bigrpowr

Vendee Globe 2020

Recommended Posts

54 minutes ago, Somtam Cowboy said:

What's up with Miranda??780363766_Screenshot(5).thumb.png.abf846362edd1d5a54a8f0c2913737dd.png

 

She is in a wind hole apparently :

Quote

Le message du bord de Miranda Merron

"Juste avant la tombée de la nuit, j'ai enfin trouvé le temps de réfléchir à cet incroyable moment que constitue pour moi le passage du Horn. Après le passage d'un front, le soleil et le ciel bleu sont apparus, avec des albatros, des nuages de forme lenticulaire, et cette délicieuse odeur de la terre humide. C'était les premières terres que je contemplais depuis 69 jours, et j'ai eu la chance de passer à quelques milles du Horn, des îles Deceit et d'autres petits rochers. Puis plus tard dans l'après mdi, ce fut la Terre de Feu et Staten Island. J'ai beaucoup apprécié la mer calme. J'ai aperçu plusieurs bateaux, n'en n'ayant vu aucun depuis la descente de l'Atlantique, à l'exception de celui d'Alexia Barrier il y a quelques semaines dans l'Océan Indien.

Ma présence en ce lieu à bord de Campagne de France est entièrement due à Halvard que je remercie d'avoir tenté ce pari et d'avoir cru en notre capacité à monter ce projet. Je le remercie pour le dur travail qu'il a accompli ces deux dernières années. Je remercie nos sponsors et nos partenaires techniques de leur soutien. Et tous ceux qui nous aident et nous soutiennent d'une manière ou d'une autre. Je suis une fille très chanceuse. Merci à tous pour vos charmants messages.

Pour l'heure, je suis empétolée au centre d'une dépression. Pas un souffle d'air sur l'eau. C'est probablement la punition pour avoir navigué hier sous le vent des montagnes de la Terre de Feu sans avoir été arrêtée. Au moins, les safrans et la quille sont libérés de toutes algues."

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And just in case you missed who picked these two 6 weeks ago.:lol::lol:

What Buttons wife said then stuck in my mind.

"will you still love me if I dive south and screw it up"

On 12/6/2020 at 11:08 AM, jack_sparrow said:

Damian Seguin first showed his hand as a 'smokey' last Thursday.

On 12/3/2020 at 4:11 PM, jack_sparrow said:
On 12/3/2020 at 3:53 PM, AnotherSailor said:

Burton is killing it! Ruyant is slowly falling behind.

Burton certainly is max VMG now and staying in the SW pressure as Charlie is running out of horsepower looking to gybe (which in real time he probably already has). 

Damian Seguin also staying in SW pressure and going in right direction is appearing as a smokey 

 IMG_20201203_160843.jpg

Now he has fully 'revealed' his hand and he like Louis Burton will 'PEEL' off from the 'peloton' when they see an opportunity.

As Louis said to his wife and manager (Kevin's cousin) as he was looking to find the station for the SO east bound 'train'..... "will you still love me if I dive south and screw it up" :P

Watching 'brave moves' like this are what makes this race...from the lesser ranked and less monied, more so. Add in also being a paralympic competitor....wow.

IMG_20201206_110537.jpg

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From https://twitter.com/skol33

3 different ways to apply the time bonuses and their results (this was done last night):

  • Time bonus with the average speed in the last 24 hr;
  • Time bonus with the average speed in the last 4 hr;
  • Time at the Equator.

EriG24eXMAMRgw4y2.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Bebmoumoute said:

From https://twitter.com/skol33

3 different ways to apply the time bonuses and their results (this was done last night):

  • Time bonus with the average speed in the last 24 hr;
  • Time bonus with the average speed in the last 4 hr;
  • Time at the Equator.

 

 
 
 

Thanks! Great someone has gone and done this properly. Feel like the final method (time at the equator) is the most helpful. The 24hr avg speed just feels wrong - JLC has a higher average speed because the fleet is compressing at the doldrums. In 24 hours time this measure will look completely different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
35 minutes ago, b3nharris said:

Thanks! Great someone has gone and done this properly. Feel like the final method (time at the equator) is the most helpful. The 24hr avg speed just feels wrong - JLC has a higher average speed because the fleet is compressing at the doldrums. In 24 hours time this measure will look completely different.

I am sure there are as many ways to look at this issue than people interested in the race... But yes, I agree a physical point of passage makes more sense. Altough it doesn't account for east/west distances.

At least this gives some insight.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Regarding Yannick Bestaven, it is even more than just "some damage". Apparently, he did a massive nose dive at Cape Horn; the whole front of the boat burried in the water and he lost his pullpit and his furlers.

His exact words: " Je n’ai plus de balcon, plus d’enrouleur et il y a certaines voiles dont je ne peux plus me servir. "

"I no longer have a pullpit or a furler and there are some specific sails I can no longer use".

So he tried to repair as much as possible, but there are some light wind sails that he no longer can use. Therefore his difficulty to maintain the same pace as the competition in the South East Trade Winds...

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's a shame... i'm really hoping that Bestaven or Seguin do something great... they have been truly inspirational so far.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Laurent said:

Regarding Yannick Bestaven, it is even more than just "some damage". Apparently, he did a massive nose dive at Cape Horn; the whole front of the boat burried in the water and he lost his pullpit and his furlers.

His exact words: " Je n’ai plus de balcon, plus d’enrouleur et il y a certaines voiles dont je ne peux plus me servir. "

"I no longer have a pullpit or a furler and there are some specific sails I can no longer use".

So he tried to repair as much as possible, but there are some light wind sails that he no longer can use. Therefore his difficulty to maintain the same pace as the competition in the South East Trade Winds...

 

Bugger. Given that the fact he's still in with a very real chance of winning - either outright or with the time compensation - is pretty incredible.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Destremeau has arrived in Christchurch

Sans titre.png

First, and hopefully last, time someone tries to build a cockpit cover out of cardboard. Almost the most hilarious part of this whole Vendee

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, Laurent said:

"Je n’ai plus de balcon, plus d’enrouleur et il y a certaines voiles dont je ne peux plus me servir."

Interesting to speculate what he's lost. Sounds like the big J1 tacked down on the bow (not the sprit) is gone but he may still have a MH0 or FR0? I think he doesn't have a true kite as such. Too much upwind for a code sail recently hence down on speed?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Boris must be exhausted after the last 24 hours.

 

Screen Shot 2021-01-18 at 7.54.16 AM.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Way back someone noted the band of high pressure extending west from the Canaries, but forecast now suggests bridges across.

 

Screen Shot 2021-01-18 at 8.24.12 AM.png

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, TheDragon said:

First, and hopefully last, time someone tries to build a cockpit cover out of cardboard. Almost the most hilarious part of this whole Vendee

Fuck, was it actually built out of Cardboard? 

 

I mean, it looks like it there. I just assumed it was made from Plywood at least (which would have been an interesting choice in itself). 

 

I love when people have a go, but Destremeau at times makes me wonder about his sanity

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If Burton pulls this off he will really deserve it, having taken all sorts of risks in the SO, fallen back, and now clawed his way back to the lead.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Icedtea said:

Fuck, was it actually built out of Cardboard? 

 

I mean, it looks like it there. I just assumed it was made from Plywood at least (which would have been an interesting choice in itself). 

 

I love when people have a go, but Destremeau at times makes me wonder about his sanity

Yup, there were videos of him in the Atlantic showing holes in it as waves came over the boat, and now all you see is the remnants.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
45 minutes ago, TheDragon said:

Boris must be exhausted after the last 24 hours.

 

Screen Shot 2021-01-18 at 7.54.16 AM.png

 

Yep, but obviously relieved to be out of the ITC ...

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Appears Armel is finally looking for some new playmates...

20210118_071518.thumb.jpg.c9f649b45d22b1584f109bd3a3e1c731.jpg

430 nm in the past 24 hrs, and in the correct direction too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
47 minutes ago, Varan said:

Appears Armel is finally looking for some new playmates...

430 nm in the past 24 hrs, and in the correct direction too.

Yes, he's been first or second in distance covered over 24 hours for the last 5 or more updates and is over 200 nm closer to the leader than when he rounded the Horn. The Regadata projection has him passing Maxime at the latitude of Cape Verde, but that seems to be assuming no Doldrums slowdown; unlikely. Still, 10th seems eminently doable, the real question is can he catch JLC, Dutreaux, Pedote and Seguin?

tripon_vg2020-20201225-tripon-photo3350b-haute-dfinition-vi.thumb.jpeg.842c9b5c5b49a461238d8d9dd084bc69.jpeg

It's really a pity that we won't get to see L'Occitane compete with the leaders in the same weather system, but is it not safe to say at this point that Sam Manuard has designed a boat that's capable of winning this race?

_BO_7934.thumb.JPG.73005bd593afdd4c2f911b18d8f93297.JPG

22 knots, if I saw his screen correctly:

 

Edited by HeartOfGold
Added link to video.
  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

https://france3-regions.francetvinfo.fr/pays-de-la-loire/vendee-globe-skipper-toulonnais-sebastien-destremau-va-equiper-son-bateau-casquette-cockpit-carton-1891586.html

Bad translation... (sustainable reasons? :lol:)
Why a cardboard cap?

Sébastien, who came last in his last Vendée Globe in 2017, did not have a protective cap on his Imoca, although almost all boats have them. He therefore decides to embark on this new challenge and have it made out of cardboard. He initially wanted to have this cap made when the village opened in order to be in contact with the public and be able to talk. The village is completely closed to the public, the project continues anyway, it is the sculptor Stéphane Munoz who creates this element.

“I didn't want to make a carbon cap, it's something that doesn't suit me. I understand all these technological aspects very well, speed, race to victory, I respect all that. I think that. now is the time to move on and say that on our boats we still need to build them in a sophisticated way, but there is still a huge step to be taken regarding non-structural elements like caps, chests , the bunks. There, I am inside the boat, there are a multitude of things that we can do other than carbon which is disgusting for the planet! " confirms Sébastien Destremau.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm still rooting for a Louis Burton, Damien Seguin, Jean Le Cam podium (in no particular order)... come om guys !

Chances are incredibly slim, but everything is still very much in flux in the race... we shall see...

Yes We Cam !

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From the tracker it looks like both Bestaven and Seguin are now going upwind (North-East)... and Seguin is down to 6knts... why would they do that? can't be that good for VMG...

Are the other overlays showing a different situation?

Btw: Le Cam used to say "if in doubt, go West"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, HeartOfGold said:

but is it not safe to say at this point that Sam Manuard has designed a boat that's capable of winning this race?

He’s definitely one of the architects who’ll get new business from this cycle. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Miffy said:

He’s definitely one of the architects who’ll get new business from this cycle. 

It'd be nice to see a few more boats from him, vs Juan K. 

I'd still really like to see L'Occcitane directly against some of the other new boats, in the same conditions.  It took him several thousand miles to pass Cremer and the new Verdier boats have never really pulled away from the dagger board boats either. The only time I can say we've seen a clear advantage has been reaching thru the trade winds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, TheDragon said:

Way back someone noted the band of high pressure extending west from the Canaries, but forecast now suggests bridges across.

 

Screen Shot 2021-01-18 at 8.24.12 AM.png

The timing of that bridging will be interesting.  Burton & Dalin should reach that HP zone in 48 hours or so, right at about the same time it starts to collapse from West to East.  With Dalin 175 miles further East then Burton, he may save hundreds of miles of sailing,  if he can connect with a bridge about the same time as Burton to the West of him.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, tDot said:

The timing of that bridging will be interesting.  Burton & Dalin should reach that HP zone in 48 hours or so, right at about the same time it starts to collapse from West to East.  With Dalin 175 miles further East then Burton, he may save hundreds of miles of sailing,  if he can connect with a bridge about the same time as Burton to the West of him.

Was just wondering the same thing...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Translation of today's Jean Le Cam update on the FR VG website :

Jean Le Cam (Yes we Cam!) was on video-chat this morning. He talks about the doldrums and gives his analysis of the race for the head of the fleet. He doesn't make any predictions because for him, it is impossible to predict!

"Some people said that the doldrums would not be very active... Well (he laughs) as it turns out, the winds are very erratic!

Currently we are in the famous doldrums, this zone of convergence of two weather systems. It's a windless zone, and the further north you go, the faster you can get out of it. The first one which comes out touches the wind, and can take a little advance. It's like the rich getting even richer!

At the front we saw Bureau Vallée getting comfortable, Apivia is a little bit behind. It is not the direct route, so the rankings are not very revealing.  We go north then afterwards we will go the east towards Sables d'Olonne.

Sometimes the doldrums move from the south to the north, which means that the doldrums can follow us up! In those circumstances, you stay in them for two or three days ... And the files do not always see that. It can happen, it's never the same passage twice.

I'll tell you a story: yesterday I was under Spi. It was refusing a little, so, well, I said to myself "let's stop", I go to the front, I lower my Spinnaker. You have to know that before that I had given some red [wine] to Éole, Neptune and myself (but to them mostly). After I had just lowered my sail and gotten back to the back of the boat, I had 25 knots of wind, with a 160° wind shift! I remained under mainsail alone, in a squall. It's really very random at the moment.

Anything is possible for the rankings! But I'm not making predictions. You're always asked to predict what you can't predict. It's at the end of the fair that you count the dungs. And then at least, you are sure not to make a mistake. For me everything is fine for now, but it's never over until you cross the finish line.

Last night I didn't sleep much with these winds that change constantly. This morning I was in the spirit of "we will rest when we arrive in les sables d'Olonne" but we will have a rest area in the trade winds, we will be 4 days on the same tack. It will be "pilot and dodo"! After that we are going to have some downwind, it will be a little less stable.

I tinkered yesterday, because my engine mountings had detached themselves. It was my last technical to-do, after the repair of the J2. We'll see if it holds, for the moment it's not very needed anyway. You're happy when you manage to do what you had to do. »

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
44 minutes ago, ant1 said:

Jean Le Cam

tinkered ... engine mountings had detached themselves

brilliant bit of French understatement there (shurely shome mishtake?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, bclovisp said:

From the tracker it looks like both Bestaven and Seguin are now going upwind (North-East)... and Seguin is down to 6knts... why would they do that? can't be that good for VMG...

Are the other overlays showing a different situation?

Btw: Le Cam used to say "if in doubt, go West"

It's the Doldrums, any forward progress is positive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
42 minutes ago, tDot said:

It's the Doldrums, any forward progress is positive.

Head for the cloud. Fuck the direction.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like where Pip is to the West. Zero pressure for Alan / Arnaud in 24-48h, she might even close up on Charal

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting change in the route options between yesterday and today.  There is so much more to play in this race.  The speed and direction of the low pressure off to the northwest of the race track is the big influencer. 

vendeetrackup.JPG

vendee20comp.JPG

vendeewx.JPG

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For those interested, here is the video of Jean Le Cam's engine "tinkering", ah, there are subtitles now... so... good :)

Concerning the problem itself, the front mountings (the youtube translation isn't very faithfull to what he said) detached/separated from the boat 3 or 4 weeks ago. And of course he's not talking about "cruise liners" at the end, but just regular cruising sailboats (the stairs are usually also the engine cover and you lift them to access the engine).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bestaven, Le Cam and more 

Yannick Bestaven (Maître CoQ IV): "I no longer have an intact boat and I have a lot of technical problems. When I rounded Cape Horn, I caught a big depression. I crashed violently which ravaged the whole front deck of the boat. I no longer have a pulpit, no furling system and there are some sails that I can no longer use. I tried to repair as best I could, to keep holding on, but I need a lot of sail changes and small weather sails that I couldn't use. All this added to the difficulty of crossing the Doldrums. But I'll try to finish in the best possible way".

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The long term forecast is looking like the fleet will maintain good boat speed all the way into the finish line.  The extra speed will really increase the effect of the time given to the PRB rescuers. The leaders will need to extend their lead to maintain their winning position after the correction.  

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, GER 100 said:

Will Harris on the scenario for the final sprint (yacht.de, german).

  • ETA: around 2021-01-28
  • 7 boats in 24 h
  • the final legs won't be too extrem, so no survival mode, but full-on racing to the end.

 

80dc04ba277d204bbc14d261c3b783f4c129e482

 

 

Not much port tack for Dalin and Ruyant to push on their undamaged foils, looks quite good for Burton I would say, and maybe Boris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
21 hours ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Destremeau has arrived in Christchurch

Sans titre.png

Lyttelton. Christchurch doesn't have anywhere sensible to park. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Louis Burton clearly wanting to be the most westerly boat. 

 

Looks like an opportunity opening up for Armel Tripon to sail a shorter route and cut the corner a bit. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So many podium contenders... bloody hell. Such a difference from last time.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice bit about Servane and Louis Burton. Snips from SW article by Ed Gorman 19 Jan 02:17 EST

Servane Escoffier: We can't wait to give him a hug

You don't hear a lot about the home front during the Vendée Globe, but every IMOCA sailor trying to complete his or her dream on the world's oceans right now has loved ones waiting for their safe return and following their every move.[ . . . .]

Supporting him through every step of this exceptionally tough road has been his wife Servane Escoffier. She hails from one of France's great offshore racing families and is one of the most accomplished female ocean racing sailors in the sport with transatlantics and a two-handed round-the-world race to her name. She knows exactly what her husband has been up against and is clearly a force of positive energy whom Burton is only too happy to acknowledge.

During a radio call immediately after he completed his repairs off Macquarie Island a few weeks ago, he was asked about her. "My wife?" he said. "She is amazing, incredible and so is the team. I have their support day and night - it's super-cool."

So what has it been like for Escoffier - cousin of the PRB skipper Kevin Escoffier - during the past 70 days while Burton has been on the high seas, leaving her to take care of their two children, a boy of nine and a girl, aged seven.

She described a non-stop routine, seven-days-a-week. "I wear the hats of wife, mum, team manager and business owner, "she told the IMOCA Class. "On land, when Louis is here, we try to share the job and the children, but when he is at sea, it is not the same you know."

"The most important thing," she added, "is to try to be there for the children and make sure their life is not too rushed. Louis and I are really a team. With the technical team and the business team, I try to manage all the projects. I try to do my best. But, for sure, I make mistakes sometimes - I am stressed sometimes and sometimes I am calm, but I am so busy; I could be on the phone non-stop," she adds laughing.

Escoffier, 39, said she and Burton rarely, if ever, speak on the satellite phone but prefer to use WhatsApp which, she says, has revolutionised her communications with her husband since the last Vendée Globe. Using the text service she is able to regularly update him on all the daily news concerning the children and their life at home.

"Louis is someone who is really focused when he is sailing," she said. "But he likes to be in contact with the people he loves and likes, and with his sponsors too, so WhatsApp is really pretty cool." [. . . .] 

"I know my husband," said Escoffier, who jointly runs a business with Burton that promotes young offshore sailors. "I know how he goes at everything, everyday in life and in his work - he is somebody who loves life and never stops - never. If he tries to do something, he does it 100%, so I know his strength of mind."

Continuing that theme, Escoffier says she has not been surprised to see her husband fight back to the front of the fleet over the last few weeks. We asked her if she thought he could yet win the race, but she reckons that is not as important as reflecting on what he has already achieved. "In the current context, to be honest, Louis has already won, when you consider where he was to where he is now. The rest is a bonus," she said.

In the meantime, Escoffier and the kids are eagerly awaiting their father's return to Les Sables d'Olonne. "While he is not here I try to take the pressure off him as much as possible," she said. "I try to make him laugh and tell him, 'OK, this last section is the icing on the cake.' For sure we really, really want to hug him but there is maybe twelve days to go - we are like children with Christmas coming and with Santa coming home."

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bits from today's Vendée Live #73 [EN]

Herrmann to Pierre Casiraghi (founder of Team Malizia): " I'm a bit scared be honest. . . . Scared to break something. I think someone like Louis or Yannick, they just go throttle down and I used to be the same with the old foils, and have gone through so many conditions and learned that they last and don't break. New foils I don't have that and am a little bit scared."

Jacques Caraës explains DTL/F waypoints, both up and down the Atlantic (didn't expect such a close grouping for the finish); big ETA Jan 27 (next Wed).

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This event has been incredibly close. Talk about lead changes:

At the head of the fleet now Charlie Dalin (Apivia) has been in first place 178 times since November 8th when the race started.  Sail-World

An amazing edition of the Vendée Globe. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From yesterday, but Conrad Humphrey's guest former RC Denis Horeau worth a listen. He had high praise for JLC and Damien Seguin, Isabelle and Clarisse. Wishes for Yannick to win, but really wanted Alex. He argues the race needs an international to win; not sure about sailing inside the cave. Near the end of the vid, he thinks Louis' experience and boat "deserves" to win.

Re Kevin E's rescue: good points about how lucky it was--there were such good sailors around--since the beacon gave wrong positions for 7 hours and was very close to a major disaster. 

He's sorry not enough of the sailors care about the clean energy race, but figures the rules have to change first.

His book's new edition, not available in EN, sounds like a good reference.

2 key decisions for the future. Need to decide: Non-assisted? or Best tech? (electronics, foils, comms, team help). Currently the NOR  . . .  needs work.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Varan said:

An amazing edition of the Vendée Globe. 

Yes. Can't help think how much more amazing it could have been if the top 10 had dashboards like Herrmann's, updating every 2 to 5 sec, and positions data fed to a Windy tracker.

Remember how glued we were to Leg 10 of the VOR, able to sense each wave as Burling and Brunel surfed past Tuke and Mapfre?  Exhausting, but *that* was more gripping.

This edition is good, but really hope the VG organizers see the potential to really captivate a world wide audience.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Way off topic: Only one more sleep before 4D day--the Day Duck Dynasty Departs. Couldn't resist. 

  • Like 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not your usual doldrums vid. Yannick wins.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Herrmann generates a lot of good will and attention for his program, he won't win the VG, but I think he's given the event more than he's taken. There are some folks who basically put in minimal effort on communications once they secure the funding and leave France? They might win, leave the imoca scene and start a technical boatyard/prep consultancy - but they give back very little to the sponsors and VG organizers. It is what it is and the skippers should always be allowed to be who they are - but I think the public notices. 



 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmmm. Many of the less communicative are giving enough just to compete, but point taken about the minimal comms.

Still, sometimes when following the more communicative, like Pip and Herrmann, I just want to yell, "shut up and sail!" Same for the mast-climb and fixit vids. Those have tended to be overly dramatic. Hell, they're sailors, and thus easy to forgive much overacting and poor comms. And put their diets online and free the skippers from all those cooking shows.

How to let them sail and still grow the followers? Something like, make their OSCARs/ masthead GoPro 24/7 public Live Stream, and leave it to the editors ashore to cherry-pick footage for the daily Live and news releases. Frankly, I've found the shore team background interviews more compelling than the sat-lagged skipper interviews. Or at least cut their media obligations so they have more time to think how they want to sell the more personal moments. Post their nav solutions, say, 8 hrs later, and that can fuel a lot of 'expert' commentary ashore.

Lots of ways to free them up to be more competitive sailors. 

not a rant,  just considering the options.

 

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been having issues posting up images.  So very late with this. Bureau going fast in the wrong direction?  Route solutions not much different after 21 hours?

Vendee20.JPG

vendee20comp.JPG

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yeah this big west route is a gamble but all sailing is..... Come on louis..... oh and Damien
Best race ever

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
50 minutes ago, Hitchhiker said:

Been having issues posting up images.  So very late with this. Bureau going fast in the wrong direction?  Route solutions not much different after 21 hours?

vendee20comp.JPG

Routes seem to match the little I've seen today, especially the importance of that gybe north level with the Canaries. Will be amazing if only a 1hr delta at the finish, especially if the lead boat has to decide whether to cover the more direct option.. Wouldn't be surprised to see more than two within such few hours. Fingers crossed.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, stief said:

Routes seem to match the little I've seen today, especially the importance of that gybe north level with the Canaries. Will be amazing if only a 1hr delta at the finish, especially if the lead boat has to decide whether to cover the more direct option.. Wouldn't be surprised to see more than two within such few hours. Fingers crossed.

 

I don't put any credence in the deltas at the finish.  These are routed at the same polar percentage.  What I find really interesting is that the delta between two sets of solutions is only two hours and one hour after 13 hours of sailing!  But, I think for sure there are going to be close grouping of finishers.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An article from a couple of days ago (hope it wasn't posted already) on Michel Desjoyeaux's take on Louis Burton's race, and what's to come, translated from https://www.scanvoile.com/2021/01/michel-desjoyeaux-analyse-la-course-de.html

Michel Desjoyeaux analyzes Louis Burton's race and seems confident for the future, "he should keep a good pace".

First to cross the equator last night, Saturday January 16, one hour ahead of Charlie Dalin, Louis Burton is playing at the front of an intense Vendée Globe. The race at the front of the fleet is grandiose as they attack the North Atlantic, and the skipper of Bureau Vallée 2 seems unshakeable both in his determination and in the ability of his foiler to find new legs in these tonic north-easterly trade wind conditions. Michel Desjoyeaux, double winner of the Vendée Globe (2000, 2008) analyzes the Louis Burton race and seems confident for the future.

Louis Burton down to business
"He ran his race, managing his technical penalties and day-to-day problems. Louis really sails with his guts. He was 2nd in the Indian Ocean just behind Charlie Dalin. Did he push like a boar to get into so much trouble afterwards? Anyway, he carried his cross for a few days. Many would have legitimately abandoned because the damages he sustained were not small "things". He had some luck with the weather during his stop in Macquarie, but he came back and he didn't just come back. He went through the pack, and took back 2nd place, and without blabing about it. He is quite serene, he is down to business...."

Keeping up the pace
"It looks like the weather is going to be accommodating for the last part of the course. We can see that over 24 hours, the leading group was fast. It's now a speed race and Louis is facing an IMOCA, Apivia, which is not at 100% as its port foil cannot function normally. As we can see, Bureau Vallée 2 is also keeping pace with Thomas Ruyant whose boat is no longer at 100% of its potential either. In the North Atlantic trade winds, Louis should keep a good pace. Afterwards, we will have to see how everyone manages to catch the depression at the level of the Azores and how they will cope with those tonic conditions. The end of the course is never easy to manage... The boats are worn out, we don't really know what state the sails are in. On the mental side, I'm not worried! Louis is a warrior: he is able to cope with technical problems, he has a more versatile profile than some of the other competitors".

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Right so if you french folks while reviewing the rules could just move to a 2 year cycle, that be great :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A little trip down memory lane... an old documentary that covers the first edition in 1989... a true 80s time capsule, and even if its in french the images should speak somewhat for themselves.

 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lamazou has a Macintosh onboard ! (around 19:40), I wonder what he was using it for ?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
39 minutes ago, ant1 said:

A little trip down memory lane... an old documentary that covers the first edition in 1989... a true 80s time capsule, and even if its in french the images should speak somewhat for themselves.

Thanks. (Got a good laugh out of the clip with Jean-Yves Terlain. My kind of sailor, cigarette and all. Reminded me of JLC)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, yl75 said:

Lamazou has a Macintosh onboard ! (around 19:40), I wonder what he was using it for ?

Nice catch. Likely digital pics and logs, IIRC. 1990 would be System 6 --  still have the discs :lol: 

IN 1999, could get weather faxes off the radio onto the mac; don't know if was available in 89/90.

Did a check, but can't recall any nav software at the time, though for anything graphic, Apple was the way to go. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, stief said:

Thanks. (Got a good laugh out of the clip with Jean-Yves Terlain. My kind of sailor, cigarette and all. Reminded me of JLC)

Ruined innumerable packets of Gauloises dinghy sailing in the 70s and early 80s.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Jean-Baptiste said:

Ruined innumerable packets of Gauloises dinghy sailing in the 70s and early 80s.

Yep, then rolled Drum for years--great wind seeker on a sailboard. Hook the arms around the boom, and boom! 10 minute way to check for wind in a drifter, and distract the competition. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jean Francois Coste also has one, around 42:15

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, stief said:

Yep, then rolled Drum for years--great wind seeker on a sailboard. Hook the arms around the boom, and boom! 10 minute way to check for wind in a drifter, and distract the competition. :D

I quit in 86 when my twin daughters arrived, but as Air France allowed smoking on aircraft until 2000 was the beneficiary of 14 more years of passive smoking. Still occasionally miss it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Been a bit out of touch lately with work and all, but holy shit, our happy friend Armel has been giving a go as of late.

20210119_175540.thumb.jpg.fb4257967abaf9608c0ece3d1f5878bd.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And JY Terlain had two of them apparently :

Quote

Les « Mac Plus » de Terlain. Dans la cabine d’UAP, son monocoque jaune surmonté d’un rouf ressemblant à la pyramide du Louvre, Jean-Yves Terlain possède un équipement informatique de premier plan. Lors de cette 1ère édition, il embarque deux Apple Macintosh Plus de bureau…

https://www.voile.banquepopulaire.fr/passion/vendee-globe-la-ou-tout-a-commence

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Jean-Baptiste said:

I quit in 86 when my twin daughters arrived, but as Air France allowed smoking on aircraft until 2000 was the beneficiary of 14 more years of passive smoking. Still occasionally miss it.

Cool (well not now, but OK back then). Saw your post in the JVT thread. Was just trying to find the tweet Ari made, where he finished the Route de Rhum, then tweeted from the cockpit somewhere over SE Asia. Any time I flew (passenger only), would always look down at the ocean and imagine sailing there, and vice versa. No doubt you know the perspective.

Quote

You have scarcely stopped flying though?
I had some flights until the second of April and then two weeks later they called me back to ask if I would do two flights to China to pick up protective clothing, face covers and masks and things like that. We just carried cargo, flying the Airbus a350 with 336 seats, all empty. We flew with six pilots and stayed almost 24 hours in the plane and then less than two hours stopover in Shanghai. They loaded the Cargo and we stayed in the plane the whole time. I volunteered. We (Finnair) have five of our 24 wide-bodied now working flying cargo from Asia. I want to be back working soon. It is such good fun flying I can't wait to be back to it. It will be nice to get back to work. I think this situation, as far as flying goes, will last several years and so I don't think air traffic is going to be the same as before Coronavirus.

https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/19660/ari-huusela-the-finnish-airline-pilot-is-getting-ready-for-vendee-globe-lift-off

[sorry Varan--drifted off there. Back to Armel]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Found below googling around, so in fact Macsea (which became Maxsea) was launched on the Mac already in 1985 !

 

 

mac_1985.png

 

Or below :

Quote

Depuis 1992, MaxSea a parcouru du chemin ! Ça fait déjà plus de trente ans que MaxSea développe des logiciels de navigation maritime dédiés aux plaisanciers et professionnels de la mer.

mac

Mais cette aventure a tout d’abord débuté sous le nom de MacSea en 1985. Pourquoi ? D’une part « Mac », nom de l’ordinateur de la marque Apple sur lequel le premier logiciel a été développé par notre président Brice Pryszo. D’autre part le terme « Sea » qui rappelle le cœur de métier de l’entreprise. Ce n’est qu’en 1999 que MacSea devient MaxSea en axant son développement informatique sur PC.

https://blog.mytimezero.com/4658-2/

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, yl75 said:

Lamazou has a Macintosh onboard ! (around 19:40), I wonder what he was using it for ?

There used to be navigation/routing software that ran on mac computers. Mac sea?

Also software that was used to download images in real time from low earth orbit satellites. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

428833048_Capture_decran_2021-01-20_a_03_31_55.thumb.png.21a4ad39c89686d7f5fe149ed58bc1d9.png

12 minutes ago, jhc said:

There used to be navigation/routing software that ran on mac computers. Mac sea?

Also software that was used to download images in real time from low earth orbit satellites. 

Indeed !

An article about it below (page 21 22 23), where it says that "Mac Sea"(developed in Bayonne) was already linked to the nav instruments and could integrate weather faxes :

http://www.retronik.fr/revues/megahertz/1987/MHZ058_12-1987.pdf

And this was about the 1986 BOC challenge won by Jeantot.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, yl75 said:

Indeed !

An article about it below (page 21 22 23), where it says that "Mac Sea"(developed in Bayonne) was already linked to the nav instruments and could integrate weather faxes :

http://www.retronik.fr/revues/megahertz/1987/MHZ058_12-1987.pdf

Thanks yl75 ! The screenshot of an early version of macsea on page 21 is epically retro. Cool magazine btw..

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, ant1 said:

Thanks yl75 ! The screenshot is "epic" in a retro way ! Cool magazine btw...

Yes, funny to look at that and these old "techies" magazines :)

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, stief said:

Cool (well not now, but OK back then). Saw your post in the JVT thread. Was just trying to find the tweet Ari made, where he finished the Route de Rhum, then tweeted from the cockpit somewhere over SE Asia. Any time I flew (passenger only), would always look down at the ocean and imagine sailing there, and vice versa. No doubt you know the perspective.

https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/19660/ari-huusela-the-finnish-airline-pilot-is-getting-ready-for-vendee-globe-lift-off

[sorry Varan--drifted off there. Back to Armel]

Since you mentioned Armel, happy, happy, happy

Armel Tripon (L'Occitane en Provence) echoes the same message: "Happy? Yes, I still am. Several times a day, I tell myself that I have an incredible chance to do this race, that I am having strong, intense and fabulous moments. And I'm having a blast! "

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, yl75 said:

Yes, funny to look at that and these old "techies" magazines :)

 

That was back when Macs were sooo..different. A "desktop" was huge, with an equally huge monitor. Unwieldy, and you needed to operate with dos.

The Macs were "object oriented". Something Microsoft stole, and ran with. 

A Mac, with Mac sea, at sea, was a tool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Below Tip&shaft podcast from yesterday with Serviane Escoffier (Kevin's sister and Louis Burton girlfriend and team manager) and Paul Meilhat :

https://www.tipandshaft.com/podcasts/posreport/episode12-paul-meilhat-servane-escoffier/

Discussing the strategy for the remaining route, but no time to listen, need to get some sleep ..

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
19 minutes ago, Varan said:

Since you mentioned Armel, happy, happy, happy

Armel Tripon (L'Occitane en Provence) echoes the same message: "Happy? Yes, I still am. Several times a day, I tell myself that I have an incredible chance to do this race, that I am having strong, intense and fabulous moments. And I'm having a blast! "

Saw this earlier (thought it was posted?) and noticed how smoothly L'Occitane (and Armel) was going. Usually there is jerking and slamming in most of the vids from other boats, but this seemed different. Wanted to check with you: just the conditions here, or is it the design?

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, stief said:

Hmmm. Many of the less communicative are giving enough just to compete, but point taken about the minimal comms.

Still, sometimes when following the more communicative, like Pip and Herrmann, I just want to yell, "shut up and sail!" Same for the mast-climb and fixit vids. Those have tended to be overly dramatic. Hell, they're sailors, and thus easy to forgive much overacting and poor comms. And put their diets online and free the skippers from all those cooking shows.

How to let them sail and still grow the followers? Something like, make their OSCARs/ masthead GoPro 24/7 public Live Stream, and leave it to the editors ashore to cherry-pick footage for the daily Live and news releases. Frankly, I've found the shore team background interviews more compelling than the sat-lagged skipper interviews. Or at least cut their media obligations so they have more time to think how they want to sell the more personal moments. Post their nav solutions, say, 8 hrs later, and that can fuel a lot of 'expert' commentary ashore.

Lots of ways to free them up to be more competitive sailors. 

not a rant,  just considering the options.

 

 

You know, 99% of the time I read your stuff and nod, yep, make's sense...not this time and rare that I comment, but this didn't make sense.

 

First, Pip, Boris, Isabelle, et al...they release 2-5 minutes vids of what they do, what they are feeling.  You can choose to not watch, right?  Yet it would seem you do so why then tell them, too much.  It is your choice.  

Overly dramatic?  Seriously?

Was Clarissa's multiple mast climb's to fix a sail (and the emotional trauma she chose to share) overly dramatic or not even close to what it really takes.  I've been hoisted to the top of a mast of a 27' boat in a dock and my heart was pounding...fuck 90+ ft alone so sorry sir, but I think it barely touched the surface of the grit it takes and yes, if drama sells access to the next ride, do you blame them for that is what we've turned this race (and others) into.  Part reality TV for the sponsors, for the skippers, and for the fans.

You have two audiences here, one which would be the general masses, mostly sailors, but not blue water, not solo, not that adventurous, but drawn in by all three (that's me).  I've learned how to watch, how to listen, and when to not comment (if I follow such like Anarchy), and this is the bulk of your draw.  The other are folks like you.  Very knowledgeable, experienced both in the type of sailing and the tools.  Your fantasy list would be your wet dream for playing ghost skipper (and I don't mean that negatively) but would be data overload for the majority of fans/followers so RC folk, sponsors, they need to balance what is affordable, what will attract the masses, for frankly, they know you'll follow no matte what...Off shore sailing/racing is a drug you love (and I get it).

personally I found that this event had a good balance of information from the Official sites (VG, youtube, facebook, media) and forums like this that augment with community anchors that help in the play by play.  Do we really need to add 24/7 video, real time tracking (even if you can stop racers from seeing each other), because unlike those skippers, we're not responsible for racing the boat(s) 24/7.

Like I said, I follow your posts, you tend to be ... balanced...but in this your "addiction" is getting the better of you.  However, Maybe by 2024 Starlink will have and allow ocean connectivity with broadband capability and satellite communications costs will be so low that having a live stream mast cam/bow cam/whatever cam (but not Yes we Cam) could be possible, but I would be concerned that ads would become the norm and if that happened, I'd not watch.

 

Hoping Pip can hold on to her position, she made a tough call that is a hole she needs to dig out of, betting Boris will find a gear in the trades and hold a top three going into France, sending good thoughts that Isabelle makes it safe to SA, that Clarissa beats the odds and drags Armel(?) back into her sights, and JLC shows those foilers you don;t need fancy to sail at the top....you need skill, luck, and and good boat as well.

 

fair winds.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No worries. I just feel sorry for them when they are obligated to put on a show--which is not their primary area of expertise. That they do share, is much appreciated. I was just trying to imagine how they could be freed from the obligations, and still meet the publicity needs of the race. 

Yes, it takes a lot to climb the mast (Pip chose not; good on her). Clarisse so chose, OK--but wonder what she would choose if there was less obligation to come up with a 'show'. 

btw, I try to pay attention to those who don't communicate as well as some. Didac, eg. Ari, Maxime, and more that I didn't get to know. Giancarlo. Manuel. And more. I'm OK with that, even If the forum's interest is elsewhere.

Bottom line is I don't like pressure they face from us and the organization  (fines are in the NOR if they fail to produce), but it is what it is. Just trying to think how it could be better for them.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, stief said:

Saw this earlier (thought it was posted?) and noticed how smoothly L'Occitane (and Armel) was going. Usually there is jerking and slamming in most of the vids from other boats, but this seemed different. Wanted to check with you: just the conditions here, or is it the design?

 

According to Manuard in a recent Seahorse article, one of the objectives of the scow design was to reduce slamming and decelerations from the bow digging in. Foils exit higher than the other designs and are fully retractable. L'Occitaine En Provence gave up some static waterline to accomplish the scow bow they wanted. I personally really like what they did and expect to see more from Manuard in the Imoca class.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Varan said:

According to Manuard in a recent Seahorse article, one of the objectives of the scow design was to reduce slamming and decelerations from the bow digging in. Foils exit higher than the other designs and are fully retractable. L'Occitaine En Provence gave up some static waterline to accomplish the scow bow they wanted. I personally really like what they did and expect to see more from Manuard in the Imoca class.

Right, and thanks.Got most of that from posts you've made in the past, and picking up bits and hints elsewhere about the design. Was really asking if the few seconds of above clip might show (prove?) the advantages of the design, since it could just be a smooth bit of water or wind.  Too little to tell for sure, but figured you'd know better than I would.  

Certainly he's happy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites