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Vendee Globe 2020

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Interested in the drift prediction software the race control was using, apparently it was first developed to track oil spills. Is this now standard in SAR operations or is it a bit of Vendee innovation?

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1 hour ago, eastern motors said:

Sold out of M, L, XL

Good thing there were some Sm ones left....:-)

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Vid ;
So Epirb and PLB, and strobe light on the Bib. Heard the flapping of sails inside his Bib. How far does that sound go ?
Note to myself, sound horn if you think you see something.
And all safety material seems worth it, including banana. Cost a lot, and takes up lots of room on mini's, but heck, worth it.

but overall, pheww that all ended well...

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Just a request to the barage of newbies posting in this thread. Please take some time to watch and listen, and read everything posted earlier before posting. There are folks on here, (not me), who have actual expertise or experience and whose judgement and words should not be dissed at first opportunity. Just as one example, anyone who has been here for enough time to pay attention knows that LeoV is not bullshitting.

 

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2 hours ago, LeoV said:

Sounds like you never tried on a TPS, I have one and use it every year to check it. 4 seconds to get into your TPS, that alone is impossible. Then sending a message and get the Bib (one of the two onboard) nay. Minutes...lets say 4 minutes.

Thanks for the translators, it speaks more then my rude understanding of French. The talk between the 4 skippers was excellent to know that the group spirit is alive and well. Even with million Euro projects.

getting into the TPS is fast, but not 4 seconds fast, yes it is a bit clumsey to move around in. Kevin was wearing his TPS at time of accident if i have heard things right, he had time to send a text and get in the L/raft.
i have worn and used a TPS for real, they are just amazing suits! 
you can both sail in them and survive in them;  i had mine refurbed (Guy Cotton did FOC) post mid Atlantic incident.

great seamanship by Jean Le cam and both to be smiling afterwards and making jokes, is fantastic 

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^^^^^
eh, Haji and Potter and father of Boss guy are my not bullshitting persons, but thanks...

I was on the French Affaires Maritime when we searched for Roberto (mini), and on a trip near Helgoland I saved/helped 6 guys on a sport fishing trip. It is stressful, all hats of to race organisation and sailors...

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1 minute ago, SSolo said:

you can both sail in them and survive in them;  

SSolo I mean with guy from Boss :).
You can float in a TPS for fun, beer can on your belly, fun in harbors with current. That is how I test them :)

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1 hour ago, eastern motors said:

We need to crowd fund a new boat for JLC in 2024.

PRB owes Le Cam a very expensive new toy

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9 minutes ago, SSolo said:

Kevin was wearing his TPS at time of accident if i have heard things right

no, he immediately went in the boat to grab the TPS, then jumped into TPS, wore it over his foulie/trousers (from french live IIRC)

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So now Dalin is in pretty rough conditions and sailing conservatively (14.3 knots in 34 knot winds earlier, now 17 in 31). Seems that there is no way these boats can go fast enough in these conditions to stay with the low, unlike the big JV boats.

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7 hours ago, Miffy said:

There’s... substantial compression loads on the hull and PRB was light even when launched - subsequent additions of foils only meant higher loads. We will see how much Kevin will share on the future  

anyway from JLC man of the hour himself

 

At the very end of the video just before they cut, Kevin says something really interesting. He says "I wonder if the foils didn't invert like we discussed before". By this, I think he means "I wonder if the foils didn't pull the boat downward..." Imagine, for some reason (probably bow down attitude), the angle of incidence of the foils becomes negative and they start working against the buoyancy of the boat. That would add massive loads to the hull, may be enough to break it.

@Zonker Do you think this is possible?

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18 minutes ago, k-f-u said:

I felt like digesting this whole miraculous rescue in a timeline on the race tracker...

1259958796_VendeeGlobe2020-RescueJeanLeCamJLC-KevinEscoffier.thumb.png.a95d72b4ab723d95e0a38d711c4f4e9d.png

Thank you for this!  It is quite the information and piecing it together.

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4 hours ago, Bebmoumoute said:

...he was just able to grab and put his TPS survival suit on and then jump in the water with his liferaft. He just had an EPIRB and small personal AIS/HF beacon.

I have some burning questions (like always while reading this kind of rescue stories) - what were the actual devices that proved to be useful or what could have been useful? 

Was this really an EPIRB that gave up the position of the life-raft or it was actually a PLB attached to the life-jacket? Or they have EPIRB attached to the life-raft? 

If Kevin had an AIS beacon, why didn't Jean use his AIS receiver to track the position? In the end the position given by CROSS was only 1.5 miles off but he still had to conduct visual search. These devices should have range from 2 to 8 miles depending of the model and conditions.

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Best news to wake up to this morning and what a story.  Gives new meaning to the line "When the bow breaks the cradle will fall" ;-)  but in this case baby got rescued.

 

Now that Kevin is safe, what's going on with Isabelle.  She's taking a pretty strong right turn towards the ice line and has slowed.  Windy shows a lot of wave height, but as I look at wind I am wondering if she's trying to dive away from the center of the HP that may roll over their section of ocean?

 

I see Sam has also shifted south and from what I have gathered reading here, you need to keep these rocketships powered up so don't let AWA get above 120?  There is a fun race within a race here along with 4 boats looking like a restart in the not so SO.

 

Redress for Cam will be interesting since it would need to factor diversion, time on station/rescue, then continuing with two on board for x period of time.  The longer Kevin stays on board the more difficult will be the redress, but in the end, what ever they come up with won't matter as much as JLC finishing strong.

Well Done and "Yes we Cam!"

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22 minutes ago, Snowden said:

Interested in the drift prediction software the race control was using, apparently it was first developed to track oil spills. Is this now standard in SAR operations or is it a bit of Vendee innovation?

SAR/Coast Guard(s) has had drift prediction software for quite a while.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Search_and_Rescue_Optimal_Planning_System

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6 minutes ago, Panoramix said:

At the very end of the video just before they cut, Kevin says something really interesting. He says "I wonder if the foils didn't invert like we discussed before". By this, I think he means "I wonder if the foils didn't pull the boat downward..." Imagine, for some reason (probably bow down attitude), the angle of incidence of the foils becomes negative and they start working against the buoyancy of the boat. That would add massive loads to the hull, may be enough to break it.

@Zonker Do you think this is possible?


 

I'm trying to understand this, does it mean that on the crest of a wave the boat is accelerating on the foils down the wave to the extent that it wants to drive the boat under on the bottom of the wave, increasing the force on the bottom?

As cool as the foils are, it seems like overall it's a negative on the race.  It really seems to increase the percentage of luck in the race, just being lucky enough to get through it without ripping your foils off puts you in the lead.  And it seems to decapitate the best racers, if they lose a foil.  The boats seem just seaworthy enough without foils.  That said it's so fucking cool to see them flying. 

But it seems like it would be a better race overall without foils.  While I think the AC boats are pretty ugly, it makes sense for them to foil. 

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41 minutes ago, loneshark64 said:

PRB owes Le Cam a very expensive new toy

Yes, for 2024 an expensive boat and a brand new shinning set of teeth  :D

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9 minutes ago, bucc5062 said:

Best news to wake up to this morning and what a story.  Gives new meaning to the line "When the bow breaks the cradle will fall" ;-)  but in this case baby got rescued.

 

Now that Kevin is safe, what's going on with Isabelle.  She's taking a pretty strong right turn towards the ice line and has slowed.  Windy shows a lot of wave height, but as I look at wind I am wondering if she's trying to dive away from the center of the HP that may roll over their section of ocean?

 

I see Sam has also shifted south and from what I have gathered reading here, you need to keep these rocketships powered up so don't let AWA get above 120?  There is a fun race within a race here along with 4 boats looking like a restart in the not so SO.

 

Redress for Cam will be interesting since it would need to factor diversion, time on station/rescue, then continuing with two on board for x period of time.  The longer Kevin stays on board the more difficult will be the redress, but in the end, what ever they come up with won't matter as much as JLC finishing strong.

Well Done and "Yes we Cam!"

I believe Le Cam already won this edition. 

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6 minutes ago, Panoramix said:

At the very end of the video just before they cut, Kevin says something really interesting. He says "I wonder if the foils didn't invert like we discussed before". By this, I think he means "I wonder if the foils didn't pull the boat downward..." Imagine, for some reason (probably bow down attitude), the angle of incidence of the foils becomes negative and they start working against the buoyancy of the boat. That would add massive loads to the hull, may be enough to break it.

@Zonker Do you think this is possible?

Yes, I think it is possible, though I am not Zonker and excuse me to jump in here. 

Watch the videos from Sam Davies in strong wind. Sometimes the bow is dragged under water instead of coming up high as it should be. And it is not only the Code 0 which is more down pushing in my experience, other than e.g. a code one or the smaller staysails. I have read somewhere here that they have electronic adjusters for the positive or negative angle of the foils but I doubt that, even if they have those, that the reaction of 5-axis gyro and the e-motors and their power will be able to adjust quick enough. Therefore the theory as above is interesting. But than, what do I know?

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2 hours ago, k-f-u said:

How come you compare these two accidents? I guess just because they both happened recently (ok, and both involve a Frenchman). Otherwise they have nothing in common. So no point in drawing conclusions about media coverage and storytelling. 

And as others have said, the 4 seconds is not about getting off the boat but more about the time it took to flood the boat. 2 minutes between the breakage and him being in the TPS (cf. the PRB article) 

You have to ask? Both were life threatening, both were to athletes at the top of their sport and both happened suddenly and unexpectedly. And yes i suppose you are right they are both French and both incidents happened in last few days but I hadn't considered two such irrelevances. Try a different approach because sarcasm isn't your forte. I am glad the French media were awake to this as i was informed by Benmoumoute (thanks man)

As an example CNN has two articles about the F1 crash and nothing about PRB on their sports page. 

It's not the only time either. When Pete Goss rescued Raphael Dianelli (apologies if i have spelt that wrong) there was hardly a mention and Tony Bullimore only got more press because after several days in the upturned hull of Excide Challenger the Australian Navy expected to find a corpse. It as also one of the longest distances from land that a successful rescue had been accomplished. An awesome achievement by the crew of, I think, HMAS Adelaide.

Perhaps the 4 seconds is not the whole timeline. Kevin first reported "water ingress" i understand  and like any good seaman - and Kevin is a VERY good seaman he would have taken precautions like donning his survival suit - after all the water that far south is a little chilly. If i read it right the 4 seconds refers to the time it took the boat to fill when the bow let go. ) could be wrong and as those who know me on the forums i am always open to be corrected if that is the case.

We will only know the full story when Kevin gets back to dry land which is some time after Dec 7th

See ya on the water

SS

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The foil AoA inversion occurs when the boat bow hits a wave in front, that tries to rapidly lift the bow. The rapid pitch rotation causes a vertical velocity component at the foil that inverts the foil AoA, causing the foil to create a downwards force and try to counter the bow lifting. Result is longitudinal bending and torsion of the hull girder.

This effect is exaggerated because the stern is in the water, and thus is able to resist the pitching rotation. The stern is then the pivot point, not the foil, hence the vertical velocity component at the foil. Would not occur in the same way for a fully foiling boat, as stern could sink more easily.

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2 minutes ago, Manfred said:

even if they have those, that the reaction of 5-axis gyro and the e-motors and their power will be able to adjust quick enough.

Gitana would like a word with you.

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4 minutes ago, Manfred said:

Yes, I think it is possible, though I am not Zonker and excuse me to jump in here. 

Watch the videos from Sam Davies in strong wind. Sometimes the bow is dragged under water instead of coming up high as it should be. And it is not only the Code 0 which is more down pushing in my experience, other than e.g. a code one or the smaller staysails. I have read somewhere here that they have electronic adjusters for the positive or negative angle of the foils but I doubt that, even if they have those, that the reaction of 5-axis gyro and the e-motors and their power will be able to adjust quick enough. Therefore the theory as above is interesting. But than, what do I know?

No foils are manually controlled under the rules, and the axis of movement very limited.  Stored power is only allowed in specific applications, for a servo for rudder yaw (the autopilot) and for the keel ram.

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16 minutes ago, sully75 said:

I'm trying to understand this, does it mean that on the crest of a wave the boat is accelerating on the foils down the wave to the extent that it wants to drive the boat under on the bottom of the wave, increasing the force on the bottom?

As cool as the foils are, it seems like overall it's a negative on the race.  It really seems to increase the percentage of luck in the race, just being lucky enough to get through it without ripping your foils off puts you in the lead.  And it seems to decapitate the best racers, if they lose a foil.  The boats seem just seaworthy enough without foils.  That said it's so fucking cool to see them flying. 

But it seems like it would be a better race overall without foils.  While I think the AC boats are pretty ugly, it makes sense for them to foil. 

It just means that for some freak reason instead of making the boat float higher the foils made it sink partially  until the structure gave in!

Without the new tech the race would be duller. People start talking about it 2 years before the start as the new boat enter the Route du Rhum!

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24 minutes ago, Panoramix said:

At the very end of the video just before they cut, Kevin says something really interesting. He says "I wonder if the foils didn't invert like we discussed before". By this, I think he means "I wonder if the foils didn't pull the boat downward..." Imagine, for some reason (probably bow down attitude), the angle of incidence of the foils becomes negative and they start working against the buoyancy of the boat. That would add massive loads to the hull, may be enough to break it.

@Zonker Do you think this is possible?

yeah, it makes sense. Designers missed it in the calculations. Foilers boats is a new territory. We had 2016 foilers but we never know until new scenarios happen. 

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27 minutes ago, sully75 said:

But it seems like it would be a better race overall without foils.  While I think the AC boats are pretty ugly, it makes sense for them to foil. 

I suggest a Scow with foils .. Pointy bow and foils are like a baguette. Opposing forces make it easy to break. 

Newer boats except VPLP look quite voluminous anyway. 

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20 minutes ago, hump101 said:

The foil AoA inversion occurs when the boat bow hits a wave in front, that tries to rapidly lift the bow. The rapid pitch rotation causes a vertical velocity component at the foil that inverts the foil AoA, causing the foil to create a downwards force and try to counter the bow lifting. Result is longitudinal bending and torsion of the hull girder.

This effect is exaggerated because the stern is in the water, and thus is able to resist the pitching rotation. The stern is then the pivot point, not the foil, hence the vertical velocity component at the foil. Would not occur in the same way for a fully foiling boat, as stern could sink more easily.

Even though I can't evaluate that in engineering terms, it sounds quite reasonable and would explain the 90° bow up situation Kevin found himself in

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2 hours ago, k-f-u said:

Kevin in the EN live telling that moonlight helped to locate each other in the night. A

That was good to know. I looked at Windy satellite pic whether it was overcast but it was almost no clouds though I was not sure whether it was accurate or not. 

It can be quite bright during full moon than one may think. 

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7 minutes ago, troll99 said:

I suggest a Scow with foils .. Pointy bow and foils are like a baguette. Opposing forces make it easy to break. 

Newer boats except VPLP look quite voluminous anyway. 

Speaking of which... some good speeds the past four hours for our friend as he blows past the middle group.

20201201_065322.thumb.jpg.a15b620a2dd9a6ded7843430a0f987b9.jpg

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24 minutes ago, shanghaisailor said:

You have to ask? Both were life threatening, both were to athletes at the top of their sport and both happened suddenly and unexpectedly. And yes i suppose you are right they are both French and both incidents happened in last few days but I hadn't considered two such irrelevances. Try a different approach because sarcasm isn't your forte. I am glad the French media were awake to this as i was informed by Benmoumoute (thanks man)

As an example CNN has two articles about the F1 crash and nothing about PRB on their sports page. 

It's not the only time either. When Pete Goss rescued Raphael Dianelli (apologies if i have spelt that wrong) there was hardly a mention and Tony Bullimore only got more press because after several days in the upturned hull of Excide Challenger the Australian Navy expected to find a corpse. It as also one of the longest distances from land that a successful rescue had been accomplished. An awesome achievement by the crew of, I think, HMAS Adelaide.

Perhaps the 4 seconds is not the whole timeline. Kevin first reported "water ingress" i understand  and like any good seaman - and Kevin is a VERY good seaman he would have taken precautions like donning his survival suit - after all the water that far south is a little chilly. If i read it right the 4 seconds refers to the time it took the boat to fill when the bow let go. ) could be wrong and as those who know me on the forums i am always open to be corrected if that is the case.

We will only know the full story when Kevin gets back to dry land which is some time after Dec 7th

See ya on the water

SS

@Corryvreckan gave a good explanation why it's not the best comparison with regard to media coverage

3 hours ago, Corryvreckan said:

One big difference is that the F1 has detailed footage of the horrific crash, complete with fireball to show on the evening news. (or so I assume, I haven't watched it).

Ocean racing has little boat icons moving slowly across a computer screen, then some grainy video of a couple of guys talking on the radio in a cramped boat.  Most news execs will take one look at the guy with the wild hair going "Clack, Clack, Clack... why are you looking at me?"  and think to themselves, good question.

Ocean racing just isn't going to produce the same visual footage.

And my point was mainly to not compare these two events just because they happened at the same day and then draw conclusions about storytelling in sailing. 

The details of the rescue are out, just watch the VG FR & EN live videos and the three JLC onboard videos.

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37 minutes ago, TPG said:

SAR/Coast Guard(s) has had drift prediction software for quite a while.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Search_and_Rescue_Optimal_Planning_System

It's even in Open CPN, which has a plugin for generating up to 4 search patterns;

  • Parallel Track
  • Expanding Square
  • Sector Search
  • Oil Rig (Quadrant Single)

https://opencpn.org/wiki/dokuwiki/doku.php?id=opencpn:opencpn_user_manual:plugins:safety:sar#what_does_sar-pi_do

Other plugin-goodies too; automatic AIS SART Activation, DSC or Buddy via AIS. I'm very happy I have never had to use these.

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19 minutes ago, troll99 said:

I suggest a Scow with foils .. Pointy bow and foils are like a baguette. Opposing forces make it easy to break. 

Newer boats except VPLP look quite voluminous anyway. 

The strength of the bow is not just a function of its slenderness, and fat bows can be locally weaker than thin bows if built down to a weight. A slim bow can be made strong and a little flexible, but a fat bow will always be stiff, and require a lot more material to be strong. For a hull girder, stiff is not good, whether strong or weak, as stiff attracts load.

However, the force generated by a bow is a function of its slenderness, fat is more force, and more force at the bow equals more force in the hull girder, so need to be careful. There is a reason multihulls, and some high speed monohull powerboats have slender wave piercing bows. If IMOCA will run at similar speeds, they will need similar bow shapes.

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In re Romain Grosjean - his survival was a tribute to the self-critical engineering work of multiple generations of engineers and crash experts - the survival cell and halo worked as intended. The crash barrier, fuel containment did not. He was not supposed to split the armco barriers and emerge on the other side. His racesuit, which was just upgraded this year to give him 20 seconds more time getting out of the car saved him. If he had been concussed, suffered a broken ankle or was unable to remove his own seatbelt & foam clips, or his survival cell hadn't gotten as far thru the barrier and he was between two sheets of steel - he would be dead.

Something uniquely different from other events, F1 actually has a driver union & the sport itself recognizes casualties are bad for business. Whereas in sailing - you still have a lot of dockside event managers whose concern for the well being of sailors is about as much as saying "if they crash coming into a busy port at night unescorted at 20 knots because the race is close, they crash it is their own fault"

You can always tell how a sport or event is managed by how much pat on the back they give themselves after an event that could have become tragic. Notice how the sailors involved talk vs. event managers/ppl further removed from the jeopardy.

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4 minutes ago, hump101 said:

The strength of the bow is not just a function of its slenderness, and fat bows can be locally weaker than thin bows if built down to a weight.

However, the force generated by a bow is a function of its slenderness, fat is more force, and more force at the bow equals more force in the hull girder, so need to be careful. There is a reason multihulls, and some high speed monohull powerboats have slender wave piercing bows. If IMOCA will run at similar speeds, they will need similar bow shapes.

I agree but I don't think one has to focus on lowering weight constantly.

For car analogy, heavier cars are faster because of better grip and CoG. Nissan GTR changed the game and now we see 1.8-tonne cars acting like supercars. 

We could apply the thinking to the boat-design. We see boats flying more on the surface rather than diving into waves, the function surpasses the weight penalty IMHO.

 

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8 minutes ago, Miffy said:

Whereas in sailing - you still have a lot of dockside event managers whose concern for the well being of sailors is about as much as saying "if they crash coming into a busy port at night unescorted at 20 knots because the race is close, they crash it is their own fault"

The skipper retaining responsibility for their own safety is a fundamental part of racing and general seamanship. IMOCA handles this well by being skipper-managed.

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Is the preloading of the rig by the runner tension higher in this years event of the VG? Probably to deal with the limited mast strenghs compared to the RM?

That would be a reason for the higher stresses on the forestay, J2 and J3 stays which bend the bow up....

Extra some slamming in high speed and ...crack goes the forward section up in the air. 

AT vertical stringer could be a victim of the same scenario...

Any inputs from people who know better???

 

 

 

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3 minutes ago, Snowden said:

The skipper retaining responsibility for their own safety is a fundamental part of racing and general seamanship. IMOCA handles this well by being skipper-managed.

Sure - so is a driver retaining autonomy when getting a drivers license from the FIA. But there's theory and practice. There are boats that shouldn't have left the dock in other events but sponsors, commitment, denial, unwillingness to disappoint compounds to wishful thinking. Skippers also don't have much of a say when they're front 10 million dollar campaigns and the race finishing is a clustefuck.

The attitude is telling. IMOCA is certainly the better of the multitude of events out there. The VOR/Volvo/Ocean Race? Not.

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KE's timeline, vetted by the VG EN communicators. Life raft 3m underwater? News to me; Sorry if I missed that detail earlier

Quote

Mayday
“I didn’t have time to do anything. I just had time to send a message to my team. I’m sinking I’m not joking. MAYDAY. Between the moment when I was out on deck trimming the sails and when I found myself in my survival suit, barely two minutes had passed. It all happened extremely quickly.”
Organising my survival            
“I came out of the boat and put on my survival suit. I could see smoke. The electronics were burning. Everything went off. My only reflex was to grab my telephone to send the message and pick up the survival suit which I never stow away. I wanted to pick up the grab bag, but I couldn’t get to it with the water rising. I grabbed the liferaft at the stern. Open I couldn’t get into it as it was three metres under the water. The water was up to the door in the cockpit.”
Jumping in the raft         
“I would have liked to have stayed a bit longer on board, but I could see it was all happening quickly and a big breaker came and I was in the water with the liferaft. At that point I was not feeling very confident. Being in a raft in 35 knots of wind is not reassuring. I was only reassured when I saw Jean. But the problem was to find a way to get on board with him. We said a few words. It was a real battlefield out on the water. He was forced to move away, but I could see he remained close by. I stayed in the raft until early this morning.”
The recovery      
“I didn’t know whether the weather would ease enough to carry out a manoeuvre. He was 2 metres from me. He sent me a line, but it was difficult to stop the boat. In the end I managed to reach some tubing and lift myself aboard. The sea was still heavy with 3.5m high waves. It is hard in such conditions to climb aboard a 60’ boat, particularly as it is hard in the survival suit. It’s lucky I’m in good shape physically, as I can promise you it is not easy.”

https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/20714/from-mayday-to-safely-aboard-yes-we-cam-kevin-escoffier-explains

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50 minutes ago, hump101 said:

The foil AoA inversion occurs when the boat bow hits a wave in front, that tries to rapidly lift the bow. The rapid pitch rotation causes a vertical velocity component at the foil that inverts the foil AoA, causing the foil to create a downwards force and try to counter the bow lifting. Result is longitudinal bending and torsion of the hull girder.

This effect is exaggerated because the stern is in the water, and thus is able to resist the pitching rotation. The stern is then the pivot point, not the foil, hence the vertical velocity component at the foil. Would not occur in the same way for a fully foiling boat, as stern could sink more easily.

The sort of longitudinal bending which could lead to the sort of damage in the photo below? Big jump to make and veering on wild speculation here, but if two boats failed in a similar mode - albeit with quite different outcomes -  is that the start of a pattern?

Alex Thomson video of damaged frame and required repairs – Sailweb

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3 minutes ago, stief said:

Open I couldn’t get into it as it was three metres under the water. The water was up to the door in the cockpit.”

I believe he said the forward liferaft. Not sure exactly where it was stowed, but he says he got the other, aft one, even though the cockpit was pretty full, and got it to the stern.

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2 minutes ago, stief said:

KE's timeline, vetted by the VG EN communicators. Life raft 3m underwater? News to me; Sorry if I missed that detail earlier

In an earlier/different version Kevin said that the smaller life raft, stored in a bag inside the boat, was unreachable. So he took the one at the stern.

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3 minutes ago, stief said:

KE's timeline, vetted by the VG EN communicators. Life raft 3m underwater? News to me; Sorry if I missed that detail earlier

https://www.vendeeglobe.org/en/news/20714/from-mayday-to-safely-aboard-yes-we-cam-kevin-escoffier-explains

Not sure the translation is spot. On. The original French is:

J’ai pris le bib (radeau de survie) à l’arrière. Le bib avant n’était pas accessible, il était déjà trois mètres en dessous de l’eau. L’eau était dans le cockpit jusqu’à la porte ».

He took the rear liferaft (bib a l’arrière) The section is red is: "The raft in front was not accessible - it was already three metres under the water". This lines up with someone else's translation earlier, plus it makes sense with someone's excerpt from the SIs on the positioning of liferafts.

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4 hours ago, shanghaisailor said:

 

Funny old world or perhaps as a sport we are not very good at telling our story  

This.

US of A the $$& drives the news.   Big pro sports build & maintain the narrative.  Same old, same old story around these parts.

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58 minutes ago, hump101 said:

The foil AoA inversion occurs when the boat bow hits a wave in front, that tries to rapidly lift the bow. The rapid pitch rotation causes a vertical velocity component at the foil that inverts the foil AoA, causing the foil to create a downwards force and try to counter the bow lifting. Result is longitudinal bending and torsion of the hull girder.

This effect is exaggerated because the stern is in the water, and thus is able to resist the pitching rotation. The stern is then the pivot point, not the foil, hence the vertical velocity component at the foil. Would not occur in the same way for a fully foiling boat, as stern could sink more easily.

I suggest the actual functioning and hence design of an Imoca foil is still in a very experimental phase, otherwise why would there be radically different types out there?

When you consider the foil is almost never fully immersed and is moving through waves and wave tops in which individual "lumps" of water are moving in all directions, (quite fast in big waves) and the foil itself is both ventilating and possibly cavitating over parts of the surfaces almost all the time, you have a fluid/solid interaction situation which is near-impossible to define in mathematical terms, let alone finding any ideal solutions. It is old fashioned R & D with a sprinkling of science.

Foils work, and by trial and error and experimentation people are learning how to design and make better ones all the time. As for having a full understanding of how they work, that is another matter altogether.

For the Imocas and for the Vendee Globe in particular, foils represent progress. They have made the boats significantly faster and have added a degree of glamour and much technical interest. Contrary to many peoples expectations (including mine I confess) they have not been the cause of higher attrition. One of the most severe races in terms of percentage finishers was 2008/9 before foils. Quite a few foils have broken, but up until now foils have never caused catastrophic boat failure on an Imoca and the jury is out on that one for PRB this time. It will be hard to prove anyway assuming the bits of PRB are beyond hope of recovery. As far as the race is concerned foils are a success and just go to prove that innovation leading to increased speed is win win for a technical sport.

Any lightweight fast raceboat can be broken sailing hard in severe sea conditions. That is why some competitors have sailed less aggressively than others, knowing that there is a long way yet to go. I have noticed several boats in this VG going relatively slowly in this race compared with speeds which they have been making in earlier shorter Imoca races this year in similar wind conditions and boat preservation rather than an inability to go fast is obviously the reason.

 

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1 hour ago, bucc5062 said:

Redress for Cam will be interesting since it would need to factor diversion, time on station/rescue, then continuing with two on board for x period of time.  The longer Kevin stays on board the more difficult will be the redress, but in the end, what ever they come up with won't matter as much as JLC finishing strong.

Well Done and "Yes we Cam!"

Maybe redress should be "just let Kevin help race the boat." :lol:

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6 minutes ago, coyotepup said:

Maybe redress should be "just let Kevin help race the boat." :lol:

JLC will probably have to struggle to keep Kevin out of his bow and bilge manically trying to make himself busy and useful - dude gets his hands dirty

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1 hour ago, Varan said:

I believe Le Cam already won this edition. 

Totally agree, the strategy (inner lane vs foilers), the media (his clac clac clac vids) the seamanship (Escoffier's awesome rescue) & of course he's won everyone's hearts... CLAP CLAP CLAP (loud applauses)

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Made a little translation of the first part of french version of the vendee live video :

(1:21) Intro sequence

This image of relief, kevin Escofier the skipper of PRB onboard Jean Le Cam's boat last night just after his shipwreck. It's a story that's ending well, very well actually, and we're rejoicing.

Good morning everyone and welcome to this vendee live we are tuesday 1st of december, a date that will now be historic in this 9th edition.

We will be going over kevin escofier's rescue. To talk about it with us on set are, the president of the vendee globe Yves Auvinet, with you we'll come back on this team work at sea and on land, Jacques Caraes race director, with you we'll come back on the facts to understand what happened during all these hours, and finally Eric Palatin of the newsdesk we'll later see where the boats were at that time.

(2:15) Start of skippers live

We imagine your night was very short, it was even more so for our two heroes, and despite this very short night they are with us live.

Good morning gentlemen, we are delighted to see you. How are you doing, Jean Le Cam, Kevin Escoffier?

JLC: Well listen, things are going well. Hey, you can come over here.

Yeah, so we can see both of you well at least.

JLC: Yeah, it's better right.

Take a seat, so how are things going 19 hours after this extraordinary adventure?

JLC: Well listen it's going rather well, right now... we're constantly answering the phone, well... and, well, it's part of things you know... anyways.. listen kevin slept 2 hours last night, I must have slept 1 hours and a half and in the end, in the end we're doing good because after moments like these... well... it wasn't a given either so yeah, it's good to be here.

Indeed it's good to be here, so Kevin can you come back on what happened before the rescue itself?

(3:35) JLC to Kevin, handing him the headset and repeating the question the host just asked

Of course there is only one headset on a boat. So kevin, if you can hear us well, explain us what happened before the rescue itself?

KE: Yeah, I still have a hard time realizing what happened. the thing is we were all approximately in the same place, we were going at it a little with Jean, Seb Simon, Boris Hermann, and Yannick Bestaven, and the wind was coming in, I had rolled the small gennaker I had been under for some time and that was giving me good speed, and I was, I had brought it down and I was preparing myself for stronger conditions, so I had a main sail with two reefs and a J2, so a smaller sail in front, in conditions that were maneuverable to start with and the wind was starting to come in at 30 knots, and that's when I went into... a surf with the boat, because the wind was coming in I was on deck... surf... at the bottom of the wave the boat nosedove into the wave, but like it happens to us very often, and then I felt something unusual was going on, and in fact the boat never came back out, and when it came back out the boat was broken in two, and when I say broken in two I mean there was a 90 degree angle, at the level of the mast foot, between the front and the back of the boat. And there I... saw... like if someone had opened a dam's spillway, water going up very very quickly, that first cut the engine, it was charging because I was filling up the batteries for the wind to come to be sure to have enough energy, and then it powered off everything onboard, I just had the time to send a texto to the organization, to my technical team actually, and then I jumped on the TPS, because, the water was going up very very quickly, I had water up to the knees already so I managed to jump on, take my TPS and get out of the boat before the water, the water was already at 3/4 of the boats door.

(5:30)

Jacques, a word to Kevin?

JC: Well a word, we saw each other, we longingly talked with Jean by skype because we practically lived their landing in to cockpit live, so it was an incredible moment, and what I can say is congratulations to these two sailors because there's combined experience, and I don't think you do something like this without experience.

Kevin, so we can understand, we're not used to it of course, how did things go afterwards in the liferaft?

(6:00)

KE: So to start off, in those moments I had very little time to make a decision, water was going up so fast, an imoca isn't supposed to be able to sink, and I had that in mind, so there were two things, it was either I stayed on the boat, or I was going on a liferaft, I wanted to stay on the boat as long as possible because for me it was was the most safe, the only doubt I had was that since the boat was broken in two, and that the part I was on was the one connected to the keel the boat was in fact heavier with less floatability reserves and I was seeing it go down very quickly, so I wanted to go secure the lifeboat that is normally at the bottom of the cockpit, but the water was already at the level of the boat's deck, the level of back of the boat's deck, so I pulled the liferaft from under the water to put it on the deck of the cockpit, and when I was trying to secure it the boat heeled over, a wave broke over the deck and threw me in the water with the liferaft, so I didn't have a choice in fact between staying on the boat and going in the water, so then I was in the water, I activated the liferaft, I had the grab bag I had managed to get a hold of on my back and a distress case I was keeping with me, that was inside the boat, up high, that's how I had been able to recover it, and at that point I was in the water with all that, I managed to activate the liferaft and climb into it, and then I kept on looking, and during 15 minutes I was still seeing PRB's bow pointed straight up, that's why I could still see the boat, I quickly lost sight of it obviously considering the state of the sea, and at that point in the raft I activated a beacon, the big beacon I recovered on the boat, and a small beacon that I have at all times in my sailsuit, and in fact the TPS, I had so little time that I put it directly over my sailsuit, so I managed to pull the beacon out of my sailsuit's pocket, I activated it too, and that's how Jean managed to recover me from what I understood the first time, because we lived the events but from two different viewpoints, and the conditions at that time made a transbording impossible, jean arrived with two reefs, I could see that it was very difficult to control the boat, it was pretty impressive to see an imoca, you're in a liferaft, to see an imoca luffing going right by, we exchanged two words, we signaled each other to temporize, and I understood, I knew that the weather conditions were going to get better so I told myself listen Kevin you're on a liferaft, you can spend the night in it and tomorrow it will be dayliht and the conditions will be simpler, it's better than taking the risk of having a bad transboarding where things can turn bad, and that's when I waited and spent the night in the liferaft, listen, I closed the zip, I felt the waves regularly coming against the raft, I fed on the survival rations, I drank a little water to try and stay zen, I continued to think positively, telling myself that guys were on zone, that I had been seen, I told myself don't panic, something will happen eventually, and so that's it, I tried to sleep a little too, but not too much so that, and what's surreal is that I was starting to wait for the sunrise and I then hear a sail flap, I hear a sail flap, I open the zip, I put my head outside and I see Jean heading straight for me, and I tell him "we're doing this now?", and he says "yeah, now, now!", and then he tells me "I'm going to come rest against you.", and then I see, because I see the maneuver he's doing you know, he starts to drift, in order to drift towards the raft, and then it gets to let's say 5 meters, the boat with it's momentum gets in front of the raft, Jean throws me a line with a buoy, when I say a buoy it's kind of like the buoys you put around the waist at the pool to play with the kids, it's the same thing, I managed to get a hold of it, I put it around the waist and I stayed in the raft and Jean and me both tried from our ends to pull on it, give a little slack so Jean could tack it to the boat and reduce the distance between us, and we reduced the distance as much as we could, up to the point where I could let's say jump, jump as well as possible, because he was going full in reverse with the engine, and sometimes I was seeing, in the waves, the back of the boat that was going up, the propeller that was coming out of the water

(10:16)

Yes, surrealist, really

KE: You see the scenario, quite a sight when you're waking up, yeah it was, and I managed to grab a rudder bar, watching out for the hydrogenerators, because hydrogenerator blades cut into skin like butter, so I jumped on the rudder tubing and Jean helped me climb onboard and at that point I can tell you it was a big sigh of relief, and thank you TPS, thank you TPS too.

For us too it was a relief of course. Yves Auvinet, you must want to react.

YA: Yes, it's pure happiness to see them both together on screen this morning, pure happiness because it's true that last night, in the night with Jean Jacques we were waiting, and Jacques... allows me to thank the race direction for the work done, and it's pure happiness to know them, to know Kevin is safe and my hat off to Jean, it's unanimous, on our territory, but well beyond our vendeen territory, because it's... we say the vendee globe is a human adventure, but it's a human adventure that goes beyond everthing we can hear from many other competitions, and frankly, to seem them both here it's.. very moving.

Yes, it is moving. Jean how... after all it's nearly a remake, in reverse, of course we're thinking about 2008, how are you seeing this now today, 10 hours after this adventure?

(they exchange headset again and the host repeats the question)

JLC: Yeah you can say that. In 2008 I was the rescued and this time I'm the rescuer, so we're going from the rescued to the rescuer.

So we call you king Jean, it's god Jean

JLC: No, it's that... well I hadn't done that yet, so I had to... so... it's done now, and of course it's with PRB... coincidentally of course, of course right... sometimes fate... you wonder... sometimes scenarios are hard to come up with, but this one... the first part of the race was already a scenario that no one imagined and now it rebounds into a "one again"... so.. that's that

So what's your program for the next hours?

(13:06)

JLC: Well the program is that, to start with, all of Kevin's cloths are drying, there's water dripping so Kevin is squeezing them from time to time, because we're a little alike we don't like to have water inside the boat, so... there's that, then well... well we'll send up a reef at some point because right now we're getting eaten up by the high pressure... so we'll have to... but we haven't had much time since this morning.

Of course, we're going to leave you, really thank you to have been with us. Yves Auvinet maybe you would like to thank them too?

YA: Yes, that's for sure, solidarity between skippers has been prooved once again last night, bravo to both of them and bravo to the three other skippers that deviated from their course to meet them, under coordination from Jacques next to me, but... Kevin take care of yourself and Jean get back to your race and we will be really very very happy to welcome you at the sables d'olonne.

Thank you very much gentlemen to have been with us, we're delighted that...

JLC: Congratulations to the organization, congratulations to the whole shore team, with Jacques and the whole team which was extremely efficient.

Right, we're going to talk about right away, it was real teamwork at sea and on land, thank you very much, both of you, to have been with us, we are really delighted to have seen you, and see you very soon, of course.

So, Jacques, we're going to talk about all this, how do you live this when you're a race director, how did it happen for you?

JC: Well it happened suddenly quite frankly. When I got the call fron the CROSS Corsen, sorry the CROSS Griz-Nez, which is the referent CROSS for MRCCs abroad, that call was a distress call, a beacon that was activated, so right away it's serious, major damage, we had little information, we only knew that had exchanged a couple of words so.

And where was that?

JC: Well I was in my office, so the CROSS calls us and I just talked with Jean-Marc Lefayere who told me there was a whatsapp saying "I'm sinking, it's not a joke, mayday"... that was the only exchange we started out with, so it was pretty brutal.

Right, so how are things organized then, its a whole team that...

JC: Yes, we're a whole team, we were three on location during the whole night so we were taking turns, we established direct communication with CROSS Griz-Nez of course which was informing us, the MRCC Cape Town took over at one point, we also saw that there was a cargo called the pearl, but that was at 20 hours from there, it was too far, so we needed to coordinate between ourselves and it's true that in that oceanic desert it's the sailors that assist each other and that's how we rerouted Jean Le Cam who was the closest first, and then when I saw by nighttime that it wasn't going as well as we hoped we took it upon ourselves to reroute three other boats to go cover the area, which was triangular, that Christian Dumar with Sebastien Josse had given us with drift timelines and that was later confirmed with a drift simulator that Meteo France gave us too, with a lot of efficiency, and that's how, crossing multiple sources we determined where to go.

(16:40)

We'll see that later with Frederic's cartography. But why did it take so much time? Because the first cal is at about 14:46, so why so much time?

JC: Well it takes time because first of all we're on sailing boats in strong sketchy seas with strong winds, we're not on the side of a road, so it's... you can't go straight you have to gybe...

It's south of afica

JC: It's south of Cap Town, that deserted oceanic area where there are very few commercial ships, it's a tricky zone, with currents, opposing currents that make for a very sketchy sea

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Snowden said:

Interested in the drift prediction software the race control was using, apparently it was first developed to track oil spills. Is this now standard in SAR operations or is it a bit of Vendee innovation?

We've used drift simulations in SAR since I was doing it in the 90's. It's not new. 

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24 minutes ago, coyotepup said:

Maybe redress should be "just let Kevin help race the boat." :lol:

Wouldn't you love YWC to pop into cape town, grab some more supplies and the two of them sail finish the race together :)

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45 minutes ago, b3nharris said:

He took the rear liferaft (bib a l’arrière) The section is red is: "The raft in front was not accessible - it was already three metres under the water". This lines up with someone else's translation earlier, plus it makes sense with someone's excerpt from the SIs on the positioning of liferafts.

thanks, and to Chasm and cms. "it" (forward raft) underwater makes more sense, and helps sort out which one couldn't  "open"  or be opened. 

" I grabbed the liferaft at the stern. Open I couldn’t get into it as it was three metres under the water."

(and apologies for the delayed response.   Waiting for reactions limits to reset.). 

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Most surprising thing I think is that the mast did not fail in compression before the bow peeled off...

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Seems the OD masts can stand compression better than bending.. 

But if the boat breaks under mast, runner and forstay loads, you won nothing. 

Boat without mast is bad, but mast without boat underneath.....too bad.

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8 minutes ago, stief said:

thanks, and to Chasm and cms. "it" (forward raft) underwater makes more sense, and helps sort out which one couldn't  "open"  or be opened. 

" I grabbed the liferaft at the stern. Open I couldn’t get into it as it was three metres under the water."

(and apologies for the delayed response.   Waiting for reactions limits to reset.). 

Turns out the full explanation is much more complicated and hairy - see ant1s transcription above.

.
 

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4 hours ago, Corryvreckan said:

One big difference is that the F1 has detailed footage of the horrific crash, complete with fireball to show on the evening news. (or so I assume, I haven't watched it).

Ocean racing has little boat icons moving slowly across a computer screen, then some grainy video of a couple of guys talking on the radio in a cramped boat.  Most news execs will take one look at the guy with the wild hair going "Clack, Clack, Clack... why are you looking at me?"  and think to themselves, good question.

Ocean racing just isn't going to produce the same visual footage.

You are right with the sort of equipment the Vendee boats appear to carry but the technology is available - just look at the coverage from the Volvo boats. Remember the Vestas grounding for example. It doesn't have to be edited on board but could be sent off to a centralised video suite to be polished up.

By the way I love your screen name. I used to keep one of my boats at Ardfern and have been in the Gulf a couple of times - always at slack water i hasten to add but many many years ago i witnessed the whirlpool in all its glory. I was on a Venture Scout weekend on Scarba and watched it from the raised beaches above. It was real scary stuff even though i was on dry land.

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2 hours ago, shanghaisailor said:

If only our sport or even just one event in our sport could engender such interest from the media in other countries we'd be on a winner.

Maybe it's also the media. The UK mainstream media isn't exactly renoun for its work.

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1 hour ago, staysail said:

Foils work, and by trial and error and experimentation people are learning how to design and make better ones all the time. As for having a full understanding of how they work, that is another matter altogether.

 For the Imocas and for the Vendee Globe in particular, foils represent progress. They have made the boats significantly faster and have added a degree of glamour and much technical interest. Contrary to many peoples expectations (including mine I confess) they have not been the cause of higher attrition.

They certainly work and they will continue to win. But the 2019/2020 generation of boats has had a very poor showing here, not solely because of the foil component but due to the whole package, including skippers’ experience with these boats and the amount of data about what they would do. Having minimal data about how these would perform in southern sea states is a big risk. Apivia is positioned to win it, but if it doesn’t you would have to say the newest generation failed completely and much more stick time before the VG is a missing link.

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18 minutes ago, b3nharris said:

Turns out the full explanation is much more complicated and hairy - see ant1s transcription above.

I was (am) still watching/ and reading that. Complicated is right--need to check the location of the forward raft, and beacons, and . . .

btw, Gotta like the new initiation. "Hey newbie: your skills are showing" is better than 'fuck off newbie; show us your girlfriend's tits." Nicely done and welcome back @ant1 

Not that tits aren't also appreciated.

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13 minutes ago, loneshark64 said:

They certainly work and they will continue to win. But the 2019/2020 generation of boats has had a very poor showing here, not solely because of the foil component but due to the whole package, including skippers’ experience with these boats and the amount of data about what they would do. Having minimal data about how these would perform in southern sea states is a big risk. Apivia is positioned to win it, but if it doesn’t you would have to say the newest generation failed completely and much more stick time before the VG is a missing link.

I mean... it is 2020 and covid fucked with everyone in the world. 

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Plenty more details and clarifications to come but my first take aways are. 

1) The only communication from KE was a "WhatsApp" txt message sent by sat phone and then his EPIRB position. 

2) For search it's not clear if JLC localised the first time using AIS MOB but once he lost sight it didn't help.

3) After resting and then returning to the new EPIRB+drift datum in the dark JLC saw the lift rafts strobe and localised on it. Mark 1 eyeball is a very powerful tool. 

4) It's not clear whether he did or did not have his grab bag as he mentions at one point "it was on his back" and at others that he could get to it, but the location of emergency equipment is critical. 

As others have stated, you can't get into a survival suit in 4 seconds. We practiced this often in my previous life and it is always a faf. Getting into a life raft from the water, in a survival suit is not straight forwards but adrenaline helps. 

5) His perception after first seeing JLC as to what was happening didn't match reality. This actually worked in his favour as he just went into wait for morning mode. However if he had known that his position was now not known to the rescuers could he have done something? We don't know what he had with him but I think it's clear he didn't have his sat phone. 

 

Great outcome in the end, and that's the bottom line right now but as always, there will be lots to learn from this. 

 

 

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A few thoughts after some reading here (maybe wrong) Comparing F1 with IMOCA is like comparing Kerosene with Wind (...?...)

About Media exposure..., F1 will allways win, a simple reason is everyone owns a car but not everyone owns a sailing boat... just sayin'

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The latest translation seems to state K E was swept off the stern while holding raft (un-inflated) and possibly EPIRB (which he was trying to secure the stern rail) and possibly a grab bag. SO extremely lucky he was able to maintain hold on raft & get inside.

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Just now, longy said:

The latest translation seems to state K E was swept off the stern while holding raft (un-inflated) and possibly EPIRB (which he was trying to secure the stern rail) and possibly a grab bag. SO extremely lucky he was able to maintain hold on raft & get inside.

yes. hopefully the painter line was attached.

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13 minutes ago, Buck Turgidson said:

As others have stated, you can't get into a survival suit in 4 seconds. We practiced this often in my previous life and it is always a faf. Getting into a life raft from the water, in a survival suit is not straight forwards but adrenaline helps. 

There's a big difference between the commercial safety course/review or safety at sea seminar and THE BOAT IS FUCKING SINKING GET THE FUCK IN YOUR SURVIVAL SUIT. 4 seconds? probably not, people need to stop bringing that up. right fucking quick? yes.

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Not an expert by any means but it seems like it was just lucky he was able to get his raft and get in it.  Finding him in his survival suit and retrieving him seems close to impossible.  It seems like this could have gone much worse very easily.

 

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Really extensive description of what happened from Hubert Lemonnier (deputy race director) in Tip&Shaft latest Pos Report podcast: https://www.tipandshaft.com/podcasts/posreport/episode5-pascal-bidegorry-hubert-lemonnier/

 

Jean Le Cam kept a live Skype link with the Race Commitee through the whole thing. At some point he disappeared from the camera, the people in the Race Office heard him without knowing what was happening and suddenly he came back in front of the camera smiling followed by Kevin in his TPS suit. Apparently it was a hell of a moment.

The Race Committee had started discussion with the South African Army apparently about using one of their planes, but according to Hubert Lemonnier; discussions were not going so great...

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1 minute ago, TPG said:

There's a big difference between the commercial safety course/review or safety at sea seminar and THE BOAT IS FUCKING SINKING GET THE FUCK IN YOUR SURVIVAL SUIT. 4 seconds? probably not, people need to stop bringing that up. right fucking quick? yes.

yes also I don't think the guy was probably using a stopwatch while all this happened.  I imagine if the entire bow ripped off the boat and went vertical, the boat was sinking very quickly, particularly if the keel was attached to the aft end. 

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11 minutes ago, Buck Turgidson said:

However if he had known that his position was now not known to the rescuers could he have done something? We don't know what he had with him but I think it's clear he didn't have his sat phone. 

We now know that he had an AIS PLB in his pocket at all times. (From his Dongfeng VOR routine.) He also took the boats EPIRB with him. Initially to mount it on the railing for better reception, then managed to hold onto it as he went swimming and into the raft.

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28 minutes ago, longy said:

The latest translation seems to state K E was swept off the stern while holding raft (un-inflated) and possibly EPIRB (which he was trying to secure the stern rail) and possibly a grab bag. SO extremely lucky he was able to maintain hold on raft & get inside.

Extremely lucky, experienced and pretty well fit (strong core & arms)

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1 hour ago, ant1 said:

....so I pulled the liferaft from under the water to put it on the deck of the cockpit, and when I was trying to secure it the boat heeled over, a wave broke over the deck and threw me in the water with the liferaft, so I didn't have a choice in fact between staying on the boat and going in the water, so then I was in the water, I activated the liferaft, I had the grab bag I had managed to get a hold of on my back and a distress case I was keeping with me, that was inside the boat, up high, that's how I had been able to recover it, and at that point I was in the water with all that, I managed to activate the liferaft and climb into it, ..

So having already suited up was washed overboard together with liferaft (while trying to secure it) with one grab bag (backpack), distress case, vessels epirb and AIS PLB (attached to suit).

That could have so gone to shit so easily.

- It all happened exactly as it did BUT he was not suited.

- He got washed overboard AFTER securing raft.  Boat and liferaft go to the bottom. 

 

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11 minutes ago, Buck Turgidson said:

5) His perception after first seeing JLC as to what was happening didn't match reality. This actually worked in his favour as he just went into wait for morning mode. However if he had known that his position was now not known to the rescuers could he have done something? We don't know what he had with him but I think it's clear he didn't have his sat phone. 

 

 

Supremely ballsy, and apparently smart, move for both of them to get some rest for a few hours awaiting better conditions and light before attempting recovery.  

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16 minutes ago, Miffy said:

I mean... it is 2020 and covid fucked with everyone in the world. 

+1

At times I feel like such a loser ( sailed once last two months) but, in truth, my boat needs work and the yard/workshop is closed/ not closed depending on what current Covid restrictions are in Cali.   Maddening but, no point in whining - everyone’s sheit out of luck these days.   

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3 minutes ago, Bebmoumoute said:

Really extensive description of what happened from Hubert Lemonnier (deputy race director) in Tip&Shaft latest Pos Report podcast: https://www.tipandshaft.com/podcasts/posreport/episode5-pascal-bidegorry-hubert-lemonnier/

 

Jean Le Cam kept a live Skype link with the Race Commitee through the whole thing. At some point he disappeared from the camera, the people in the Race Office heard him without knowing what was happening and suddenly he came back in front of the camera smiling followed by Kevin in his TPS suit. Apparently it was a hell of a moment.

The Race Committee had started discussion with the South African Army apparently about using one of their planes, but according to Hubert Lemonnier; discussions were not going so great...

Also from Hubert Lemonnier, the EPIRB signal they were getting via CROSS Gris-Nez was erratic an inconsistent, which caused some confusion.

They will be looking into this.

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I have not seen a single post of the radical "Green" who were complaining of Thomas dropping the tip of his foil into the sea. We have a full boat here polluting the sea. Is PRB Cie intending to recover the sunk ship ? 

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3 hours ago, Panoramix said:

Imagine, for some reason (probably bow down attitude), the angle of incidence of the foils becomes negative and they start working against the buoyancy of the boat.

This was a known problem with the canting keels.  I actually wrote about it in my singlehanded book after I interviewed the designer about it.  It would be good to know if it's still an issue.

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