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Vendee Globe 2020

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1 hour ago, Panoramix said:

Wow... well prepared, especially if you consider that she probably is on a tight budget!

Is anybody the figures of the budget for each competitor ?

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42 minutes ago, cortosam said:

Is anybody the figures of the budget for each competitor ?

I don't think that there is somewhere a public list of the budgets, but she is sailing a boat that must be about 20 years old...

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Such good news. Her team backed a winner. Lots more reading to do to find out more about her team and sponsor. 
She gives a shout out to Alan Roura too.

Kudos to Joff Brown, Paul Larsen, and whoever else managed to get those two to help her media and budget. 

Quote

Every part of my body aches. I have bloody knuckles on every finger, bruises all down my legs and muscles I didn't know I had that hurt but YES!!!!! The new rudder is in and Medallia is back in the game.

Alan Roura had to replace a rudder on this boat, in a fairly similar place, when he was racing it as La Fabrique in the 2016 Vendee Globe. I talked to Alan about this story and it always amazed me that he was actually able to change a rudder in the Southern Ocean, I couldn't imagine how hard it must have been. On the strength of his story I had a spare rudder built for my race and Joff and I practiced the procedure for changing the rudders over just two weeks before the start in Le Sables D'Olonnes. But every time I thought of Alan changing the rudders over in the Southern ocean there was doubt in my mind as to whether I would be able to do it.

Yesterday I was scared and apprehensive. The conditions were far from ideal, a big swell and a forecast for a light patch between gales. I talked through the procedure with Joff and with Paul, the main concern was slowing the boat down enough to get the rudder in and then the boat landing on the rudder stock and doing damage to either. Eventually, with a drogue out of the back and under bare poles in 16-18 knots of breeze, I went for it.

I think the whole procedure took about an hour and a half with many hours of preparation and packing up before and after. My heart was in my mouth for the whole time. I ran around the cockpit, winding winches, pulling ropes, sliding over to the back of the boat to grab, yank, manhandle rudder ropes and anchor chain. Once I was committed to doing it there was nothing that was going to get in my way. There were some tough moments and I had to plead with my boat and the ocean a couple of times but when that new rudder stock finally came shooting up through the deck level bearing, the out-loud whooping that came from me could easily have been heard for miles around...if anyone had been there to hear it.

I'm now back in the game, the breeze has filled in and Medallia is humming along at 15 knots and I can't quite believe that I did that.

 

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This has been said before but Pip is an absolutely amazing writer. It almost feels like I was there with her.

Absolutely fantastic stuff, I'm so happy for her and her team.

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Amazing stuff! Hope we get a bit more details on the procedure, or maybe a vid! 

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6 minutes ago, yl75 said:

Amazing stuff! Hope we get a bit more details on the procedure, or maybe a vid! 

A vid seems a bit of a stretch.  If I were hanging off the transom in 6 degree water on the approach to Cape Horn, trying to fix my boat, I'm inclined to think videography would be well down my priority list.

 

Edit:  Of course, I should add that if by some bizarre confluence of inexplicable events I actually crossed the start line of the VG, I would have browned my trousers in the first cold front off Finisterre, taken one look at Theta, and chickened out in Lisbon with my tail between my legs.

So what do I know?

Go Pip!

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1 minute ago, Corryvreckan said:

A vid seems a bit of a stretch.  If I were hanging off the transom in 6 degree water on the approach to Cape Horn, trying to fix my boat, I'm inclined to think videography would be well down my priority list.

You'd rig the go pro up for a wide shot and set it running though, wouldn't you? If it all went wrong you wouldn't need to share the footage. The skippers are savvy business people as well as excellent sailors.

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on the photo looks lika a go pro is rigged on the coachroof

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Probably the whole procedure was live on WhatsApp so her team and the Race directors could follow/advise, much as JLC left his on during Kevin's rescue.

Pip, as a Yachting World contributing journalist, would know the value of such footage.

[edit] was just watching her Nov 5 dock walk with Paul Larsen. Very interesting to look back from this point in the race. Link added 

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Point taken about the go pro - I have to admit I hadn't thought of that when I commented.  That may be in part because I rarely find fixed shot go pro footage terribly compelling, though in this case it might be.  But this isn't the venue for film criticism (cf Girl with a Patreon), so I'll let it go at that.

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??? (didn't see any criticism . . . you made a good point, and others added --not subtracted-- more useful info). 

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3 minutes ago, stief said:

Can't quite make out what Clarisse is saying here (no youtube up yet(, but sounds like she had a rough time and is back up. 

Just a vid about her morale, or does she give any info about her slowdown yesterday?

 

https://twitter.com/VoileBanquePop/status/1347534771816001538?s=20

 

Explaining that she felt so down that she couldn't stop crying for no reason yesterday... and that while she did she found some reasons to as in a couple of hours her main sheet traveler broke and her J2 got a small tear.

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1 minute ago, stief said:

Can't quite make out what Clarisse is saying here (no youtube up yet), but sounds like she had a rough time and is back up. 

Just a vid about her morale, or does she give any info about her slowdown yesterday?

 

https://twitter.com/VoileBanquePop/status/1347534771816001538?s=20

 

She is saying she was expecting a big change after the Horn, but it's not been the case. Weather has been unpredictible.

She broke the mainsheet traveller rail yesterday, then a 45 knots squall came and she didn't really anticipate it, so she furled the J2 in a hurry and slighlty tore it.

All together, she has not been feeling great for a few days, and struggling to sleep well. She is looking forward to the better phase of the race. She is saying she wants to share this so people can see that VG is very hard.

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And she apologises to her family for complaining to them all the time :) sounds rough... :( 

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Got it -- thanks.

(Gad, I love this place: the speed of informed responses is remarkable.)

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Apologies in advance for the tasteless question, but what kind of ballpark budget would a VG sailor expect to need for the services of a decent boat captain?

For each 1 year contract --  would 100K be too high or low? Or just totally misinformed.

Foils budget? Think I've heard 1/2 a million

Sails? About the same as a foil budget? (Pip's sponsorship allowed her to get some new sails IIRC), and someone said they had a choice between sails or foils. 

Am not looking for top secret insider gossip--just some guidance whether my estimates are too high or low for an average project.

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5 minutes ago, stief said:

For each 1 year contract --  would 100K be too high or low?

I'll do it for less...

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I know a few Spanish pros  that would do it for A LOT less

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3 minutes ago, stief said:

Apologies in advance for the tasteless question, but what kind of ballpark budget would a VG sailor expect to need for the services of a decent boat captain?

For each 1 year contract --  would 100K be too high or low? Or just totally misinformed.

Foils budget? Think I've heard 1/2 a million

Sails? About the same as a foil budget? (Pip's sponsorship allowed her to get some new sails IIRC), and someone said they had a choice between sails or foils. 

Am not looking for top secret insider gossip--just some guidance whether my estimates are too high or low for an average project.

100k€/year for a boat captain seems way overestimated. I think a senior engineer / NavArch (10+ years experience) would make about half of that tops.

Top of the notch pair of foils is 500/600 k€. This of course doesn't include the boat modifications.

 

I would also be very surprised if Pip even considered new foils... What would be the point for her? You can see that the other low-cost campaigns that went that way (Roura, Boissières) are not benefiting from the foils at all.

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Pip’s sponsor is very excited to be working with her and has talked about future support publicly.

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1 minute ago, chuso007 said:

I know a few Spanish pros  that would do it for A LOT less

Thanks. I'll revise to 25K ballpark in my head for now. (Did Didac, like Conrad C last time, live out of a container and do much of  his own prep? :P ). 

 

8 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

would also be very surprised if Pip even considered new foils

Didn't mean to suggest she did. Can't recall which team mentioned that a month or so ago. Thanks for the senior engineer benchmark.

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1 minute ago, Raz'r said:

Pip’s sponsor is very excited to be working with her and has talked about future support publicly.

Link please, if convenient. I got lost trying to figure out the links among the Medallia/ Smartsheet relationship last year: they seem to be competitors in the same market.

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29 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

100k€/year for a boat captain seems way overestimated. I think a senior engineer / NavArch (10+ years experience) would make about half of that tops.

Top of the notch pair of foils is 500/600 k€. This of course doesn't include the boat modifications.

 

I would also be very surprised if Pip even considered new foils... What would be the point for her? You can see that the other low-cost campaigns that went that way (Roura, Boissières) are not benefiting from the foils at all.

Remember that if the boat captain earns EUR50k, the team is probably paying close to EUR100k once you factor taxes, pension, social security, medicare etc...

 

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3 minutes ago, bclovisp said:

Remember that if the boat captain earns EUR50k, the team is probably paying close to EUR100k once you factor taxes, pension, social security, medicare etc...

+ Hotels and Food

 

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30 minutes ago, stief said:

(Did Didac, like Conrad C last time, live out of a container and do much of  his own prep? :P ). 

That's very likely!

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Oh dammit.  Problems aboard Groupe SETIN for Manuel Cousin

"In an involuntary jibe, a mainsail batten carriage broke and the mainsail was damaged above the 3rd reef. She is currently sailing under J3 alone, knowing that this headsail is also showing some signs of weakness."

 

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When she gets home, Pip can give AT crap for not having a spare rudder.

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A little off-topic, but ... While the front-runners having long rounded the horn, I'm still quite obsessed with the mythical cape. Here is a nice video from the german adventurer Arved Fuchs, which some of you might like.

 

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And back on topic, weather analysis from Yoann Richomme is up on today's T&S

Always need to filter for gtrans. "loser of the week" ???!  :rolleyes:

Quote

Charlie is the loser of the week

Like everyone else, I am quite surprised by the slowness of this Vendée Globe , Armel (Le Cléac'h) had taken 8 days less four years ago to reach Cape Horn; I have heard a lot about the fact that the new foilers do not live up to the expectations they had given us. But you have to understand that having a new foiler in a chaotic sea, like the one they had, is the equivalent of taking out your Porsche 911 in the middle of a traffic jam : you put your back and keep pace. The other factor to take into account is reliability, it takes years to make his boats super reliable, that's what Yannick has managed to do.

good read nonetheless.

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Awesome job changing the rudder mid-ocean.

  PIP what an amazing sailor. WFD! :)

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3 hours ago, stief said:

??? (didn't see any criticism . . . you made a good point, and others added --not subtracted-- more useful info). 

I just meant I wasn't going to diverge into becoming a film critic  (X type of video is 'good', or 'bad').  You're right - I simply hadn't thought of the GoPro option till others mentioned it.

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Manuel COUSIN is in trouble. Hope is can sort things out.

deepl translation

A message to let you know that following an untimely stop of my autopilot, the boat went down with the consequence for the moment, at least one mainsail carriage damaged and the mainsail torn above the 3rd reef but I think it can be repaired, the tear not being too important: less than 1 m2.

My J3 is also torn on 50cm, the same repairable.

The pilot left again, I remake road under J3 alone while waiting to be able to repair and to see my concern of pilot ". Good day, Manu

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1 hour ago, Your Mom said:

When she gets home, Pip can give AT crap for not having a spare rudder.

He's not the only one - on the Live today it was mentioned that LinkedOut isn;t carrying a spare rudder either. Apparently the larger rudder is just too big and heavy to be replaced singlehandedly.  Marcus Hutchinson also mentioned they were slightly shocked by how much repair material Alex was carrying (when he brought it on deck for the bow repair) - said other teams certainly weren't as well equipped.

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1 hour ago, stief said:

And back on topic, weather analysis from Yoann Richomme is up on today's T&S

Always need to filter for gtrans. "loser of the week" ???!  :rolleyes:

good read nonetheless.

Perhaps what can be taken away from this is when designing something new, the conditions it will be operating in perhaps need to be considered.  In the example, It's great you can buy a fast fancy car, but if a good portion of the race you are stuck in traffic, that's a lot of money not well used.

 

I would think that those designing foils would consider ocean conditions @ or below 40 degrees or if they did not and just designed for speed, they learned a lesson.  I am sure a lot of good hard data will come out of this race and maybe the answer will be a different type of foil that either has more range adjustment or slightly less power so it can be more effective in the high winds and chaotic seas of the SO.  Charal has certainly been eating up boats and does he not have the curved foil like HB?

 

I've been watching the AC racing from NZ.  There is no question that those boats are fast.  They put a lot of money, time, and design to make these amazing foilers, but what got me was once they were on a race course, the race was kind of boring.  Speed differentials were such that many times (yes, there were a few close races) the race was basically over after the 2nd leg.  I also noticed that the course was fairly short with short legs so one race took between 30-40 minutes.  So what did all that speed get us?  Yes the technology is there, but was it needed in this way?

This has been an amazing VG to follow and I love that after 10,000+ miles of racing there are still a mix of older and new boats in the top 11 and many still under 100 nm from each other.  It also has shown that fast is relative to conditions, big budget does not mean a podium (or finish), and as I've come to realize the heart of this race, keeping it accessible with a reliable chance to win for a range of budgets will do more to keep it alive then trying to eak out another two kts and shutting out teams due to cost.

 

Different topic, now that Pip has her rudder back she still has a chance to build back what she lost.  Strong system coming from behind and she's not lost too much on the foilers who's performance will be matched or even less then her's in those conditions.  I'd love to see her dig in and try to pass them again.  Yes She Cam!!

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4 minutes ago, bucc5062 said:

Perhaps what can be taken away from this is when designing something new, the conditions it will be operating in perhaps need to be considered.  In the example, It's great you can buy a fast fancy car, but if a good portion of the race you are stuck in traffic, that's a lot of money not well used.

 

I would think that those designing foils would consider ocean conditions @ or below 40 degrees or if they did not and just designed for speed, they learned a lesson.  I am sure a lot of good hard data will come out of this race and maybe the answer will be a different type of foil that either has more range adjustment or slightly less power so it can be more effective in the high winds and chaotic seas of the SO.  Charal has certainly been eating up boats and does he not have the curved foil like HB?

...

Traffic jam probably isn't the best metaphor - it's more like taking the Porshe on the Paris-Dakar rally.

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Same route for the leaders. I can see now that Yannick is stuck in the first pic. In the second pic - Monday night prognosis.Untitled-2.thumb.jpg.9643711d6fbe4a3c323c65a16c365360.jpgUntitled-1.thumb.jpg.4583b38ec1d984fdcfbeca2a29af4beb.jpg 

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10 minutes ago, Corryvreckan said:

Traffic jam probably isn't the best metaphor - it's more like taking the Porshe on the Paris-Dakar rally.

you could say "loads of road maintenance everywhere"

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https://voilesetvoiliers.ouest-france.fr/course-au-large/vendee-globe/vendee-globe-bestaven-perdra-t-il-son-avance-la-nouvelle-analyse-strategie-de-mino-vittet-e2fb1472-511b-11eb-8861-ef8a2a853ec7

Vendée Globe. Will Bestaven lose its lead? : Mino Vittet's new strategy analysis
New column from Dominic Vittet, the Voiles et Voiliers strategy / weather expert for the Vendée Globe. Today, he talks about the complicated weather forecast for the South Atlantic. A real Russian roulette for leaders ... Read to understand the real Vendée Globe, and essential if you play on Virtual Regatta ...


The weather for this Vendée Globe is definitely unlike anything… The road-books carefully prepared and worked on before the start, and which offer riders typical diagrams to help them in their strategic choices, are good to throw in the trash, or almost.

Vendée Globe. Cartography to follow the skippers

Admittedly, a depression born under the Argentinian coast is growing, activating and heading south-east while respecting the usual statistics. But further north, through Buenos Aires (Argentina) and Uruguay, a constellation of small soft depressions and ephemeral anticyclonic cells, with random trajectories, transforms this rise of the South Atlantic into Russian roulette. It will take nerves and a little success to overcome all the traps of this labyrinth and build a coherent strategy in this vast ocean. A tense puzzle for Yannick Bestaven who would like to keep his hard-earned capital before attacking the North Atlantic. A catalog of enticing opportunities for Charlie Dalin and Thomas Rettant who are always looking to win.

Enjoy our special subscription offer Vendée Globe: 1 st month free, then 1 € / week

Friday 8HTU.
Friday 8HTU. | DR
[Legend of the map above]: Master CoQ (red circle) goes around the small low pressure center 31 from the west (red line). He could also have taken the purple route and tried to get out earlier in the trade winds (purple dotted lines). Apivia (yellow and green) and LinkedOut (blue circle) are taking advantage of westerly winds to the north of depression 33 while Damien Seguin (red and white circle) and his pursuers (red dotted lines) are upwind in northerly winds. Clarisse Crémer (white circle) and Armel Tripon (yellow and black circle) finally out of the calm of depression 34, spinning in SW winds.

The main Saint Helena anticyclone (HP1) begins its migration towards Brazil (yellow arrow) and will soon close the door towards the trade winds ...

The last 48 hours have therefore been difficult for Yannick Bestaven who had to make a crucial choice between two options.

The first was to play your own game and, at the same time, try to land a fatal blow to the two crabs who have not let go for so long. If he managed to maintain his lead before starting the ascent to Les Sables, he would ensure a comfortable North Atlantic, all the more necessary since the duo who are pursuing him inherently have a higher speed potential than his in the waters. tropical. The skipper of Maître Coq therefore needs a little head start if he wants to win his magnificent Vendée Globe.

With this in mind, I predicted Tuesday a possible advance of Maître Coq of 450 miles at the equator. This prophecy was only possible on condition that the door of Saint Helena did not close too quickly, that Yannick could move east and that he could catch the trade winds on starboard tack. By avoiding the tackling that is coming along the Brazilian coast in a northerly wind, he could have sailed towards the equator with a good handful of miles in advance in his bag, to which were added his ten bonus hours. Enough to see the future in a big way.

Join Voiles et Voiliers on Facebook

But the playing field is so wide that it is no doubt necessary to be cautious. A longitudinal shift of a few hundred miles to the east in this uncertain meteorological maze would have opened the door of all hopes to Charlie and Thomas. By taking this risk, Yannick could have lost control of the race at the same time. As a good racer, he therefore decided to keep an eye in the rearview mirror and mark his two immediate pursuers in the breeches by positioning himself in their axis.

This more conservative option has its meteorological arguments.

It is very likely that, over the next few days, the Saint Helena high will eventually spread horizontally as far as the Brazilian coast and leave only a narrow wind corridor along the American coast to rise towards the equator. . By betting on this more “classic” positioning of high pressure, the leader is making a double blow: he does not take the risk of being stuck by the growing tentacles of Saint Helena and he guards himself from the wind to go up towards the trade winds.

However, this decision will cost him dearly. By stumbling earlier in areas with little wind and forced to sway, Yannick could lose all the good lead he had built up from the Horn and end up neck and neck with the two latest generation Verdier plans to head for the 'equator.


OHTU Monday.
OHTU Monday. | DR
[Map caption above]: Braked by less windy conditions, Master CoQ is caught up by Apivia and LinkedOut .

They should be able to escape north of the zone of calm (small blue dots) stretching horizontally across the South Atlantic. This is the game completely revived for the top three.

Behind, the group of pursuers (red dotted lines) led by Damien Seguin could end up on the wrong side of the barrier and let the three leaders go away for good. But the motivation to finish in the Top 5 must be great!

 

With the predictions and routings this morning, the match is fully restarted for the top three who could reach the latitude of Recife on January 16.

As often, when the horizon is not clear, it is better to be a hunter than to be hunted.

We can trust the one who has been leading the race for almost three weeks and who until then has made few mistakes to sell his skin dearly.

See you on Tuesday !

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Amazing she was able to do that without getting in the water.  Hoping she has a great sail from here on out!

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13 minutes ago, stief said:

Pip's vid of the rudder change

 

Great video, makes it look pretty straightforward... I’m sure it wasn’t at all easy with 6 degree water and a sizeable swell...

Clearly a touch of luck that she found a suitable weather window, but what a good example of (a) having the right spares on board and (b) actually rehearsing the operation beforehand. Well done to Pip and her team!

Now really hoping she can reclaim 15th place...

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20 minutes ago, stief said:

Pip's vid of the rudder change

 

Beat me to it...... That shows the necessity or planning and drills!

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28 minutes ago, stief said:

Pip's vid of the rudder change

 

You know... [chewing] ... this crow is actually pretty tasty, once you get used to it.  :P

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6 minutes ago, littlechay said:

Beat me to it...... That shows the necessity or planning and drills!

Sorry--checked the thread twice, and waited a few minutes.

btw, wanted to ask you if the chances of hitting something might factor into the leaders choosing a West or East option? Seems either side in this part of the Atlantic is a lottery, but maybe the chance of hitting a UFO one side or the other might hedge the routing bets for the leaders.

West has the counter current and fishing boat hazards and {?}; east looks like it might be like a  . . .St Helena garbage patch, or whale route?

Or . . . just the usual roulette for the fleet?  

(pardon the muddled question . .  chewbacca bikinis are a distraction)

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27 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

How did she attach the pull down rope to the old rudder without getting in the water ???

Good point. Had expected to see, as Snowden said, the boat heeled over so she could lasso it or something like that. We'll probably hear more details in the Live or other interviews.

Guess the new question is WWJD --"What would Joff do?" :P

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1 hour ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

 

image.png.9b697c57f8f40d803e975416a424d7a3.png

 

Clarisse briefly questions the meaning of life, concludes that it really is to kick other sailors' asses, and quickly puts 23 miles in front of Tripon.

 

Beautiful and courageous video to post by Clarisse.  Keep up the fight!  

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Absolutely in awe of Pips accomplishment of replacing her rudder.  From watching the video of her practicing in the marina I figured she must have to go into the water to complete the task.  I was worried for her yesterday after seeing the forecasted weather. 

I had the same thought as posted above. How'd she get the downhaul line on the rudder?  Watched the vid several times and it appears the old rudder has the same harness on it that the new rudder does.  I'd have to assume that must have been put on by Pip in the water?!?!? Is there another explanation? Did she tip the boat and go over the side?  Either way, huge effort to get that done solo, in that seastate.

Alan Roura didn't have the old rudder to contend with when he pulled off the replacement last Vendée. 

Screenshot_20210108-152926_Gallery.jpg

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Well done Pip and keep on fighting.  You beat those guys ahead once, do it again.  

Between Pip, Isabelle, and Clarissa, these sailors are showing the true grit of sailing and life.  The same to Boris for he's had his share of issues as well.  Do what you can to keep going and don't stop till stop is the only option left.

 

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4 hours ago, tDot said:

  I'd have to assume that must have been put on by Pip in the water?!?!? Is there another explanation?

Perhaps fishing some very thin Dyeemea first around the rudder and then between top of the blade and hull? Only needs a small gap. Chinch tight and hang the chain on that. (With yet another line to secure the container.)
Does not sound fast but certainly better than swimming. I'm sure we'll learn more in the future.

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7 hours ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

 

image.png.9b697c57f8f40d803e975416a424d7a3.png

 

Clarisse briefly questions the meaning of life, concludes that it really is to kick other sailors' asses, and quickly puts 23 miles in front of Tripon.

 

 

 

Amazing work Pip - changing the rudder on approach to Cape Horn will always be remembered as a standout achievement. Watching the Volvo guys do it at as a team vs her doing it by herself - amazing. And full kudos to her boat dude for instigating or planning the 'dry' run. Hopefully Alex sends her a note of congratulations and watches the video to learn the process...

 

And for Clarisse - seeing her do it hard - showing herself doing it hard - while it may be a media strategy in itself - actually earns a lot of respect from me. Nobody loves a first-timer that is just IGing happy, polished videos all the way round the world - but to show some genuine lows on the way through shows some authenticity - and gives some reason for granting the respect that she deserves.

 

 

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13 hours ago, Bebmoumoute said:

100k€/year for a boat captain seems way overestimated. I think a senior engineer / NavArch (10+ years experience) would make about half of that tops.

Top of the notch pair of foils is 500/600 k€. This of course doesn't include the boat modifications.

 

I would also be very surprised if Pip even considered new foils... What would be the point for her? You can see that the other low-cost campaigns that went that way (Roura, Boissières) are not benefiting from the foils at all.

Pretty far off the mark on what a senior engineer’s salary is. Here in the U.S, mid career/entry level senior engineers start around the $100k Euro mark ($125k USD). True senior level engineers can often be north of $200k/yr. I know plenty on the software side making north of $200k Euro/year, some without formal degrees.

I would wager that an experienced naval architect like Verdier is probably making closer to $500k/year, AC campaigns and $600k foils cost what they do for a reason...

I’m also reasonably confident some of the TP52 boat captains are pulling in 6 figures, so I would not at all be surprised if the top VG teams had similar salaries for their employees.

Finally, I suspect you could back out some of these numbers based on the campaign costs published by some teams (HB’s is pretty well known), an estimate of team size and estimate of boat cost. The latter is a big variable, IIRC, 8million GBP seems about right for a foiling IMOCA, five or take a million or 2.

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3 hours ago, F18 Sailor said:

Pretty far off the mark on what a senior engineer’s salary is. Here in the U.S, mid career/entry level senior engineers start around the $100k Euro mark ($125k USD). True senior level engineers can often be north of $200k/yr. I know plenty on the software side making north of $200k Euro/year, some without formal degrees.

I would wager that an experienced naval architect like Verdier is probably making closer to $500k/year, AC campaigns and $600k foils cost what they do for a reason...

I’m also reasonably confident some of the TP52 boat captains are pulling in 6 figures, so I would not at all be surprised if the top VG teams had similar salaries for their employees.

Finally, I suspect you could back out some of these numbers based on the campaign costs published by some teams (HB’s is pretty well known), an estimate of team size and estimate of boat cost. The latter is a big variable, IIRC, 8million GBP seems about right for a foiling IMOCA, five or take a million or 2.

US salaries are generally higher than euro salaries, especially software ones, it is not a good bench mark. A senior software engineer in London which pre-brexit was one of the top tech places in the EU will earn 60-90k GBP (80-125k USD). I would expect other engineering disciplines to be similar ballparks in the EU. Yes there are outliers, but thats the typically advertised rate.

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12 hours ago, stief said:

Sorry--checked the thread twice, and waited a few minutes.

btw, wanted to ask you if the chances of hitting something might factor into the leaders choosing a West or East option? Seems either side in this part of the Atlantic is a lottery, but maybe the chance of hitting a UFO one side or the other might hedge the routing bets for the leaders.

West has the counter current and fishing boat hazards and {?}; east looks like it might be like a  . . .St Helena garbage patch, or whale route?

Or . . . just the usual roulette for the fleet?  

(pardon the muddled question . .  chewbacca bikinis are a distraction)

I have seen very little in the way of UFOs either way. But this time of year the West option has plenty of fishing vessels to negotiate both honest and legal inside the EEzs and high seas bandits outside the EEZs .. Close to the Brazil coast there are lot of nets and longlines usually with strobes on but you have to be awake to see them! 

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I went, mostly, off-grid on the boat from the 24th Dec. until yesterday and got back to find my scraper script no longer worked as the VG website has had a major overhaul. Anyway it is fixed now. For those that missed it, I made a Python script to scrape the position reports into Expedition tracking format and later added a GPX file output to it too. Updated version is on Github now. Littlechay/vendee-scraper: web scraper for vendee globe 2020 - output file for Expedition software (github.com)

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5 hours ago, F18 Sailor said:

Pretty far off the mark on what a senior engineer’s salary is. Here in the U.S, mid career/entry level senior engineers start around the $100k Euro mark ($125k USD). True senior level engineers can often be north of $200k/yr. I know plenty on the software side making north of $200k Euro/year, some without formal degrees.

I would wager that an experienced naval architect like Verdier is probably making closer to $500k/year, AC campaigns and $600k foils cost what they do for a reason...

I’m also reasonably confident some of the TP52 boat captains are pulling in 6 figures, so I would not at all be surprised if the top VG teams had similar salaries for their employees.

Finally, I suspect you could back out some of these numbers based on the campaign costs published by some teams (HB’s is pretty well known), an estimate of team size and estimate of boat cost. The latter is a big variable, IIRC, 8million GBP seems about right for a foiling IMOCA, five or take a million or 2.

 I can see eyebrows raising to unprecedented heights in Port-La Foret and Lorient, they probably can't figure this is even foreseeable.

P-S: on the other hand when they make 10k it costs 20k to the team.

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7 hours ago, F18 Sailor said:

Pretty far off the mark on what a senior engineer’s salary is. Here in the U.S, mid career/entry level senior engineers start around the $100k Euro mark ($125k USD). True senior level engineers can often be north of $200k/yr. I know plenty on the software side making north of $200k Euro/year, some without formal degrees.

I would wager that an experienced naval architect like Verdier is probably making closer to $500k/year, AC campaigns and $600k foils cost what they do for a reason...

I’m also reasonably confident some of the TP52 boat captains are pulling in 6 figures, so I would not at all be surprised if the top VG teams had similar salaries for their employees.

Finally, I suspect you could back out some of these numbers based on the campaign costs published by some teams (HB’s is pretty well known), an estimate of team size and estimate of boat cost. The latter is a big variable, IIRC, 8million GBP seems about right for a foiling IMOCA, five or take a million or 2.

Well, I am a French naval architect with 13 years experience in the south of the UK. I know a fair amount of navarchs in the UK and the west of France with the same sort of experience. We all make around €50k/year.

90% of the IMOCA campaigns are based in Britanny (you know that part of the world that is NOT in the US).

 

 

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15 hours ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

 

 

 

Clarisse briefly questions the meaning of life, concludes that it really is to kick other sailors' asses, and quickly puts 23 miles in front of Tripon.

 

Now it is a real fear. It is what I mean. 

Easy to push fear away when adrenaline kicks in and get going during the South Ocean. Relaxing earlier once exited SO and get back to reality.

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On 1/6/2021 at 11:36 PM, stief said:

So glad the sailors are insulated from the madness ashore.

They might prefer to stay out there at the moment.

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7 hours ago, F18 Sailor said:

Pretty far off the mark on what a senior engineer’s salary is. Here in the U.S, mid career/entry level senior engineers start around the $100k Euro mark ($125k USD). True senior level engineers can often be north of $200k/yr. I know plenty on the software side making north of $200k Euro/year, some without formal degrees.

I would wager that an experienced naval architect like Verdier is probably making closer to $500k/year, AC campaigns and $600k foils cost what they do for a reason...

I’m also reasonably confident some of the TP52 boat captains are pulling in 6 figures, so I would not at all be surprised if the top VG teams had similar salaries for their employees.

Finally, I suspect you could back out some of these numbers based on the campaign costs published by some teams (HB’s is pretty well known), an estimate of team size and estimate of boat cost. The latter is a big variable, IIRC, 8million GBP seems about right for a foiling IMOCA, five or take a million or 2.

 

46 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Well, I am a French naval architect with 13 years experience in the south of the UK. I know a fair amount of navarchs in the UK and the west of France with the same sort of experience. We all make around €50k/year.

90% of the IMOCA campaigns are based in Britanny (you know that part of the world that is NOT in the US).

 

 

not forget European income tax 50% more or less

Which countries tax their citizens the most? | World Economic Forum

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^ UK should be at about 52% on that chart if you include national insurance (45% without)

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And I am still glad that I live in the Netherlands ;)

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1 hour ago, troll99 said:

 

not forget European income tax 50% more or less

Which countries tax their citizens the most? | World Economic Forum

Highest rate of income tax, generally levied on the highest earners. I doubt many boat captains would fall in that bracket...

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6 minutes ago, mowgli said:

And I am still glad that I live in the Netherlands ;)

What about all the Dutch though? ;)

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10 minutes ago, jimmyuk81 said:

Highest rate of income tax, generally levied on the highest earners. I doubt many boat captains would fall in that bracket...

true, i think this pic gives a better picture. In some countries, employers still pay 30% taxes on wages. Add social costs and income taxes for employees.

Payroll_and_income_tax_by_country.png

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3 minutes ago, Snowden said:

What about all the Dutch though? ;)

???

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Okay, change in topic.  I just want to know how they go about taking a leak when all geared up (Southern Ocean style).  I *know* when I'm offshore and in my foulies it's not fun stripping down enough to take a wizz, neve mind dropping a log in the head.  It's a real Pain In The A$$ to undress just to ....

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Isabelle hit an OFNI "with the foil. So, a small part of the foil broke off." She (and we) hopes the damage isn't too bad.

 

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Sam, too had troubles: fatigue, autopilot, and keel. Safari trans from V&V Modifié le 09/01/2021 à 13h41

Hello to all V & V readers,
I have gone through a slightly more delicate period as you can read below, but my concerns have now been resolved, it is important to me to give my news to all those who follow me and show me support that gives me strength. Here is my logbook for the past week:
I'm not a runner but I know that in a marathon, we talk about the 30th kilometer wall. Over the past two days, I think I've been in the Vendée Globe version of this famous wall.
It started with a loss of wind info that my autopilot was using, obviously while I was sleeping. It was very dark and it was blowing at 30 knots! The repair was done not without difficulty and required a lot of work to get the boat back on track, but fortunately it was done without damage. I also managed to find the defect and correct it in my electronics so everything is finally fine from this point of view!
The next adventure was to discover that my keel actuator had slipped... and that the area around it was flooded... so I had to turn the boat out of the water, pump it and close the keel cylinder.
A little grinding, gluing and laminating later, the cylinder was secured
While I was doing my routine checks, I discovered that the head of the cylinder (the part attached to the keel) was unscrewing... At sea, it is impossible to screw it back on, so the solution was to create a system to block it and prevent it from unscrewing further. A little grinding, gluing and laminating later, the cylinder was secured. By a happy coincidence, I happened to be in an area with very little wind.
The cylinder now has more play than usual which makes my keel a little "noisy". It was a little worrying, so I carried out many checks to make sure that the noise came only from the keel and was not a sign of another problem but everything is fine.
In writing this, it seems rather simple to repair these small damages, but here, alone, with the fatigue and stress accumulated while sailing to the other side of the world (and having already damaged my keel once!), this episode totally exhausted me. I felt that every time I had solved one problem, another appeared. Those I described to you were also accompanied by a whole bunch of small problems, such as a cut I made to myself in the middle of a repair (only a minor cut!).
I'm on my way home now more than ever
Thank God, I am not alone and I have the incredible support and encouragement of my shore team who worked day and night to find solutions to Heart Initiatives problems and help me remotely solve everything as best I can here.
Now that everything is safe, I am confident in the ability of my cylinder to hold until arrival, and I can rest a little to recover. Fortunately, the weather is mild with me and the conditions are good. I have a few days of respite before the next depression!
Oh - and the good news is that I was so busy that I passed one of my " milestones" without realizing it. Here I am in the West longitudes because I passed the Antimeridian or "date change line" and so I won one day!! Or I lost one... depending on how we look at it!
I am more than ever on my way home now.
Sam

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6 hours ago, triumph72 said:

Good find--thanks for the timestamp too. Glad to hear Joff Brown in person (didn't know Pip had reported a "creaking" the day before). He's supposed to be on tomorrow's Live, so this is good prep for that. 

Still reading up on him and his company Boatshed Performance in Gosford https://performance.boatshed.com/contact-joff-brown

He certainly has had his reputation boosted by this incident.

[edit] added time stamp of explanation of how she got the old rudder out without swimming

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6 hours ago, littlechay said:

I went, mostly, off-grid on the boat from the 24th Dec. until yesterday

Happy Christmas and New Year.  Missed your insights when the leaders were near the Falklands.

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Last video from Yannic Bestaven; I find interesting that he is saying that he is really happy to have taken a spinaker with him... Saying in the video that it is the fifth time that he is using it...

Does anybody know if Charlie Dalin or Thomas Ruyant have also a spinaker???

 

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2 hours ago, no_ballast said:

Ho! Charlie now at 24 knots. Haven't seen that in a while in this race. Will feel good while it lasts.

Finally we see conditions more suitable the new foilers... Boris is also quite fast, since 18:00 UTC is > 20 kts. What surprises me is that Thomas is relatively slow although he is not far away form Charlie.

image.thumb.png.eaee9099dda6267374bdc19d006c2268.png

 

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