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Vendee Globe 2020

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1 hour ago, Coconuts.is said:

There is approximately 40 tonnes on the head of the keel when it is fully canted and sailing.  So you could say about half that, around 20 tonnes to hold it on center.  That would be a tall order with the space where you could tie the lines.  I am not sure it would be possible with the more modern type keel geometry... definatly a very difficult problem to solve.

Did you see the Conrad Humphreys interview with Joff Brown today? In Conrad's case they wrapped line around the sliding part of his hydraulic rams to stop it  moving, but it sounds like Humphreys had hydraulic failure as opposed to the ram mounts failing, which seems to be what has happened to MACSF.  Joff Brown was saying the modern keels have the ram around 50-60cm from the main pivot, and with 3100kg at 4.5m you'd be looking at 27.9 tons on the ram with the keel horizontal. I think the calculation you want is how much moment can the hull of an imoca create with a wave beam on, if you assume the keel is hanging straight down. Charal for example has a displacement of 8 tons, and a beam of 5.85m. So you could imagine several tons acting at 1.5m from center and being resisted by the ram at .5m. So your 20tons number is probably at the high end, but certainly in the ballpark That's crazy if you think about it, no wonder they occasionally fail!  

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Sorry, not caught up, so sorry if already posted, but I found this interesting:

The skipper of Charal has the honour of being the fastest in the fleet between Cape of Good Hope and Cape Horn, at 30 days 14hrs 27 minutes some 45 minutes quicker than Armel Tripon (L'Occitaine en Provence).

Sail-World also notes Ruyant has just climbed his mast for the fifth time, this time to repair his wind indicator after racing three days blind with no precise wind data.

 

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Updated tracker shows Dalin tacking to the west?? Certainly would not do that if the Windy forecast is right.

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Armel coming west as well, getting ready for the wind to veer left. He is now down to 772nm behind the leader. He is not out of it just yet.

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4 hours ago, Coconuts.is said:

There is approximately 40 tonnes on the head of the keel when it is fully canted and sailing.  So you could say about half that, around 20 tonnes to hold it on center.  That would be a tall order with the space where you could tie the lines.  I am not sure it would be possible with the more modern type keel geometry... definatly a very difficult problem to solve.

Point taken, but it seems like it would be a lot less if the keel is centered.

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Dodgy days ahead for the lead boats.  Going to be little sleep and lots of time blurry eyed looking at options up the course.  Yannick is really going to be working for his pay!

 

@Snowden Yes there is a provision within Exp to have diff polars for port and starboard. See the image below for the diff tabs. I wonder if Charly and Thomas have been strip charting their numbers to build asymetrical polars.

vendeepolars.JPG

Vendee20.JPG

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Louis Burton for win...  That's my call.  Wasn't he first across the start line (over early)?  Dude is in a rush to get to the finish.  

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1 hour ago, crashtack said:

Why did Charlie significantly bear off in the latest update? It doesn't seem as if he's heading to more wind.

image.png.b274ec596d1186d0d7cd5a3513f1b888.png

Ha,

Because master navigator Yannick found the fastest way again.
I find this very captivating, really brillant..
Next position report in 1 hour.

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Thankfully Isabel is finally out of that low pressure system.

 

It's amazing to see the top 5 boats within 60 miles of the same DTF. 

I'm pulling for Louis Burton.  Ever since he was the first to take the risk and dive South towards the IEZ, I've been hoping he could pull it off. Stoked that he's made it back into contention. 

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JLC will like this sked: the boats ahead are all hole spotting for him. And Damien is still in some wind.

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Wow,

This is close racing.
Daniel Seguin highest speed.
315882067_Knipsel3.thumb.PNG.825b82224311552d09080cb4fff66395.PNG

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42 minutes ago, Schakel said:

Wow,

This is close racing.
Daniel Seguin highest speed.
 

Second highest. Charal is suddenly significantly faster than the boats around him. Decided to put the hammer down now they are out of the Southern Ocean and on the way home? Looks like this group will have a much better passage through the South Atlantic too.

image.thumb.png.de3397e0d03def33d1085bbd319afde9.png

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52 minutes ago, Schakel said:

Wow,

This is close racing.
Daniel Seguin highest speed.
 

It's Damien not Daniel

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For those saying that Beyou is only in delivery mode, he holds the fastest following times:

  • Les Sables to Cape Horn;
  • Good Hope to Cape Horn.

He is still in it for the fastest race time after his restart.

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3 hours ago, Rainbow Spirit said:

I sincerely doubt that the wind overlays we see on the tracker are all that accurate. 

+1 

 

Generally I think the lighter it is, the less likely the wind overlays are to be in any way accurate. 

 

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I still think Yannick is best positioned. Just eyeballing the GRIBS as I scrolled though I couldn't see where the routing was getting a faster route to the finish from. I guess there was just a narrow corridor there that worked on the numbers just for the last couple of days, and I am guessing that the guys more to the east were/are gambling for a break. 

My routing has him first to the finish again buy a couple of hours over APIVA... but with 16 - 17 days (ish) to the finish anything could happen :) 

Yannick has the most options sitting where he is, currently sailing into more pressure as the others move into less, whatever happens to the forecasts he should be able to cover... I think. 

FWIW it looks like something like 80-90% of the remaining course is on Stb'd 

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3 hours ago, tDot said:

It's amazing to see the top 5 boats within 60 miles of the same DTF. 

Now within 26nm. It's basically a restart after 64 days of sailing - utterly crazy.

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1 hour ago, littlechay said:

I still think Yannick is best positioned. Just eyeballing the GRIBS as I scrolled though I couldn't see where the routing was getting a faster route to the finish from. I guess there was just a narrow corridor there that worked on the numbers just for the last couple of days, and I am guessing that the guys more to the east were/are gambling for a break. 

My routing has him first to the finish again buy a couple of hours over APIVA... but with 16 - 17 days (ish) to the finish anything could happen :)

Yannick has the most options sitting where he is, currently sailing into more pressure as the others move into less, whatever happens to the forecasts he should be able to cover... I think. 

FWIW it looks like something like 80-90% of the remaining course is on Stb'd 

Good, I am rooting for him as up to this high IMHO he had given everybody a master class of navigation (remember the sailing through St Helena on the way out plus the clean trajectory in the Southern ocean).

Eyeballing it I was thinking that he had fallen behind because he was leeward to the others and would as a consequence suffer in term of speed when they eventually reach the trade-winds.

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Yannick has no chance! The new foilers are "murderers" in such conditions as the flat sea, weaker winds. It is where the new ones have the biggest advantage.

Putting foils on Yannick's boat is like putting lipstick on a pig. Or tiny dinosaur arms on an elephant body. 

image.thumb.png.19a4283acc797190489e3ea068c26bfa.png

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We must not forget that three boats will be getting time taken off their finish times, being Yes We Cam 16h 15m, Maitre Coq 10h 15m and Sea Explorer 6h. At an average of 10knts say, that means YWC is 161.5 nm up the course, MQ IV 101.5nm and SE 60nm atm.

This has to be the best ever VG for the spectators ever, so many boats so close together...

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2 hours ago, b3nharris said:

Second highest. Charal is suddenly significantly faster than the boats around him. Decided to put the hammer down now they are out of the Southern Ocean and on the way home? Looks like this group will have a much better passage through the South Atlantic too.

.

I meant the top group who are in close racing.
Charal, well we all know the story, he was able to fight back to 16-th position, and still climbing.
Remarkable.

 

1 minute ago, Rainbow Spirit said:

We must not forget that three boats will be getting time taken off their finish times, being Yes We Cam 16h 15m, Maitre Coq 10h 15m and Sea Explorer 6h. At an average of 10knts say, that means YWC is 161.5 nm up the course, MQ IV 101.5nm and SE 60nm atm.

This has to be the best ever VG for the spectators ever, so many boats so close together...

True!

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18 minutes ago, troll99 said:

Yannick has no chance! The new foilers are "murderers" in such conditions as the flat sea, weaker winds. It is where the new ones have the biggest advantage.

Putting foils on Yannick's boat is like putting lipstick on a pig. Or tiny dinosaur arms on an elephant body. 

 

 

That might be true if LinkedOut and APIVIA still had 100% working port foils. But they don't, so it's not. And if 80-90% of the remaining race is on starboard (see @littlechay) then surely Maitre Coq has an advantage - certainly over LinkedOut - who knows for APIVIA.

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24 minutes ago, b3nharris said:

That might be true if LinkedOut and APIVIA still had 100% working port foils. But they don't, so it's not. And if 80-90% of the remaining race is on starboard (see @littlechay) then surely Maitre Coq has an advantage - certainly over LinkedOut - who knows for APIVIA.

I don't think it is a big difference.. more likely 97-98%. The cut of the top of the foil is likely to cause a sideways wobble.. Charlie's fix creates more drag. But nothing dramatic. Thomas was able to sail well without wind wane info .. that's more insane. :o

It is more up to the sailor's performance. Charlie and Thomas recover better but the experience of Yannick can make up it too.. an exciting race though  :D 

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1 hour ago, troll99 said:

Or tiny dinosaur arms

Like this maybe if the new boats are known for dali foils maybe the 2016 generation will be T rex foils

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13 minutes ago, V21 said:

Like this maybe if the new boats are known for dali foils maybe the 2016 generation will be T rex foils

;) My first reaction was when I saw 2016 boats with "new foils" in the year 2020. 

Hump Day Funny Pictures - August 20, 2014 | T rex humor, Trex jokes,  Dinosaur funny

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5 hours ago, Schakel said:

Wow,

This is close racing.
Daniel Seguin highest speed.
315882067_Knipsel3.thumb.PNG.825b82224311552d09080cb4fff66395.PNG

Damien, not Daniel

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11 minutes ago, remenich said:

Damien, not Daniel

I noticed, Thanks.
Next report in half an hour.

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From the Vendee EN newsfeed ( emphasis mine): 

"Bestaven obviously played his routing carefully and was to a great extent the victim of his timing but further west the wind has been more unsettled and lighter – he made 13 tacks in 36 hours in the corridor of northerly winds."

Fighting for every inch all while knowing it was an exercise in futility. That is some tenacity.

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1 hour ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

Pip struggling for words! Thankfully, not for long:

Pip Hare at the Horn, 'Finally It Is Done'

https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/21648/pip-hare-at-the-horn-finally-it-is-done

Best quote?  Quite a few,  but what really works is how she told the whole story of the crossing -- the article builds up what a rotten day she had, with the crash gybe while stuck down below fixing the rudder, the code 0 wrapping, and then concludes the writing with

Quote

Sailing close to Cape Horn after this terrible day was just the tonic I needed. It made me smile despite my exhaustion and disappointment, it reminded me of just what I have achieved so far in this race and the possibilities of everything that has to come. It was incredible to see it up close and I will remember that vision for the rest of my days. For me I think the Capes are named the wrong way round, because this one definitely brought me hope.

Nailed it--Cape of good Hope.

The vid was the icing: short and bittersweet. 

Quote

I want it to be burned into my memory for the rest of my life. I can't believe i'm here. I'm so proud. I'm so happy to be here.

It's magnificent. . . .  It's  Cape Horn.  

This is . . . I think this is one of the proudest moments of my life.

Aha! Finally a piece I could use to get the missus hooked on watching ocean racing (this has been a 10 year project). Sigh. Fail

She said: "OK, but the pic of the Horn is all cloudy and blurry."

I will not give up. One of these years I'll get her to appreciate the struggle these sailors have to get around the Horn and home.

Should have waited until she had her coffee. 

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Aha! Yannick almost twice as fast (snail racing), and now Damien joins the stuck up crowd. 

Land should be heating up soon, and that will help mess up the routing. Great to watch, miserable to sail.

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18 minutes ago, stief said:

Aha! Finally a piece I could use to get the missus hooked on watching ocean racing (this has been a 10 year project). Sigh. Fail

What worked with my wife was Clarisse's Mini Transat campaign. We both got hooked.

21 minutes ago, stief said:

Should have waited until she had her coffee.

I risk life and limb if I do that.

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The first 9 boats are being compressed together,
The last 4 having more speed then the top 5.
Yannick still in a very interesting position, will it work out?

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The pic of the Horn is quite stirring. I can't even imagine the sensation of being there at that moment, trying to fathom the entire continents that lie beyond.

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12 minutes ago, troll99 said:

Pip finishing Horn and Alex - not. Perfect rabbit-turtle allegory. 

In the UK we have the tortoise and the hare. Too confusing for allegories in this case.

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11 minutes ago, troll99 said:

Pip finishing Horn and Alex - not. Perfect rabbit-turtle allegory. 

Why is that in a race between a turtle and the rabbit, the turtle always  wins? — Steemit

I'm not sure. In your example the rabbit's road kill and the tortoise has arrived to the detroitous left by the rest of the fleet and supporters who've already been and gone.

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16 minutes ago, troll99 said:

Pip finishing Horn and Alex - not. Perfect rabbit-turtle allegory. 

Good one. Add the rabbit having its front leg shot off (twice?), its tail grabbed and pulled off, its nose smashed and overturned, hitting a roadblock   . . .. 

Too many changes needed to be perfect, sadly. And then the rabbit returns again and again :D

Sorry--back to the race. See y'all tomorrow.

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21 minutes ago, Snowden said:

 

In the UK we have the tortoise and the hare. Too confusing for allegories in this case.

In Brexit times, it is too little time to figure out that. :P

 

 

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28 minutes ago, European Bloke said:

I'm not sure. In your example the rabbit's road kill and the tortoise has arrived to the detroitous left by the rest of the fleet and supporters who've already been and gone.

Hmm, maybe a youtube video is needed so one can make a deep analysis after. A good question though. 

 

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1 hour ago, European Bloke said:

I'm not sure. In your example the rabbit's road kill and the tortoise has arrived to the detroitous left by the rest of the fleet and supporters who've already been and gone.

yeah but the tortoise (Hare) had a spare rudder

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How much risk from local effect is there being  200 NM from the coast of Brazil?  Yannick is passing Dalin on the inside.

Anyone else hoping Tripon will close the gap before the equator?   As they get to the easterlies it may be harder to gain the 600 miles he needs to get in the race.

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The 0400 to 1700 update yields some interesting info.  At least I think it does.  Routing all the boats at 102% and only one seems to be close to that performance scale. MCoQ, second appears to be Bureau.  Of course, they are all essentially sailing in a mine field of wind holes. But, I also wonder if some foil damage is starting to show up on Apivia and Linked.

 

Vendee20.JPG

vendeepolarcomp.JPG

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Top 9 boats about 100 miles from first!!

Several of those 9 leaders have time coming to them when they cross the line. How many hours is Jean getting, 24?

How do they apply X # of hours after the finish? # of hours X your average speed over the course?

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4 hours ago, Varan said:

cd.jpg.72a553618a9fa9e8ac794219093e1216.jpg

Is this what they mean by uphill sailing?

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https://isabellejoschke.com/objectif-terre-pour-isabelle-vendee-globe/

Objectif terre for Isabelle:

After her retirement from the Vendée Globe on Saturday east of the Falklands off Argentina, and the understandable despondency that followed, Isabelle and the MACSF team were quickly re-mobilised. In the hours that followed, a race against the clock began to ensure the safety of the sailor, who was forced to continue her route in very difficult sea conditions (5 to 6 metre swell, over 40 knots of wind), conditions made even more dangerous by the loss of control of the keel of her IMOCA boat.

The night from Sunday to Monday was also very trying: our skipper, who was busy sealing the water ingress on board, experienced a big fright when his boat went to the heap and lay down on the water. His vigilance over the last 48 hours and the technical assistance provided by his shore team enabled him to extricate himself from the southern depression and now progress in milder seas towards the Brazilian coast. In perhaps a dozen days from now, Isabelle should be docking in a port of the South American giant which has yet to be determined.
 
The priority: guaranteeing Isabelle's safety

The MACSF team led by Alain Gautier didn't have time to breathe a sigh of relief, nor to feel sorry for the bad luck that shattered the hopes of its skipper on this round-the-world race. As soon as his retirement was announced, the team worked hard to minimise the risks aboard a boat that had become unstable and less manoeuvrable.
 
"We had to re-mobilise immediately so that Isabelle felt safe and surrounded. At times, there is a small feeling of helplessness because we are far from her. She is at the heart of the action to manage this situation as well as possible. With the shore team, we can just provide her with our technical support, Florian Giffrain (the boat captain) and I work on all these aspects. We try to think of everything to help him in the best possible way. For morale, Cécile Poujol gives him permanent support and we know how important that is". says team manager Alain Gautier

Assistance with routing and settings

Since the loss of her keel, Isabelle has been forced to sail differently on her IMOCA, which no longer reacts in the same way. The technical team has intervened to help her choose the best route to take and determine the most suitable speeds. She also benefits from the invaluable help of Christian Dumard, weather consultant to the Vendée Globe race management.
 
"Isabelle has her routing but it was necessary to rework it in relation to the boat's potential, which has deteriorated considerably. The most complicated thing was to determine how fast she could move forward, and according to what wind strength and direction. The question of the sea state was also a big problem until Monday. It's a whole set of parameters that you have to try to combine to give her the best possible option. For speed for example, we have to find the right balance: Isabelle needs to be dynamic to be able to control the boat and not find herself at the mercy of the waves, but at the same time we have to keep the boat moving forward without taking risks. Since she no longer has a keel, she has only had one loose keel, which is already a performance in itself. On the spot she injured her hand. Over the last two days she has been able to show great lucidity. Now the situation has improved, the risks of finding a chaotic sea again are receding. However, vigilance must remain the order of the day because we have to manage the instability of the wind, which could cause problems". deciphers Alain Gautier
 
A fallback port probably in Brazil

On Tuesday around 13:00 French time, Isabelle was 1,750 miles from Salvador de Bahia. Within ten days or so, the Franco-German sailor could dock in a Brazilian port, the choice of which has not yet been made.
 
"From now on, Isabelle will have to be patient. She is currently crossing a windless zone. She should land in Brazil more certainly than in South Africa, even if today the question is not completely clear-cut. However, the tip of the African continent seems far away and involves risks. The port could be Itajai, Rio de Janeiro or Salvador de Bahia. The objective is that it should reach the north as quickly as possible to find a flow of trade winds from the east that circulate on the latitude 25-26 South. We're in the process of setting up arrival solutions to have a team ready to welcome it. For the rest, repairing the boat on site so that it can return to France by sea or loading the IMOCA MACSF on a cargo ship, for the moment nothing has yet been decided but we're anticipating all the solutions to be as efficient as possible in the zone". reveals Alain Gautier

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

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40 minutes ago, TheDragon said:

Is this what they mean by uphill sailing?

Gentlemen don't sail uphill.

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46 minutes ago, Virgulino Ferreira said:

https://isabellejoschke.com/objectif-terre-pour-isabelle-vendee-globe/

Objectif terre for Isabelle:

After her retirement from the Vendée Globe on Saturday east of the Falklands off Argentina, and the understandable despondency that followed, Isabelle and the MACSF team were quickly re-mobilised. In the hours that followed, a race against the clock began to ensure the safety of the sailor, who was forced to continue her route in very difficult sea conditions (5 to 6 metre swell, over 40 knots of wind), conditions made even more dangerous by the loss of control of the keel of her IMOCA boat.

The night from Sunday to Monday was also very trying: our skipper, who was busy sealing the water ingress on board, experienced a big fright when his boat went to the heap and lay down on the water. His vigilance over the last 48 hours and the technical assistance provided by his shore team enabled him to extricate himself from the southern depression and now progress in milder seas towards the Brazilian coast. In perhaps a dozen days from now, Isabelle should be docking in a port of the South American giant which has yet to be determined.
 
The priority: guaranteeing Isabelle's safety

The MACSF team led by Alain Gautier didn't have time to breathe a sigh of relief, nor to feel sorry for the bad luck that shattered the hopes of its skipper on this round-the-world race. As soon as his retirement was announced, the team worked hard to minimise the risks aboard a boat that had become unstable and less manoeuvrable.
 
"We had to re-mobilise immediately so that Isabelle felt safe and surrounded. At times, there is a small feeling of helplessness because we are far from her. She is at the heart of the action to manage this situation as well as possible. With the shore team, we can just provide her with our technical support, Florian Giffrain (the boat captain) and I work on all these aspects. We try to think of everything to help him in the best possible way. For morale, Cécile Poujol gives him permanent support and we know how important that is". says team manager Alain Gautier

Assistance with routing and settings

Since the loss of her keel, Isabelle has been forced to sail differently on her IMOCA, which no longer reacts in the same way. The technical team has intervened to help her choose the best route to take and determine the most suitable speeds. She also benefits from the invaluable help of Christian Dumard, weather consultant to the Vendée Globe race management.
 
"Isabelle has her routing but it was necessary to rework it in relation to the boat's potential, which has deteriorated considerably. The most complicated thing was to determine how fast she could move forward, and according to what wind strength and direction. The question of the sea state was also a big problem until Monday. It's a whole set of parameters that you have to try to combine to give her the best possible option. For speed for example, we have to find the right balance: Isabelle needs to be dynamic to be able to control the boat and not find herself at the mercy of the waves, but at the same time we have to keep the boat moving forward without taking risks. Since she no longer has a keel, she has only had one loose keel, which is already a performance in itself. On the spot she injured her hand. Over the last two days she has been able to show great lucidity. Now the situation has improved, the risks of finding a chaotic sea again are receding. However, vigilance must remain the order of the day because we have to manage the instability of the wind, which could cause problems". deciphers Alain Gautier
 
A fallback port probably in Brazil

On Tuesday around 13:00 French time, Isabelle was 1,750 miles from Salvador de Bahia. Within ten days or so, the Franco-German sailor could dock in a Brazilian port, the choice of which has not yet been made.
 
"From now on, Isabelle will have to be patient. She is currently crossing a windless zone. She should land in Brazil more certainly than in South Africa, even if today the question is not completely clear-cut. However, the tip of the African continent seems far away and involves risks. The port could be Itajai, Rio de Janeiro or Salvador de Bahia. The objective is that it should reach the north as quickly as possible to find a flow of trade winds from the east that circulate on the latitude 25-26 South. We're in the process of setting up arrival solutions to have a team ready to welcome it. For the rest, repairing the boat on site so that it can return to France by sea or loading the IMOCA MACSF on a cargo ship, for the moment nothing has yet been decided but we're anticipating all the solutions to be as efficient as possible in the zone". reveals Alain Gautier

Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

Thank you for the translation.  What a challenge this will be for Isabelle.  I am wondering though why she cannot use her engine and use it to make a more direct route to shore (based on sea conditions).  It would seem that with a swinging keel putting up enough sail to head to shore could create more instability that keeping the boat upright with no sails.  I could see sailing if the wind is mainly behind, but it looks like she'll have beam or forward conditions.  Napkin math, with 6 kts and @ 1000 miles gets her to the shore line in 6 days.

 

Anyway, smart people helping her out and I send good throughts for a safe return to shore for an amazing sailor/competitor.

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1 hour ago, 3to1 said:

damn, hell of a race at the front. impressive.

go Bestaven.

Go Bestaven and go Damien Seguin!!!

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3 hours ago, Snowden said:

yeah but the tortoise (Hare) had a spare rudder

The rabbit invested in lightweight shoes. 
Green Sea Turtle Storage Dish - Globe Imports

 

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7 hours ago, stief said:

 

Aha! Finally a piece I could use to get the missus hooked on watching ocean racing (this has been a 10 year project). Sigh. Fail

She said: "OK, but the pic of the Horn is all cloudy and blurry."

I will not give up. One of these years I'll get her to appreciate the struggle these sailors have to get around the Horn and home.

Should have waited until she had her coffee. 

Wife comes and checks out the Tracker with me.  Course she is my double handed partner!  And I agree, this race is turning into a NAILBITER!  Anyone in the top 9 could win.  My $$ is on Yannick or JLC tho.   And if JLC stays within 100 miles of anyone other than Yannick he will probably win.

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2 hours ago, sailordave said:

Wife comes and checks out the Tracker with me.  Course she is my double handed partner!  And I agree, this race is turning into a NAILBITER!  Anyone in the top 9 could win.  My $$ is on Yannick or JLC tho.   And if JLC stays within 100 miles of anyone other than Yannick he will probably win.

Missus has been tolerant, and best crew evaah.  She'd lift her starboard heels on the 470 we raced 45 yrs ago, and be under the boom and out on the port wire beautifully. Still recall her standing straight up on  the side of the boat, still hooked onto the trapeze, patiently waiting  while I flipped over onto the centreboard to get us back upright--in a blizzard one wild May long weekend regatta. Don't think we came to a full stop, and we were off again.She balanced it perfectly. Gotta love them gingers. 

So many deserving sailors this race--haven't  discovered who I'm cheering for yet. Even a 12 kt average should turn JLC's 16h 15 min credit into a nice 250 mile cushion, as no doubt he is aware.

Would love to see the big name sponsors hat in hand offering him whatever boat he wants for 2024.

edit--right: he only gets 6 hrs more than Yannick = ~ 70 -100 nm.

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4 hours ago, Liquid said:

Top 9 boats about 100 miles from first!!

Several of those 9 leaders have time coming to them when they cross the line. How many hours is Jean getting, 24?

How do they apply X # of hours after the finish? # of hours X your average speed over the 

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8 minutes ago, tDot said:
4 hours ago, Liquid said:

Top 9 boats about 100 miles from first!!

Several of those 9 leaders have time coming to them when they cross the line. How many hours is Jean getting, 24?

How do they apply X # of hours after the finish? # of hours X your average speed over the 

Crossing the line time - credit time = finish time, I expect.

JLC 16h 15 min

Herrmann 6 hrs

Yannick 10 hrs 15 mins1689465196_ScreenShot2021-01-12at5_19_59PM.png.82fd91087381a5d504a0b6650e495b8b.png

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Thanks, I somehow deleted a much lengthier explanation.   I like your short and sweet answer. 

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5 hours ago, Hitchhiker said:

Of course, they are all essentially sailing in a mine field of wind holes. But, I also wonder if some foil damage is starting to show up on Apivia and Linked.

[aside] Good to have you back after the craziness this last few days.

re AP and LO, don't know if you were logging their numbers, but there was a really interesting drag race between the two a few days ago that I hoped you'd seen.

On the tracker playback it's from 07/01 20:21 UTC -> 09/01 21:17 UTC. Nice conditions, and yet there was a moment when Charlie on AP was able to suddenly  and then consistently gain over Thomas on LO. Almost like he'd found a mode Thomas couldn't match.

 

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2 hours ago, stief said:

[aside] Good to have you back after the craziness this last few days.

 

 

Thanks Stief.  And just to be clear, I was not in the Capitol on that day, I was driving back from a J-111 survey in San Francisco.  So no need to contact the FBI, thank you very much! 

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2 hours ago, Hitchhiker said:

Thanks Stief.  And just to be clear, I was not in the Capitol on that day, I was driving back from a J-111 survey in San Francisco.  So no need to contact the FBI, thank you very much! 

Did you survey Blast or another J/111?  I know several buyers up here looking for J/111's,  but there aren't many for sale right now.  

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1 minute ago, Roleur said:

Did you survey Blast or another J/111?  I know several buyers up here looking for J/111's,  but there aren't many for sale right now.  

Yup. Blast.

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Were Destremau bowsprit issues mentioned here ?

Does not look good ..

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43 minutes ago, yl75 said:

Were Destremau bowsprit issues mentioned here ?

Does not look good ..

Yes, and no it doesn't, they say its not structural but still... so many issues on his boat, I'm really sorry for him... looks like he wants to go around anyway and possibly finish the race, but man... I hope he'll be ok

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1 hour ago, ant1 said:

Yes, and no it doesn't, they say its not structural but still... so many issues on his boat, I'm really sorry for him... looks like he wants to go around anyway and possibly finish the race, but man... I hope he'll be ok

Very very slow and erratic track over last few hours, now headed due north in the direction of NZ. Hope he’s OK, but really seems like retiring would be the right call now.

I’m not suggesting they do so in this case, but under the Vendee RR can the organisers disqualify a competitor for refusing to retire when there is significant damage to their boat?

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(i missed one thing. The new foilers start to make difference once winds start over 15kn.)

 

Vendée Globe. Nobody can say who will win, everything has to be done again for the leaders!
An unprecedented, historic situation in this ninth Vendée Globe! While 81% of the course is in the wake of the top five, there are hardly any gaps between them at all. And very little with the four boats that follow them. With 4600 miles from the finish, no one can tell who will win! Never seen.

Louis Burton on Bureau Vallée is wound up like a clock.  He can believe it too !.

Incredible: to the nearest decimal the top five in the Vendée Globe completed the same percentage of the race's total route on 12 January: 81%… Charlie Dalin, Yannick Bestaven, Thomas Rettant, Damien Seguin and Louis Burton are all at 4600 miles " and dust ”from the finish in Les Sables-d'Olonne. And the sixth, the German Boris Herrmann is at 80.9% ...

The top five completed 81% of the route ...
It's completely crazy. This is obviously unheard of on a solo round-the-world race where the odds are often made from Cape Horn, but it is nevertheless so: the first nine of the Vendée Globe fit in a handkerchief of hardly more. 100 miles! This Tuesday January 12, 65 days after the cannon shot in front of Les Sables-d'Olonne on November 8, it's like a new start to which the first five IMOCAs are engaged.


In the lead for 17 days, Yannick Bestaven was taken over by the pack. Hard for him but he "does not want to give up." | JEAN-MARIE LIOT / MASTER COQ
Charlie Dalin, Damien Seguin, Yannick Bestaven, Thomas Rettant and Louis Burton - the first five, therefore - are only separated by 25 miles! And they will have to deal with the meteorological instability as far as Recife, the horn of Brazil, to finally race in stable and vigorous south-eastern trade winds. In the meantime, the skippers are busy adjusting, looking for the right gust, observing the squalls in a stifling wetness (over 30 degrees). Energy-guzzling little earner!

On the water, there must be pressure differences, and therefore speed differences between the boats. Not easy at all!
“The road is straight north but not clear. Until Recife, the northeast trade winds are not stable, there are bubbles with less wind, and variations in strength and direction. On the water, there must be differences in pressure, and therefore in speed, between the boats. Not easy at all! » Explained Sébastien Josse, weather consultant for the Vendée Globe Race Direction this morning. The long solo race is now taking on a different face, that of a regatta in contact between five IMOCAs, if not new by adding Herrmann, Dutreux, Pedote and Le Cam.


Charlie Dalin has the cards in hand, will he have the conditions to make the power of his latest generation foiler speak? . | CHARLIE DALIN
Will the foils speak?
“The chased position of Yannick (Bestaven) is really not easy because he has to hold it. The worst thing is that we risk coming back to everyone because the area of weak wind will go away ” confided King John to the morning session, wound up like a clock, fresh complexion after his very first shower and morale looking good. The gaps in this leading group are unprecedented, perhaps presaging an arrival at Sables-d'Olonne in burst mode. The first nine are held in just 127 miles ...

“I have a port foil that I keep going in and out depending on the gusts and which I hope will use me in the hours and days to come,” Yannick Bestaven said at the midday vacation. The appendices of Maître CoQ IV are indeed in their entirety, like those of Bureau Vallée 2, which is not the case with LinkedOut or Apivia.

Unless Charlie Dalin brings out the lethal weapon for a few hours to regain the advantage at the right time? Still, if in the powerful trade winds, the advantage of the supporting wings is undeniable, below 15 knots of wind, the differential is minimal. The drift boats will therefore play cards on the tables as far as Recife ...

Seventeen in the Atlantic
The fleet stretches less than 7,000 miles on Tuesday, and now seventeen IMOCA monohulls have been sailing in the South Atlantic since Pip Hare rounded Cape Horn last night. Two competitors are still shaken: Romain Attanasio (Pure-Best Western) off Montevideo and Alexia Barrier (TSE-4myplanet) 800 miles west of point Nemo. Tonic conditions on chaotic seas for Romain who only has a few more hours, strong wind and waves of over six meters for Alexia who has been eating her black bread for more than 24 hours in the middle of a depression coming from the 'Antarctic. On the Cape Horn side, the next to take the gateway to the Atlantic will be Stéphane Le Diraison (Time for Oceans) and the Spaniard Didac Costa (One planet One ocean). (press service source)

 

Vendée Globe. Nobody can say who will win, everything has to be done again for the leaders!

An unprecedented, historic situation in this ninth Vendée Globe! While 81% of the course is in the wake of the top five, there are hardly any gaps between them at all. And very little with the four boats that follow them. With 4600 miles from the finish, no one can tell who will win! Never seen.

 
Louis Burton on Bureau Vallée is wound up like a clock. He can believe it too !. | STEPHANE MAILLARD Show slideshow
Sails and Sailboats.Modified 01/12/2021 at 9:31 p.m.

Incredible: to the nearest decimal the top five in the Vendée Globe completed the same percentage of the race's total route on 12 January: 81%… Charlie Dalin, Yannick Bestaven, Thomas Rettant, Damien Seguin and Louis Burton are all at 4600 miles " and dust ”from the finish in Les Sables-d'Olonne. And the sixth, the German Boris Herrmann is at 80.9% ...

 

The top five completed 81% of the route ...

It's completely crazy. This is obviously unheard of on a solo round-the-world race where the odds are often made from Cape Horn, but it is nevertheless so: the first nine of the Vendée Globe fit in a handkerchief of hardly more. 100 miles! This Tuesday January 12, 65 days after the cannon shot in front of Les Sables-d'Olonne on November 8, it's like a new start to which the first five IMOCAs are engaged.

SEE AS WELL

Follow the Vendée Globe live on the Vendée Globe map
: The match is completely restarted, Dominic Vittet analyzes an incredible suspense

 
MjAyMTAxZDE4MGJiNWMyNzcwZDA0MGMxN2VhZDRiM2IxYzA5OGM?width=940&focuspoint=50%2C50&cropresize=1&client_id=bpeditorial&sign=fc191a6508984041c9e6bf1b238c61706a0cd681b18e0848c83df65c96bee6e8 In the lead for 17 days, Yannick Bestaven was taken over by the pack. Hard for him but he "does not want to give up." | JEAN-MARIE LIOT / MASTER COQ

Charlie Dalin, Damien Seguin, Yannick Bestaven, Thomas Rettant and Louis Burton - the first five, therefore - are only separated by 25 miles! And they will have to deal with the meteorological instability as far as Recife, the horn of Brazil, to finally race in stable and vigorous south-eastern trade winds. In the meantime, the skippers are busy adjusting, looking for the right gust, observing the squalls in a stifling wetness (over 30 degrees). Energy-guzzling little earner!

On the water, there must be pressure differences, and therefore speed differences between the boats. Not easy at all!

“The road is straight north but not clear. Until Recife, the northeast trade winds are not stable, there are bubbles with less wind, and variations in strength and direction. On the water, there must be differences in pressure, and therefore in speed, between the boats. Not easy at all! » Explained Sébastien Josse, weather consultant for the Vendée Globe Race Direction this morning. The long solo race is now taking on a different face, that of a regatta in contact between five IMOCAs, if not new by adding Herrmann, Dutreux, Pedote and Le Cam.

 

Subscribe for free to the Voiles et Voiliers Newsletter

Join Voiles et Voiliers on Facebook

MjAyMTAxYWFmYzk4NGE4ZDYyOGUzZjdjMTEzMDU2MThhODQ3MDQ?width=940&focuspoint=50%2C50&cropresize=1&client_id=bpeditorial&sign=2f775e0532c7403c483794d500cc412a175aaff6a5572e24571976c788c2aec3 Charlie Dalin has the cards in hand, will he have the conditions to make the power of his latest generation foiler speak? . | CHARLIE DALIN

Will the foils speak?

“The chased position of Yannick (Bestaven) is really not easy because he has to hold it. The worst thing is that we risk coming back to everyone because the area of weak wind will go away ” confided King John to the morning session, wound up like a clock, fresh complexion after his very first shower and morale looking good. The gaps in this leading group are unprecedented, perhaps presaging an arrival at Sables-d'Olonne in burst mode. The first nine are held in just 127 miles ...

“I have a port foil that I keep going in and out depending on the gusts and which I hope will use me in the hours and days to come,” Yannick Bestaven said at the midday vacation. The appendices of Maître CoQ IV are indeed in their entirety, like those of Bureau Vallée 2, which is not the case with LinkedOut or Apivia.

Unless Charlie Dalin brings out the lethal weapon for a few hours to regain the advantage at the right time? Still, if in the powerful trade winds, the advantage of the supporting wings is undeniable, below 15 knots of wind, the differential is minimal. The drift boats will therefore play cards on the tables as far as Recife ...

Seventeen in the Atlantic

The fleet stretches less than 7,000 miles on Tuesday, and now seventeen IMOCA monohulls have been sailing in the South Atlantic since Pip Hare rounded Cape Horn last night. Two competitors are still shaken: Romain Attanasio (Pure-Best Western) off Montevideo and Alexia Barrier (TSE-4myplanet) 800 miles west of point Nemo. Tonic conditions on chaotic seas for Romain who only has a few more hours, strong wind and waves of over six meters for Alexia who has been eating her black bread for more than 24 hours in the middle of a depression coming from the 'Antarctic. On the Cape Horn side, the next to take the gateway to the Atlantic will be Stéphane Le Diraison (Time for Oceans) and the Spaniard Didac Costa (One planet One ocean). (press service source)

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42 minutes ago, troll99 said:

 

What's the need to post the same text twice really ? I makes the thread even more cluttered and is pretty much useless...

 

Ari is growing salad.

EriG24eXMAMRgwy.jpg

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1 minute ago, Bebmoumoute said:

What's the need to post the same text twice really ? I makes the thread even more cluttered and is pretty much useless...

 

Ari is growing salad.

EriG24eXMAMRgwy.jpg

it was some complaints that some can't read the bigger text therefore I post plain text as well. 

I cannot please everyone :lol:

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2 minutes ago, troll99 said:

it was some complaints that some can't read the bigger text therefore I post plain text as well. 

I cannot please everyone :lol:

Plain text is enough, and add the link so people can access the source article

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2 minutes ago, troll99 said:

it was some complaints that some can't read the bigger text therefore I post plain text as well. 

I cannot please everyone :lol:

Only post the plain text then, please, everybody can read that !

 

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Personally I've had to ignore a few people who post full articles as I've normally seen them via VG social media anyway, I think quoted interesting sections and linking the relevant article is far better than just copy and pasting entire articles, it just makes it harder to parse useful information out.

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The top three managed to take a small lead again added with Louis Burton as fourth topman.
Yannick making the slowest speed. Great...
572139360_Knipsel6.thumb.PNG.948ac65fca83ae10885e303f254b5f48.PNG
 

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M. Tripon is about 30 NM from crossing his own track from the way down, he took a significantly more westerly route having been in different weather to the leaders.

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16 minutes ago, Schakel said:

The top three managed to take a small lead again added with Louis Burton as fourth topman.

This race has more lead changes and close racing than the average F1 Grand Prix or any AC race involving INEOS

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Herrmann points out in today's Lives their gribs are now able to route to the finish for the first time.

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15 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Ouest France is telling Destremeau to stop there and retire in NZ. They say it is now too risky to carry on.

https://www.ouest-france.fr/vendee-globe/humeur-vendee-globe-merci-sebastien-mais-il-est-temps-de-rentrer-7116467

Headlined under "HUMOR. Vendée Globe. "Thank you Sébastien, but it's time to go home..."

Wish he'd listen.There's already a Rimas thread.

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Louis Burton was so far behind in the south Ocean and stopped for repairs and now he's up the front how is this possible...., 

No one pushing hard like Armel/AT ? 

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