotion, scrutinize every detail. Everything makes sense after almost 59 days at sea (*). "It's splendid damn it, it's magnificent" repeats the skipper of L'Occitane en Provence, this morning of Wednesday January 6 at the stroke of nine o'clock. Very few other sporting events and adventures generate such intense emotions. None after two months of solo competition, day and night. Very difficult to imagine for the earthlings, this Cape Horn is a deliverance.
The icing on the cake, the wind, which has calmed down a lot, pushed L'Occitane en Provence to shave very close, the famous Chilean Cape. Here is the gateway to the Atlantic and its promises of less Dantesque seas, less stressful waves, temperatures which are finally starting to rise again after freezing weeks circling the white continent, Antarctica.
“It's magnificent, splendid, such a symbol for sailors! "
We were able to converse with Armel two hours ago, when passing Cape Horn. He was playful, euphoric. "I didn't come here on purpose to shave the stone!" But the wind gave way and eased, which got me there… and I'm not going to complain. I can see it very closely, this famous Cape Horn so hoped for: it is right there, to my left, I pass only 4 miles from it, it's crazy! "The images sent by the skipper of L'Occitane en Provence are extraordinary, you have to understand their value. No other Vendée Globe skipper has passed so close to the Horn so far.

The new Cape Hornier Armel Tripon still says: “It is such a symbol for sailors. This is the first time in my life that I have come here, the first time in my life that I have spent two months alone at sea… And the last few days have been so hard that it is like a deliverance ”. When asked about the value of the symbol, he looks for his words, taken by emotion and loose “I feel like a pilgrim who arrives for the first time in his life in a holy place, in Jerusalem, in Mecca. or elsewhere. It represents so much, commitment, motivation. If that happens I will only come here once in my life… ”

“I have a few glitches including a tear in my mainsail above the third reef. "

In recent days, Armel Tripon was forced to brake the boat, “because the sea was foul, crossed, the boat was banging a lot. There was a way to break everything! So yes, the fact that the wind and the sea finally calmed down a few hours ago, I take that as good news. Especially since I have a few glitches including a tear in my mainsail, above the third reef. I'll have to find a moment to put it down on the deck and fix it, as soon as the time is right. The operation should take me about four hours. It is not worrying, I act according to the priorities. For example here I see that Clarisse (Crémer, who is 12th) is only 60 miles ahead of me, but I am not at all obsessed with trying to get back on her. It would be a mistake. But it will come! However, it is clear and very noticeable over the phone that Armel is more than ever willing to give his all to get back to the top of the pack. Until the end, believe in it because anything is possible in an ocean race!

The thrill of passing the cape, a sail to repair, a Vendée Globe to finish while being in the best possible position in the standings. To give everything again, until the end… This is what drives the skipper of L'Occitane en Provence, who is clear on the priorities. There is still a lot, a lot of work and miles to cover to complete this solo round the world race. “I can attack again when it is right to do so.

Armel has not said his last word!

(*) L'Occitane en Provence passed Cape Horn at 9:01 am French time (8:01 GMT), after 58 days, 18 hours and 41 minutes at sea. Armel Tripon crossed the course in 13th position in the Vendée Globe, 9 am and 42 minutes after Clarisse Crémer.

Watercolor: Alice Van de Walle

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1 hour ago, Bebmoumoute said:

The two straps/ropes don't prevent the foil from deflecting upwards when it generates lift.

 

1 hour ago, LeoV said:

Movement of foil in and out, up and down is another movement.

only in and out, I think as it puts more stress on the wedge as there are some gaps to create in/out function.

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Decent Live today. Andi continues to impress-- guess that's part of why  T&S' has the "International edition in English, in partnership with Andi Robertson."

He got Charlie Enright to discuss many topics, like foils, crew selection (Dalin, most likely), and for the boatbuilder, some views of the new build (screenie time-linked)

1835161082_ScreenShot2021-01-06at10_12_46AM.png.7df0697f3d6c4127374073b9f689a4b8.png

Also good was getting Pip to talk about her writing--like making the race accessible to a wider audience

Really--was a surprisingly good watch.

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5 hours ago, cortosam said:

Nako "Mam Goz", as he liked to be called, who looked after his kid during all my first years of ocean racing, went to the stars

Thanks for the translation. Good reminder of all the people behind the sailors.  Though, still confused by the above. His friend  . . . became an actor? died? 

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The way I understand it, he lost a friend of 25 years and he dedicates his crossing of Cape Horn to him.

 

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2 hours ago, GER 100 said:

I have the suspicion that my wind instruments indicate too little, that it had therefore more wind. But the sail is also built a bit too light, I realize

@jackolantern was interested in the repairs also, but this is the first time, IIRC, that Herrmann mentioned it might be windvane related.

Pip also discussed tech support for her NKE and B&G autopilots talking to the wind inputs, and she's not the only one. 

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3 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Thanks. Did you happen to run across something where Yann Eliès hinted IMOCA might rule on a max size of foils? Perhaps a podcast?

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hello @Herman !
Regarding synoptic charts, here you can find it from Marinha do Brasil: https://www.marinha.mil.br/chm/dados-do-smm-cartas-sinoticas/cartas-sinoticas

Sat images (goes16): http://satelite.cptec.inpe.br/acervo/goes16.formulario.logic?i=en

I'd like to say thank you for the wx updates you post, I'm following your steps with opencpn and have been learning a lot in the process. 

Cheers,

Renato
 

Clipboard.png

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28 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

plain and non plain texts, see below. The second link paywall.

Vendée Globe. Morgan Lagravière: "Yes, I am amazed at the performance of Maître Coq"
Morgan Lagravière, who is about to take the start of the Jules-Verne Trophy with Gitana, is the skipper for whom the boat was built, Safran II, the current Maître Coq of Yannick Bestaven. It sheds light on this 2015 VPLP-Verdier plan.

  
Vendée Globe leader with Maître Coq, Yannick Bestaven sails on the boat (ex-Safran II) with which Morgan Lagravière took the start of the last edition.

 
Maître Coq, your old boat, Safran, has not been modified much, it remains very competitive, does that surprise you?

Yes, and I am not the only one to be surprised by the current classification in the Vendée Globe, we did not all expect that at the start, even if we know that there are always surprises. But from there to having an order of classification like that. After, Maître Coq, my former Saffronis a previous generation boat from 2015 so it is not an old boat either. It is the same hull as that of Banque Populaire which won the previous Vendée Globe with Armel Le Cléac'h. There were just different choices between our boats in terms of deck and interior design. But overall, these boats were some of the best of the previous generation. They had a good base and they are more reliable thanks to a longer development and navigation time. Obviously, in a year like that of the Vendée Globe, it's something important.

Indeed, even if I am not their project, I think that there has not been a lot of changes on the boat, except for the cap which has been lengthened a little, and the rake system which controls the foils. which has been installed to fit the gauge. After having seen the images, they seem to have worked on ergonomics and comfort on board. Because it should be remembered that these are fairly wide boats that generate a lot of violence in their behavior, unlike the previous generation, like the old Safran (now MACSF) which was narrower and less aggressive. Ergonomic work, in the long term, is linked to performance ...

 And the skipper?

Yannick is doing a really good job with this boat. Because, of course, the boat is important, but the skipper is even more important in this exercise. And on continuity, because Yannick has been at the forefront since almost the start of the race. And from the moment he took the lead in the Vendée Globe, he hasn't let go since. It's quite respectable, and I admire it.

READ ALSO : The foilers haven't said their last word ...

These 2015 VPLP-Verdier plans, such as Maître Coq or Bureau Vallée II, are perhaps even more versatile than the latest?

In fact the surprise is twofold. The first is that these boats are still very efficient. But it is ultimately a very relative surprise because, in the end, it is very difficult to judge the pure performance insofar as we do not know what conditions they have. So their performance is relative compared to the elements of comparison that we have: for example also compared to the two new boats which are in front, Apivia and LinkedOut, two Verdier plans, which are, for once, below the performances which 'they had been able to show so far. Perhaps these are also the boats that are not at the level of performance they should achieve, and that we have only seen in Transat or short scale races. What further makes the comparison difficult is that there are no more, at the forefront only two latest generation boats, two Verdier plans, and in addition we do not know if they are reduced in their potential by damage. I believe that Thomas Rouillard has only one foil left and Charlie has some concerns on that side as well.

So it's true that when we look at them on the charts, and we scrutinize their speed, we rarely see them above 20 knots, so we ask ourselves questions about the performance of these boats over the very long term. . However, in the Vendée Globe this notion of duration, of long term is very important. And when we see boats like those of Benjamin Dutreux, Damien Seguin, or Jean Le Cam, with even older boats, the performance is even stronger. She is just exceptional. It is all of this that makes you think about the type of boat to design for a Vendée Globe, and not for transats.
What were the strengths of your Safran, the current Maître Coq?

They were boats pushed to the extreme of power by the shape of the hull, very flat and with very tight lines. You might think they were architect's boats designed to perform well on flat seas. And when we were there and we had power, we had the hulls that responded so that it slipped. I remember in the New York Vendée, when I had broken a foil from the start. I left without foils, and while I was in front of a front, I was going almost as fast as the foil boats. What is important is also the reliability of the boats. Me at the time I wiped the plaster a bit with these new boats, the foils, the new systems… All the development time that has since been gained has benefited the skippers… It will be the same with the new foilers on the way. 'arrival,

Was it your case in 2016?

Yes, with the end of the Vendée Globe that we did, plus all the sailing, and the significant resources we had at Safran, we tried to tick as many boxes as possible. Afterwards, by relaunching the project with Roland Jourdain and Kaïros, we had less financial means, and our idea was to make it more reliable so as not to have additional expenses beyond the resources available to us. And Yannick also benefits from all this work, just as Louis Burton benefits from all the work that had been done at Banque Populaire. This is where we see that time is important.



Vendée Globe. Morgan Lagravière: "Yes, I am amazed at the performance of Maître Coq"

Morgan Lagravière, who is about to take the start of the Jules-Verne Trophy with Gitana, is the skipper for whom the boat was built, Safran II, the current Maître Coq of Yannick Bestaven. It sheds light on this 2015 VPLP-Verdier plan.

 

Vendée Globe leader with Maître Coq, Yannick Bestaven sails on the boat (ex-Safran II) with which Morgan Lagravière took the start of the last edition.

 

Maître Coq, your old boat, Safran, has not been modified much, it remains very competitive, does that surprise you?

Yes, and I am not the only one to be surprised by the current classification in the Vendée Globe, we did not all expect that at the start, even if we know that there are always surprises. But from there to having an order of classification like that. After, Maître Coq, my former Saffronis a previous generation boat from 2015 so it is not an old boat either. It is the same hull as that of Banque Populaire which won the previous Vendée Globe with Armel Le Cléac'h. There were just different choices between our boats in terms of deck and interior design. But overall, these boats were some of the best of the previous generation. They had a good base and they are more reliable thanks to a longer development and navigation time. Obviously, in a year like that of the Vendée Globe, it's something important.

Indeed, even if I am not their project, I think that there has not been a lot of changes on the boat, except for the cap which has been lengthened a little, and the rake system which controls the foils. which has been installed to fit the gauge. After having seen the images, they seem to have worked on ergonomics and comfort on board. Because it should be remembered that these are fairly wide boats that generate a lot of violence in their behavior, unlike the previous generation, like the old Safran (now MACSF) which was narrower and less aggressive. Ergonomic work, in the long term, is linked to performance ...

 
MjAyMTAxMzE2YzlhMTY5ODZmYzViZGMzNzZjMzNkOTIwNzcwYzg?width=630&focuspoint=50%2C25&cropresize=1&client_id=bpeditorial&sign=fc31aba2a21ece575778de604667979a6ea6ba651f58bcc89464dca475289f16 Morgan Lagravière on Safran during the start of the Vendée Globe 2016 | PHILIPPE CHÉREL / WEST-FRANCE

And the skipper?

Yannick is doing a really good job with this boat. Because, of course, the boat is important, but the skipper is even more important in this exercise. And on continuity, because Yannick has been at the forefront since almost the start of the race. And from the moment he took the lead in the Vendée Globe, he hasn't let go since. It's quite respectable, and I admire it.

READ ALSO : The foilers haven't said their last word ...

These 2015 VPLP-Verdier plans, such as Maître Coq or Bureau Vallée II, are perhaps even more versatile than the latest?

In fact the surprise is twofold. The first is that these boats are still very efficient. But it is ultimately a very relative surprise because, in the end, it is very difficult to judge the pure performance insofar as we do not know what conditions they have. So their performance is relative compared to the elements of comparison that we have: for example also compared to the two new boats which are in front, Apivia and LinkedOut, two Verdier plans, which are, for once, below the performances which 'they had been able to show so far. Perhaps these are also the boats that are not at the level of performance they should achieve, and that we have only seen in Transat or short scale races. What further makes the comparison difficult is that there are no more, at the forefront only two latest generation boats, two Verdier plans, and in addition we do not know if they are reduced in their potential by damage. I believe that Thomas Rouillard has only one foil left and Charlie has some concerns on that side as well.

So it's true that when we look at them on the charts, and we scrutinize their speed, we rarely see them above 20 knots, so we ask ourselves questions about the performance of these boats over the very long term. . However, in the Vendée Globe this notion of duration, of long term is very important. And when we see boats like those of Benjamin Dutreux, Damien Seguin, or Jean Le Cam, with even older boats, the performance is even stronger. She is just exceptional. It is all of this that makes you think about the type of boat to design for a Vendée Globe, and not for transats.

MjAyMTAxYWFlZmY3YzJkYjgzNDE1YTg4MzdjMmE3OTQxYTlmOGE?width=630&focuspoint=50%2C25&cropresize=1&client_id=bpeditorial&sign=81dc1a7d96c68ad0f4bcccd1018abc125db56f871bf49de9308d27baa97cc7d3 Morgan Lagravière (| WEST FRANCE ARCHIVES

What were the strengths of your Safran, the current Maître Coq?

They were boats pushed to the extreme of power by the shape of the hull, very flat and with very tight lines. You might think they were architect's boats designed to perform well on flat seas. And when we were there and we had power, we had the hulls that responded so that it slipped. I remember in the New York Vendée, when I had broken a foil from the start. I left without foils, and while I was in front of a front, I was going almost as fast as the foil boats. What is important is also the reliability of the boats. Me at the time I wiped the plaster a bit with these new boats, the foils, the new systems… All the development time that has since been gained has benefited the skippers… It will be the same with the new foilers on the way. 'arrival,

Was it your case in 2016?

Yes, with the end of the Vendée Globe that we did, plus all the sailing, and the significant resources we had at Safran, we tried to tick as many boxes as possible. Afterwards, by relaunching the project with Roland Jourdain and Kaïros, we had less financial means, and our idea was to make it more reliable so as not to have additional expenses beyond the resources available to us. And Yannick also benefits from all this work, just as Louis Burton benefits from all the work that had been done at Banque Populaire. This is where we see that time is important.

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50 minutes ago, stief said:

Thanks for the translation. Good reminder of all the people behind the sailors.  Though, still confused by the above. His friend  . . . became an actor? died? 

Yep, he's talking about his youth, being 3 friends who met being volunteers at a french sailing school in Paimpol, north britanny, and dreaming about the Cap Horn.

And dedicates this to one of thoses two friend "qui est parti dans les étoiles" which is a french expression to say he passed away.

They're pictures of Coz Castel, near Paimpol , at the Glénans sailing school, where people learn sailing on sailboats with the famous red stripe in the main.

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Edited by cortosam
Mistake
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38 minutes ago, stief said:

Thanks. Did you happen to run across something where Yann Eliès hinted IMOCA might rule on a max size of foils? Perhaps a podcast?

Not that I recall. I think several people have mentioned it would be a good idea.

My understanding is that if the mast stays the same, it limits the size of the foils anyway... And following this current VG, they all may well consider shorter foils.

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15 hours ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

All I care is that today, finally, we, heterosexual non-gay manly man, can buy beauty products, and cheer for L'Occitane in a Vendee-Globe. :P

Due to the sponsorship of Armel and his amazing boat, I spent the $$$ on L'Occitane products for my wife. She loves everything! Expensive, but amazingly nice products.

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JLC and a scripted "philosophical" bit. Might be wrong, but as a facetious performance, was extra entertaining.  I laughed. 

 

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11 minutes ago, stief said:

JLC and a scripted "philosophical" bit. Might be wrong, but as a facetious performance, was extra entertaining.  I laughed. 

 

The quote at the start is from a Johhny Hallyday song :

 

Jean is a fan and sang "Allumez le feu" stading on the race podium at the finish 8 years ago :

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

The quote at the start is from a Johhny Hallyday song :

Jean is a fan and sang "Allumez le feu" stading on the race podium at the finish 8 years ago :

Thanks (though1st  the vid is geoblocked here--point made nonetheless).

Sounds like he was intending to be serious, and I misinterpreted JLC's motives.  Apologies. 

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4 minutes ago, stief said:

Thanks (though1st  the vid is geoblocked here--point made nonetheless).

Sounds like he was intending to be serious, and I misinterpreted JLC's motives.  Apologies. 

You cannot not see that !

 

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2 hours ago, troll99 said:

So yes, the fact that the wind and the sea finally calmed down a few hours ago, I take that as good news. Especially since I have a few glitches including a tear in my mainsail, above the third reef. I'll have to find a moment to put it down on the deck and fix it, as soon as the time is right. The operation should take me about four hours. It is not worrying, I act according to the priorities.

More sail problems. Not quite as severe as Boris' but still ...

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4 hours ago, Varan said:

If AT retires, I sure would like to see Hugo Boss pick up Clarisse.

Banque Populaire seems like a good fit for her if they can put her in a new boat  The discussion about foiling or non-foiling for her trip this time was pretty interesting.  Generally about getting a solid boat where she didn't have to learn to deal with foils while getting solid experience.  And, I suspect there will be entirely new foiling packages for next time.  These foilers don't seem to fit the Southern Ocean sea conditions very well.  Maybe it's just this unique year, but there have been very few of the 500-mile days that were hoped for.  Perhaps in the flat water of the Atlantic on the way home - there were a few on the way south.

 

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3 hours ago, terrafirma said:

 

My personal conviction is that the late launch of new boats (less than 2 years from the departure of the Vendée Globe) is a real handicap for the success of a project especially by aiming only the one shot for the Sponsors. With the rise in the Atlantic also the time when the negotiations are happening, one could imagine, and I hope, that the sponsors will now bet on 2 successive editions with the same boat / skipper couple to succeed!
 

I agree with this. I think going again in the same boat may well be more competive than building a new boat.  4 more years to work the boat up,  refine foils and sails. Think of the first race as an opportunity and a second as the objective. 

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30 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

You cannot not see that !

Thanks--that worked. Must have been moving for many.

(My friends and I lean more to the John Cleese school about emotions. We chickened out at one friend's funeral a few years ago. He had challenged us to do . . . )

back to the race.

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12 minutes ago, oioi said:

I agree with this. I think going again in the same boat may well be more competive than building a new boat.  4 more years to work the boat up,  refine foils and sails. Think of the first race as an opportunity and a second as the objective. 

Don't forget the toll this race takes on the boats, though - Davies' Iniatives Coeur was 3rd in 2016 as Maitre Coq with Beyou driving but has suffered various structural issues since

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9 hours ago, GER 100 said:

Back to the important things. Cape Horn selfies. Clarisse passed way off-shore, so no footage of the magic cape either. Now our next chance for proper Cape Horn Foto und Video footage is on Armel, who passed close and right after sunrise.. Pics or it didn't happen ;)

image-c-520-324.jpg.564a1dbca8d5c37532102088546d85c4.jpg

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53 minutes ago, GER 100 said:

More sail problems. Not quite as severe as Boris' but still ...

I read that Boris has passed 5th Cape Horn. Impressive for such a young sailor. 

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41 minutes ago, Left Shift said:

snip....

  And, I suspect there will be entirely new foiling packages for next time.  These foilers don't seem to fit the Southern Ocean sea conditions very well.  Maybe it's just this unique year, but there have been very few of the 500-mile days that were hoped for.  Perhaps in the flat water of the Atlantic on the way home - there were a few on the way south. 

It is a strange edition from the boat builders/designers perspective. More questions about the latest generation of foils generated then answered in this “VG laboratory”.

-How well could the C-foils (Boss and Arkea) have worked in the South?

-Seems the other new-gen foilers are not living up to the promise, but maybe it is the weather indeed. The fact that apart from Maitre Coq non of the previous generation foilers are able to shake of the older boats with straight boards seems to point at this.

- I am inclined to put the distance L ‘occitaine made good in the South up to more favourable weather. But too bad a head to head of that design with the other foilers would have been very interesting.

In the race as it is, Yannick Bestaven looks really strong. Some time compensationin hand and his lead almost 300 miles now. He has also managed to almost get back on the line between his main pursuers and the finish, reducing the East-West separation risk.

The way Damien Sequin managed to get ahead of the rest of the pack is also very impressive, as is the come from behind and overtake job Burton has managed.

 

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6 hours ago, Jean-Baptiste said:

Mme considered proper but likely the French state is carrying out a long term billion euro study of the issue.

And the researchers went on strike yesterday. :lol:

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32 minutes ago, troll99 said:

I read that Boris has passed 5th Cape Horn. Impressive for such a young sailor. 

Did you see #7355540 ?

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