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Vendee Globe 2020

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13 minutes ago, Dark Cloud said:

Poor Seb, he had to retire last edition with major damage (don't make me google exactly what that was)

In the last VG he finished 18th and last out of 29 with 124d12h38'

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20 minutes ago, Herman said:

Weather analysis

 

Thank you,  really helpful to understand what is going on. Much much appreciated 

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Massive moment in the race coming up. Charlie Dalin Apivia looks to be in a better position to get into the trade winds and sail away. Thomas may get parked while Charlie sails away? Apivia out to around a 50 mile lead could easily turn it into 150 miles. With a healthy lead he can then focus simply on keeping the boat together and picking his moments. It looks bad for Alex as he is stuck. Apivia could  end up 1000 miles ahead of boats like Hugo Boss who are that far back. 

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32 minutes ago, oioi said:

Thank you,  really helpful to understand what is going on. Much much appreciated 

Yes +1 many thanks these inputs are extremely appreciated. 

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Hydraulic failure on Merci. Ruptured line? The translations on the VG site are google translate level...
At least the headcap stayed on this time. (Last VG it backed off and Conrad had to hammer it back in place. No spanner big enough on board.)
 

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10 minutes ago, terrafirma said:

Massive moment in the race coming up

I think that moment has already happened with only 4 making it past the T junction.

2 definitely past, leaving only le Cam better placed than foiling Keven to muddle through the lighter stuff. The rest go south. 

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6 hours ago, tDot said:

I'm a little bit surprised that no one else has followed Louis Burton on his Southerly route.

Sometimes better to cut and run early. There will be lots of followers. 

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Thinking about AT's race.  

 

Having to step out of your routine will impact down the line.  He will be behind on maintenance and general checks,  behind on weather routing,  down on sleep. 

 

Quite often one set back has issues further along. Let's hope not. 

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As it is night time down there, presumably AT has sails down, drifting whilst slaving away in a hot black furnace?

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Is there any GUIDANCE here???

2016 - Damaged foil information dead zone, not even still pics of foil stump dressing before and after.

That equaled pushed hard as fuck and if it wasn't for those starboard tack legs in the Pacific, the delta at Cape Horn would have been a lot less than 800 mile. The target was chasing not just a podium but #1.

______________

2020 -  A fully blown cinamatic production with only half the job done, (more to follow) including this vid on all his materials inventory laid out on deck like at a boat show. I was waiting for talking head sponsor cutaways to appear.

Does that equal I'm done and now target is first just a matter of a finish and bonus is a respectable one???

 

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17 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Is there any GUIDANCE here???

2016 - Damaged foil information dead zone, not even still pics of foil stump dressing before and after.

That equaled pushed hard as fuck and if it wasn't for those starboard tack legs in the Pacific, the delta at Cape Horn would have been a lot less than 800 mile. The target was chasing not just a podium but #1.

______________

2020 -  A fully blown cinamatic production with only half the job done, (more to follow) including this vid on all his materials inventory laid out on deck like at a boat show. I was waiting for talking head sponsor cutaways to appear.

Does that equal I'm done and now target is first just a matter of a finish and bonus is a respectable one???

 

It is odd but Alex knows he is stuck where he is with no wind for days, and has multiple nights of work to do and hot days stuck in a black box with 100 cameras and little else to do. 

So he’s doing what most people do these days, playing with his phone and dicking around on Instagram.

I wouldn’t have a clue how to sail out of that spot efficiently. It’s not at all clear to me that “run south” will carry the day, so if Alex can fix things he could still be within striking of the podium two days from now. Charlie could lock it up by the weekend, but who knows with the potential for attrition, God forbid.

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1 hour ago, terrafirma said:

Massive moment in the race coming up. Charlie Dalin Apivia looks to be in a better position to get into the trade winds and sail away. Thomas may get parked while Charlie sails away? Apivia out to around a 50 mile lead could easily turn it into 150 miles. With a healthy lead he can then focus simply on keeping the boat together and picking his moments. It looks bad for Alex as he is stuck. Apivia could  end up 1000 miles ahead of boats like Hugo Boss who are that far back. 

Trade winds?

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9 hours ago, despacio avenue said:

Yes; Paul was pretty restrained and careful in his comments and reaction to the damage, which Conrad seemed clearly aware of and eager to move on...

Paul knows his shit when comes to fixing bits of boat at sea or in a hurry.

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9 hours ago, Russell Brown said:

I don't think that's true. There are a lot of things one can do to increase bond strength, but pressure is not necessarily one of them.

 

9 hours ago, Zonker said:

Yeah typically epoxy wants a fairly thick glue line. Some adhesives like polyurethanes or resorcinal glue want lots of clamping pressure, but not epoxy.

It might help to ensure the whole area is firmly held in place while it glues, but a few clamps will do the trick with the small patches he is using.

If he's replacing laminate with dry cloth and epoxy, then a vac pump is a great aid.  If he's bonding C-plate, then a couple of clamps will be just fine.

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9 hours ago, Thread Killer said:

I think the main advantage is it allows for the least amount of resin to be used. 

Draw the excess resin out into the bleed stack along with any air voids.

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8 hours ago, tDot said:

It sounds like some guys are interchanging laminating carbon cloth with epoxy resin and the use of epoxy resin as an adhesive to bond premade parts.

They are two different processes, that can use the same resin, but they have different sets of rules/ theories/ practical approaches.

Definitely, but as usual the armchair boat builders know best. ;) 

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1 hour ago, cms said:

As it is night time down there, presumably AT has sails down, drifting whilst slaving away in a hot black furnace?

He did say in one of the recent feeds that he was planning a night shift due to the heat and humidity.

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Nice 'call out' for Peter in ATs last video :-)
In reality Pete has had less sleep than Alex since Saturday evening, as he has had to all the liaison, brain work etc inc writing up instructions for Alex to undertake the repairs. The lad is really putting in the graft to get Alex back to full race mode.  The Northumberland oak wedges Pete put onboard' just in case'  have been put to good use...the oak came from trees we felled and used in building our home.. and making the bar in our pub (The Beresford Arms, Whalton).  So lots of north east england/Northumbrain links to AT and HB :-)

 

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Video of the nearly finished repairs.

He says that only one step is still needed to complete them.

Not really an expert, but they dont seem too incredibly bad, imo.

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23 minutes ago, SSolo said:

Nice 'call out' for Peter in ATs last video :-)
In reality Pete has had less sleep than Alex since Saturday evening, as he has had to all the liaison, brain work etc inc writing up instructions for Alex to undertake the repairs. The lad is really putting in the graft to get Alex back to full race mode.  The Northumberland oak wedges Pete put onboard' just in case'  have been put to good use...the oak came from trees we felled and used in building our home.. and making the bar in our pub (The Beresford Arms, Whalton).  So lots of north east england/Northumbrain links to AT and HB :-)

 

It's been awhile since I've been in that pub! I'll pop in and say hello post lockdown.  

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31 minutes ago, SSolo said:

Nice 'call out' for Peter in ATs last video :-)
In reality Pete has had less sleep than Alex since Saturday evening, as he has had to all the liaison, brain work etc inc writing up instructions for Alex to undertake the repairs. The lad is really putting in the graft to get Alex back to full race mode.  The Northumberland oak wedges Pete put onboard' just in case'  have been put to good use...the oak came from trees we felled and used in building our home.. and making the bar in our pub (The Beresford Arms, Whalton).  So lots of north east england/Northumbrain links to AT and HB :-)

 

This one snippet and backstory is just awesome! 

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30 minutes ago, SSolo said:

Nice 'call out' for Peter in ATs last video :-)
In reality Pete has had less sleep than Alex since Saturday evening, as he has had to all the liaison, brain work etc inc writing up instructions for Alex to undertake the repairs. The lad is really putting in the graft to get Alex back to full race mode.  The Northumberland oak wedges Pete put onboard' just in case'  have been put to good use...the oak came from trees we felled and used in building our home.. and making the bar in our pub (The Beresford Arms, Whalton).  So lots of north east england/Northumbrain links to AT and HB :-)

Thanks for that.  At least this time you didn't have to test cut the ram:D

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16 hours ago, Varan said:

Probably well timed gybes, but I cannot help but wonder if Ruyant's trip up the mast was not 100% successful, limiting his sail choices, particularly masthead sails. 

Partially yes, if I'm not misreading this FB post transcript of a FR soundcloud call

Quote

As evidenced by his trajectory of the last hours, the skipper of LinkedOut is not on the attack, but clearly in recovery mode. As always in a Vendée Globe, everything is a matter of dosage, and recovery does not mean sleep at the bottom of the banner. A level crossing may be being established today with the reunification of two large high-pressure areas into a single Saint Helena high, and it is not time for laziness, but for the fight against time. The importance of sliding south of these vast fanned areas is crucial, and the two leaders of this beginning of the third week of the race are able, with significant new efforts, to hold their own by touching within 24 hours these southerly winds conducive to riding towards the Cape of Good Hope.

The Morning // Ruyant, between recovery and strategy! We get it, the last 36 hours haven't been resting for Thomas Ruyant. His mast head climb has very logically left traces and Thomas recognizes having lost a lot of energy there. As demonstrated by his trajectory of the last hours, the skipper LinkedOut is not attacking, but clearly in recovery mode. As always in a, it's all about dosing, and recovery doesn't mean sleeping at the bottom of the banette. A level crossing may be established today with the reunification of two large high-pressure areas into a single St. Helena's high-pressure high-speed high-speed high-speed high-speed high-speed high-speed high-speed high-speed high-speed high-speed high-speed high-speed high-speed high-speed high-speed high-speed The importance of sliding south of these large fan areas is crucial, and both leaders of this beginning of the third week of race are able, with significant further efforts, to pull their pin out of the game by touching within 24 hours These southern sector winds conducive to cavalry to the Cape of Good Hope. Until then, small anti-cyclonic cells will have to be crossed, mostly looking close to a wind anemia. The Verdier plan doesn't like these looks, in tiny air. The entire Thomas in TR Racing team, aware of this little 'gap' performance, has fixed it by equipping the sailboat with a large spinnaker, carrying a veil that @[2382270362009415:274:Apivia Voile-Charlie Dalin] is not equipped with. This veil, difficult to establish and settle, requires a Thomas Ruyant to the best of his form and positive aggression. This is not yet the case, and we are going back to this essential recovery time after climbing a 28-metre mast in the Atlantic. Thomas and Charlie (Dalin) will thus regatta in this medium wind changing both in force and direction until the salvation located in the limit of the ice door placed by the organization to ban skippers from accessing areas where iceberg and growlers evolve.. A day full of maneuvers, stops at the booth and sailing changes advance for the two leaders certainly this morning inhabited by the certainty that a major episode of this 9th Vendée Globe is underway, so much adventure the two sister ships signed Verdier managed to escape, and enter the disturbed systems of the far south in a very favorable configuration to cavalier to the full east. Until then, at work Gentlemen! The day is going to be rich and intense intense Thomas's words at the official holidays this morning: https://soundcloud.com/user-821179818/thomas-ruyant-vacation-official-24-november

 

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6 hours ago, Butenbremer said:

Well, as JLC claims he sails the equivalent to an R4. Must be close to this one:

image.png.1228a0dbf08abe43e0a22acbb8bf41e5.png

When i saw a clip in FB, I thought of JLC

 

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3 hours ago, cms said:

As it is night time down there, presumably AT has sails down, drifting whilst slaving away in a hot black furnace?

Err, they're pretty much in our time zone!

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Dee EN Live on the weather: True this: "I was sailing on the weekend at home and had no idea what the forecast was, but I could tell them exactly what was going on in the S Atlantic."

Yup.

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Re Destremau's troubles, I had thought hydraulic leaks could often be fatal. Was surprised neither the VG report nor Dee's comment brought that up. Google showed me wrong.

Guess the local horror stories are waaaay old, and the tech is much better than the past,

Still, Destremau using sails to start his diesel last time was something old farmers would have understood :D

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Michel Desjoyeaux did it way back in the 2000 edition - the professor probably will finish the race before the quirky French Aussie too :P

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I had forgotten that. His whoops of joy when it finally fires at around 59 seconds of this vid are well deserved. Incredible resourcefulness 

 

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9 minutes ago, Miffy said:

Michel Desjoyeaux did it way back in the 2000 edition - the professor probably will finish the race before the quirky French Aussie too :P

IIRC it was fun following Mich D's advice to Destremau.  And thanks for the Aussie ref. Didn't know Destremau is a dually. 

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So used that line like a massive pull cord? What did he wrap it around on the engine? And what was he opening and closing on the top of the engine?

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5 minutes ago, TheDragon said:

So used that line like a massive pull cord? What did he wrap it around on the engine? And what was he opening and closing on the top of the engine?

on older engines you often had a decompression valve intended to allow manual starting - on new marine diesels of a certain size, the only way to do it is to remove the injector 

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And apparently, Sébastien Destremau is finding solutions to fix his hydraulic system for the keel canting mechanism.

"The keel is now locked in the central position, and it no longer seems to move. It's great; it means that the hydraulic system is now leak free and the plumbing has been purged of all air pockets. The boat is not very far from being sailable again. Before I put the hydraulic system back under pressure and hoist sails again, I need to clean up the inside of the boat; about 2 hours of work ahead."

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Sam looks to be getting a bit more wind than Louis on the latest sked. Alex moving better too. Still "complicated" though.

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Still 32 boats on course, a record ?
Dalin extending. He has a different set of sails then Ruyant, and putting an effort in to lead.

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7 hours ago, Herman said:

Some LP-busses come along south of the fleet, see GFC pic #2. But it is hard to estimate if one of the 3 boats that seem to have passed the SACZ south (Dalin, Ruyant, Burton) can catch these or not. For Dalin and Ruyant, it is hard for me to make out if there are still less wind patches at their locations due to the SACZ. See pic #4 for clouds and the yellow line

Right. Seems Charlie at least is getting some help from  the LP bus (renault?)

41516589_ScreenShot2020-11-24at11_23_56AM.thumb.png.53a833a99ff7ba50469e245867715bf4.png

https://www.windy.com/plugins/windy-plugin-regadata

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13 minutes ago, LeoV said:

Still 32 boats on course, a record ?
Dalin extending. He has a different set of sails then Ruyant, and putting an effort in to lead.

Are you sure about that? I was wondering why Thomas Ruyant has been bleeding miles to Charlie Dalin in the past 2 days... May it be that Thomas has NOT solved all his problems of halyards and locks at the top of the mast, and he cannot hoist the sail he would want to have under current conditions? After his climb to the mast, it was not totally clear to me if he was back to 100% or if he still had limitations on what he could hoist.

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Vendee Globe site  mentioned a difference in spinnakers on both Verdier's but I forgot when.

and Sam has a stowaway :) pink inflatable flamingo placed by shore team...

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7 minutes ago, Laurent said:

Are you sure about that? I was wondering why Thomas Ruyant has been bleeding miles to Charlie Dalin in the past 2 days... May it be that Thomas has NOT solved all his problems of halyards and locks at the top of the mast, and he cannot hoist the sail he would want to have under current conditions? After his climb to the mast, it was not totally clear to me if he was back to 100% or if he still had limitations on what he could hoist.

https://www.tipandshaft.com/en/imoca-en/antoine-koch-i-have-fought-hard-to-be-able-to-mix-designing-with-sailing/

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4 hours ago, nasil2nd said:

 

Video of the nearly finished repairs.

He says that only one step is still needed to complete them.

Not really an expert, but they dont seem too incredibly bad, imo.

Huh. I have those exact scissors and tape measure sitting beside me right at this moment. 

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6 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

I think that moment has already happened with only 4 making it past the T junction.

2 definitely past, leaving only le Cam better placed than foiling Keven to muddle through the lighter stuff. The rest go south. 

My prediction is Kevin Escoffier for a podium finish. 

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6 minutes ago, despacio avenue said:

Huh. I have those exact scissors and tape measure sitting beside me right at this moment. 

Me too, and I have a bucket of ice water to keep my beer cold and my epoxy pot cool from exotherm... Why isn't Alex using ice from his galley icemaker to do the same?

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58 minutes ago, LeoV said:

Vendee Globe site  mentioned a difference in spinnakers on both Verdier's but I forgot when.

also machine trans quoted above #4527, but original Fr here 

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1 hour ago, Laurent said:

Are you sure about that? I was wondering why Thomas Ruyant has been bleeding miles to Charlie Dalin in the past 2 days... May it be that Thomas has NOT solved all his problems of halyards and locks at the top of the mast, and he cannot hoist the sail he would want to have under current conditions? After his climb to the mast, it was not totally clear to me if he was back to 100% or if he still had limitations on what he could hoist.

He mentioned installing 2 mechanisms (prime and backup as originally) to hoist headsails to the top of the mast. Except if both broke again, the difference in their wardrobe seems more plausible explanation (if no other issue). Given the progress over there, the wind might vary quite a lot (intensity and direction) between the location and it can lead to some nm one way or the other.

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Kojiro san throws a buoy overboard with the drogue still taped together and lifting it with the antenna housing that says don't lift with antenna housing :D

At least it is slightly better than the VOR buoy tosses that are thrown overboard like trash with plastic bags and cardboard still attached.

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4 hours ago, troll99 said:

9 hr curing for 10mpa lap shear.

at 21-23C.  It might be hotter there; and it's a non linear relationship with temperature. Small increases in temp = big change in cure time.

Nice shout out to Pete Hobson. 

The USN still uses wood wedges and props for damage control (along with more sophisticated gear).

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8 minutes ago, Zonker said:

The USN still uses wood wedges and props for damage control (along with more sophisticated gear).

Chain clamp winches, pipe shims and bracing pads everywhere. 
 

 

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Borderline in a few areas, hopefully it does the job for AT.

Epoxy ~ Gurrit AMPRO

Maximum relative humidity for use is 70%.

The product is optimised for use at temperatures between 15 and 25c.

Ensure adequate ventilation in work areas.

Respiratory protection should be worn if there is insufficient ventilation.

Solvent vapours should not be inhaled as they can cause dizziness, headaches, loss of consciousness and can have long term health effects.

 Obviously using mask, but even still, down there.

As said above, world of a difference in coverage this time around, compared to 2016.
Long may it last.

 

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The Third bunch just about to join the Second bunch.....A bit of Bunching up to go round the outside

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The damage on the Boss would make me nervous. Is beefing it up with plates and wedges and glue going to make it stronger than the original??? It has to be! At least he can keep an eye on it and if things deteriorate he can take some sails down and aim for the next harbor, which might not be close. He still seems to be slow at this point.

Interesting weather situation. Is there any chance the peloton, or part of it, will sail the long way around the two leaders (or one of them)? If the leaders get stuck in a hole while the wind is fulling in from the east, could a passage to the exclusion zone by made by the chasing group? I think it is a far shot, but I am hoping for the sake of the race that it at least gets a bit closer. Actually anything is still possible!

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South or even SSW it is then for the boats. In the 21:30 schedule some VMG's getting really low now or even negative (Simon was heading due west in the last 30 mins for the 21:00 timestamp). Davies seems to be reeling in Burton due to higher boatspeed and better VMG in the last 2 schedules (17:00 and 21:00). The most southern boat, Dalin/Apivia, was hitting 17 kts in the last 30 mins for the 21:30 timestamp. Suggesting getting closer to a LP zone, one of the busses moving east. 

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6 hours ago, troll99 said:

now I can see that he uses 545 Spabond.. 9 hr curing for 10mpa lap shear. 

https://www.gurit.com/-/media/Gurit/Datasheets/Spabond-545.pdf

 

I just love that stuff..... modern wonder of the world.... 

6 hours ago, k-f-u said:

 

plenty of good videos on Boris YT channel!

Great vid.... I have total respect for these sailors and after 20 years on big boats i fully appreciate the effort and techniques used to perform these sail changes. They are heavy and stiff and to find the motivation and strength to change one, especially in the cold southern ocean, is testament to their commitment and desire to win. I'm sure the back markers don't change gears nearly as much.
Bravo


@madwhy the Avatar  change.... or do i have the wrong mad
 

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8 minutes ago, Herman said:

South or even SSW it is then for the boats. In the 21:30 schedule some VMG's getting really low now or even negative (Simon was heading due west in the last 30 mins for the 21:00 timestamp). Davies seems to be reeling in Burton due to higher boatspeed and better VMG in the last 2 schedules (17:00 and 21:00). The most southern boat, Dalin/Apivia, was hitting 17 kts in the last 30 mins for the 21:30 timestamp. Suggesting getting closer to a LP zone, one of the busses moving east. 

I can picture Dalin hopscotching from wind-patch to wind-patch and making it through.  And I can envision a route SW around the high for Sam and Louis.  Not that either of these look easy.  But I have the toughest time seeing how PRB, JLC and Boris are going to make it through without beating against the north side of the high.

Gonna be fun to watch.

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51 minutes ago, PIL66 - XL2 said:

I just love that stuff..... modern wonder of the world.... 

Great vid.... I have total respect for these sailors and after 20 years on big boats i fully appreciate the effort and techniques used to perform these sail changes. They are heavy and stiff and to find the motivation and strength to change one, especially in the cold southern ocean, is testament to their commitment and desire to win. I'm sure the back markers don't change gears nearly as much.
Bravo


@madwhy the Avatar  change.... or do i have the wrong mad
 

Watching this, I was reminded of a video I saw a year or more ago when Samantha Davies was working with her team to make modifications to her boat in order to make eg sail changes easier. I am curious whether and what changes were made to her and any of the other boats being sailed by women in particular, but really anyone else in this race, to help facilitate this work which, as PIL66-XL2 noted, requires a lot of effort, and strength, in the best of circumstances, and here they will be facing some pretty difficult conditions in the Southern Ocean.  

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4 hours ago, OPAL said:

Maximum relative humidity for use is 70%.

Yeah, well there's what the data sheet says and then there is the real world. I've used lots of epoxy on rainy days and I'm sure the humidity was > 70%. Perhaps the material properties were never as high as a lab but you do what you have to. Not sure how you deduced he used AMPRO.  He could have just as easily used the AMPREG 21 or 22 epoxies.

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Charlie has the hammer down again. 

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The December issue of my favorite rag arrived today, Seahorse magazine. Includes some good pieces by Guillaume Verdier. A dozen of his designs are competing in this Vendee, two new and 10 older. He is critical of the Imoca rule prohibiting rudder elevators. 

"It is like making someone build an aeroplane without a tail wing. Good luck. You cannot really fly. It makes for the most uncomfortable boats on the planet. The boat and skipper are assaulted on all sides."

He talks about the crazy ways skippers have to drive these boats "lying on their backs and looking behind".

But what thought was really cool... "I worry all the time they are at sea. If something bad happened to them I honestly  think I would give up working on these projects."

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It is an interesting choice of course for Arkea Paprec - just north of west heading 273°.  Maybe he has decided he needs to follow the Brits, who are following Burton.

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Hope Andi asks Mermod about Verdier's comments tomorrow on the Live

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44 minutes ago, Varan said:

The December issue of my favorite rag arrived today, Seahorse magazine. Includes some good pieces by Guillaume Verdier. A dozen of his designs are competing in this Vendee, two new and 10 older. He is critical of the Imoca rule prohibiting rudder elevators. 

"It is like making someone build an aeroplane without a tail wing. Good luck. You cannot really fly. It makes for the most uncomfortable boats on the planet. The boat and skipper are assaulted on all sides."

He talks about the crazy ways skippers have to drive these boats "lying on their backs and looking behind".

Skippers/Teams this addition supported traditional rudders.

Next edition??

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31 minutes ago, jack_sparrow said:

Skippers/Teams this addition supported traditional rudders.

Next edition??

I’m firmly against it until someone can articulate a failure mode of a rudder elevator that doesn’t cause catastrophic consequences for the skippers and boat. Everyone knows what the designers and builders want - more business and engineering hours. 

But we also know what will happen once imocas start flying with elevators, two generation of boats suddenly become even less valuable, rudder systems cost even more than foils - and the failure mode will be terrible. 

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2 hours ago, Varan said:

Repair must have worked...

20201124_165519.thumb.jpg.9b867785dc95f12da68728d9548f8fc8.jpg

Hub also shows AT doing 11 kts.

just done the outside and needs to keep it dry.

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14 hours ago, mad said:

If he's replacing laminate with dry cloth and epoxy, then a vac pump is a great aid.  If he's bonding C-plate, then a couple of clamps will be just fine.

14 hours ago, mad said:

Draw the excess resin out into the bleed stack along with any air voids.

 

Mad I'm continually looking at what I carry for redundancy and repair for tours remote. Sometimes wonder if it would not be easier just having two fucking boats. 

With no vacuum gear Manfreds suggested use of the 'permeable' conforming type bandages for quitting excess resin a good one.

Already in onboard medical kit used for compression, support, securing dressings, plaster splinting etc. 

So just stock up with more and that kills two birds. Rebuilding shit plus more times ashore for falling over after drinking too many and taking off some bark.

mullbinde-4m.jpg

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The IMOCA class is already split, stretched out over 1000s of miles. Again. Despite the blessing of St Helena.

Suhali class needed? 

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1 hour ago, Tunnel Rat said:

It is an interesting choice of course for Arkea Paprec - just north of west heading 273°.  Maybe he has decided he needs to follow the Brits, who are following Burton.

I'm hoping that was a tracker glitch and will come clear with the update.  its one thing to have a little bit of west in your southerly vector, another thing again to head west.

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14 minutes ago, Miffy said:

But we also know what will happen once imocas start flying with elevators, two generation of boats suddenly become even less valuable, rudder systems cost even more than foils - and the failure mode will be terrible. 

Auto Pilots will have the last say and good as they are, can't see that happening anytime soon offshore.

Look at AC crashes in still water with bodies galore on board and electronic control systems costing more money than god.

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15 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:
15 hours ago, terrafirma said:

Massive moment in the race coming up

I think that moment has already happened with only 4 making it past the T junction.

2 definitely past, leaving only le Cam better placed than foiling Keven to muddle through the lighter stuff. The rest go south. 

Terra I didn't factor in Boris also taking the high road..make that 5 excl Seb. 

IMG_20201125_132249.jpg

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Dalin doing 10.4 upwind at a true wind angle of 16 degrees! and 14kns TWS.

 

Screenshot_20201124-231457.png

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3 hours ago, Varan said:

 

He talks about the crazy ways skippers have to drive these boats "lying on their backs and looking behind".

 

what does he mean by looking behind? is it to see where the transom is in relation to the water surface for the sake of hull trim?

 

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15 minutes ago, 3to1 said:

what does he mean by looking behind? is it to see where the transom is in relation to the water surface for the sake of hull trim?

 

"The only way to exist at sea is to lie down on a bean bag with your head toward the bow. They drive the boat laying on their backs and looking behind, that's how crazy it has become." is what he was reported to have said.

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3 hours ago, stief said:

Suhali class needed?

4.5 knots might be a tad slow, Stief. ;-)

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3 hours ago, Miffy said:

I’m firmly against it until someone can articulate a failure mode of a rudder elevator that doesn’t cause catastrophic consequences for the skippers and boat. Everyone knows what the designers and builders want - more business and engineering hours. 

But we also know what will happen once imocas start flying with elevators, two generation of boats suddenly become even less valuable, rudder systems cost even more than foils - and the failure mode will be terrible. 

Also think allowing elevators would be like opening pandora‘s box: This would enable full foiling with even higher potential speeds, more system load, in particular on the rudder system. Then rudders need to be significantly longer and it would be like „au revoir“ for the tilting rudders, more likely to end up in cassette rudders like Gitana17. Also the overall lateral balance of the boat might  be revisited, as there will be to points with lifting forces unlike now.

So, if above should not happen but keep other positive aspects (like increased pitch stability, maybe avoiding the bow slamming when falling off foils), some complex rule could be required prohibiting/preventing full foiling.Let’s see...

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18 hours ago, jack_sparrow said:

Is there any GUIDANCE here???

2016 - Damaged foil information dead zone, not even still pics of foil stump dressing before and after.

That equaled pushed hard as fuck and if it wasn't for those starboard tack legs in the Pacific, the delta at Cape Horn would have been a lot less than 800 mile. The target was chasing not just a podium but #1.

______________

2020 -  A fully blown cinamatic production with only half the job done, (more to follow) including this vid on all his materials inventory laid out on deck like at a boat show. I was waiting for talking head sponsor cutaways to appear.

Does that equal I'm done and now target is first just a matter of a finish and bonus is a respectable one???

 

He may as well re-build the whole boat.! Epic fail by someone in my eyes. I would certainly be pissed if I was the owner but yes Alex isn't the owner Hugo Boss are. Alex giving us a tutorial on boat building in the meantime. All sounds very weird to me.! Who knows what will happen from here?

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21 minutes ago, 3to1 said:

why is this guy always breaking his boats?

Always thought when he got tired he didn't change down a gear and or his approach changed for the worse. Slow to reef, maybe slow to check potential break points etc. 

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1 hour ago, ivansh said:

Sam and Louis pretending it's an inshore race

1.png.147b22d9cfe18bf4a0b9e0386b979d68.png

Yet another southern atlantic training camp!

Pushing each other seems to work, looking on distance to PRB, JLC

06C7BFDF-B902-4AD0-A258-BB79CAC0D984.jpeg

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