yl75

Francis Joyon IDEC Asian tour

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There looks to be a small worm hole at around 100 E through that high pressure area.  It looks to be slow but other than going to Aussie not a lot of choice.

The tracker wont scroll south far enough. I guess they pay for the amount of tracker coverage they expect to have to use.  The Brest Atlantiques one won't move much beyond the Atlantic either.

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5 hours ago, jb5 said:

There looks to be a small worm hole at around 100 E through that high pressure area. 

Indeed, although not very stable, right now it disappears at +9 +12

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Was just thinking it may be worth it to head around the south of Australia, up the Tasman and on up through the Coral Sea to the Philippines Sea and then turn left into the South China Sea. At least it would be fun to watch and probably a whole lot of fun to do. 

 

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9 hours ago, yl75 said:

When will they turn left ?

"Shortly" ;)

Quote

A SUNDAY SAILING AT MORE THAN 30 KNOTS TOWARDS AUSTRALIA

Pierre Giboire

The giant trimaran IDEC SPORT skippered by Francis Joyon and his four crewmen is continuing to head due east this Sunday averaging more than thirty knots towards the south of Australia. In the positions at 5.30 p.m., IDEC SPORT had sailed no fewer than 743 miles over the past 24 hours averaging 31 knots. 

Not far from 40 degrees South, the red giant is below the latitude of Cape Leeuwin heading east. The trimaran should turn left and head north shortly to sail towards the Sunda Strait to enter the China Sea and makes her way towards Ho Chi Minh City, the next stop in Vietnam of the IDEC ASIAN TOUR.

Following in the footsteps of the big sailing vessels

It looks like Francis Joyon and his crew have decided to sail around the world, if you look at their route to the south far from their destination in Asia. However, going right down to the SE is the consequence of their weather strategy as they are aiming to take advantage of the low-pressure areas in the Southern Ocean, as this worked so well for Francis and his crew during the Jules Verne Trophy in 2016-2017. During that crewed round the world record, which IDEC SPORT still holds (40 days, 23 hours, 30 mins), Francis and his crew shattered the record for crossing the Indian Ocean in just 4 days and 9 hours.

This is in fact the route taken by the big sailing vessels in the 19th Century, which were looking for downwind sailing conditions to be able to make headway east towards the south of Australia.

 *The Indian Ocean record was set between Cape Agulhas in South Africa and Cape Leeuwin to the SW of Australia.

https://trimaran-idec.geovoile.com/portlouis_hochiminh/2019/tracker/

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Wow!!!

Starting from 22 South and destination at 10 North, but going to 35 South in between to catch the right winds!

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Still think he should have blown off the "tour" and gone for the Jules Verne instead (and singlehanded to boot). Francis is frigin amazing. A true sailing god.

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Latest position doesn't show a quick and easy way across the ridge for FJ. Looks like he'll have to ride this gybe for at least three more hours. At least he avoided the second one developing behind him

1572990614_ScreenShot2019-11-24at6_09_00PM.png.649153d6d43a0c4554e499c539e67d86.png

btw, Windy is asking for beta testers (including creating and saving short movies) of their satellite views. I played around there for a few hours using FJ's current position. Might be interesting when he crosses the doldrums and for following other racers too.

 

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He is sailing the old route from the age of discovery. It was or hug the coast of Africa (Portuguese, to India) or this route ( Dutch, to Java ).

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Now in the light stuff, but "ahead of schedule" . .  . 

Quote

We went further south than initially planned because of the area of high pressure, which meant we had to get closer to Australia. We now have to get around it via the east and we are likely to have light winds in the coming hours.” This was inevitable and Francis and his crew of four accept it philosophically, aware that over the past few days they have achieved some very remarkable performances meaning they are ahead of schedule. Sailing 745 miles averaging more than 31 knots on Sunday, IDEC SPORT is now well positioned to face this transition before picking up some stronger SE’ly winds which will take them up the Indian Ocean towards Indonesia.

Hundreds of litres of water in the boat…

These high speeds were achieved without punishing the boat at all. “We wanted to avoid sailing upwind in heavy seas,” insisted Francis. “That is why we deliberately prolonged our route towards the south. The only problem is that the vibrations aboard the boat at such high speed opened an inspection hatch in the daggerboard housing and the boat immediately filled  with several hundreds of litres of water, which we had to evacuate after getting some of our food and clothes wet.”

https://www.idecsport.com/en/idec-sport-ahead-of-forecasts/

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More slow and interesting times ahead.

The entry into the Java sea looks to be tough and probably with a lot of traffic (what is that strait called between West Java and South Sumatra?) and then the northern area as they approach Singapore also looks very slow as well with a lot more shipping. 

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21 minutes ago, jb5 said:

More slow and interesting times ahead.

The entry into the Java sea looks to be tough and probably with a lot of traffic (what is that strait called between West Java and South Sumatra?) and then the northern area as they approach Singapore also looks very slow as well with a lot more shipping. 

"Détroit de la sonde" in French, "Sunda strait" in English. Also quite a bit of current I think, as it is quite shallow.

And indeed this Java sea seems to be a more or less permanent wind hole...

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Interesting reading on Wikipedia about the Sunda Strait (some VORs used the Malacca Strait). Nav problems indeed, though the MarineTraffic map shows less density than the Malacca

Quote

The strait stretches in a roughly northeast/southwest orientation, with a minimum width of 24 km (15 mi) at its northeastern end between Cape Tua on Sumatra and Cape Pujat on Java. It is very deep at its western end, but as it narrows to the east it becomes much shallower, with a depth of only 20 m (65 feet) in parts of the eastern end. It is notoriously difficult to navigate because of this shallowness, very strong tidal currents, sandbanks, and man-made obstructions such as oil platformsoff the Java coast. It had been an important shipping route for centuries, especially during the period when the Dutch East India Company used it as the gateway to the Spice Islands of Indonesia (1602-1799). However, the strait's narrowness, shallowness, and lack of accurate charting make it unsuitable for many modern, large ships, most of which use the Strait of Malacca instead.[2]

The strait is dotted by a number of islands, many of which are volcanic in origin. They include: Sangiang (Thwart-the-Way), Sebesi, Sebuku, and Panaitan(Prince's). The most famous volcano, however, is Krakatoa, which exploded in 1883 in one of the deadliest and most destructive eruptions in recorded history. The islands in the strait and the nearby surrounding regions of Java and Sumatra were devastated in that eruption, primarily due to intense pumice fall and huge tsunamiscaused by the collapse of the volcano. The eruption drastically altered the topography of the strait, with as much as 18–21 km³ of ignimbrite being deposited over an area of 1.1 million km² around the volcano. 

Figure FJ will send pictures going past the Krakatoa area.

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11 hours ago, stief said:

Interesting reading on Wikipedia about the Sunda Strait (some VORs used the Malacca Strait). Nav problems indeed, though the MarineTraffic map shows less density than the Malacca

Figure FJ will send pictures going past the Krakatoa area.

There was a major collapse of Anak Krakatoa in Dec 2018 when the height of the volcano reduced from 400m to 100m in one event.  The resultant tsunami killed approx 400 people, mostly on the Java side of the strait.  A small side note in the history of Krakatoa.

Minor eruptions are almost continuous - latest recorded on 24th Nov.

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Driven by Indian Ocean Kelvin waves also. 

One of my favorite parts of following races in new places is learning about this stuff. 

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Below a nice map of average winds (coastal and land) :

https://s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/globalwindatlas3/HR_posters/ws_World.pdf

taken from :

https://globalwindatlas.info/downloads/high-resolution-maps/World

 

Interactive version :

https://globalwindatlas.info/

 

The Java sea clearly appears as a wind hole (in fact on the Doldrums "band")

 

And what also always impresses me is the strange patterns of the tide levels across the world :

image-20150828-19918-1x8vicp.jpg

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Joyon and team almost out of the sunda strait, and they seem to be quite lucky, a little breeze is filling in in the java sea

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2 hours ago, yl75 said:

Joyon and team almost out of the sunda strait, and they seem to be quite lucky, a little breeze is filling in in the java sea

Waiting to hopefully see some pictures/video of the passage through the Sunda Strait. They got pretty close to Sumatra and some islands off the coast.  Must have been some sight for the locals to see a boat like IDEC Sport go past.

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1 hour ago, Kenny Dumas said:

Screaming along at 1 knot. 

https://trimaran-idec.geovoile.com/portlouis_hochiminh/2019/databoard/?lg=en&leg=1

Min instantaneous speed 29 November 10:00 UTC 0.7 knots.

Max instantaneous speed after Sunda strait 20:30 UTC same day is 13.1 knots. 4 hour average speed 4.8 knots at 20:30 UTC. Not bad at all considering the wind conditions.

Just 90 min earlier 0.9 knots. Wind is evidently quite variable and I would expect it to remain so for more than a day, maybe for several days.

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210nm in 24hr's @ 8.8kn.  I'd be pretty happy with that. Francis, not so much you'd think.  I don't see the Port Louis to Ho Chi Minh record attracting too many future attempts.

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Now light variable winds. Then a little better close to Borneo cost, and then heavy upwind toward the Ho Chi Minh made worse near the finish by seaway/waves caused by this:

 wp2919.gif

Not nice condition to sail upwind even when not facing the typhoon winds. Boat breaking conditions in 96 hours?

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4 hours ago, NotSoFast said:

Now light variable winds. Then a little better close to Borneo cost, and then heavy upwind toward the Ho Chi Minh made worse near the finish by seaway/waves caused by this:

 wp2919.gif

Not nice condition to sail upwind even when not facing the typhoon winds. Boat breaking conditions in 96 hours?

Seems I was both correct and wrong. I expected it would take 96 hours to finish. => wrong.

After I wrote that above I found this:

https://www.idecsport.com/en/idec-sport-in-indonesia/

Quote

... Francis, who estimates they will arrive in Ho Chi Minh City early in the morning (European time) on 3rd December.

That's something like 60 hours from now. So 96 hours is expected to be well after they finish according to Joyon. Yet 60 hours from now the center of the typhoon Kamuri is still on the eastern side of one Philippines island and it should take some time for the waves created at the western side to reach Idecs future track.

But then on the same article there is also this:

Quote

The final stretch of the voyage as they tackle the crossing of the South China Sea towards Vietnam is likely to be tricky for IDEC SPORT. After the light winds off Indonesia, they should pick up a strong NE’ly air stream powered up by Cyclone Kamuri. Gusts in excess of forty knots are forecast ahead of the bows of IDEC SPORT. The final 900 miles or so look like being a bit of an effort, sailing upwind in strong winds.

 

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Quote

The final 900 miles or so look like being a bit of an effort, sailing upwind in strong winds.

Then looking at the tracker: https://trimaran-idec.geovoile.com/portlouis_hochiminh/2019/tracker/?lg=en

At December 1st, 01:00 French time, speed is 11 knots and there is only 730 nautical miles to go. Over 40% of it seems to be in light air based on the tracker forecast. Can't make any sense from the claim (taken from from the link in above post) that last 900 miles is upwind in heavy air.

I have to disagree on Joyon at that one. He must be tired and/or air is just too hot with no air conditioning.

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Glad they made a safe passage for all concerned. The risks to themselves and others were well managed. 

Quote

A mindblowing finish
It is true that our entry into the China Sea was very hard. The boat was really slowed down and we had to fight hard sometimes not to drift backwards in the strong currents below Sumatra. It took us three days to reach the coast of Borneo. With hardly any transition, we found some fairly nasty conditions when we entered the China Sea after doing our best to avoid punishing the boat. We really felt for her in these boat-breaking conditions with 12-foot high waves and breakers coming straight at us. The boat was really slamming to the extent that it was impossible to stay in our bunks or eat the slightest meal. The finish in the Mekong Delta was a totally irrational moment. There was almost 35 knots of wind and in spite of that, the sea was covered with fishermen pulling in their nets and hundreds of boats. It’s a miracle that we didn’t get anything caught up in the appendages. We zigzagged around these boats. Then, we saw huge container vessels sailing up and down the river. The Mekong brings down all sorts of objects, mainly tree trunks. It was a bit stressful.

  This benchmark record will be dangerous to challenge.

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https://www.idecsport.com/j-2-francis-joyon-pare-a-declancher-lacte-3-entre-le-vietnam-et-la-chine/

Act 3 of the IDEC SPORT ASIAN TOUR is coming up with another new record for Francis and his crew between Vietnam and China. They are due to start around midday local time on Saturday.

“Conditions for the start look fairly rough with 25-30 knot headwinds. We are going to have to weave our way in and out for 150 miles before picking up a more favourable system and seas that are not too rough. We will be upwind and tacking all the way through this new route to Shenzhen. For the finish, we will have to be very cautious and watch what is happening because of all the shipping between Shenzhen, Macao and Hong Kong. The boat is ready for this new challenge and the crew pleased to be setting off together again. We expect to take around four or five days to reach Shenzhen, which means we should arrive in China between 18th and 19th December.”

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8 hours ago, jb5 said:

https://www.idecsport.com/j-2-francis-joyon-pare-a-declancher-lacte-3-entre-le-vietnam-et-la-chine/

Act 3 of the IDEC SPORT ASIAN TOUR is coming up with another new record for Francis and his crew between Vietnam and China. They are due to start around midday local time on Saturday.

“Conditions for the start look fairly rough with 25-30 knot headwinds. We are going to have to weave our way in and out for 150 miles before picking up a more favourable system and seas that are not too rough. We will be upwind and tacking all the way through this new route to Shenzhen. For the finish, we will have to be very cautious and watch what is happening because of all the shipping between Shenzhen, Macao and Hong Kong. The boat is ready for this new challenge and the crew pleased to be setting off together again. We expect to take around four or five days to reach Shenzhen, which means we should arrive in China between 18th and 19th December.”

This is going to be a brutal leg.

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And he's off on a 870nm beat, with moderate weather conditions forecast. 1965171081_ScreenShot2019-12-14at2_26_36PM.png.a0c9bdbfed026e7dea884984ca370030.png

Best wishes for a safe voyage

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Snipped from today's report. 

Quote

Faster than planned

“Yes, we were a bit faster than planned,” said Francis Joyon, who admits he is pleased to have got away from the difficulties of the first 36 hours of dangerous sailing after the start from the Vietnamese coast. “We had to carry out more than twenty changes of tack along the coast,” he told us. “Our idea was to avoid the stronger winds offshore. In spite of that, we had to deal with sailing upwind in more than 35 knots. The boat slammed a lot in heavy, choppy seas. The sky was very grey and dull and in the reduced visibility we had to zigzag around all sorts of traps, a lot of fishing boats, nets that were drifting and a lot of small lights which we didn’t identify as a boat or an island. It was a bit stressful. Since then, we changed tack and headed east, before going back on the starboard tack to head due north towards China. It is looking a bit brighter and we caught sight of the sun today.”

https://www.idecsport.com/en/idec-sport-expected-to-reach-china-tomorrow/

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On 12/12/2019 at 8:24 AM, jb5 said:

We expect to take around four or five days to reach Shenzhen, which means we should arrive in China between 18th and 19th December.”

 

4 hours ago, stief said:

Faster than planned

Yep, they are about to finish in under 3 days, managing to peak at 438 miles over 24 hours towards the end.   Well done.

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It looks like Soldini was quite lucky (or chose well his start) for the wind in the Java sea, dosn't look that great for Joyon at this point

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3 hours ago, yl75 said:

It looks like Soldini was quite lucky (or chose well his start) for the wind in the Java sea, dosn't look that great for Joyon at this point

Yes looks like what they faced on the way up, in reverse. Ghosting along in coast breeze again possibly. 

Was looking at the history of the this from the ships running tea. Pretty interesting. Good write up on the IDEC site on the link below. Seems that the end was the actual dock so tide played its part. 

https://www.idecsport.com/en/the-fabulous-story-of-the-clipper-route/

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They are now 2500 miles from Cape Town, and still witha pretty good lead (584 nm). They have passed those nasty small low pressure systems. Hopefully, a high pressure system will develop SE of Cape Town and give them some broad reach sailing all the way; otherwise there will be some tough sailing, upwind, with antarctic winds from SW...

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https://www.idecsport.com/bonne-esperance-en-moins-de-15-jours/

Doing well over 700nm ahead.

Francis on the Indian Ocean. “The passage through La Sonde Strait was horrible. It is a place where over a hundred miles the China Sea dumps plastic waste. We saw floating all kinds of filth, bottles of gas, fridges and plastics by the thousands ... We had to enter far into the Indian to find crystal clear waters. For several days, we have been enjoying this totally deserted universe. Only two small liners reported to AIS. We also had the pleasure of being accompanied for two days by two albatrosses with white capes. They had fun with us, going from one side to the other on the back of the boat. An enchantment! "

 

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1 hour ago, jb5 said:

We also had the pleasure of being accompanied for two days by two albatrosses with white capes.

Think they're white capped albatrosses or shy albatrosses . 

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250 miles to go before Cape of Good Hope and close to 700 miles lead.

They are in a good place, but very light winds until the Cape and their speed shows it (mid teens)... They might lose some of that lead before turning right into the Atlantic. 
Did Maserati stop in Capetown, or just passed really close? Their track is not clear...

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2 hours ago, Laurent said:

250 miles to go before Cape of Good Hope and close to 700 miles lead.

They are in a good place, but very light winds until the Cape and their speed shows it (mid teens)... They might lose some of that lead before turning right into the Atlantic. 
Did Maserati stop in Capetown, or just passed really close? Their track is not clear...

Doesn't seem like Maserati stopped from their blog at the time.

https://maserati.soldini.it/hong-kong-london-maserati-multi-70-rounded-cape-of-good-hope/

IDEC currently racing along at 1.8kn in those light winds.

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They really had a tough Indian Ocean, and the South Atlantic doesn't look great at all, even looking 60 or 90 hours ahead, but regaining miles now.

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Going fast now.  30kn at 100% VMG.  Should gybe pretty soon and could get a nice look at that Namibian shoreline in the next 24 hours.  Lucky guys.  After that it starts to look more complex the further north they get.

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Looks like IDEC are going the long way to get north with the southeastern trades to Brazil pretty much then across the doldrums.  Shades of Macif in the Brest Atlantiques.  Maserati hugged the African coast and were fairly slow at times as a result in that section but IDECs VMG isn't going to be looking too good for a while either.  Maybe they will have a better angle in the northeastern trades to go around the Azores and home.  Not done yet.

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8 hours ago, jb5 said:

Looks like IDEC are going the long way to get north with the southeastern trades to Brazil pretty much then across the doldrums.  Shades of Macif in the Brest Atlantiques.  Maserati hugged the African coast and were fairly slow at times as a result in that section but IDECs VMG isn't going to be looking too good for a while either.  Maybe they will have a better angle in the northeastern trades to go around the Azores and home.  Not done yet.

Yes, Maserati route was very unusual, but on the other hand the doldrums look huge right now, and even worse looking 90hours ahead

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11 hours ago, yl75 said:

Yes, Maserati route was very unusual, but on the other hand the doldrums look huge right now, and even worse looking 90hours ahead

Confirmed by last news report on IDEC website.

Also, they have been under full cloud cover since Capetown, which means that the solar panels are not charging up as well as expected, and since they took very little diesel for the genset, they are installing a second wind turbine to charge the batteries...

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They got a good look at St Helena now heading southwest.... Painful. 

 

Screenshot_20200205-175517.png

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Imagine doing that on a square rigger.

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On 2/5/2020 at 12:20 AM, yl75 said:

Yes, Maserati route was very unusual, but on the other hand the doldrums look huge right now, and even worse looking 90hours ahead

 

On 2/5/2020 at 12:13 PM, Laurent said:

Confirmed by last news report on IDEC website.

Lots of jibes this evening and the forecast on the doldrums is still looking pretty grim, the naviguesser(s) must be sweating.  Yet that last news from the team still confidently projects arriving home in 12 days.

 

19 hours ago, DtM said:

Imagine doing that on a square rigger.

That image reminds me of the horse latitudes, though modern routing seems to have more or less tamed those

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1 hour ago, tama_manu said:

That image reminds me of the horse latitudes, though modern routing seems to have more or less tamed those

Yes, indeed. And we've solved the lack of drinking water issues too, thank goodness.

Still, imagine sitting there for weeks and weeks at a time. It would drive ya absolutely bonkers.

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Looks like the western doldrums option has closed on them but there is a possible path with light winds around 25 deg west, if the forecast is anything like correct.  Maybe they are already heading for it from their current trajectory but their speed right now at 3kn is pretty awful.

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Soldini had some great days, along Mauritania Morocco coast, really wonder what was the weather pattern then, anyway to know ?

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OUCH!

Their lead has completely melted away (now officially 2 nm lead...)

They are aaaaaalllllmost in the NE Tradewinds, and hopefully they will slingshot forward on starboard tack for a few days, but it looks like there is another windless zone to pass North of the Tradewinds before they can hope to hang onto a low pressure system moving towards Europe. This is not a done deal....

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17 hours ago, yl75 said:

Soldini had some great days, along Mauritania Morocco coast, really wonder what was the weather pattern then, anyway to know ?

https://earth.nullschool.net/#2018/02/14/1200Z/wind/surface/level/orthographic=-23.67,13.94,878/loc=-18.536,21.711 - earth.nullschool is useful for this. Just change the date in the URL. Only available for past 5 years or so

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Finally out of the Doldrums and sailing NNW at about 20 knots. They went all the way to 86 nm deficit against Maserati, but they are catching up; only 30 miles behind right now.

On the same day, Soldini had a really tough day, with only 150 miles towards the finish line in 24 hrs, so IDEC should catch up and maybe get back in the lead tomorrow, but not by much....

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On 2/11/2020 at 6:46 AM, pmwx said:

https://earth.nullschool.net/#2018/02/14/1200Z/wind/surface/level/orthographic=-23.67,13.94,878/loc=-18.536,21.711 - earth.nullschool is useful for this. Just change the date in the URL. Only available for past 5 years or so

 

20 hours ago, yl75 said:

Thanks a lot for that link, good to know

Been available about as long as Windy, and I have gone with Windy and never looked into the Nullschool much.

Can someone tell me if there is anything in there that is better than Windy?

 

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1 hour ago, Fiji Bitter said:

 

Been available about as long as Windy, and I have gone with Windy and never looked into the Nullschool much.

Can someone tell me if there is anything in there that is better than Windy?

 

There is a way to go back in time on windy  ?

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3 hours ago, Laurent said:

Finally out of the Doldrums and sailing NNW at about 20 knots. They went all the way to 86 nm deficit against Maserati, but they are catching up; only 30 miles behind right now.

On the same day, Soldini had a really tough day, with only 150 miles towards the finish line in 24 hrs, so IDEC should catch up and maybe get back in the lead tomorrow, but not by much....

Once they cross that ridge about 28 deg N they look like they should be in for a pretty rough ride in the wake of the storm (Denis?) that should pass to the north ahead of them.  The South Atlantic really made this tough for IDEC.  Also not forgetting the boat has been all over the place in recent months and they are probably protecting it as best they can. Fingers crossed for this one. I never expected it to be as close as this is turning out. 

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4 hours ago, yl75 said:

There is a way to go back in time on windy  ?

Good point, there is not. It goes back to the beginning of the day only, a few days would be nice to have. They say they don't have the resources to do so, but would like to do it in the future.

The data of the weatherstations goes back further, but that's not the same.

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The problem with things like windy is that to do historical data you either have to have stored all the gribs you downloaded to generate daily forecasts, which then limits you to historical since you first did this,  which means a lot of storage and a built in utility limit or tie into someone else who does that for you (which is expensive).

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Back in positive territory with more than 200 nm lead. They should have another day of good Trade winds and then a last low wind zone to pass before they can hook up to a low pressure system barreling towards Scotland.

Maserati had several days of so-so, taking back and forth along the coast of Morocco. So baring equipment failure, they should be able to take the record... To be continued.

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Yes the North Atlantic looks quite good, elongated thin Azores high, and then should go fast up to London

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Not very lucky with this Azores high, it got more complicated and moved, but should still be ok afterwards.

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From the routing on IDEC web site, they seem to be now through the high pressure ridge and should have good winds all the way to the finish. Boat speed currently at 27 knots. I hope for them that they will be able to put some East on that heading pretty soon... Only 77 miles ahead now... AAARRRGGHHHH! Still nail biting stuff.

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Impressive (or lucky) finish :

capture-de28099ecc81cran-2020-02-17-acc8

And it will probably continue till the end.

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37 minutes ago, Kenny Dumas said:

Joyon rocks!

Indeed, and in fact it was quite close for them missing the train after the Azores high, very close.

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Over a 1000 miles lead now... Except for mechanical failure/ accident, it is a done deal.

What is really impressive is that, like every time, Francis Joyon makes it look easy...

Only one "slight" problem before arrival. According to the latest news on the official website; they ran out of fuel, so no more genset to recharge the batteries, and the batteries are so low that he will have no AIS and no radar to sail up the Thames estuary, which is a very busy place... Hmmm... and yes, he will have to cross the Dover-Calais narrow passage by night apparently; one of the busiest shipping lane in the world.

Crossing fingers....

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1 hour ago, Laurent said:

Over a 1000 miles lead now... Except for mechanical failure/ accident, it is a done deal.

What is really impressive is that, like every time, Francis Joyon makes it look easy...

Only one "slight" problem before arrival. According to the latest news on the official website; they ran out of fuel, so no more genset to recharge the batteries, and the batteries are so low that he will have no AIS and no radar to sail up the Thames estuary, which is a very busy place... Hmmm... and yes, he will have to cross the Dover-Calais narrow passage by night apparently; one of the busiest shipping lane in the world.

Crossing fingers....

Good grief.  FJ and AT are my favorite sailors by far but my gosh their decisions sometimes...  Good luck to them!!

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4nm to go ! :

capture-de28099ecc81cran-2020-02-19-acc8

Don't know if there is a live somewhere

 

 

They will be live on FB and Instagram after the arrival :

 

Playing it safe for the arrival : two reefs, staysail :

 

 

(must all make all those tacks easier)

Btw at the time of the clippers, were they towed in the narrow part of the eastuary ? Where was the actual harbour ?

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Done :

 

 

Nice light and weather for this arrival!

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6 hours ago, yl75 said:

 

 

Btw at the time of the clippers, were they towed in the narrow part of the eastuary ? Where was the actual harbour ?

 

Either on the Isle of Dogs, or Wapping, near where she's moored atm.  Going to head down there later and take a look at her

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