Starboard!!

Offshore racing costs

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This "pay-to-play" thread has brought up the cost of offshore racing, with a 10-20k number thrown around a few times. Interested in what others' estimates are for a competitive 35-40' boat doing say Annapolis or Newport > Bermuda.  With just some quick back-of-envelope numbers, I'm getting roughly between 20-30k.

Sails & rigging: $12,500 - 16,500

  • #4 heavy wx jib meeting SER requirements: $4000-5500
  • storm jib & trisail: $2000-2500
  • Spare halyard & sheets, snatch blocks, extra shackles, etc... : $1000
  • (optional) Code zero (for those long reaches): 5500-7500

Safety & electronics: $3500 - 8350

  • Satphone & Iridium Go rentals for 2 weeks: $1000
  • Weather routing (Predictwind pro vs  Expedition): $250 / 1300
  • EPIRB: $350
  • Liferaft (rental / purchase)  $1100 / 2500
  • SOLAS flares, backup lights, radar reflector, bilge pump, misc repair supplies: $800-1200
  • (Optional) AIS beacons for 8x crew: $2000

Consumables & Misc: $4000 - 4800

  • Food (8x for 10 days): 1200-2000
  • Gas: 100
  • Dockage: 500
  • Entry Fees & ORR cert: 1600
  • Safety at sea + 1st aid cert: 600

 

 

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BITD a guy took his then obsolete Tartan 41 to SORC. This was a group of friends & family, not a high end "program" racing an also ran semi-hot boat for fun and he documented the costs.

IIRC the prep and two weeks or whatever SORC lasted cost him $50K - 40 years ago.

The only abnormal expense was trucking the boat to Fla from the Lakes.

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This assumes a boat that's otherwise already competitive for local racing, so good sails, rigging, electronics, etc... Starting from scratch you'd add another 30-40k I imagine.

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You are assuming the boat is otherwise not well equipped for offshore. 

Presumably the boat would have ORR certificate and a copy of Expedition with a Predict wind subscription if it's otherwise raced inshore. 

The event expenses might be:  

  • Haul out: bottom paint, thru hull & Rigging inspection $5000
  • Satphone & Iridium Go rentals for 2 weeks: $1000
  • Consumables & Misc: $4000 - 4800
  • Food (8x for 10 days): 1200-2000
  • LP (stove) Gas: 100
  • Dockage: 500
  • Entry Fees  1100
  • Delivery crew plane tix: 2 * $500

The Capital required for the race  would be on the order of: (Potentially some of this can be borrowed....) 

Sails & rigging: $12,500 - 16,500

  • #4 heavy wx jib meeting SER requirements: $4000-5500
  • storm jib & trisail: $2000-2500
  • (optional) Code zero (for those long reaches): 5500-7500

Safety & electronics: $3500 - 8350

  • EPIRB: $350
  • Liferaft (purchase)  2500
  • SOLAS flares, backup lights, radar reflector, bilge pump, misc repair supplies: $800-1200
  • (Optional) AIS beacons for 8x crew: $2000
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A drop in the bucket but you can get sailgrib on android for less than 40 bux (i think) for weather routing. Get a Samsung waterproof tablet, galaxy tab active 2, and you can do most nav stuff on deck.  Last couple distance races I did, Nap to Newport and Newp Bermuda I was navigating.  The boat had a pc with expedition and I compared that with sailgrib as far as routing on my personal tablet.  Damn near exactly the same projected route.

At least you can cut the cost of expedition.  Expedition is great if you have it all set to go with your instruments connected and an expedition guru onboard, but it is a pita to keep up with all the features.  If your not fluent in it, it's not worth the cost because 90 pct of it you won't use.

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It really depends on the boat.  I just prepped my old slow boat for an offshore race.  We were set up for local round the buoy "racing". 

I'd focus on the structural design aspects of your boat before you worry about gear you can load on, etc since these are more difficult to do/require someone to actually do the work.  Most 35-40' are built with this sort of stuff already taken care of because ABYC or ISO recreational craft requirements.  Or your boat is old and may need some of this:

  • Can provide stability data or sistership data.  Could be on your ORR cert or you paid to get that measured?
    • you may have to get measured, have a professional do a stability analysis or a stability test to be allowed to enter. 
  • What if you're lifeline stanchions aren't tall enough?  What if you're lifelines are coated or you took advantage of the (brief) window where soft lifelines were allowed (or maybe they still are for some categories of offshore race)? 
  • Manual bilge pumps above/below deck
  • jackline and good tether hard points at various work stations
  • emergency steering- hopefully you've alrady got this, I didnt.
  • Do you have "enough" handholds down below?
  • Are you hatches and portlights up to the task for offshore work?
  • Is your engine in good shape and reliable enough once you're out of seatow range?
  • Are your batteries a "sealed" type and in good condition for offshore work
  • Does your cockpit have adequate drainage?
  • Good sleeping arrangement (lee clothes, pipe berths, etc)
  • Can you carry enough fuel/water?
  • Probably many more items but im just too lazy to keep going.

Some would say you can't be "competitive" without legit personalize weather routing and forecasts...

That said, I'd trim a few things from your list  because I'd say you already have them or a boat thats set up for sailing would have them already.

The event expenses might be:  

  • Haul out: bottom paint, thru hull & Rigging inspection $5000  Aren't you already doing this if you're racing or just using your boat?
  • Satphone & Iridium Go rentals for 2 weeks: $1000  Ok sure or borrow one, rent one, etc. 
  • Consumables & Misc: $4000 - 4800  Not exactly sure whats in this category
  • Food (8x for 10 days): 1200-2000  Ok, fair.  $2000/8 people is $50pp per day for 3-4 meals and snacks for 5 days of provisions.  
  • LP (stove) Gas: 100  Sure.
  • Dockage: 500  
  • Entry Fees  1100  
  • Delivery crew plane tix: 2 * $500  If you must.
  • The Capital required for the race  would be on the order of: (Potentially some of this can be borrowed....) 

    Sails & rigging: $12,500 - 16,500  Sure you probably want to replace that 10 year old rod rigging before ripping down to Bermuda.  

  • #4 heavy wx jib meeting SER requirements: $4000-5500  Sure, or find a used one or manage to finagle a measurement for an old blade or #3?
  • storm jib & trisail: $2000-2500  You dont already have these?
  • (optional) Code zero (for those long reaches): 5500-7500  Depending on the race, the boat, and your budget- why the heck not.
  • Safety & electronics: $3500 - 8350

  • EPIRB: $350  yes
  • Liferaft (purchase)  2500  yes
  • SOLAS flares, backup lights, radar reflector, bilge pump, misc repair supplies: $800-1200  Assuming you have to upgrade regular flares to solas and add some of the required bits and bobs, build out a decent DC kit, ok.
  • (Optional) AIS beacons for 8x crew: $2000  Probably less now since the prices have come down but ok.
  • Legit First Aid kit-  something that is up to the task for offshore type issues + manual
  • Adding general safety gear you dont think of and probably dont have:
    • enough tethers with ISO ratings, dual and single-  those are like $150 x 6:  $900
    • Decent jacklines-  $200-300
    • Drogue-  $250?
    • Other method of emergency steering besides e tiller -  this could be anything from some line and tackle to more complicated
    • Lee clothes with your sail number (Alternate method for displaying sail numbers)-  Probably a few hundred dollars.  I made a set myself for $20 worth of adhesive sail numbers and some grommets.

 

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Done Newport Bermuda three times on the same boat with a generous owner. Total cost for the trip was about 50k give or take. Ten crew plus owner everything is paid for from the time you show up in Newport the day before the start until you take a cab to the airport. Travel expenses to Newport and from Bermuda are on you. The boat was very well equipped for sailing and hotel rooms were provided for the whole crew on either end through Saturday night after the race. Miscellaneous expenses like booze and food on land were on you with the exception of a crew dinner. I was pretty lucky to have gotten that ride.

 

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I wrote some stuff, then deleted it.

 

This is the reality, but it's not a good reality.

 

 

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Did a 1500nm offshore passage on a new boat. Cost approximately 10k for safety gear and consumables. The required offshore race sails and fees would be another 10-15k easily. With an extra 4-5 crew, costs would go up accordingly.

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A minor tangent, but this discussion had triggered me on a problem I have with modern production boats.

OK, I'm a skiff/dinghy guy by nature, but I have owned a cruiser/racer and the problem I had in looking for one was none of them have adequate provision for jacklines.

I grew up being taught you should be clipped in before leaving the companionway (and I think that's still the rule)

 

But try finding or installing a hard point or jackline mounting anywhere in or near the cockpit of these boats; more so if you don't want something that will stub your toe every time you go near it.

And the molded liner construction means you can't easily retrofit anything either.

And don't get me started on sea berths and lee cloths

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Most of these estimates also assume the boat is already where it needs to be to start the race. If you need to have the mast dropped and keel off to truck it somewhere, have it put together and splashed, and then hauled, taken apart, and brought back home at the end, the costs can almost double. You might be looking at $80k-$100k to do something like a N2B.

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11 minutes ago, Carrera said:

Most of these estimates also assume the boat is already where it needs to be to start the race. If you need to have the mast dropped and keel off to truck it somewhere, have it put together and splashed, and then hauled, taken apart, and brought back home at the end, the costs can almost double. You might be looking at $80k-$100k to do something like a N2B.

Throw in the costs of getting the crew to/from the boat.  While some owners leave that cost to the crew other owners cover that.  6 to 10 or so round trip airfares.  And if you have one or more pros on board, there is his/their daily fee and expenses.

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What he said above. 8 times on a Swan 56' and it was at least 70-80K USD each when you count the Old House rental in Tucker's Town (owner's girlfriend NOT included) .. 

Sail Safe ( and find an owner who likes to take Ambien)   ; )

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We spent around $1k a foot in the 2016 Pac cup. This included two kites and shipping the boat home. 

 

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39 minutes ago, IMR said:

We spent around $1k a foot in the 2016 Pac cup. This included two kites and shipping the boat home. 

 

So $24K, right?

I helped put together a program for a Ross 40 for 2003 Transpac.  All in (excluding cost of boat) to get the boat to the start line including new race sails, pulling/going through the rig, race bottom, safety equip to meet regs, nav equipment and comms (SSB and sat phone), watermaker and food = $75K. 

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1 hour ago, IMR said:

We spent around $1k a foot in the 2016 Pac cup. This included two kites and shipping the boat home. 

 

Not telling you anything you don't already know but your situation seems like more of an outlier though.  Not many people are willing or even able to do a 2000+ mile race in a 24 ft boat.  Not many 24 ft boats are even able to do a long offshore race either.  Definitely an amazing and inspiring race you guys pulled off and although I have mad respect for anyone who does that race on a small boat or shorthanded I don't think I'm alone in thinking a bigger boat would be more enjoyable.  $24K is still a shitload of normal money for a recreational activity (not so bad when you use the usual 10x conversion factor for boat dollars though).  Probably not good for any of us to think about but imagine explaining this to a non sailor.

"How much did the trip cost you?"  

"Oh about $24K not including buying the boat"

How much do you win if you get first?"

"Oh there's no cash prize, just a pickle dish." 

"How much time did you have to take off work?"

"Oh, a couple weeks."

"Must have been a relaxing vacation though right?"  

"Uh, yeah in some ways. If not getting any sleep, peeing in your foulies at the helm, living on power bars and being soaked from head to toe for a couple weeks is your idea of fun." 

"So let me make sure I understand this correctly, it cost you $24K and 2 weeks of vacation time to do this torture fest?"

"Um, yeah.  So ah, any spots left open on your bowling team?   For some reason I'm thinking about changing sports now.":D

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I've entered my boat in a number of offshore races, right coast.  As alluded to in previous posts, a lot of the costs mentioned would be for the first race.  Subsequent races would be a lot less because you've already purchased the storm sails, heavy weather jib, offshore flare kit, liferaft (if you're doing more than one race, buy the damned raft), special lifejackets, etc.  In fact, if you've gone to the effort to prep your boat for one race, it wouldn't make any sense at all to stop at one.  If you want to buy a screecher for every race, your sailmaker will love you to bits.  But since everyone spreads out on a race, the difference between a new screecher and a one-year old screecher (which was only used once last year, right?) will only be about 10 minutes after 600 miles.  That's probably not enough to move up or down in the finishing results.

I don't make my crew pay for anything other than travel.  But I'm not a high-falutin' professional program either.

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3 hours ago, Hitchhiker said:

So $24K, right?

I helped put together a program for a Ross 40 for 2003 Transpac.  All in (excluding cost of boat) to get the boat to the start line including new race sails, pulling/going through the rig, race bottom, safety equip to meet regs, nav equipment and comms (SSB and sat phone), watermaker and food = $75K. 

We did not have to race prep the bottom it was done for class racing.  We went through the rig 3 years before for class racing. We also had most of the sails. Heck I have been on boats where $1k a foot was the sail budget. All depends on what the boat needs. 

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In the words of a well known San Diego sailor/boatbuilder I used to sail with "Yacht racing is not a sport for the homeless."

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A lot of this HUGELY depends on what the boat was used for before and after. Do you already have a SSB/liferaft/storm sails/epirb/etc? If not, would you be using them from then on or would this all be one-time expenses?

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I commented earlier on the costs associated with the Newport Bermuda runs I've done but I am leery of owners who ask their crew to pitch in to cover costs or do some of the more time consuming/heavier maintenance. In those situations I'm always concerned about what else on the boat has been done on the cheap (safety related equipment/systems). Buy the boat you can afford to pay a professional to take care of. 

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On 11/8/2019 at 6:34 PM, SamLowry said:

I've entered my boat in a number of offshore races, right coast.  As alluded to in previous posts, a lot of the costs mentioned would be for the first race.  Subsequent races would be a lot less because you've already purchased the storm sails, heavy weather jib, offshore flare kit, liferaft (if you're doing more than one race, buy the damned raft), special lifejackets, etc.  In fact, if you've gone to the effort to prep your boat for one race, it wouldn't make any sense at all to stop at one.  If you want to buy a screecher for every race, your sailmaker will love you to bits.  But since everyone spreads out on a race, the difference between a new screecher and a one-year old screecher (which was only used once last year, right?) will only be about 10 minutes after 600 miles.  That's probably not enough to move up or down in the finishing results.

I don't make my crew pay for anything other than travel.  But I'm not a high-falutin' professional program either.

So maybe a more valid question is:  What does it cost to own and campaign a race boat per year?   

 

Oh wait.....doesn't this thread fall under the category of "if you have to ask the price, you can't afford it" ?

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Where’s Glen McCarthathy to lecture me on how affordable sailing is now?  

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I could share the spreadsheet...

we’re prepping a 43’er for PacCup 2020. This is race expense only:

 

        Budget  
Entry Fees    $400 + $22.50/foot    $1,368   
Food    20/day/person/14 days    $1,960    
Fuel    40 gallons at $5    $200    
Shipping to Hawaii    Container cost    $500    
Medical Kit        $500    
Raft Rental      $800    
Nav Routing    Weather Router - $900    
PacCup Tracker        $500    ?
Weather (predictwind Pro)        $250    
Sat Phone    Inmarsat    $500    
Sat Phone/Connectivity    Service  fee 500, equiment 1100        
            
    Total for race over    $7,478    
            
Delivery back            (Assume 2 of the racers come back with the boat, find 2 more)
Food    4 people, $25/day/20 days    $2,000    
Fuel    40+40 gallons at 5    $400    
Shipping of race stuff back        $500    
Airfare for crew    2 fly in @ $600    $1,200    
            
        $4,100    
            
            
    Estimated Total Cost    $11,578    

 

Not included:

New main, new kite, new #3. #2 and other kites are good for the trip.  Need new heavy air sails.

new standing rigging

new lifelines

emergency rudder and cassette

new batteries 

4 halyards, 1 spare

2 sets checkstays

all new running rigging: sheets, guys, etc. shackles were re-used

2 new winch handles

nav computer & software

bottom job

dropping the rudder for inspection

Full ORR rating

(And yes, I had the replace the engine)

it will make no sense to do this once. We need to plan on at least 3 to make it even close to worthwhile.

 

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46 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

I could share the spreadsheet...

we’re prepping a 43’er for PacCup 2020. This is race expense only:

 

        Budget  
Entry Fees    $400 + $22.50/foot    $1,368   
Food    20/day/person/14 days    $1,960    
Fuel    40 gallons at $5    $200    
Shipping to Hawaii    Container cost    $500    
Medical Kit        $500    
Raft Rental      $800    
Nav Routing    Weather Router - $900    
PacCup Tracker        $500    ?
Weather (predictwind Pro)        $250    
Sat Phone    Inmarsat    $500    
Sat Phone/Connectivity    Service  fee 500, equiment 1100        
            
    Total for race over    $7,478    
            
Delivery back            (Assume 2 of the racers come back with the boat, find 2 more)
Food    4 people, $25/day/20 days    $2,000    
Fuel    40+40 gallons at 5    $400    
Shipping of race stuff back        $500    
Airfare for crew    2 fly in @ $600    $1,200    
            
        $4,100    
            
            
    Estimated Total Cost    $11,578    

 

I have a friend who raced a 35' boat in what I think was the 2016 pac cup which was a rough year weather-wise.  Boat was so badly damaged once they arrived in Hawaii it couldn't be sailed back as initially planned.  Fixing it in Hawaii was not a great option due to availability of parts, increased costs and the owner not being there to keep an eye on the projects or do any DIY projects.  Cost him $22K just to get the boat shipped back to San Francisco from Hawaii.  I've never done a Pac cup but I've always thought about doing it on my own boat one day.  His experience however is making it harder and harder to pull the trigger.  That and as much as I love sailing I'm just not sure I like anything enough to do it 24/7 for 10-12 days.  3-4 days seems to be where I'm ready to get off the boat and do something else.  That's just me though, much respect for everyone who has a longer attention span than myself and does that race!

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1 hour ago, Psycho Tiller said:

I have a friend who raced a 35' boat in what I think was the 2016 pac cup which was a rough year weather-wise.  Boat was so badly damaged once they arrived in Hawaii it couldn't be sailed back as initially planned.  Fixing it in Hawaii was not a great option due to availability of parts, increased costs and the owner not being there to keep an eye on the projects or do any DIY projects.  Cost him $22K just to get the boat shipped back to San Francisco from Hawaii.  I've never done a Pac cup but I've always thought about doing it on my own boat one day.  His experience however is making it harder and harder to pull the trigger.  That and as much as I love sailing I'm just not sure I like anything enough to do it 24/7 for 10-12 days.  3-4 days seems to be where I'm ready to get off the boat and do something else.  That's just me though, much respect for everyone who has a longer attention span than myself and does that race!

We did transpac in 2015. I think one of the most interesting aspects for me was watch standing. That and just being “out there.”

crossing my fingers that we’re hitting the expensive stuff now. Shipping her back would definitely be a drag.

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The benefits of shipping are: 

you know the cost before you leave,

no matter the condition the boat arrives in it will get back to California. 

Cons 

cost 

it might actually take longer than sailing home. 

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25 minutes ago, Raz'r said:

We did transpac in 2015. I think one of the most interesting aspects for me was watch standing. That and just being “out there.”

crossing my fingers that we’re hitting the expensive stuff now. Shipping her back would definitely be a drag.

Sail fast, take chances, enjoy the adventure and Godspeed to you and your crew!  As reluctant as I've been to just suck it up, pay the money and do that race it's always very inspiring to follow the fleet during the race (from the comfort of my couch:)).  

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If you only want to race offshore ONCE, the costs are astronomical.

OTOH once we had a boat in the Bermuda race that was continuing on around the world. Almost everything they bought they would have needed anyway so their cost was essentially the entry fee.

Pro Tip: If you want the offshore skipper experience on a low budget, there likely are boats looking for crew over and someone to skipper back. Your out-of-pocket would be a lot of time and some food.

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If you have a decent offshore boat, have liferafts and all the offshore gear, everything works, then you could probably do Newport-Bermuda for around $25K. Where it starts ot get expensive is where you start buying new gear, sails etc.

On 11/11/2019 at 10:26 AM, kent_island_sailor said:

If you only want to race offshore ONCE, the costs are astronomical.

OTOH once we had a boat in the Bermuda race that was continuing on around the world. Almost everything they bought they would have needed anyway so their cost was essentially the entry fee.

Pro Tip: If you want the offshore skipper experience on a low budget, there likely are boats looking for crew over and someone to skipper back. Your out-of-pocket would be a lot of time and some food.

Absolutely true - your first race is a killer on the pocket book. But once you're established, it's doable to keep your boat maintained at that level. 

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5 minutes ago, TwoRockKnock said:

If you have a decent offshore boat, have liferafts and all the offshore gear, everything works, then you could probably do Newport-Bermuda for around $25K. Where it starts ot get expensive is where you start buying new gear, sails etc.

Absolutely true - your first race is a killer on the pocket book. But once you're established, it's doable to keep your boat maintained at that level. 

Yep

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On 11/10/2019 at 11:23 AM, WaterUnderADuck said:

I commented earlier on the costs associated with the Newport Bermuda runs I've done but I am leery of owners who ask their crew to pitch in to cover costs or do some of the more time consuming/heavier maintenance. In those situations I'm always concerned about what else on the boat has been done on the cheap (safety related equipment/systems). Buy the boat you can afford to pay a professional to take care of. 

if everyone went by your adage there wouldn't be very many boats out there racing.. 

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On 11/11/2019 at 9:26 AM, kent_island_sailor said:

If you only want to race offshore ONCE, the costs are astronomical.

OTOH once we had a boat in the Bermuda race that was continuing on around the world. Almost everything they bought they would have needed anyway so their cost was essentially the entry fee.

Pro Tip: If you want the offshore skipper experience on a low budget, there likely are boats looking for crew over and someone to skipper back. Your out-of-pocket would be a lot of time and some food.

The boat I raced in the early 90s was heavily ocean raced. The Marion race, the Marblehead one, all the LIS stuff, cruises to the Caribbean etc. If you use your boat a lot, it makes all those expenses very much worth it.

Also worth noting that even in 1990, to run a vintage fiberglass 40 footer took a good salary to support. And I don't mean like a regular joe but something more. At the time he said his average cost of ownership was 15k per year (1990 dollars) storage maintenance haulout rigging replacing sails electronic maintenance all of itaveraged. He raced that boat for about a decade.

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On 11/10/2019 at 11:23 AM, WaterUnderADuck said:

... In those situations I'm always concerned about what else on the boat has been done on the cheap (safety related equipment/systems). Buy the boat you can afford to pay a professional to take care of. 

With some exceptions, I'm often more confident doing the work myself, b/c that way I know it was done right, no shortcuts, and most importantly, I'll know how to fix it if it breaks again on the water. Paying a pro means trusting that they did it right, and unless the budget is unlimited, there's no guarrantees there.

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6 minutes ago, Starboard!! said:

With some exceptions, I'm often more confident doing the work myself, b/c that way I know it was done right, no shortcuts, and most importantly, I'll know how to fix it if it breaks again on the water. Paying a pro means trusting that they did it right, and unless the budget is unlimited, there's no guarrantees there.

As a crew I don't know if you did it right. Given the choice between a pro who does that work day in and day out and most white collar owners, I'll take the yard guy.

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1 hour ago, Bump-n-Grind said:

if everyone went by your adage there wouldn't be very many boats out there racing.. 

Or you could drop down a level. That J109/J105 stretching you thin? Why not try a J24.

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14 minutes ago, WaterUnderADuck said:

As a crew I don't know if you did it right. Given the choice between a pro who does that work day in and day out and most white collar owners, I'll take the yard guy. 

I doubt you know the first thing about "doing it right".

The "yard guy" is often as not, basically a seasonal worker of dubious training & experience, b/c most of the yards struggle to keep good workers with inconsistent work over the winter. And yards don't make money by taking the time to do it perfectly, they make money by hitting their estimates and finishing the project.  Sailors are notoriously cheap and go to the lowest bidder, so it's a race to the bottom in quality of work. 

Bring a boat in to the travel lift some time and watch the yard guys yank on the stancheons and loosen them, to get an idea of how much care the average "yard guy" puts in their work.  Or look at all the crap that breaks or was installed wrong by builders on brand new boats -- hose were done by pros to a price point, and they should know the boat better than anyone but still get it wrong. 

Rigging, significant engine work, gelcoat, and anything needing a crane are my exceptions, b/c that requires specialty training or equipment and it's worth it.

 

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There seem to be two different distinct points here.  First is how much does it take to get/maintain a boat to offshore (USSailing/ISAF) safety standards.   The second is how much does it cost to RACE said boat.  Once you get the boat and maintain it to safety standards, then some of the costs to race are fixed such as entry fees, dockage, and other costs more flexible. Want a new laminate main or headsail that will only last a season, or heavier dacron sails?  Run a tablet with free or nearly free WX routing software or invest in high end weather routing software and consultants?  I don't see  $10-20K unless you're campaigning a boat that isn't already up to snuff.   Don't get me wrong, given that much cash I'm sure I'd find something on the boat to spend it on. 

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Do you sail to Bermuda, hang around, and sail home?

Do you fly one entire crew home and fly a delivery crew out?

Do you stay on shore when there?

Lots of variables

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$ 500 per hour if the boat starts out perfectly sorted. Dock to Dock. So if you race 35 days a year @ 6 hours a day...do the math. Makes those on-shore postponements and on the water abandonments rather costly. Don't you just love it when your told that you cannot leave the area (on shore) as further announcements could come at any time? Or the best one, you finish within the time limit and the competition does not, so they abandon the race...that's what I call Complete Control ....thank you  (The Clash) 

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7 hours ago, WaterUnderADuck said:

Or you could drop down a level. That J109/J105 stretching you thin? Why not try a J24.

Cuz the J35 is more fun than either of the two sprit boats you refer to and a J24 is a fucking pain box. but you're welcome to it, crew dog

.

 

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16 hours ago, Starboard!! said:

I doubt you know the first thing about "doing it right".

The "yard guy" is often as not, basically a seasonal worker of dubious training & experience, b/c most of the yards struggle to keep good workers with inconsistent work over the winter. And yards don't make money by taking the time to do it perfectly, they make money by hitting their estimates and finishing the project.  Sailors are notoriously cheap and go to the lowest bidder, so it's a race to the bottom in quality of work. 

Bring a boat in to the travel lift some time and watch the yard guys yank on the stancheons and loosen them, to get an idea of how much care the average "yard guy" puts in their work.  Or look at all the crap that breaks or was installed wrong by builders on brand new boats -- hose were done by pros to a price point, and they should know the boat better than anyone but still get it wrong. 

Rigging, significant engine work, gelcoat, and anything needing a crane are my exceptions, b/c that requires specialty training or equipment and it's worth it.

 

+1 - About 95% of the work ever done on my boat was done by me.

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